ppt - Plymouth

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14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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Videoconferencing

over the Internet

Graeme Horton


Videoconferencing over the Internet has a
number of potential uses:


Videoconferencing can be used as a
‘distance learning tool’, providing a ‘virtual
classroom’


Videoconferencing can also be used as a
collaborative tool, both within the same
classroom, and/or between distributed
classrooms, and/or individuals


Videoconferencing over the Internet can
be used as a ‘distance learning tool’, to
provide students with a ‘virtual classroom’


This could be a group of students who
meet together face to face in a single
location, equipped with videoconferencing
facilities


The student group could then be managed
‘locally’ by a qualified teaching assistant,
while the ‘teacher’ teaches and interacts
with the group ‘online’ via videoconference


Alternatively, some or all of the students
could all be distributed geographically,
each one joining the virtual ‘group’ via
Videoconferencing over the Internet


Videoconferencing used to occur mainly
between special ‘room
-
based’ or
computer
-
based units connected via ISDN
telephone lines


Here is an example of the use of room
-
based videoconferencing equipment:


The following series of
pictures show a group of
students studying
together over a distance,
with the aid of
videoconferencing
technology.


A ‘local’, (Plymouth)
group, and a ‘distance’
(Exmouth) group
effectively managed to
‘meet up’ and study
together, despite there
being 50 miles
separating them.


This photograph was
taken in the Plymouth
Babbage
videoconference suite.


The ‘local’ (Plymouth)
group is present here,
along with the teacher.


The ‘distance’ (Exmouth)
group were 50 miles
away (they can be seen
on the monitor in the
picture)


The high quality video
camera, which can be
panned, tilted, and
zoomed by remote
control (it’s mounted on
top of the television
monitor in the
photograph), and the
pressure zone
microphone (PZM) which
is situated in front of the
television monitor, can
relay images and ambient
audio to the group 50
miles away in the
Exmouth
videoconference suite.


The Exmouth group also
had a high quality
camera, PZM
microphone, and
television monitor, and
images relayed from the
Exmouth group can be
seen on the Plymouth
group’s monitor in the
photograph.


Loudspeakers were also
provided at both ends, to
relay the audio from the
microphones at each site


The PowerPoint presentation
shown in the photograph to
the right was shown to both
groups simultaneously.


The ‘distance’ (Exmouth)
group viewed the
presentation on their own
monitor, along with a small
inset picture of the Plymouth
group (picture in picture).


The ‘local’ (Plymouth) group
viewed the presentation on a
projection screen, and could
also view the responses of
the Exmouth group on their
own (Plymouth) monitor.


Students at both 'ends'
were able to view the
presentation, and interact
with each other, and the
teacher, through
comment and discussion.


A number of advances have been made in
videoconference technologies. One of
these being videoconferencing over the
Internet using Internet Protocol (IP)


Videoconferencing over the Internet using
IP (i.e. H.323) has enabled us to use real
-
time data/file/application sharing


More information can be found on the UoP
Distance Learning website at:
http://www2.plymouth.ac.uk/distancelearning/


OK, so what else can we do with
videoconferencing technologies (apart
from presenting with PowerPoint?


Most room based videoconference
systems have a video cassette recorder
(VCR) and/or digital versatile disk (DVD)
input. Video can be therefore be shown


Most room based videoconference
systems also have a document camera
input, where a document or ‘object’ can be
placed under a special camera for display


Most room based videoconference
systems also have a personal computer
(PC) video input (i.e. SVGA) and/or
personal computer (PC) data input (i.e.
USB or Firewire). Anything you can ‘do’ on
a computer can therefore be ‘shown’


PC data inputs (in combination with IP
H.320 or H.323 protocols) allow
application sharing, so that computers
connected at each end can ‘work together’


If we ‘move away’ from ‘room
-
based
videoconference systems’, and consider
‘computer
-
based videoconferencing
systems’ using H.320 or H.323 protocols
(i.e. videoconferencing between
computers using Microsoft NetMeeting
etc), it’s possible to fully utilise the real
-
time data/file/application sharing potential
of videoconferencing technologies


For example, I could share an application
with someone over the internet


This could be an electronic document, or it
could be a collaborative graphics or video
project


For example, I could begin to draw a
picture, which you then add to, in
‘cyberspace’…


…or, I could take control of your computer
mouse, and show you how to do
something on your computer


The use of videoconferencing over the
Internet doesn’t have to be limited to
‘distance learning’ contexts.


