Group D survey[1] - RoxanneJSylvester-Moore

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16 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

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Chen, S. Y., & Fu Y. C. (2009). Internet use and
academic achievement: Gender differences in early
adolescence.
Adolescence, 44
(176), 797
-
812.

_________________________________

Group D:


Mirae Grant

Renee Kirkland

Karen Schubert

Roxanne Sylvester



Walden University


Designing and Assessing Learning Experience


EDUC 8103



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Descriptive Survey Research:


Has applications in quantitative and qualitative
methods


Helps to quantify participants “perceptions,
attitudes or skills”


Normally identifies one or more research
question


Samples are used from the population to
generalize findings


Generally utilizes pre
-
established instruments

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Panel Survey Studies: Advantages:


Follows the same group/sample


Conducts research over time


Panel data useful in answering questions on
dynamics of change


Predicts long
-
term or cumulative effects



Panel Survey Studies: Disadvantages:


Difficulty in securing the sample


High mortality rate due to length of study


Can hurt the internal validity of the design


Vulnerable to testing threat


Vulnerable to instrumentation threat


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Chen and Fu (2009) used the panel survey to study
the effects that Internet use had on Taiwanese middle
school students’ academic achievement. They also
looked at whether that effect was gender related,
usage related, and the correlation between the two.



Conducted an exhaustive literature review in order to
identify the best hypotheses for the survey.



The panel survey was the appropriate design as Chen
& Fu wanted to examine longitudinal data from t
he
same group to not only answer questions on the
dynamics of change, but to predict the long
-
term
effects of Internet usage on adolescents.


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Dependent Variable: The self
-
reported test
score on the high school entrance exam



Independent Variables: “All independent
variables were taken from the student’s
survey in the 8
th

grade” (Chen & Fu, 2009, p.
802).



Control Variables: Class ranking, gender, and
parents’ education

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The following are ethical considerations for panel
surveys:



Researchers need informed consent from the
parents if the study participants are children.


Researchers need to debrief participants at
conclusion of study if the purpose of study is not
fully disclosed at inception.



For the study by Chen and Fu (2009):



Participation was voluntary


No harm was done to the participants


Benefits outweighed the harm (as there was no
harm done)


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Statistical Table: Summary of Variables

(Chen & Fu, 2009, p. 803)

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Chen and Fu (2009) used three inferential
statistical tools to test their findings:


The Chi
-
square (which tests nominal data) to test
the differences between male and female
computer use.


The Pearson correlation was used after the Chi
-
square identify the intercorrelations among the
variables.


Most importantly, regression analyses examined
how respondents’ academic achievement in the
9
th

grade varied on the patterns of Internet use in
the 8
th

(while controlling for background
variables and academic achievement in the 8
th

grade)
(Chen & Fu, 2009, p. 803).




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When all background variables were consistent, the
frequency of Internet use alone was a non
-
significant
factor in predicting student performance”
(Chen & Fu,
2009, p. 806).



Findings confirmed Hypotheses 1a, 1b, and 1c:
“Spending time on the Internet
per se

had no definite
implication for students’ academic achievement, but
the types of online activities indeed played a key role”
(Chen & Fu, 2009, p. 806).



Findings confirmed Hypothesis 2: “Students who went
to Internet Café’s consistently scored lower on the
high school entrance exam…”
(Chen & Fu, 2009, p. 806).




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Chen and Fu (2009) incorporated rigorous statistical
controls for validity (checking for truth and accuracy)
directly into their study.


The study’s results are generally consistent with
previous studies, which helps validate the measures.


Generalizability was an issue because of the specific
nature of the sample.


Because of the strict adherence to, and the complexity
of the variables tested, the causality could be
determined and verified.


The panel survey was an effective design for this survey
as the longitudinal nature was imperative in collecting
the data and verifying the results.



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To account for known gender differences between
academic achievement and Internet use, the full
sample was split by gender and further analyses
was done to synthesize the results.


The research was well
-
designed and well
-
planned.


Chen and Fu set out to validate their hypotheses
and their findings supported both positive and
negative correlations for their hypotheses.


If time and money weren’t considerations, the
sample could have been expanded


the test
scores between 8
th

and 9
th

grade are a really
narrow test of academic achievement.




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Gender differences in online activities are substantial
among Taiwanese adolescents.


Boys tend to not only average more time using the
Internet, they use the Internet more for gaming and
frequent Internet Café’s more than girls, which
negatively correlates with academic achievement.
Adding parental controls helps to mitigate, but not
erase these negative effects for boys.


More studies need to be done across genders and
cultures to determine if these test results are true in all
cultures.



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Chen, S. Y., & Fu Y. C. (2009). Internet use and academic



achievement: Gender differences in early adolescence.



Adolescence, 44
(176), 797
-
812.


Lodico, M., Spaulding, D., & Voegtle, K. (2006). Methods in



educational research: From theory to practice. San Francisco,



CA: Jossey
-
Bass.


Panel Survey
. (n.d.). Retrieved from


http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/tutorial/



Cho2/panel_adv.html


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