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ecture notes

Date
: [7 May 2011
]

Subject
: [What is CAM
]

Module 1
: [0900
-
10:30
]



Notes

What is CAM?

According to the National Center for
Complementary

Complementary and
Alternative Medicine

(
CAM)


is a group of diverse medical and health care
systems,
practices, and products that are not presently considered to be

part of conventional medicine (NCCAM 2011).”
Conventional medicine is
m
edicine as practiced by those who are M.D.s
(medical doctor) or D.O.
(doctor of osteopathy) degrees and by their allied h
ealth professionals, such
as physical therapists, psychologis
ts, and registered nurses. I personally do
know of some
health care providers
that
practice both CAM and
conventional medicine.
I consider
them the smart ones because they are not
afraid to learn

new ways of healing.
There is some
scientific evidence
that
exists
and is still being done
regarding some CA
M therapies. CAM is a
so
diverse and many conventional MD
physicians

lump them all together.
Conventional physicians also
feel not enough evidence
based research is
there.

I personally like how CAM practitioners treat the whole person (mind,
body & spirit). Many CAM therapies as well are less invasive and do not use
surgical means. People use CAM for various reasons but mainly to improve
their overal
l heal
t
h and wellness.

Many
CA
M therapies
are widely used and available in the United States.
They include diverse products and practices such as dietary supplements
and botanicals, traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, mind
-
body
medicine, and
therapeutic massage.

Alternative Medicine:

What Does It Mean?

Alternative medicine is a term that
identifies

medical practices that may not
be traditional in nature.


Alternative medicine is a form of medical
L

intervention that is used in place of tradition
al
conventional
medicine.
They
are medical treatments that are considered not part of main stream
medicine.
There are other forms of interventions that are considered
complimentary medicine.


I find it very
interesting to see how more an
d
more alternative
medical therapeutic measures

are making their way into the
mainstream.


What
are

are some examples of alternative medicine?
Prayer
for some
can
be considered a form of alternative medicine.

Researchers have been
studying the effects of

prayer on a person’s

health status
, and
realize
t
hat
prayer does seem to aid i
n a
person’s healing process.

Believe it or not
many
people use prayer as their
only
source of medicinal use
.

I can tell
you that many members in
my

family
actually use prayer like others
in
combin
ation with conventional
traditional medicine.

Homeopathic medicine is a form of alternative medicine.

This medical
practice relies on the belief that “like cures like”.

This means that what
disturbs a person’s immune system is given to them in small doses
. The
person is supposed to build up a resistance

(immunity) to and then recover
to better health.

Traditional Chinese Medicine which I find fascinating is one form of
alternative medicine that you may have heard of. .

This is the practice of
balancing a person “QI” pronounced chee.

It is thought that if you balance
your “QI” it is a way to maintain hea
lth and wellness.

This can be done
through acupuncture, natural supplements or meditation. Later in Module 3
we will discuss acupuncture more

in depth
.


Micozzi, M. (2006). Fundamentals of Complementary & Integrative Medicine
(3rd edition) St. Louis, Mo:
Saunders Elsevier

National Center for Complementary Medicine.
What is Complementary and
Alternative Medicine?
Retrieved from
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/whatiscam/D347.pdf




What are the major

types of complementary and
alternative medicine?

Whole Medical Systems

Whole medical systems are built upon complete systems of theory and
practice. Often, these systems have evolved apart from
an

earlier than the
conventional medical approach used in the United States. Examples of whole
medical systems that have developed in Western cultures include
homeopathic
medicine

whole medical system that originated in Europe.
Homeopathy seeks to stimulate
the body's ability to heal itself by giving very
small doses of highly diluted substances that in larger doses would produce
illness or symptoms (an approach
called "like cures like"). N
aturopathic
medicines are

whole medical system that originated in Eur
o
pe. Naturopathy
goal is

to support the body's ability to heal itself through the use of dietary

and lifestyle changes in combination
with CAM therapies such as herbs,

massage, and joint adjustment
.

