NetMaster for TCP/IP Handbook

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The NetMaster® for TCP/IP
Handbook
 Overview of concepts and tour of features
 Step-by-step configuration best practices
 Usage scenarios with real network problems
CA NetMaster® Network Management for TCP/IP r11.5
July 2007
EDNM200115ASE
The NetMaster
®
for TCP/IP Handbook

The NetMaster
®
for TCP/IP Handbook

The NetMaster
®
for TCP/IP Handbook

About this handbook

This handbook is a companion for users and administrators of CA NetMaster
®

Network Management for TCP/IP r11.5 (NetMaster for TCP/IP).

NetMaster for TCP/IP monitors, manages, and helps to diagnose your z/OS
mainframe IP network resources and environment. It’s a product with wide
capabilities; new users sometimes don’t understand everything it does, or how to
start using it. Start here, by reading this handbook – it will help.

The Aim

This handbook doesn’t go into every function – that’s done in the product manuals.
This contains just the essential concepts, best practice advice, and examples that
you need to quickly make NetMaster for TCP/IP useful.

Where detailed ‘How To’ instructions are needed, this handbook refers you to other
NetMaster for TCP/IP product documentation, such as the online help and the User
and Administrator Guides.

The Authors

This handbook was written by the people who wrote the product: the NetMaster for
TCP/IP software engineers. Thank you for your interest in our product.

Your Comments

We want this book to be genuinely helpful. Please pass all comments and requests
for additions to CA Technical Support, and they’ll make sure we get them.

This Edition

This is the second edition, July 2007.



Publication References

User Guide means the manual:
Unicenter
®
NetMaster™ Network Management for TCP/IP User Guide r11.5
Administrator Guide means the manual:
Unicenter
®
NetMaster™ Network Management for TCP/IP Administrator Guide r11.5
Getting Started Guide means the manual:
Unicenter
®
NetMaster™ Network Management for TCP/IP Getting Started r11.5

Conventions

Shaded text like this contains hints, tips, and FAQs

Many navigation instructions appear in the format /IPCON (D.C)
These refer to the NetMaster 3270 interface.
/IPCON is a shortcut, and can be entered at any ===> prompt.
(D.C) is the equivalent path, starting at the Primary Menu panel.
The NetMaster
®
for TCP/IP Handbook

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Table of contents
About this handbook.................................................................................1

Table of contents.......................................................................................2

Who should use this handbook, and how...................................................5

Part 1. Explore NetMaster for TCP/IP...............................7

Chapter 1. What, How, and Where.............................................................8

What does NetMaster for TCP/IP do?.......................................................8

How does NetMaster for TCP/IP work?....................................................12

What resources can be managed?..........................................................13

Where does the data come from?...........................................................15

Chapter 2. Differences and Extras...........................................................16

Distributed network management products..............................................16

Automation products............................................................................16

SNA network management products.......................................................17

Other z/OS network management products.............................................17

Chapter 3. Explore the Connection Lists..................................................22

Access Connection and Telnet Connection Lists........................................22

Filter the connections...........................................................................24

Manage a Connection List.....................................................................25

Use Connection List actions...................................................................26

SmartTrace a connection......................................................................28

Use the WebCenter Connection Lists.......................................................30

Where is Netstat?................................................................................32

Chapter 4. Explore the IP Node Monitor..................................................33

Access the IP Node Monitor...................................................................33

Use IP Node Monitor commands.............................................................34

SmartTrace an IP node.........................................................................35

Use the WebCenter IP Node Monitor.......................................................36

Chapter 5. Explore the Alert Monitor.......................................................37

Access the Alert Monitor.......................................................................38

Use the WebCenter Alert Monitor...........................................................38

Use Alert Monitor commands.................................................................39

Chapter 6. Explore Connection Event History..........................................40

Access the connection event history.......................................................41

Filter the connection events..................................................................42

Sort the connection event history...........................................................42

Other connection event functions...........................................................43

Chapter 7. Explore the Performance Data................................................44

Real-time performance data..................................................................44

Sample and summary performance data.................................................46

ReportCenter example reports...............................................................47

Chapter 8. Explore SmartTrace................................................................48

One-step packet tracing (line command mode)........................................49

Custom packet tracing (menu mode)......................................................53