It can also be used as a collaborative tool
both within the same classroom, and
between distributed classrooms


Use within the same classroom could
enable students to communicate and
collaborate on projects through the
computer in the same classroom


However, students in the same classroom
could collaborate on projects through the
computer, whilst simultaneously
communicating and collaborating with
other students…


… situated in other (distant) classrooms,
and/or with other individual students
distributed geographically…


…effectively removing the ‘walls’ of the
‘traditional’ classroom


A number of recent advances have been
made in videoconferencing
-
over
-
the
-
Internet technologies


Videoconferencing used to occur mainly
via ‘room
-
based’ systems (set
-
top box,
camera, microphone, monitor, and
speakers)…


…or via a computer (using a webcam and
headset with videoconferencing software,
such as “Microsoft NetMeeting” or
“CUCME” etc


However, there have been a number of
recent advances in videoconferencing
methods and technologies


Goodmood WIP (by Two Four TV) is an
example of this advancement. It enables
students to videoconference via a
standard Web Browser (such as Internet
Explorer) on a standard computer
equipped with a webcam and a headset.


Goodmood, also adds a significant range
of additional features and functions

The main Goodmood web browser window
contains a videoconference window in one
corner of the screen

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

The teacher can be seen by all the students
in their own videoconference window

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

The teacher can select a particular student
to view, either privately, or so that all other
students can see the selected student as
well…

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

However, In addition to the videoconference
window, Goodmood also offers a set of
customisable ‘web parts’, that can be added
to the main Goodmood Web Browser
window:

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

For example, the main Goodmood window
can include another window, simultaneously
containing a PowerPoint presentation, or a
video clip

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

… and another window containing an
asynchronous or synchronous discussion,
and/or a voting/polling facility

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

The discussion window can simply contain
text sent from the teacher to all the students,
such as general instructions or feedback
(one
-
to
-
many)…

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

…or the messages could be pre
-
created, i.e.
to provide a ‘guide
-
on
-
the
-
side’ set of study
notes (one to many)..

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

…or the messages could be specific real
-
time notes, such as instructions, i.e. “Please
view the PowerPoint presentation now”, or
“Vote now” (one to many)…

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

…or the messages could be specific real
-
time notes from the teacher to individual
students i.e. “Are you still with us?” (one to
one)…

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

…or an individual student could send a
private messages to the teacher, i.e. “I’m a
bit confused” (one to one)…

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

In other words, the discussion window could
enable the teacher to have a private (one to
one) text conversation with a specific
student, or a public (one to many) text
conversation with ‘all’ the students

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

An individual student could also send a
message to all the students (if permitted) i.e.
“who was it who mentioned that article on
behaviour last week” (one to many)…

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

The discussion window can also be used in
a many
-
to
-
many context (i.e. a threaded
discussion).

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

It can also be used for public voting/polling
(many to many), or for private voting/polling
(many
-
to
-
one)

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

…thus potentially affording a real
-
time,
switchable, one
-
to
-
one, or one
-
to
-
many, or
many
-
to
-
many interactive videoconference

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion

More information can be found at:
http://www.twofourdigital.com/goodmood.asp

Feedback comments

Streamed
or live
video link

Synchronised
PowerPoint or
similar
presentation

Files for sharing: any format

Threaded discussion


What about the ‘future’…


Well, it’s often very difficult to predict the
future, but here are some ‘pointers’:


Microsoft SharePoint


watch this space,
as this is fast becoming the ‘future vision’
of an effective integration between virtual
learning environments (VLEs), existing
classroom technologies (computers and
software applications, graphics tablets,
and Interactive Whiteboards etc), and
videoconferencing and media on
-
demand/
streaming technologies


The integration of videoconferencing
technologies with 3G mobile telephony


The integration of videoconferencing
technologies with Virtual Reality (VR),
and/or Haptic, and/or tele
-
immersion
technologies


another one to ‘watch’!


The ‘future’ is very difficult to ‘predict’


However, even though we can’t be ‘sure’
of the future of changes, what we probably
can be ‘sure’ of is the changes of future!


Have fun