Texas State Technical College Waco Course Syllabus

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Texas State Technical College Waco
Course Syllabus



Course Rubric & Number:
GAME 1306



CIP Code:
10.0304



Course Title:
Design and Creation of Games



Course Description:
Introduction to game and simulation development. Includes analysis of existing
applications and creation of a game using an existing game engine. In-depth
coverage of the essential elements of game design. Also covers an overview of
cultural history of electronic games, survey of the major innovators, and
examination of the trends and taboos that motivate game design.



Prerequisites:




Co-Requisites:
None



Department Chair:
Rodney Ortigo Date:



Approved by CIP Committee:

Date: May 26, 2010


WECM Learning Outcomes:

(CO1) Summarize the evolution of the electronic game industry
(CO2) Explain essential game and simulation elements
(CO3) Evaluate the strengths and limitations of game and simulation systems
(CO4) Identify programmatic and graphical elements of a development system
GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 1 of 18

GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 2 of 18

(CO5) Develop a concept document and simple game.

Student Resources:

Textbooks: Internet Access at home required.

Tools and Materials:


Quantity Item Description
1 Dropbox Account – for turning in assignments
1 Digital Drawing Tablet (one for entire degree) – Wacom Bamboo
1 Backpack or Carrying Case (one for entire degree)
As Needed Sketchpad with removable pages – Minimum 50 pages
1 12” Mannequin (one for entire degree)
1 set Drawing/Graphite Pencils
As Needed CD-R's – for entire semester
2 Sharpie permanent markers
1 package Notebook Paper
1 Three-ring binder
1 Headphones (one for entire degree)


TSTC Grading Policy:

(Grades for all Major courses must be C or better)

TSTC Grading Criterion:

Grade Percent Description Grade
Points
A 90 – 100 Excellent / Superior
Performance Level
4
B 80 – 89 Above Required
Performance Level
3
C 70 – 79 Minimum Required
Performance Level
2
D 60 – 69 Below Required
Performance Level
1
F Below
60
Failure to meet Performance
Requirements
0
IP -- In Progress
W -- Withdrawal 0
CR -- Credit 0
AUD -- Audit of Course 0
See College Catalog for complete descriptions.


GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 3 of 18

Class Participation Policy:
You are required to be present during each scheduled class session throughout the semester. If you are not
present at the beginning of the class period, you will be counted absent. If you come into class after class has
begun, do so quickly and quietly; do not disturb the entire class.
It is your responsibility to contact the instructor at the end of the class period to let me know that you arrived
late, at which point your absence will be changed to a tardy, provided you arrived to class within the first 20
minutes. If you miss more than 15 % of the class periods within the semester, you will be given an “F” for
your course grade. Make note that three tardies is equivalent to one absence; so do not make a habit of being
late to this class. Managing your activity schedule is the student’s responsibility. If you determine, that it is in
your best interest to withdraw from this course, you must do so by Friday, April 1, 2011. You are solely
responsible for completing the withdrawal process. If you need assistance in doing so, please do not hesitate to
ask.


Students with Disabilities:
If you have a documented disability that will impact your work in this class, please contact the Office of Deaf
and Disabled Student Services (D/DSS) so that appropriate arrangements for your accommodations can be
made. In accordance with the federal law, a student requesting accommodations must provide documentation
of his/her disability to D/DSS. For information, visit D/DSS in the Fentress Center or call (254) 867-3600.

Once you and a D/DSS representative have signed a Letter of Special Accommodations, take the
accommodations letter to each class for which an accommodation has been determined. Meet individually
with each class instructor to discuss the accommodations letter. Have the instructor sign and keep a copy of
the letter. Take the original letter, signed by the instructor, back to D/DSS so they are aware that the instructor
has been officially informed of the need for accommodations.

Conduct

Students are expected to read and abide by the Student Code of Conduct as described in the student handbook,
and on-line at http://www.waco.tstc.edu/admissions/cs/. Any breaches of this code will result in disciplinary
action.



GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 4 of 18

Course Assessments & Grading Scheme:

Assessment
Scale
% of Final Grade


Unity Video Papers (3) 100 points each 5%
Unity JumpStart Tutorials (4) 100 points each 10%
2D Content Labs (15) 100 points each 10%
3D Content Labs (7) 100 points each 10%
Unity 2D Game Labs (6) 100 points each 10%
Unity 2D Game Project (1) 100 points 20%
Unity 3D Game Labs (6) 100 points 10%
Unity 3D Game Project (1) 100 points 20%
Evaluation 100 points 5%

Total 100%



Description of Graded Elements of the Course:

Unity Video Papers

Each Unity Video Paper assignment is designed to ensure the student has made the necessary preparations for
the class. Each Unity Video Paper assignment deals with a certain segment of introductory Unity video
material and is meant to gauge the student’s ability to participate in subsequent class lectures and labs, as well
as, familiarize them with the Unity Game Engine interface and common terminology of the program.

Students are required to watch the following three sections of introductory video material and write a 3 to 5
page, doubled spaced, paper explaining what they have learned by watching each video series.

The tutorials listed below can be found online at the following web address:
http://www.walkerboystudio.com/html/unity_training___free__.html



1. Unity 3D Application (Tools, workflow, Interface, etc) Videos 1 - 60
2. The Fundamentals of Scripting in Unity 3D Videos 1 - 26
3. Unity 3D API (Application Programming Interface) Videos 1 - 23


GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 5 of 18

Students will be graded on the quality and quantity of content. Papers written using minimum limit of three
pages will be graded for a possible total of 70 points, while those writing to the maximum of 5 pages will be
graded for a possible total of 100 points. Each paper will be graded based upon the following guidelines:

50% Content
20% Organization
10% Format
10% Grammar / Punctuation / Spelling
10% Readability / Style

Each paper will be completed and submitted through the course website. Each homework must be saved in
Microsoft Word *.doc format. The document name must be as follows: last_name_paper##_1306.doc. i.e.
Smith_paper01_1306.doc. Any other format or document naming convention will not be accepted. Homework
will be available to access from the course website at least one week before the assigned due date. Late work
will not be accepted, be sure to complete your homework before the assigned due date.


Unity JumpStart Tutorials – 4 Total


Each video assignment is designed to increase the student’s skill within the Unity 3D Game Engine package.
Each subsequent video provides building components towards constructing a basic, yet complete, introductory
video game. This video series is meant to prepare the students on the basics on the Unity 3D Game engine
prior to them receiving instruction. This series should ensure all students are familiar with the Unity 3D game
engine, as well as terminology, prior to instructor lead lecture.

The tutorials listed below can be found online at the following web address:
http://www.unityjumpstart.com/ProofOfConcept_1/


The video series will be turned in on a CD-Rom. This video series must be completed using the Unity 3D
game engine. In addition, the CD will be labeled as follows: The Student Name, the Class Name, Number and
Section and finally, the assignment. Any other format or lab naming convention will not be accepted. Late
work will not be accepted, be sure to complete your lab before the assigned due date.

GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 6 of 18

This video series will be graded based upon following written and verbal instructions, completing digital asset
design, and writing script to create the expected functionality. Any lab that is submitted containing errors,
meaning it does not run, will receive a grade of zero.































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2D Content Labs – 15 Total

Each lab assignment is designed to increase the student’s skill within the Photoshop digital painting package.
Each subsequent assignment provides building components towards constructing complete and detailed user
interfaces, UI widgets and detailed 2D graphic elements.

The tutorials listed below can be found online at the following web address:
http://psd.tutsplus.com/articles/web/40-quality-photoshop-ui-design-tutorials/


1. (1) Creating a Knob in Photoshop 9. (19) Nokia 5300 Cell phone interface
2. (2) How to Make a Menu Interface for a Fantasy
Themed iPhone Game
10. (20) Photoshop Tutorial: Audio Interface
3. (4) How to Create a Slick and Clean Button in
Photoshop
11. (22) Aqua Interface
4. (10) Build a Slick Rich User Interface in Photoshop 12. (35) Video Player Skin
5. (11) Loading Interface 13. (36) Designing a Black Audio Player Interface
6. (13) Zoom Player Design Skin 14. (37) MP3 Player Interface
7. (14) Volkswagen Inspired Navigation 15. (40) Create a Speed Gauge and Watch Icon in
Photoshop
8. (15) MP3 Player Interface Design

Each lab will be turned in on a CD-Rom. Each lab must be written using Photoshop or a compliant 2D graphic
package. In addition, the CD will be labeled as follows: The Student Name, the Class Name, Number and
Section and finally, the assignment. Any other format or lab naming convention will not be accepted. Late
work will not be accepted, be sure to complete your lab before the assigned due date.

