Telephony guide for NHS 111

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Telephony
guide
for NHS 111


NHS 111

Programme

Version
1.4

July 2012






Telephony Guide for NHS 111 v1.2

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1

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21



Audience

NHS 111 programme teams across the NHS.

Document Title

Telephony guide for NHS 111

Document Status

Current Version

Document Version

1.4

Issue Date

January 2012

Prepared By

Telephony Subject Matter Expert, NHS 111 Programme Team


Version

Date

Name

Comment

0.1

11/4/2011

Simon Beresford

Initial draft

0.2

18/4/2011

Simon Beresford

Corrections after comments from Phil Bastable. Many
additional areas are now
covered including OOH call
handling. Total number of pages increased from 6 to 11.
Change log inserted.

0.3

26/4/2011

Simon Beresford

Corrections after comments from Dave Howarth

0.4

27/4/2011

Phil Bastable

Layout amended to be NHS 111 Brand compliant

0.5

3/5/2011

Simon Beresford

Further comments from Phil

1.0

22/9/2011

Simon Beresford

Timeline added and Mass Call Event added to the glossary.

1.1

17/11/2011

Simon Beresford

Bug fixing, Ultimate Resilience added. Various
improvements

1.2

12/12/2011

Simon Beresford

Updated messages and some detail. PCTs replaced with
“Routing Areas”. Added short sections on national and local
emergencies

1.3

6/6/2012

Simon Beresford &
Phil Bastable

Added section on messages to be played while calls are
wa
iting and GP diversion messages. Information on DDI
numbers added.`

1.3a

6/6/2012

Simon Beresford

Corrected an error in DDI list.

1.3b

13/6/2012

Simon Beresford

Added more detail to DDI information

1.4

3/7/2012

Simon Beresford

DDI diagram change, Change

to DDI list.



Document control

Telephony Guide for NHS 111 V1.2

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Document control

1

Contents

2

1

Introduction

4

1.1

Purpose

4

1.2

Audience

4

1.3

Status

4

1.4

Related documents

4

2

NHS 111 service summary

5

2.1

Vision

5

2.2

Core principles

5

2.3

Scope

5

2.4

How will 111 work?

6

3

Guidance

7

3.1

Announcements

7

3.2

Basic Process with one provider

7

3.3

Process with multiple providers

8

3.4

Linking 111 providers together at the “ACD level”

9

3.5

Call Routing

9

3.6

NNGs

9

3.7

Mobile Telephony

10

3.8

Mapping Exercise

11

3.9

Tagging calls from specific groups

11

3.10

Telephone numbers that have been moved

12

3.11

Call Handling standards

12

3.12

Call recording

12

3.13

Calls in other languages

12

3.14

Text relay / Typetalk calls from the Deaf.

12

3.15

999 escalation

12

3.16

Resiliency of the service

13

3.17

Ultimate Resiliency

13

3.18

111 and Pandemic Flu or other national incidents.

13

3.19

111 and local incidents

14

3.20

GP Surgery Answer Machine Messag
es

14

Contents

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3.21

DDI numbers required

15

4

Glossary

18

4.1

Summary

18

4.2

Glossary table

18

6. Timeline for Telephony

20


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1.1

Purpose

This document

provides a basic guide to telephony for the NHS 111 service. It does not
pretend to tell you everything you need to know but it does get you started.

It is deliberately written for a non technical audience so if you are a telephony expert you
may find it

a bit simplistic, however there is information here that you need.

The following are some of the key points that are communicated in this document:

1.

The area that might route calls to a NHS 111 provider will not correspond exactly
to existing GP cluster, P
CT, SHA or even national boundaries; however steps can
be taken to give a fair match with joint working and appropriate messaging

2.

It would be normal for the same call centre to handle 111 and calls that are
diverted from Out Of Hours numbers. In some areas

GP answering machine
messages just give the 111 number

3.

NHS 111 call handling providers need to be resilient and recommendations as to
how that can be achieved and included in this document. However a new Disaster
Recovery facility will be available in ex
treme circumstances to redirect calls to
other providers

4.

More than one provider can be used in a given area (National Numbering Group)
but it is very hard for this to be done on a geographical basis except by a “Press 1
for x and 2 for y” basis.

5.

It is pos
sible to redirect patients landline telephone numbers to specific
destinations, either en masse or individually

1.2

Audience

The primary audiences for this document are those in the NHS who are responsible for
setting up and running the NHS 111 service in the
ir local area and persons who are in a
management role in NHS 111 providers.

