Accessible Web & Instructional Materials

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4 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

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Accessible

Web & Instructional Materials

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Section 508 Web Accessibility


"Section 508" refers specifically to Section 508 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce
Investment Act of 1998.


The law requires Federal agencies to purchase electronic and
information technology that is accessible to employees with
disabilities, and to the extent that those agencies provide
information technology to the public, it too shall be
accessible by persons with disabilities


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508 Standards refer to


Software applications and operating systems (
§
1194.21)



Web
-
based intranet and internet information and applications
(
§
1194.22)



Telecommunications products (
§
1194.23)




Video or multimedia products (
§
1194.24)



Self
-
contained closed products such as copiers (
§
1194.25)



Desktop and portable computers (
§
1194.26)


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Section 508 & State Agencies



Section 508 applies to the Federal government but there may
be implications for employees and others at the State level.



Many states have also passed legislation requiring electronic
and information technology accessibility.



Additional information on individual states accessibility
legislation are available at

http://www.ittatc.org/laws/state.php

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Survey Says…..


Do you know what your state’s policy is in terms of
“technology accessibility is?”


Yes or NO


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Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
(WCAG)



T
he Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)
documents explain how to make Web content
accessible to people with disabilities.



Web "content" generally refers to the information in
a Web page or Web application, including text,
images, forms, sounds, and such.


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The Web Accessibility Initiative
Guidelines (WCAG)



The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) was formed by the
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in order to bring
accessibility considerations into the technology
development of the Web Consortium and to develop
guidelines for
accessible technology
including web
authoring and user agents (browsers).




Tim Berners
-
Lee, the inventor of the Web, and the
Director of the W3C recently said,

"The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by
everyone, regardless of disability, is an essential aspect."


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The first version of the authoring guidelines,
the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0,
became a W3C Recommendation in 1999.



The WCAG guidelines are organized into a
checklist . The checkpoints are categorized as
Priority 1
(must)
, 2 (
should)
or 3(
may).


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Key Principles of Accessible Design


Most accessibility principles can be implemented and will not
impact the overall "look and feel" of your web site design.



Provide appropriate alternative text


Alternative text provides a textual alternative to non
-
text
content in web pages. It is especially helpful for people who
are blind and rely on a screen reader to have the content of
the website read to them.



Provide headings for data tables


Tables are used online for layout and to organize data. Tables
that are used to organize tabular data should have appropriate
table headers .


Ensure users can complete and submit all forms


Ensure that every form element (text field, checkbox,
dropdown list, etc.) has a label and make sure that label is
associated to the correct form element.

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WEB ACCESSIBILITY QUICK TIPS

P.O.U.R.

Perceivable


Provide
text alternatives

for non
-
text content.


Provide
captions and alternatives

for audio and video content.


Make content
adaptable
; and make it
available

to assistive technologies.



Use
sufficient contrast

to make things easy to see and hear.

Operable


Make all functionality
keyboard accessible
.


Give users
enough time

to read and use content.


Do not use content that causes
seizures
.


Help users
navigate and find

content.

Understandable


Make text
readable and understandable
.


Make content appear and operate in
predictable

ways.


Help users
avoid and correct mistakes
.

Robust


Maximize
compatibility

with current and future technologies.


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Survey Says…


Do you know if your agency’s website is
accessible?





Is it accessible for all features? Tables?
Captchas? Forms?

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Accessible


Instructional Materials within an RtI Framework

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AIM/Assistive Technology



AIM/AT/AAC

Universal 100%


Educational Technology

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The Universal Application of Technology

(
Tier 1
)



This is technology for all kids K
-
12



NCLB calls for all states to have a framework of
standards for technology implementation at
ALL

grade levels (K
-
12)




All school districts must have corresponding district
level technology implementation plans.

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A majority of students in Tier 2 have print access
disabilities


Used by permission from CAST.org


which effects their ability to
Read
-

Write Listen
-

Speak.