IP Filtering and SmartTrace...................................................................53

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for TCP/IP Handbook

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How big is the SmartTrace trace output?.................................................53

Chapter 9. Explore the Graphical Monitor................................................57

Group resources into icons....................................................................57

Example Graphical Monitor displays........................................................58

Part 2. Configure Your Region......................................61

Chapter 10. A Calm Approach to Configuration........................................62

Do more with less................................................................................62

Don’t do everything at once..................................................................63

Chapter 11. Check Region Health............................................................64

Before you begin.................................................................................64

Implementation verification procedure....................................................65

Chapter 12. Best Practices for IP Node Monitoring..................................74

Reachability and responsiveness............................................................74

SNMP Network, Protocol and Interface Activity.........................................78

Chapter 13. Best Practices for Event Monitoring......................................79

Network and System Event Detectors.....................................................79

Connection Event History Recording.......................................................84

Chapter 14. Best Practices for Application Workload Monitoring.............86

Business Application workload...............................................................86

Telnet and FTP Workload......................................................................91

See the results....................................................................................93

Address Space and Port activity.............................................................95

Chapter 15. Best Practices for IP Infrastructure Monitoring....................98

Stacks and Network Interfaces..............................................................99

OSA (Open Systems Adaptor)..............................................................101

Cisco CIP host...................................................................................102

Enterprise Extender...........................................................................102

VIPA................................................................................................103

Performance data alerts......................................................................103

Monitoring Maps................................................................................104

See the results..................................................................................104

Chapter 16. Best Practices for Alert Management..................................106

Where do alerts come from?................................................................107

Filter alerts.......................................................................................108

Send alert notifications.......................................................................109

Keep Alert History..............................................................................110

Chapter 17. Best Practices for Graphical Monitor Implementation........111

Overview of Graphical Monitor Implementation......................................111

Stage 1. Think about your resource categories.......................................112

Stage 2. Think about your ‘zoom levels’................................................114

Stage 3. Sketch your monitor screens...................................................117

Stage 4. Build your icon boxes.............................................................118

Stage 5. Define lowest level resource groups.........................................119

Stage 6. Generate lowest level icon panels............................................120

Stage 7. Repeat for the higher levels....................................................121


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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Part 3. Manage Your Network.....................................123

Chapter 18. Reactive, Proactive, Reflective...........................................124

React to problems..............................................................................124

Warn of problems..............................................................................126

Plan for changes................................................................................127

About z/OS IP network problems.........................................................128

Chapter 19. FTP Transfers are Failing...................................................130

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................130

Be more prepared in future.................................................................131

Chapter 20. FTP Transfers are Hanging................................................133

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................133

Be more prepared in future.................................................................135

Chapter 21. FTP Transfers are Slow......................................................138

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................138

Be more prepared in future.................................................................140

Chapter 22. Telnet Connection Drops Out.............................................141

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................141

Be more prepared in future.................................................................143

Chapter 23. Application Response is Slow............................................146

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................146

Be more prepared in future.................................................................151

Chapter 24. Can’t Connect to an Application..........................................153

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................153

Be more prepared in future.................................................................155

Chapter 25. IP Stack is Slow..................................................................157

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................157

Be more prepared in future.................................................................162

Chapter 26. Stack Network Interface is Slow........................................166

Investigate the immediate problem......................................................166

Be more prepared in future.................................................................169

Chapter 27. Quick Reference for Enterprise Extender............................170

EE IP Resource Monitor commands.......................................................170

Total UDP traffic displays....................................................................171

EE and SmartTrace............................................................................173

WebCenter EE Management................................................................175

Other EE Diagnosis Resources.............................................................176

Chapter 28. Quick Reference for OSA....................................................177

OSA IP Resource Monitor commands....................................................177

OSA/SF Management.........................................................................177

WebCenter OSA Management..............................................................179


The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Who should use this handbook, and how

Part 1

Part 1, “Explore NetMaster for TCP/IP”, contains an overview of the product
concepts, and a tour of some of the main features.

If you are… then …

a new user of NetMaster for TCP/IP

an existing user - but you wonder if
NetMaster for TCP/IP could do more for
you

Read all of Part 1.
a user who has migrated from a previous
version of NetMaster for TCP/IP
Read Chapter 8 “Explore SmartTrace”
and Chapter 9, “Explore the Graphical
Monitor”.