A secondary audience are more expert individuals who set up and run the telecoms for
NHS 111 providers.

1.3

Status

This version of the document is final but will continue to be subjec
t to revision. Comments
can be made and such comments may be incorporated in future versions. It does already
provide useful information on many aspects of telecommunications and the NHS 111
service.

1.4

Related documents

This document should be read in conjun
ction with the following:



NHS 111 service specification.

1

Introduction

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2.1

Vision

The
NHS 111 service
will
make it easier for the public to access urgent healthcare and
also
drive improvements in the way in which the NHS delivers that care. The easy to
remember, free to call 111 number will clinically assess callers during their first contact
and direct them to the right
local service

first time.

2.2

Core principles

The
NHS 111 se
rvice operates according to the following core principles:



Ability to dispatch an ambulance without delay



Completion of a clinical assessment on the first call without the need for a call back



Ability to refer calls to other providers without the caller be
ing re
-
triaged



Ability to transfer clinical assessment data to other providers and book
appointments where appropriate



Conformance with national quality assurance and clinical governance standards

2.3

Scope

The

main components of the service are as follows:



a
memorable three digit telephone number


111


with associated
brand and
marketing guidelines



111 o
perations

providing
call handling,
clinical assessment and referral
of callers
to other NHS local
services for
111

calls
in a limited geographic area
;



nation
al telephony that routes 111 calls to the appropriate 111 operation



national quality assurance and clinical governance standards

NHS 111 is a simple access point to integrated 24/7 urgent care services in a local area
that provides the following benefits.



i
mprov
ed

patient

and carer

experience by providing clear, easy acc
ess to more
integrated services



improved

e
fficiency of the
urgent

and emergency health care system by
connecting patients

to the right place, first time



increased public confidence and enhan
ced

reputation of the NHS



provision of

a modern, efficient entry point to the NHS focussed on patient needs
and supporting the use of lower cost

channels



provision of management information that enables
the commissioning of more
effective and productive
health care services

that are tuned to meet patient needs

2

NHS 111 service
s
ummary

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2.4

How
will

111 work?

NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year to respond to
people’s health care needs
when:



it’s not a life threatening situation, and therefore

is less urgent than a 999 call



the GP isn’t an option, for instance when the
caller
is away from
home



the
caller

feels they cannot wait and
is simply unsur
e of which service they require



the caller requires reassurance about what to do next.

NHS 111 answe
rs the call, assesses the caller’s needs and determines the most
appropriate course of action, including:



for

callers facing an emergency, an ambulance
will be despatched without delay



where a face to face consultation is required, an appointment will be b
ooked or the
caller will be
referr
ed
to the service that has the appropriate skills and resources to
meet the
ir
needs

in the required timeframe



for callers who

do not require a face
-
to
-
face consultation
, information,

advice and
reassurance

will be provided



where the call is outside the scope of
NHS 111
,
the caller will be
signpost
ed to an
alternative service

Full details of locally available services are maintained in a directory of services and
referral protocols are in place with health care service provi
ders so that the NHS 111
service is able to book appointments, refer callers and transfer information.

Management information is provided to commissioners regarding the demand, usage and
performance of services in order to enable the commissioning of more
effective and
productive services that are tuned to meet people’s needs.


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3.1

Announcements

Announcements have been locallised so that in each SHA area the announcements only
list local areas

For example calls to 111 from a landline that is in a “live” NNG in the North East currently
receive the following announcements from the 111 network in En
gland:

“Welcome to NHS 111.
Locally

service is currently availa
ble to callers in County
Durham and Darlington

only. Please press 9 or say Yes to continue.”

In the East Midlands the message is:

“Welcome to NHS 111.
Locally

service is currently availa
ble
to callers in
Nottingham City and Lincolnshire

only. Please press 9 or say Yes to continue.”

For mobiles the announcement in a live area is (for example in the North East):

“Welcome to NHS 111.
Locally

service is currently availa
ble to callers in County
D
urham and Darlington

only. Please press 9
to continue.”


If the NNG is not “live” and is in England then the announcement is:

“NHS 111 is not currently available in the area you are calling from. If it is an
emergency please hang up and dial 999, otherwise

call NHS Direct on 0845 46 47 or
contact your GP.”