Each lab should be designed using the techniques learned that week coupled with techniques from the
previous week’s lessons/labs. As the weeks progress, so too will the complexity of the lab assignments.
Students will be expected to incorporate prior knowledge with the new information presented in the current
week’s lecture and chapter assignments

Each lab will be graded based upon following written and verbal instructions, completing digital asset design,
and producing an image that visually matches the written instructions. Any lab that is submitted containing
errors, meaning it does not run, will receive a grade of zero.

GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 8 of 18

3D Content Labs – 7 Total

Each lab assignment is designed to increase the student’s skill within the Blender 3D modeling package. Each
subsequent assignment provides building components towards constructing a complete 3D environment.

1. Creating a Present 5. Creating a Jonathan Apple Texturing- Part 2
2. Creating a Cartoon Skull 6. Creating a CG Cookie Coffee Cup
3. Happy Birthday! – Cupcakes on the house! 7. Creating a Coffee Cup Part 2
4. Creating a Jonathan Apple – Part 1

Each lab will be turned in on a CD-Rom. Each lab must be written using the Blender 3D modeling package. In
addition, the CD will be labeled as follows: The Student Name, the Class Name, Number and Section and
finally, the assignment. Any other format or lab naming convention will not be accepted. Late work will not
be accepted, be sure to complete your lab before the assigned due date.

Each lab should be designed using the techniques learned that week coupled with techniques from the
previous week’s lessons/labs. As the weeks progress, so too will the complexity of the lab assignments.
Students will be expected to incorporate prior knowledge with the new information presented in the current
week’s lecture and chapter assignments

Each lab will be graded based upon following written and verbal instructions, completing digital asset design,
and writing script to create the expected functionality. Any lab that is submitted containing errors,
meaning it does not run, will receive a grade of zero.












GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 9 of 18

Unity 2D Game Labs – 6 Total

Each lab assignment is designed to apply the skill sets discussed in each lecture in a visual format using the
Unity Game Environment. Each subsequent assignment provides building components towards a complete 2D
style video game.

1 – “2D” Project Introduction 4 – Prefabs, Collection, and HUD
2 – Interactions 5 – Particle Systems
3 – Instantiation and Rigidbodies 6 – Menu Design

Each lab will be turned in on a CD-Rom. Each lab must be written using the Unity Game Engine. In addition,
the CD will be labeled as follows: The Student Name, the Class Name, Number and Section and finally, the
assignment. Any other format or lab naming convention will not be accepted. Late work will not be
accepted, be sure to complete your lab before the assigned due date.

Each lab should be designed using the techniques learned that week coupled with techniques from the
previous week’s lessons/labs. As the weeks progress, so too will the complexity of the lab assignments.
Students will be expected to incorporate prior knowledge with the new information presented in the current
week’s lecture and lab assignments

Each lab will be graded based upon following written and verbal instructions, completing digital asset design,
and writing script to create the expected functionality. Any lab that is submitted containing errors,
meaning it does not run, will receive a grade of zero.












GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 10 of 18

Unity 3D Game Labs – 6 Total

Each lab assignment is designed to apply the skill sets discussed in each lecture in a visual format using the
Unity Game Environment. Each subsequent assignment provides building components towards a complete 3D
style video game.

1 – “3D” Project Introduction 4 – Finishing Touches
2 – Environments 5 – Building and sharing
3 – Player Characters 6 – User Feedback and Updates

Each lab will be turned in on a CD-Rom. Each lab must be written using the Unity Game Engine. In addition,
the CD will be labeled as follows: The Student Name, the Class Name, Number and Section and finally, the
assignment. Any other format or lab naming convention will not be accepted. Late work will not be
accepted, be sure to complete your lab before the assigned due date.

Each lab should be designed using the techniques learned that week coupled with techniques from the
previous week’s lessons/labs. As the weeks progress, so too will the complexity of the lab assignments.
Students will be expected to incorporate prior knowledge with the new information presented in the current
week’s lecture and lab assignments

Each lab will be graded based upon following written and verbal instructions, completing digital asset design,
and writing script to create the expected functionality. Any lab that is submitted containing errors,
meaning it does not run, will receive a grade of zero.











Unity Game Projects - 2 Total

Projects are designed to demonstrate the mastery of skills and concepts in a visual illustration. The project
focuses on mastery in asset creation and application demonstration. The project requires the student to develop
a complete 3D game utilizing the skills acquired during the semester.