These introduce new r11.5 features.

Part 2

Part 2, “Configure Your Region”, lists step-by-step configuration best practices.

If … then …

you’ve just set up a NetMaster for TCP/IP
region and need to customize it
Follow all of the steps in all of the
chapters in Part 2.

The chapters are ordered to make your
region as useful as possible, in the least
time.

Part 3

Part 3, “Manage Your Network”, contains problem diagnosis scenarios.

If … then …

you need data to help diagnose a current
network problem

you want to be warned about things that
might cause this problem in future
Refer to the appropriate chapter in Part
3 for suggestions about what diagnostic
data might help, how to get that data,
and which alerts you can set up.


The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Part 1. Explore
NetMaster for TCP/IP



Explore Configure Manage


In Part 1, you learn about NetMaster for TCP/IP by reading the concepts and
exploring some key features.


Chapter
Topic

1. What, How and Where

Explains what NetMaster for TCP/IP does, how it works,
where it gets data from, and what resources it manages.


2. Differences and Extras

Lists the things that make NetMaster for TCP/IP different
from other network management products.


3 to 9. Explore …

Tour some of the key features. You can follow along on
your own NetMaster for TCP/IP region.




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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Chapter 1. What, How, and Where
What does NetMaster for TCP/IP do?

NetMaster for TCP/IP observes and
displays information about z/OS
mainframe IP network activity, and
provides a diagnostic interface to
mainframe IP network resources and
connections.

NetMaster for TCP/IP can watch and
look after the IP networks of multiple
MVS systems (LPARS) from its
consolidated, enterprise-wide 3270
and web browser displays.

Information Provided

 Diagnostic data
From high-level resource status
to IP packet contents
 Events
From single IP connection details
to customizable exception alerts
 Performance data
From real-time to long term trend

Features Provided

Real-time, low overhead packet
tracing, with SmartTrace


Easy to use, one-step packet tracing
 Immediate trace viewing
 Parsing & decoding of packet data

Extensive advanced trace controls
 Powerful packet selection criteria
 Automatic trace stop conditions
 Flexible packet retention periods
 Command line / auto-timer control
 Run multiple concurrent traces and
view results independently
 Export utilities to CTRACE and
LIBPCAP formats

Connection management with multi-
function Connection Lists

 Lists filtered on Telnet/IP
connection criteria such as RTT,
User ID, fragmentation,
retransmissions
 Tools that can be used with each
connection provide packet tracing,
connection diagnosis including Ping
and Traceroute, and IP node
diagnosis actions against the
endpoints

Dynamic monitoring of critical nodes
and IP infrastructure, with the
IP Node Monitor, Graphical
Monitor, and IP Resource Monitor

 Tools that can be used with each
resource provide displays of
performance and configuration
data, and type-specific diagnosis
functions

Alerting on events and performance
exceptions, with the Alert Monitor

 Alerts can automatically trigger
actions
 Alert information can be sent on
via SNMP, SMTP email, and to
products such as CA Service Desk
and IBM Tivoli Netview

Audit data gathering, logging of
NetMaster messages with the
Activity Log and saving of IP, FTP
and Telnet connection details with
IP Event History

The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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What does NetMaster for TCP/IP know about?

NetMaster for TCP/IP knows about both logical and physical z/OS mainframe IP
resources.

It also knows about IP Connections to and from the z/OS mainframe.






Management cross-system  cross-sysplex  enterprise-wide

A NetMaster for TCP/IP region runs on every MVS system, to manage the local
resources. These local regions can be logically linked to one ‘focal point’ region.

From this central region, you can see and manage z/OS IP resources from all linked
regions across all systems in your enterprise.
The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Who uses NetMaster for TCP/IP?

Connection
Lists
Network operators
Respond reactively to end-user problems, diagnose IP connection
problems.

Alert Monitor Network operators
Respond to proactive notifications of network events and warnings
of atypical performance.

IP Node
Monitor

Network operators
Watch for slow, unresponsive or unavailable IP hosts.

IP Resource
Monitor
Network planners, network administrators
Monitor IP network infrastructure & examine performance data.

Graphical
Monitor
Network operators
See at a glance notification of status changes in critical groups of
resources.

