EPE321 Lecture 3rd August 2009

rodscarletΛογισμικό & κατασκευή λογ/κού

14 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 5 μήνες)

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SVN Tutorial


Subversion is a free/open source version
control system.


Subversion manages files and directories, and
the changes made to them.


Subversion operates across networks, which
allow it to be used by people on different
computers.



Subversion is a centralized system for
sharing information.


At its core is the repository, which is the
central store of data.


Any number of clients can connect to the
repository, and then read or write to
these files.


By writing data, a client makes the
information available to others.


By reading data, the client receives
information from others.


What makes the subversion repository
special is that it remembers every change
ever written to it.


A client can read the latest version of the
data, but also has the ability to view
previous versions.


A subversion working copy is an ordinary directory
tree on your local system, containing a collection of
files.


Your working copy is your own private work area.


Subversion will never incorporate other people’s
changes nor make your own changes available to
others, until you explicitly tell it to do so.


After you have made some changes to the files in
your working copy and verified that they work
properly, subversion provides you with commands to
“publish” your changes.


If other people publish their own changes, subversion
provides you with commands to merge those
changes.


Windows


Make sure TortoiseSVN (SVN Client) is installed on
your PC.


If not download and install
from

http://ftp.ee.up.ac.za/pub/windows/scm/


Linux


Most systems come standard with SVN or it can be
installed via the package management system.







Most of the time, you will start using a Subversion
repository by doing a checkout.


Checking out a repository creates a working copy of
it on your local machine.


Windows


Right click on an empty folder and select “SVN Checkout…”


Insert the repository URL
https://svn.ee.up.ac.za/private/groupname


Enter password


Linux


Using the command line where you would like to create
your working.


svn

co
--
username
groupname

https://svn.ee.up.ac.za/private/groupname


Enter password




After you have created a working copy with
the “SVN Checkout” command use the “SVN
Update” to receive data from the repository.


Windows


Right click on your working copy directory and
select “SVN Update…”


Linux


Using the command line where your working copy
is.


svn

update



Windows


Right click on your working directory and select “SVN
Commit…”


Windows will open a window where u have the option to
type a comment for the commit and will also show you the
files that are going to be committed.


Select OK to complete the process.


Linux


At the command line in your working directory.


Use the command “
svn

status” to see which files have being
modified and added. These will be written to the repository
with the commit command.


svn

commit

m “Comment XYZ”


ALWAYZ write a descriptive comment with each
commit.
Eg
. “2009/07/20 Fixed Bug XYZ”
“2009/07/20 Basic Socket Operations added”


You will be expected to make a minimum of
one single commit of your updated code per
week.


For more detail, look at the module website
under “Documentation”.


You may use 3D rendering engines, such as
Ogre3D or
Irrlicht


No game engines, only rendering engines (AI and
networking must be done manually)


May use libraries for sockets


May use built
-
in Ogre functions for input devices


May use extra libraries to load 3D models if you are
using OpenGL or Direct3D directly


Cross
-
platform 3D rendering engine


Abstraction over either Direct3D or OpenGL


Simplifies some of the
hardcore

details of
OpenGL and Direct3D


Large project with lots of documentation,
examples, and tutorials


http://www.ogre3d.org/


Cool extras like
Nvidia

Physx