1 – “2D” Unity Game Project 2 – “3D” Unity Game Project


These projects will be submitted on CD-Rom. The project must be written using the Unity game engine with
all art assets created in Blender (3D) and any compliant 2D package. In addition, the CD will be labeled as
follows, the Student Name, the Class Name, Number and Section and finally, the assignment. Any other
format or project naming convention will not be accepted. This CD-R must be submitted in person to the
instructor at the time of the final project presentation.

Each student is required to present their projects during class to their peers and classroom guest. Any student
not presenting their final project will receive a grade of zero on the project.

These projects will be graded based upon documentation, 2D and 3D art asset creation, code functionality, and
visual appearance. Any lab that is submitted containing errors, meaning it does not run, will receive a
grade of zero.



Evaluation

Influenced by factors such as consistent and timely submission of all assigned work; active participation in the
course activities; professional and conscientious work ethic; good communication with class members and
instructor. The subjective evaluation is not a simple averaging of scores in these areas. A significant
inconsistency in any dimension of the course could cause loss of the available points.

GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 11 of 18

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Course Policies:

Credit by Examination

Any student wishing to receive credit by examination must do so before the 12th class day (June 22, 2010).
This examination is only available to students attempting the course for the first time. Repeat students will not
be allowed to receive credit by examination.


Tests

All students are required to be present for each test. Any student that receives unauthorized assistance on a test
will receive a grade of zero. If a student receives assistance from another student, the student providing the
assistance will also receive a grade of zero. On test day, the classroom door will be locked five minutes after
the start of the scheduled class period; this is to ensure that students are not disturbed during an examination.
Make-up tests are not given.


Final Project

The final project will be comprehensive, covering all objectives outlined for this course. NO MAKE-UP will
be given for the final project presentation. A grade of ZERO will be given to any student not present for the
final project presentation. A grade of 70 or above must be earned on the final project in order to receive a
passing grade for the course. Even if an accumulated grade is above 70, the final project must also be above 70
or higher in order to receive a passing grade.


Academic Honesty

Texas State Technical College and the Computer Science Department expect our students to maintain high
standards of personal and academic honesty and integrity. In a college environment of this nature, student
integrity is especially critical, because the opportunities for dishonesty are more readily available and the trust
level is higher. Exploiting either of these opportunities is a particularly blatant and offensive act.

By enrolling and remaining as a participant in this course, you affirm that you will adhere to the strictest
standards of academic honesty and integrity. You must maintain academic integrity and honesty at all times,
on all course assignments: homework, projects and exams.

You must work independently when required, and work effectively in groups when required. You must use
only the resources and assistance permitted on a given course activity. Students should pay special attention
GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 13 of 18

to whether assignments are designated as ‘individual’ or ‘group’ assignments, as well as what materials,
resources, and help from others are permitted. If in doubt, ask your instructor prior to beginning the
assignment.

When you are permitted to use materials and ideas that belong to others, you must state the source of the
information in the manner required. If you use outside help or materials when not allowed, you are in
violation of this policy in the way of cheating. If you are allowed to use outside materials, but do not cite the
sources of your information, you are in violation of this policy in the way of plagiarism.

Students who assist other students in violating this policy are considered equally in violation. A grade of
ZERO will be awarded to all students involved in any dishonesty or plagiarism on any assignment or
test. If you are involved in dishonesty or plagiarism more than once, you will receive an F in the course
and you will be subject to TSTC Disciplinary Action.


Personal Behavior

You are attending a course in a professional environment; your behavior, conduct, and ethics are expected to
be that of a professional student. You may listen to music through earphones during lab and test time, but not
during lectures or class discussion. During class discussions, each student is expected to contribute to the
discussion topics. You are encouraged to ask questions as often as you would like, but be courteous of others.
If someone is speaking, wait your turn. At no time during class should you be working on other course
material or surfing the Internet. Personal laptops are not to be used in the classroom setting. Please
keep all personal laptops stored in their respective cases. All cell phones are to be turned off and put
away. Students sending or receiving text messages during class will be asked to leave and receive a zero
for the day. If any student persists in inappropriate behavior, they will be asked to leave the classroom, this
includes offensive wording on clothes or the use of profanity, no matter the form of media used.

When you come to class, be prepared. Bring all course textbooks and required material with you, including a
writing utensil and loose-leaf paper for writing notes and other important information. Be organized in your
work and storage of your assignments. Remember to always make a backup copy of your work each day.