SmartTrace All the above users. . .

SmartTrace usage can be:

 Simple: standard ‘one-step’ trace commands are integrated
into connection lists and monitors.

 Advanced: advanced custom trace functions are controlled
from their own menu.

. . . and NEW users!

NetMaster for TCP/IP has traditionally been used by network
operators and administrators.

SmartTrace now makes NetMaster for TCP/IP valuable to a new,
broader audience:

 Systems programmers who support IBM or ISV products
that use z/OS TCP/IP.

SmartTrace is an excellent tool for them to use when
diagnosing problems with the software they support, and for
verifying network security measures.

 Application programmers can use SmartTrace when
diagnosing problems with the TCP/IP applications they have
developed in-house, or have purchased and need to support.


The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Managing z/OS Mainframe IP Networks with NetMaster for TCP/IP





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for TCP/IP Handbook

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How does NetMaster for TCP/IP work?

NetMaster for TCP/IP is a VTAM
application program that runs as an
MVS started task on a z/OS
mainframe. A running instance of
NetMaster for TCP/IP (an MVS address
space) is called a NetMaster region.

The NetMaster region performs
network management functions, 3270
and web UI processing, and has
extensive internal interfaces to MVS,
VTAM and stack facilities and data.

Every NetMaster region has an
associated SOLVE SSI region. A
SOLVE SSI region is a separate
address space, which runs on the
same MVS system/LPAR.
SSI regions provide special functions
for the use of NetMaster regions on
their LPAR. Generally, only one SOLVE
SSI region runs per LPAR.

One LPAR may have multiple different
NetMaster regions. These can share a
SOLVE SSI region.

The SOLVE SSI region communicates
with the NetMaster regions using
cross-memory services, and provides
them with technologies including:
 The Packet Analyzer
 SmartTrace Packet Tracing
 EPS (Endpoint Services)
 Interfaces to IBM SMF and
UNIX System Services





What comes
in?




What
processes it?




What are the
results?


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for TCP/IP Handbook

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What resources can be managed?

Stack The IBM Communications Server for z/OS TCP/IP
stack and the CA TCPAccess stack are supported.
Multiple stacks on one LPAR can be managed.

NetMaster for TCP/IP stack monitoring encompasses a
network view (of the IP, TCP, and UDP activity), a
hardware view (of the stack network interfaces) and a
business view (of connections mapped to applications).

Open Systems
Adaptor (OSA)
OSAs are IBM’s strategic z/OS communications device.
OSA cards are installed directly into the z/OS hardware
frame. QDIO provides direct memory access to OSA-
Express and its Gigabit and Fast Ethernet connections.
OSA-2, OSA-Express and OSA-Express2 are supported.

Cisco Channel
Interface Processor
(CIP)
CISCO CIP hosts are channel-attached routers, which
interface with z/OS using the CLAW (Common Link Access
to Workstation) protocol. CIP TN3270 cards are also
managed.

IP Node An IP Node is any host reachable via IP, from the z/OS
host. They may include routers, servers, workstations,
other LPARs, interfaces. Other LPARs may also be EE
remote hosts.

Enterprise Extender
(EE)
EE is IBM’s strategic solution to providing access from SNA
LUs to SNA applications, over an IP network. It sends SNA
APPN HPR (High Performance Routing) data in UDP
datagrams. HPR - not TCP - provides the network reliability
and recovery functions.
EE involves data transfer between VTAM and the IP stack.
Application traffic can be prioritized. EE can use any IP
network interface supported by the stack.

Virtual IP Address
(VIPA)
VIPAs are software-only resources – they have no
corresponding hardware. VIPAs provide network users with
a constant IP address to use for system or application
access; behind the scenes, a VIPA may move from stack to
stack, or system to system.

Communication
Storage Manager
(CSM)
CSM is ECSA and dataspace storage, for the use of high-
performance address spaces such as the IP stack, VTAM,
and DB2 subsystems. It is administered by VTAM.

Address Space Address spaces with IP activity are managed.
Address space monitoring also provides Port data.

2216 The 2216 is an early IBM multi-protocol router.
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Where are the managed resources?

The shaded resources are managed by NetMaster for TCP/IP.
(This indicates their relative placement in the enterprise network – not their relationships.)