3.2

Basic Process with one provider

Callers in a given area (landline calls are defined by National Numbering Group) are
processed in a defined way. They are typically sent to NHS 111 call advisers on a prec
ise
DDI number. So far we have set up one DDI number per
Routing Area
, but that is not
feasible when there are many PCTs covered by a single NNG as is the case in London
.



3

Guidance

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As well as the main (primary) destination number we also
ideally need a secondary (back
up) number. This secondary number is used if the primary number fails for any reason.
Ideally the secondary number would use a different exchange/provider/route into the
building.

3.3

Process with multiple providers

If more tha
n one routing area is covered by the same landline NNG, or an area is being
served by more than one call handling provider then there are a number of different
possibilities:

1.

Calls can just be sent consistently to the same destination, by mutual agreement,

so NNG 1 goes to routing area A but NNG 2 goes to routing area B.

2.

Calls can be split between providers on a percentage basis (e.g. 50/50 or
33/33/33). This percentage can vary by hour of the day. In the quiet hours it may
be best to send calls to just o
ne provider, but that provider could be rotated week
by week.

3.

Callers can be asked to press a button to indicate the area that they are calling
from.

4.

Lists of landline telephone numbers can be provided, and calls from numbers on
the list will be routed to
a specific destination

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5.

Providers can be linked together so that calls overflow across providers using
simple, or complex rules. For example calls could be allocated to one provider for
30 seconds and if not answered also queue for other providers. This h
as to be
done at the “ACD level”. It cannot be done using the basic NHS 111 system.

The above choices are not mutually exclusive.

3.4

Linking 111 providers together at the “ACD level”

This is a complex subject, and there are many possible ways of doing this,
each with their
own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques are as follows:

1.

The organisations that are going to share calls use the ACD of one of the
providers. This could be done (for example) by extending the reach of the ACD


using a “
Survivable shelf” or by sharing the same data network and using
telephones that share access to that network.

2.

ACDs can be linked together using dedicated lines

3.

The organisations to share calls can use a “Network based ACD” which is
provided by a telecoms s
upplier and which any number of 111 call handling
organisations can get access to.

4.

If the organisations to share calls both have the same type of ACD then they may
be able to take advantage of proprietary ways of sharing calls.

3.5

Call Routing

NHS 111 uses th
e location of the caller to work out where a call should be routed. For
landlines it uses the NNG (even for calls where the CLI is “withheld”)

For mobile phones the mast location or the Emergency Area is used.

In special cases the NHS 111 infrastructure
is capable of routing on the entire telephone
number so that specific telephone numbers can be routed to special DDI numbers. (See
also “Tagging” below).

3.6

NNGs

Maps of landline NNGs have been produced for England and can be downloaded from the
DH site. The
se maps also show PCT boundaries (with a brown dashed line) and PCT
boundaries with brown dashes over a green line. Some show the location of GP practices
as a black star.

In these maps each coloured dot represents a postcode where a given NNG applies. Th
e
density of the dots can therefore be treated as an indicator of population density. An
example of part of a NNG map is shown below:







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For every NNG a “default” PCT has been calculated based on the number of postcodes
for that NNG ap
pearing in each PCT. However, by agreement, and especially during roll
out the NNGs that route calls to a given PCT solution can be altered.

For example a part of the Newcastle 0191 NNG overlapped County Durham, so the whole
0191 area was allocated to
County Durham for the 111 pilot. If the Newcastle PCTs had
their own pilot later that NNG would have been allocated to them even though that would
mean they got part of County Durham.

In fact during role out if any part of an NNG appears in a PCT and if t
here is no NHS 111
site otherwise covered it would be normal to “turn on” the NNG and route 111 calls to the
new 111 location.

Experience has shown that turning on an NNG, much of which is “Out of Area” does NOT
attract many calls from the Out of Area part

of the NNG.

In the above example there were few calls from Newcastle even though the number had
been turned on.

3.7

Mobile Telephony

Call location for 111 is based on either the masts or the emergency areas of the caller.
Some network
s

use one and approach and some the other.

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3.8

Mapping Exercise

Some time (at least six weeks) before an area goes live there needs to be a “Mapping
Exercise” undertaken with C&W where the NNGs, the masts and the emergency areas to
be turned on are agreed. Thi
s needs to be a formal process and should be done with the
participation of the SHA, the DH, C&W and neighbouring areas as well as with the
involvement of local stakeholders.