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Classroom and Computer Usage

Any misuse or abuse of computer equipment, programs, or data, including; unauthorized use of computer
resources or use of computer resources for unauthorized purposes, accessing or copying programs, records or
data belonging to the college or another without permission, attempting to breach, or breaching the security of
another user’s account or deprive another user of access to the college’s computer resources, using the
college’s computer resources for personal or financial gain, transporting copies of college programs, records
or data to another person or computer site without written authorization, or use of college computers to access
lewd, offensive, or pornographic material, will be a violations of college standards and will be subject to
TSTC Disciplinary Action.

*** Food and beverages ARE NOT permitted in the classroom at any time. ***









GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 15 of 18

Course Schedule:


Learning Activities / Assignments Due Dates
Outcomes
Weeks 1 and 2: Introduction to using Photoshop for Game and User Interface Development
Lecture will cover the introduction to Photoshop as a means to create 2D graphical elements including
Heads Up Displays (HUD), Buttons and interface elements. Topics include how to shift from image
manipulation to graphic creation. Students will be introduced to the Photoshop interface and its main
component windows and their use. An overview of layers, layer styles and blend modes will be
covered. (CO1) (CO2) (CO3)
1) List the Blend Modes available in Photoshop
2) Research 2D graphic creation
3) Discuss the use of 2D graphics in game
development
4) List methods of graphic creation in
Photoshop
Unity Video Paper #1 01/14/11
2D Content Labs 1 through 7 01/14/11
Unity Video Paper #2 01/21/11
2D Content Labs 8 through 15 01/21/11

Weeks 3: Introduction to using Blender for Game Development
Lecture will cover the introduction to the Blender 3D modeling package as a means to create 3D
elements for the Unity Game Engine. Topics include modeling for real time gaming, with a specific
look at player avatar development . Students will be introduced to the FBX export method and how to
use it in the Unity art pipeline. Other areas of discussion will include maintaining textures and real time
shaders. (CO1) (CO2) (CO3)
5) Examine the Blender modeling tool
6) List the modeling modes in Blender
7) Discuss the 3D art export pipeline
8) Identify various real time shader types
Unity Video Paper #3 01/28/11
3D
Content Labs 1 through 7 01/28/11
Unity JumpStart Tutorials 1-4 01/28/11


Week 4: Welcome to the Third Dimension - “2D” Project Introduction
Lecture will cover the introduction to the Unity game engine. Topics include where to download the
Unity software and how to install it. Students will be introduced to the Unity interface and its main
component windows and their use. An overview of difference between 2D and 3D space will be
covered. Other areas of discussion will include the game industry and the game engine’s place in
development. (CO1) (CO2) (CO3)

9) Identify the Unity interface
10) List the various Unity components
11) Compare major game companies
12) Research multiple game engines
Unity 2D Game Lab 1 02/04/11




Week 5: Interactions
Lecture will cover the various collider shapes within Unity and each of their proper uses. The idea of
physic based versus non physics based collision will be discussed and demonstrated. Other topics will
include the proper setup of Game Objects to be used as “triggers” for various types of interactions
within the Unity game engine.(CO2) (CO3) (CO4)

13) Identify the types of Colliders Unity 2D Game Lab 2 02/11/11
GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 16 of 18

14) Compare Kinematic and Non-Kinematic
collisions
15) Discuss proper “Trigger” based collision
setup
16) Examine various collision functions





Week 6: Instantiation and Rigidbodies
Lecture will cover the importance of the Instantiation process within the Unity game engine. Students
will learn the steps to create objects inside the game world as they are needed by using the Unity
scripting language. Students will be shown the use of physics based Rigidbodies and the effect they can
have on a game’s design. (CO2) (CO3) (CO4)

17) List the component of a Unity Physic object
18) Research Instantiation code
19) Discuss the creation of in game objects
20) List the steps to Instantiate objects in world
Unity 2D Game Lab 3 02/18/11




Week 7:

Prefabs, Collection, and HUD
Lecture will cover the use of the HUD, or Heads Up Display, to convey relevant information to the
game’s players. The idea of proper interface design as it applies to gaming will be introduced. Students
will learn the about the various 2D graphic file types the Unity game engine will accept and the proper
way to bring them into the game engine. Scripting the HUD to react to various in game events will be
discussed and demonstrated. . (CO2) (CO3) (CO4)