How do regions communicate?

NetMaster and SOLVE SSI regions communicate using many ways.

EPS


NetMaster EPS (Endpoint Services) is a logical transport mechanism
developed for NetMaster’s high volume, low overhead requirements.

EPS uses the IBM z/OS cross-system coupling facility (XCF) and cross-
memory services. EPS facilities are provided by the SOLVE SSI region.

INMC NetMaster INMC (Inter-NetMaster Connection) is a logical link protocol
between NetMaster regions.
INMC link traffic can be carried by EPS, VTAM or IP.

APPC IBM Advanced Program-to-Program Communication (APPC) enables
communication with remote programs at the application program level.

NetMaster has its own enhanced version of APPC. NetMaster regions
can communicate with APPC over INMC, or with native APPC.

IP
sockets
IP sockets are used to communicate with some components (such as
NetMaster ReportCenter).

PPI

IBM z/OS program-to-program interface (PPI) is a bidirectional cross-
memory interface allowing the routing of VTAM-related data such as
CNM alerts.
The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Where does the data come from?

NetMaster for TCP/IP gets data from many internal and external sources.

Data on one NetMaster region is accessible by other linked regions, providing
consolidated central display and control.

From the
NetMaster for
TCP/IP Packet
Analyzer
The Packet Analyzer maintains a dynamic database about
activity on a z/OS mainframe TCP/IP stack. This database is
designed to meet NetMaster’s exact needs with minimal
overhead.

The Packet Analyzer sees and analyzes packets that flow into
and out of every stack defined to NetMaster for TCP/IP.

From MVS
Operating System
Functions
Stack, network and system internal APIs
VTAM, MVS and Unix System Services commands
SMF records, RMF

From Device
Management
Applications

OSA/SF
From Physical
Devices

SNMP



Where NetMaster for TCP/IP data comes from


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for TCP/IP Handbook

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Chapter 2. Differences and Extras

This chapter explains how NetMaster for TCP/IP is different to other products.
Distributed network management products

Unlike distributed (Linux/Unix/Windows) products, NetMaster for TCP/IP sees the
world from the z/OS mainframe perspective. The z/OS mainframe is a
connection endpoint, and has powerful facilities available to it.

Thanks to its place in the enterprise network and the capability of its host platform,
NetMaster for TCP/IP can provide far more comprehensive functions than distributed
network-based ‘on the wire’ or ‘packet sniffer’ utilities.

More than just SNMP and polled device data attributes are available.
NetMaster for TCP/IP also gets performance data from many operating
system based sources, as well as its own Packet Analyzer.

More than just network information is available.
z/OS has access to information unavailable to many network-resident
products, including connection state information, internal queue lengths,
overall packet discard rates, and memory and CPU usage.

More than just individual device performance is measured.
Overall application workload is also calculated, and broken down by many
business-relevant criteria.

More than just physical object management is done -
logical as well as physical entities are managed.

Some logical entities, such as business applications, can be customized for
each site. An application can be logically defined as more than merely a
‘port-protocol’ combination.

Automation products

NetMaster for TCP/IP does not automatically decide to go off and reconfigure,
deactivate or interrupt any of the network. Most of its automatic actions are related
to information gathering. In general, NetMaster for TCP/IP uses its powers only to
intensively examine things. It does not attempt to change their operation.

High-impact functions may affect a system, but these requests must be issued by a
network operator. You can certainly configure your NetMaster region to do things
automatically in many cases, but again, these are completely under your control.
The NetMaster
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SNA network management products

If you’re used to SNA networks, any IP management product can seem unfamiliar.
Much of this comes from underlying differences between SNA and IP.

 SNA was designed with ease of
management in mind.

 SNA resources have fixed hierarchies,
and resource owners.

 SNA architecture mandates explicit,
granular and informative session
error and malfunction notifications –
error messages, statuses and sense
codes.

 SNA statuses are absolute and are set
only by VTAM and SNA devices.

Typically with SNA, you can display a
pending resource or session and
receive a precise status indicating
how far the control flow has gotten,
and what particular SNA request it is
waiting on.

 IP has no built-in management
controls.

 IP routing is designed to dynamically
bypass problems, so problem nodes
are deliberately not noticed.