Handling of calls diverted from GPs or existing OOH numbers

It is an important p
art of the business case for the NHS 111 service that Out of Hours calls
are handled at the NHS 111 centre, and normally at the point where 111 is turned on in a
given area the same call centre will be handling both sets of calls, with the same
processes.

It is however important that OOH and GP calls that are diverted from existing numbers are
not just transferred to 111 That would be inappropriate for two reasons:

1.

Because it would not then be possible to count the number of times a customer
dialled 111 as
opposed to dialling the existing number

2.

Because (more importantly) the call will be paid for twice and the only beneficiary
of this is the telecom companies. For example if the OOH number starts 0845
then a caller on a mobile phone would pay up to 50 penc
e per minute and certainly
no less than 10 pence per minute for the call. In addition the NHS will pay for the
call (though much less than the above numbers).

The solution is to forward OOH and GP calls to a different DDI number to 111 calls. Calls
from
both DDI numbers however should be treated the same in terms of their priority and
the advisors that the calls are routed to.

In some areas an announcement has been put on the OOH numbers telling callers that
they can now dial 111 directly for free.

3.9

Tagg
ing calls from specific groups

It is possible within an SHA to create specific groups of callers whose calls will be treated
differently. This is done by creating a list of the telephone numbers to be “Tagged” and
passing it to the DH who will pass the li
st on to the NHS 111 telephony provider (Cable
and Wireless).

Each group would have a specific DDI allocated to it.

Examples of groups that have been suggested include:



The mobile phone numbers of GPs



Nursing homes



Landline phone numbers where the caller i
s likely to want to speak in another
language such as Urdu.



Persistent callers

It should be noted that telephone numbers can only be tagged by the consent of the
owner of the telephone number and it is appropriate to have processes in place to ensure
that
that happens.

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3.10

Telephone numbers that have been moved

It is legally possible to move a telephone number, including the NNG component from one
location (e.g. London 0207 to Nottingham City


normally 0115). This is however unusual.
If this happens and the
cen
tral team is informed then (with

appropriate procedures) the
telephone number can be given the “correct” location so that it can call 111 and the call be
passed to the correct destination.

3.11

Call Handling standards

Calls to 111 follow the Out of Hours sta
ndards in terms of Call Answering, so 95% of calls
need to be answered in 60 seconds from the end of any announcement. Announcements
must not be more than 30 seconds long.

3.12

Call recording

All calls to NHS 111 need to be recorded. Calls from adults will be
retained for 8 years
and calls from or about children will be retained until their 26th birthday. Providers are also
required to ensure that systems are in place to comply with regulations concerning child
protection and vulnerable adults


this is covered

in more detail in the Service
Specification.

3.13

Calls in other languages

NHS 111 call advisers need to have a translation service available to translate calls made
in other languages. Call handlers need to know how to organise a translator without
delay.

3.14

Te
xt relay

/

Typetalk calls from the Deaf.

The 111 infrastructure is typetalk friendly and calls may arrive from the deaf via a text
relay translator. Call advisers need to understand that such calls exist and how to handle
them. No special equipment or se
rvices is required.

3.15

999 escalation

If a call to NHS 111 needs to be escalated to 999 treatment (i.e. an ambulance needs to
be dispatched) then that will done electronically using a message, not by transferring the
call. In the event that the technical mes
sage does not work for a live date then it is
possible to contemplate a work around provided that does not involve re
-
triage for a brief
period.

NHS 111 call handling organisations who deal with calls in more than one Ambulance
Trust area should calculate

from the post code which Ambulance Trust needs to be
alerted to the call and send the alert to the correct Ambulance Trust as far as possible.

Ambulance Trusts will not re
-
triage the calls that are passed to them but will dispatch an
ambulance without del
ay according to the priority (A or B) associated with the call. In the
event that there is an issue with the nature of the dispatch then this will be brought up
through the usual review procedures.

Ambulance Trusts will deal with border issues using the u
sual procedures.

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3.16

Resiliency of the service

The 111 service needs to be reliable, so 111 call handling providers should put
procedures in place so that their service is resilient.

The following list does not cover all the procedures needed as this is a tele
phony
document however it is recommended that 111 providers:

1.

In an ideal world 111 providers have two or more call centres, each with ACD
facilities which are linked and calls are automatically distributed to more than one
centre. Centres might have a “su
rvivable shelf”.

2.

Have a secondary DDI number to connect their ACD to 111 which as far possible
uses a separate location, telephony supplier and route into the building

3.