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The group of students in TIER 2 are often students in
special education that need specialized instruction to
access the general ed curriculum.




Access
to AIM & Technology
will further enhance the
instruction and support the skills needed to access and
progress in the K
-
12 general ed curriculum.







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AIM &Technology offer
a

platform that easily supports
RtI
implementation

and is more
likely to

effect positive student
outcomes.



The use of technology makes
on going
data collection, data
consumption, and data
-
based decision making a more
plausible proposition, and it can keep these important aspects
of RtI from
monopolizing

teacher time.

(Ysseldyke & McLeod,
2007).

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IDEA…



states that all students must have access to…


“ high quality, print
-
based educational materials, within the same
timeframe as their non
-
disabled peers.”




Students with sensory, physical

and other print disabilities must
be

provided with high quality

specialized formats of instructional
materials in a
timely

manner.

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What does “timely manner”
mean?


Must be defined by states as mandated in Section
300.172 of the Final Regulations of IDEA 2004



Generally means “at the same time” as other
students receive their core instructional materials in
print format.

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Who qualifies for specialized formats?


Under the Copyright Act of 1931 as Amended, students with
“print disabilities” are those who have been certified by a
competent authority as unable to read or use printed
materials because of



Blindness


A visual impairment


Physical limitations


An organic dysfunction


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Which Students Qualify for AIM ?


The IDEA requires SEAs & LEAs to provide
accessible instructional materials (AIM) to
all

students with print disabilities


whether or not
they qualify for these materials in the
NIMAS/NIMAC. (Section 300.172(b)(3))





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AIM Digital Media & Technology




The key feature s of digital media is FLEXIBILITY and
ACCESS



Digital Media can be preferable to traditional media
because of the access to content that students with a
variety learning styles can quickly achieve.



With digital content, the appropriate software and tools,
students have new options for how they (read/listen) to
obtain information and how they (speak/write)
demonstrate their understanding.


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Digital content includes text, images, sounds, and video
that have been digitized by a computer.




Digital media tools offer a wide array of features. They
can save text, speech, and images with consistency.




These features offer great flexibility in how and where
that text, speech, and images can be accessed and used by
students.



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Digital Text Resource


Bookshare.org

Funded by OSEP to provided free, accessible
materials for all students with “Chafee” qualifying
print disabilities.


The goal is to provide downloadable textbooks and
other materials, in digital formats that can
easily

be
turned into audio, large print and Braille so that
students can have
prompt and equal

access to
educational content


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The Aim Consortium


The Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) Consortium was a 15
state collaborative led by CAST (Center for Applied Special
Technology) initiated in October, 2007 and concluded at the end of
2009.



The AIM Consortium was funded by the OSEP to work
collaboratively toward the development and implementation of
high quality sustainable systems and services that ensure
timely
provision of textbooks and related core instructional materials

in
specialized formats students with print disabilities within its
member states.



http://aim.cast.org/collaborate/AIMConsortium


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Why Play the AIM GAME ?


If you subscribe to the notion that the ability to read impacts the
overall ability for a student to learn and progress in the general ed
curriculum.





Then it
would follow that the # 1 indicator of success for students
is
the ability to
learn to
read
and then
read to learn
.



If these students with print access disabilities, who
struggle with
reading,
had access to
instructional materials
in alternative
formats
they
would be more successful in school
.




RIGHT???


35

AIM and SPDG


Here is an opportunity to influence PD and increase
access for SWDs



We need
to influence SPDG project thinking
around the “accessibility of products and services
to educational personnel on behalf SWDs.



We need
to embed the AIM expectation into all
trainings and

36

Survey Says…


Do your SPDG Projects have and AIM
component?




Do you see an opportunity to introduce the
concept of AIM into your RtI initiatives?

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Is this a Book?

38

Or is this a Book?

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How do your students
read now
?

How
will they

read in the future
?

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Every Picture Tells a Story…

Thank you

Michael Ferguson

VT Department of Education

SPDG /AIM Project Director

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