21) List the steps to create a Prefab
22) Discuss the Unity 2D Workflow
23) Examine 2D Texture settings
24) Create an in game Menu
Unity 2D Game Lab 4 02/25/11




Week 8: Particle Systems
Lecture will cover all aspects of Unity’s built in Particle System. Students will learn about the various
components that Unity uses to create a fully functioning Particle System and how the interface exposes
these systems to modification. The various Particle System shader types will be discussed and
demonstrated. (CO2) (CO3) (CO4)

25) Identify the types of particle systems
26) Examine the various particle components
27) List particle shader types
28) Produce several particle systems
Unity 2D Game Lab 5 03/04/11




Week 9: Menu Design
Lecture will cover the topics of Interface Design, specifically Menu Design. Several menu designs will
be examined discussing both what makes good menu design and what does not. Students will be
introduced to new tools for the creation of 2D asset elements for use in designing interfaces. The Unity
scripting code for creating interactive menus will be discussed and demonstrated. (CO2) (CO3) (CO4)

29) Research proper menu design
30) List 2D tools for Interface Creation
Unity 2D Game Lab 6 03/18/11
Unity 2D Project 03/18/11
GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 17 of 18

31) Demonstrate the proper importing of 2D
graphics
32) Discuss Unity GUI design code



Week 10: Welcome to the Third Dimension - “3D” Project Introduction
Lecture will cover the introduction to the Unity game engine. Topics include movement along all three
axes in 3D space – X, Y and Z. Students will be introduced to the concept of camera placement, game
object alignment and proper placement in the 3D world. An overview of 3D space will be covered.
(CO1) (CO2) (CO3)
33) List the methods to access the Z axis
34) Research movement in 3D space
35) Discuss methods of object transform control
36) List the steps to move Game Objects
Unity 3D Game Lab 1 03/25/11




Week 11: Environments
Lecture will cover the Unity Terrain Engine and all the tools that are available within it. Other topics
include the use of various lighting schemes within the Unity engine and the use of 3D geometry within
game environments. Students will be introduced to prominent game designers, both currently shipping
games, and those from gaming history. (CO1) (CO2) (CO3)

37) Examine the Unity Terrain Creation Tool
38) List the Unity light types
39) Discuss the 3D model import process
40) Identify major game designers

Unity 3D Game Lab 2 04/01/11




Week 12: Player Characters
Lecture will cover the use of the Unity First Person Controller Prefab. The discussion will cover Unity
Components, Built In scripts and the proper placement of Game Objects within the game scene.
Students will be introduced to the ideas of Project Folders and their relationship to the Hierarchy/Game
view. (CO2) (CO3) (CO4)

41) List the First Person Prefab Scripts
42) Examine input control code
43) Identify proper use of pre-built Unity game
objects
44) Discuss the Prefab-Hierarchy workflow

Unity 3D Game Lab 3 04/08/11




Week 13: Finishing Touches
Lecture will cover the “polishing” of a game design. Topics to be discussed are final lighting tweaks,
the correct use of audio and sound effects and real time shaders within the Unity game engine that can
compliment a game’s final look and feel. Student’s will see various before and after shots of scenes and
will discuss what touches where added to take the environment from “OK” to “Shippable”. (CO2)
(CO3) (CO4)

45) List multiple audio types
46) Explain the Unity audio pipeline
47) Discuss Unity shader effects
Unity 3D Game Lab 4 04/15/11


GAME 1306 – Design and Creation of Games Page 18 of 18

48) Create multiple sound effects for use in game

Week 14: Building and sharing
Lecture will cover how we can export a Unity game for the Web and as a standalone project. We'll look
at various different settings you will need to consider when you are preparing your finished product for
your audience, such as graphical quality, control input, and more. (CO4) (CO5)

49) Identify proper steps to package a Unity CD
game
50) Identify proper steps to package a Unity
Web game
51) Discuss the Unity Build Process
52) Identify various Unity target platforms
Unity 3D Game Lab 5 04/22/11




Chapter 15— User Feedback and Updates
Lecture will cover what to do post release. How to update your game with new content, how to fix a
broken game that is live in the marketplace, and how to grow your game based on user feedback and
input.(CO1) (CO2)

53) Identify methods of gathering user feedback
54) List the various types of game updates
55) Compare various update codes
56) Research user testing options
Unity 3D Game Lab 6 04/29/11
Unity 3D Project 04/29/11