Have contingency plans in place to cope with a fire or other incident at their main
call

handling location. It is recommended that a charged mobile phone, with an
“Emergency Procedures” document is available close to a fire exit.

4.

Take great care in forecasting levels of demand around bank holidays, especially
“four day weekends” to ensure tha
t sufficient staff are available

5.

Have procedures in place so that if visitors to A and E say that they were unable to
access 111 the call centre is informed.

6.

Know how to contact the C&W incident desk to report any suspected problem with
the 111 network.

7.

Have an “UPS” power supply available so that a power failure to the main call
centre does not close the centre.

8.

Have three times the number of lines compared to the maximum number of 111
advisors so that surges of calls after Christmas can be accommodated.


9.

Have plans to increase the number of advisors rapidly in case of a local
emergency that increases the number of calls. This could be through a bilateral
arrangement with another 111 call handling organisation and should be capable of
being implemented w
ithin a day or so.

10.

Have the ability to implement a local message on their ACD in case of a specific
local event. It should be possible to do this within an hour or so.

3.17

Ultimate Resiliency

A feature will be available in the 111 Telephony infrastructure for a given vendor, in a
“force majeur” situation such as a fire, terrorist attack or other major incident to reduce the
number of calls that they receive (potentially as low as zero). In thi
s situation calls would
be redirected to the other providers of the 111 service in approximate proportion to their
size.

This facility is designed to be used in extreme circumstances only, when all other
contingency has been exhausted.

Details of how th
is is done will be provided to sites when they are ready to go live.

3.18

111 and Pandemic Flu

or other national incidents.

In the event of a major national incident such as pandemic flu it is possible to introduce a
message at a national level very quickly.
The message might be something like:

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“Thank you for calling NHS111. If you are calling about pandemic flu please press
8, otherwise please press 9 or say Yes to continue”

If a caller pressed 8 then they would be played a message up to 5 minutes long which

would give them more detailed instructions.

It is possible the 111 might in the future be used as the Pandemic Flu number. In that
case the routing will take the calls directly to the Pandemic Flu call centres that have been
separately procured.

3.19

111 and

local incidents

In the event that there is a
local

incident that generates a lot of calls such as
gastroenteritis then the local provider of the 111 service would be expected to be able to
put a message on their ACD, and create a separate group to handle
the calls.

The key issue is whether the incident is local or national.


3.20

GP Surgery Answer Machine Messages


This Section can also be found in a separate document from Phil Bastable


Introduction

The best practice for GP surgery out of hours answer machine messages outlined in this paper
has been developed from lessons learned in the live NHS 111 areas.


When NHS 111 is launched in a new area, it is important that out of hours messages on GP
surg
ery answer machines are updated to direct callers to the NHS 111 service as this helps to
quickly establish the new service.


Answer machine messages should be considered a key communication channel for the marketing
of the service as: they reach people a
t the ‘moment of need’; help increase public awareness of
the service; and are effective in changing public behaviour in the way they access urgent care
services.


Best Practice Options

There are two best practice options for GP surgeries to implement:

1.

Voice message with a redirect of the call to NHS 111; and

2.

Voice message with an alternative ‘out of area’ direct dial number for the NHS 111 service.


Either of these options can be implemented.


Voice message with
redirect

Callers to GP practices out of h
ours are played a voice message instructing them to hang up and
redial 111 or to hold on the line and wait to be re
-
directed to the NHS 111 service.


The answer machine message must make it clear that the call is free if the caller hangs up and
redials 111
, but a charge will be incurred if they wait to be redirected.


The redirect is necessary because it enables callers who are located outside of a live NHS 111
area but who are registered with an ‘in area’ GP practice to access the NHS 111 service. It also
enables people from outside of a

live NHS 111 area who are calling on behalf of a friend or relative
who is ‘in area’ to access the NHS 111 service.

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Note that GP surgeries that implement a divert may incur charges for this facility.


An example of an answ
er machine message with redirect:


“The GP surgery is now closed. The opening hours are X:XX to X:XX
Monday to Friday.


If you require urgent medical assistance which cannot wait until
the surgery re
-
opens, please hang
up and call

1
-
1
-
1
. Calls to the NHS
111 service are free from both landlines and mobiles.



Or alternatively you may wait and your call will be re
-
directed to the NHS 111 service. Re
-
directed
calls will incur call charges, however if you hang up and call 1
-
1
-
1 your call will be free.