 The IP layer is connectionless – all
functions need one of the IP
protocols, which vary greatly.

 With NetMaster for TCP/IP, resource
display colors are set ‘subjectively’ by
setting performance measurement
thresholds.



Other z/OS network management products

NetMaster for TCP/IP has many extras that other z/OS network products don’t.
Some are embedded extras, always part of any NetMaster for TCP/IP region:
 WebCenter
 Development Environment

Some are optional extras, you implement them only if you want them:
 ReportCenter
 WebCenter SDK
 Integration with SNA and File Transfer Management
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Ease of installation

NetMaster for TCP/IP is simple and straightforward to install and get working. It
comes with its own Install Utility.

1. The utility collects site-specific values such as data set prefixes, DASD
volume serial numbers, and JCL parameter values.

2. Using these values, the utility generates batch JCL jobs that when run,
perform the SMP/E and non-SMP/E installation of NetMaster for TCP/IP.

3. After installation, you use the utility again, to set up a new NetMaster for
TCP/IP region and generate the JCL to run it as a started task.

4. Repeat step 3 as needed – many regions can be set up from the same
installed code base.

NetMaster for TCP/IP is self contained in its own region and supporting SSI address
spaces. It requires only a few CA Common Services for z/OS components.

Unlike other z/OS IP network management enterprise solutions, it does not mandate
any complex supporting infrastructure of multiple-product frameworks, acquired
products, shared databases, proprietary server architectures, open-source
components and so on.

Development Environment

NetMaster products provide a comprehensive, self-contained user development
environment. This includes access to its function-rich NCL programming language,
and facilities to create, store and test messages, panels, and more.

You can develop your own applications, which integrate with your NetMaster for
TCP/IP region and share its 3270 user interface.

More information:
See these Unicenter
®
Mainframe Network Management and
Unicenter
®
SOLVE:Operations
®
manuals:
 Network Control Language Programmer Guide r11.5
 Network Control Language Reference Guide r11.5
 Managed Object Development Services Programmer & Administrator Guide
r11.5

You can also write programs in NetMaster REXX.

See Unicenter
®
Mainframe Network Management Working with REXX r11.5
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WebCenter web browser user interface

WebCenter is the NetMaster for TCP/IP web browser based user interface.

WebCenter complements the mainframe 3270 displays by presenting a familiar and
consistent interface for:
 Network operators without experience using 3270 applications
 People who prefer the ‘point and click’ convenience of a web UI
 Differently-abled users who find web interfaces easier to access




WebCenter is a real HTTP ‘thin client’.
It has minimal requirements – just a
PC with a current browser.

What functions are on the web?
Most NetMaster for TCP/IP major
diagnosis and monitoring functions are
available from WebCenter.

This includes the same cross-system,
enterprise-wide management ability.

(Less frequent administration tasks are
done from the 3270.)

z/OS Mainframe Hosted
WebCenter runs entirely on the z/OS
mainframe – right where NetMaster
monitoring and management functions
happen. It has no PC client or server
components.

Embedded App./Web Server
All WebCenter code is automatically
installed with NetMaster for TCP/IP.
WebCenter was custom-built for
NetMaster and has a very small
footprint.

WebCenter application and HTTP
server functions are embedded in the
NetMaster region.

No external, open source or 3
rd
party
web or application servers are used.

WebCenter set up is very quick.

Web Technology
Standard web technologies including:
HTML, XML, CSS, JavaScript, and Java
applets (not Java applications).

Dynamic mainframe-to-browser data
feeds are maintained, for real-time
monitoring.

WebCenter does full HTTP state and
session management.

Security
 Full RACF/ACF2 user log in security
 Digitally signed Java applets
 Optional HTTPS, built with IBM
z/OS System SSL
The NetMaster
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for TCP/IP Handbook

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ReportCenter web-based graphical reporting

ReportCenter is the NetMaster for
TCP/IP web-based graphical
reporting component.

ReportCenter is a z/OS UNIX System
Services (USS) Java application which
stores performance data collected by
NetMaster in a z/OS mainframe SQL
database, such as DB2 for z/OS. It
generates standard HTML graphical
reports, which you use WebCenter to
view and administer. No proprietary
report viewers are needed.