Examples of systems that have developed in
non
-
Western cultures

include T
raditional Chinese
M
edicine

whole medical
system that originate
d in China. It is based on the belief
that disease results
from disruption in the flow of qi and imbalance in the force
s of yin and
yang.
Therapeutic use
herbs, meditation, massage, and acupuncture seek to
promote

healing by restoring the yin
-
yang balance and the flow of qi.
Ayurveda
is
whole medical system
has origins

in India. It aims to integrate
the body, mind, and spi
rit to prevent and treat disease. Therapies used
include herbs, massage, and yoga
.



Micozzi, M. (2006). Fundamentals of Complementary & Integrative Medicine
(3rd edition) St. Louis, Mo: Saunders Elsevier

National Center for Complementary Medicine.
What is Complementary and
Alternative Medicine?
Retrieved from
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/whatiscam/D347.pdf




Mind

Body Medicine

Mind
-
body medic
ine therapies use
diverse

methods

that are
geared

to
enhance the mind's

ability to affect body in
a positive way.
There

are
techniques that were
considered CAM in the past but now have
become
very
mainstream (Examples
, patient support groups and cognitive
-
behavioral
therapy).
However there are othe
r
mind
-
body techniques
that
are still
considered CAM
. NCCAM still lists the below therapies or techniques as
mind
-
body therapies:



Patient support groups



Cognitive
-
behavioral therapy



Meditation




Prayer



Creative arts therapies (art, music, or dance)



Yoga



Biofeedback



Tai chi



Qigong



Relaxation



Hypnosis



Guided imagery

University of Minnesota
(2011
.
)

Mind Body Therapies
. Retrieved from
http://takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/explore
-
healing
-
practices/what
-
are
-
mind
-
body
-
therapies


Biologically Based Practices


Biologically based practices

are substances found in nature.
They are of
botanicals (herbs), vitamins, minerals, herbs,
animal derived
-
extracts, fatty
acids, amino acids, prebiotics/probiotics,
dietary supplements and whole
foods.

Complementary

and Alternative Medicine

(2007). Biologically based practices

from
National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from
http://www.revolutionhealth.com/healthy
-
living/natural
-
health/natural
-
health
-
101/complementary
-
alternative
-
medici
ne/biologically
-
based
-
medicine



Manipulative and Body
-
Based Practices

Chiropractic and osteopathic medicine are under the umbrella of
Manipulative
and Body
-
Based Practices.

These practices are

the
manipulation
applied with
controlled force to a joint.

The focus is on the structures of the body
(bones/joints/soft tissues).

The aim is to move the joint
beyond the normal
range of motion in an effort to aid in restoring health. Manipulation may be
performed as a part of other therapies or whole medical syst
ems, including
chiropractic medicine, massage, and naturopathy.
This is
movement of one
or more parts of the body.

Treatment can be
combined with physical therapy
and instruction in proper
posture.

My chiropractor
actually has

a degree in
physical therapy.

Massage is an example of body
-
based therapy.
Pressing
,
rubbing,
kneading
and moving muscles and
other soft tissues of the body.
Massage is mainly done
by using the hands and fingers. The aim is to
increase the flow of blood an
d oxygen to the massaged area
.

Manipulative and Body
-
Based Practices: An Overview

(2006). Retrieved from

http://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=8929&cn=15




Energy Medicine


Energy
Therapies

involve the use of energy fields. They are of two types:



Biofield therapies

are intended to affect energy fields that
supposedly

surround and penetrate the hu
man body. The existence of these
energy
fields has not yet be
en scientifically proven a
lthough many
believe in such fields.
For them scientific evidence is not needed.
“F
orms of energy therapy manipulate biofields by applying pressure
and/or manipulating the body by placing the hands in, or through,
these fields.


Examples include qi
gong
.
Q
i gong is a
component of
traditional Chinese medicine that combines
c
ontrolled breathing

meditation and movement.

The
intention

is to improve blood flow and
the flow of
qi.

Reiki therapy in which practitioners seek to
convey
t

a
universal energy to a person, either from a distance or by placing
their hands on or near that person.
The
aim

is to heal the

spirit and
thus the body. You also have therapeutic touch therapy. Those trained

pass their hands over anothe
r person's body wi
th the objective of
using
their own perceived healing energy to identify energy
imbalances
and promote health.



Bioelectromagnetic
-
based therapies

involve the unconventional use of
electromagnetic fields, such as pulsed fields, magnetic fields, or
alternati
ng
-
current or direct
-
current fields.