If you

have a life threatening med
ical emergency please dial 999.


Please wait and your call will be re
-
directed to the NHS 111 service.”


Voice message with alternative number

If it is not possible for a GP practice to divert calls to 111 following the voice message then an
alternative number needs to be included at the end of the voice message to enable ‘out of area’
callers to access the NHS 111 service.


The answer machine m
essage must make it clear that calla to 111 are free, but calls to the
alternative ‘out of area’ number will be charged for.


An example of an answer machine message including the alternative number:


“The GP surgery is now closed. The opening hours are X:
XX to X:XX
Monday to Friday.


If you require urgent medical assistance which cannot wait until
the surgery re
-
opens, please hang
up and call

1
-
1
-
1
. Calls to the NHS 111 service are free from both landlines and mobiles.



Or alternatively if you are callin
g from outside of the area where the NHS 111 service is available
but are registered with a GP practice that is within the 111 area or are calling on behalf of
someone within the 111 area, you should hang up and call XXXX XXXX XXXX. Please note that
calls

to this number are charged for.


If you have a life threatening medical emergency please dial 999.”


SPA messages

and existing OO
Hrs numbers

The same best practice also applies to existing single points of access and out of hours numbers.
These should
feature voice messages as detailed above.


3.21

DDI numbers required

Currently each 111 area needs to have the following DDI numbers to route calls to:


Name

Description

What set of
lines?

Primary
destination

The main destination number. Normally one
per “routing area”.

偲mma特

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Name

Description

What set of
lines?

Secondary
destination

The number C&W will route calls to if a call
does not go “off hook” on the Primary number
in 5 seconds. This number should be on a
different ISDN trunk and
enter the ACD
environment of the vendor through a different
physical route. It may be possible to combine
secondary numbers if a vendor covers multiple
areas.

Secondary

“Back door”

A number to appear on GP answerphone
messages and used by callers who are
not
local or who are calling from some distance
away about a local relative.

Primary (no divert
secondary as
called manually)

Destination for
calls with no
location or Nation
Contingency
routing

A small number of calls have no location
information (for ex
ample calls from
unregistered masts). These calls are allocated
randomly to providers based on the number of
111 calls they handle. By having a separate
DDI we can count the number of such call
received by each provider. This DDI is also
used for calls
routed as a result of calls
diverted as a result of the National
Contingency being active. (We no longer think
that National Contingency needs its own DDI
number as use is so rare)

Primary (if any
problem will be re
-
presented on
Secondary DDI)

Destinatio
n
number for calls
forwarded from
OOH or other
destinations.

This number


which should not be publicised


is used if calls are forwarded from GP
surgeries, OOH or SPA numbers.

Primary (if any
problem will be re
-
presented on
Secondary DDI)

Supervisors

A
DDI number that will reach the call centre
supervisors. This number will be circulated
within the 111 family and will be used if there
are any issues that need to be communicated.

Primary (as this
DDI is only called
manually calls do
not divert to a
Secon
dary set of
lines)


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The following diagram shows this diagrammatically:














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4.1

Summary

One of the problems with telephony is that it does use words that most people do not
know. Some of these are used in this guide and you will need to understand them.

4.2

Glossary table


Term

Description

ACD

Automatic Call Distributor. This device makes a modern call centre
possible. It sends calls to individual advisors in specific ways
(often
using a technique known as “longest idle”), it reports on what has
桡灰敮敤h扯b栠楮ir敡氠t業攠慮搠桩ht潲楣慬汹 慮搠楳 来湥g慬汹 t桥hk敹
device fo爠managing a contact cent牥.

qhe牥 a牥 diffe牥nt so牴s of ACa which wo牫 in diffe牥nt ways.

Cell

qhe ar
ea cove牥d by a mobile phone mast


this can be a few
hund牥d met牥s to ove爠PM miles.

Cif

Calling iine fdentity


the telephone numbe爠of a calle爮

aaf number

ai牥ct aial fnwa牤s. A specific telephone numbe爠that is pa牴 of a
牡nge of numbe牳. co爠e
xample an o牧anisation might have MNNR NOP
MMM as its main numbe爠but use MNNR NOP MMN to MNNR NOP MVV as
individual aaf numbe牳 fo爠specific employees o爠depa牴ments. NNN
sends calls to specific aaf numbe牳.

䕭e牧ency
A牥a

An 䕭e牧ency A牥a is a collect
ion of masts which a牥 g牯uped
togethe爠fo爠VVV and NNN call 牯uting pu牰oses. ft is much less
p牥cise than cell based 牯uting.

䱩湥i

qhis is a count of the numbe爠of simultaneous connections between
the public and the call cent牥. ff the牥 we牥 PO iine
s then the牥 could
be PO people talking to adviso牳 in you爠NNN cent牥. qypically lines
a牥 pu牣hased in g牯ups in a business envi牯nment.

jast

qhis is the device that a mobile phone talks to. rnde爠some
ci牣umstances a mast may communicate with a
mobile phone much
fu牴he爠away than no牭al.

4

Glossary

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Term

Description

Phantom calls

A Phantom call is a call made to 111 by accident without human
intervention. This is possible because wind in telephone wires and
traffic over telephone lines buried in the road can generate “1”s.

There are special features of the way in which 111 is set up to prevent
phantom calls being presented to 111 call handling organisations but
it is possible for this to occasionally happen.

Mass Call Event

A testing process used by 111 where calls are m
ade to 111 from
every telecoms carrier and mobile phone network from each area
(NNG/emergency area/location) in the area. The results are recorded
to identify any issues with telephony routing.

NNG

National Numbering Group. You probably know this as an
STD code.
An example is 0207 or 0115. The complete list can be found on the
Ofcom web site.

NNGs are associated with an area, such as Newcastle (0191), Inner
London (0207) or Nottingham (0115); however for the last few years
customers have had the lega
l right to take their telephone number
(including NNG) with them when they move house, even when they
move across the country. The 111 process allows for this in a special
way which will be discussed later.

PCT

We used to use this term

not only to refer
to a Primary Care Trust but
also to indicate any geographical area for which calls have to handled
in a specific way. It could be a cluster of GP commissioning

Routing area

We now use the term Routing Area to define an area where calls
have to be handled in a specific way.

Tagging

This is a special process in 111 that allows (by consent) a set of
telephone numbers (such as GPs mobiles, nursing homes, or
speakers of a speci
fic language) to be treated differently when they
call 111. The calls are sent to a specific DDI number and the ACD
can be set up to treat those calls differently and send them to a
special group of advisors.

Each SHA area can set up a number of 111 TAG g
roups.


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The following overall timeline shows some of the telephony related processes that need to be
considered. This list is only related to telephony. This l
ist is not exhaustive but does provide some
sense of pace:


Indicative Time
Frame

Description of area of concern

6 months before
live



Conside爠a牥as to be cove牥d including NNGs and call 牯uting
gene牡lly.



Deduce app牯imate call numbe牳 and wo牫 out numbe爠of
calls fo爠each hou爠of the week.



Wo牫 out numbe爠of adviso牳 and nu牳es fo爠each hou爠of the
week.



Conside爠whethe爠et牡 lines a牥 牥qui牥d ⡳ee net bo)



Conside爠office size and location.



Consi
de爠contingency in case main call location has
catast牯phic failu牥.



Conside爠the size and capacity of the ACD and whethe爠it
needs inc牥asing in size.

4 months befo牥
live

O牤e爠telephone lines


at least Pu the maximum numbe爠of adviso牳.
qwo diffe牥
nt aafs fo爠diffe牥nt exchanges and p牯vide牳. qhe
delive特 of telephone lines f牯m national supplie牳 is a f牥quent cause
of delay. Ag牥e national level announcements so they can be
牥co牤ed by C♗.

N month befo牥
live

偲mvide the cent牡l team with t
he aaf numbe牳. 偬an the mass call
event with the cent牡l ae team. Continuously update the cent牡l
team with any changes in go live date.

O weeks befo牥
soft live

eold the jass Call 䕶ent which opens up the NNN numbe爠in the a牥a
fo爠a PM minute pe物od
fo爠testing.

卯ft live

ln this date ⡮o牭ally a quesday at NNWMM⤠the NNN numbe爠is tu牮ed
on. Calls a牥 牥ceived f牯m existing lle numbe牳 and handled.
c物ends and family sta牴 accessing the se牶ice via NNN

偵blic iive ⡡t
least a week afte爠
卯ft iive
F

qhe numbe爠is adve牴ised and calls sta牴 a牲rving in volume. qypically
RB of the population ⡯n an annualised basis⤠sta牴s calling on the
NNN numbe爠quite quickly



6. Timeline for Telephony