ReportCenter is an optional, no-cost
feature. ReportCenter is separately
implemented to the NetMaster region,
and uses technologies external to
NetMaster, such as Java, JDBC and
DB2.

More information:
Unicenter
®
Mainframe Network Management Working with ReportCenter



ReportCenter report administration, using WebCenter



ReportCenter report excerpts, viewed using WebCenter


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WebCenter SDK for custom web development

WebCenter SDK is a separately
installable feature that provides
examples and code fragments to
help you develop your own WebCenter
pages. These pages can call your NCL
procedures to provide data.
WebCenter pages are written in the
NetMaster ESP language, which is
similar to ASP. Some familiarity with
HTML, JavaScript and CSS is required.

More information:
Unicenter
®
Mainframe Network Management and Unicenter
®
SOLVE:Operations
®

WebCenter SDK Developer Guide

Integration Capabilities

Integrated SNA Management
CA NetMaster
®
Network Management for SNA (NetMaster for SNA)
provides network management functions for mainframe SNA resources.

CA NetMaster
®
Network Automation is an ‘Operations Automation’
product for SNA resources. Supplementing the individual resource level SNA
controls, it groups SNA resources by business function, and manages them
from a service perspective by specifying these SNA groups as components of
business services.

These products can be combined with (i.e. run in the same address space as)
NetMaster for TCP/IP, providing IP and SNA network management.

Integrated File Transfer Management
CA NetMaster
®
File Transfer Management is a product which looks over
and looks after your existing file transfer activity. It monitors and manages
file transfers and the application and communication infrastructure that
supports them.

It’s sometimes mistaken for a file transfer application product. It isn’t – (CA
SOLVE:FTS is the NetMaster file transfer application product).

CA NetMaster
®
File Transfer Management is there to ensure the reliability of
your file transfers. It doesn’t transfer any data itself, but looks after the
applications that do, including CA-XCOM, Connect:Direct and
Connect:Mailbox, FTP, and CA SOLVE:FTS.

It’s sometimes mistaken for a scheduling product. It isn’t – it complements
any file transfer scheduling product or method you may already be using. It
can ‘schedule’ specific monitoring operations to watch externally scheduled
file transfers.
It can be combined with (i.e. run in the same NetMaster region as) NetMaster
for TCP/IP and the SNA products, providing consolidated network and file
transfer management.
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Chapter 3.
Explore the Connection Lists

Connection Lists show you details of all currently active connections. They’re a key
problem determination tool; and a good place for new NetMaster for TCP/IP users to
start exploring.

If you’ve been managing your connections with just the netstat command, then
you’ll like Connection Lists! They provide a feature rich complement to the netstat
and onetstat commands – they include filtering criteria, plus a lot of tools that can be
applied to each connection.
Access Connection and Telnet Connection Lists


To access the Connection Lists and Telnet Connection Lists

3270 Use /IPCON (D.C)
WebCenter Menu options Diagnostics, Telnet Connections
and Diagnostics, IP Connections


3270 navigation instructions appear in the format /IPCON (D.C)

/IPCON is a shortcut. At any ===> prompt:
Type /IPCON to nest the command and return to the current option on exit.
Type =/IPCON to close the current option, and return to the primary menu on exit.

D.C is the equivalent path, starting at the Primary Menu panel.

For help about navigating NetMaster regions, see Chapter 2, “Getting Started”, in the User Guide.

/IPCON shows the available Connection and Telnet Connection Lists.

NETM01---------------------- TCP/IP : Connections -----------------------/IPCON
Select Option ===>

T - List Telnet Connections CONNT
TF - List Telnet Connections (Advanced) CONNTF
TR - List Telnet Connections (NetSpy RTM) CONNTR
TRF - List Telnet Connections (Advanced + RTM) CONNTRF
C - List Connections CONNC
CF - List Connections (Advanced) CONNCF
CH - List Connections (with History) CONNCH
X - Exit
Example of available Connection and Telnet Connection Lists


Use C or T – unless you need the extra features of the other lists.
SmartTrace packet tracing can be done from any list.
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The /IPCON Connection List Options

/IPCON option Main source of data Includes

C List Connections

IBM Network
Management API, or
netstat (older z/OS
versions)
Local/remote host and port,
task name, start time, idle time,
stack, byte counts.

(Includes the equivalent of output
correlated from all these onetstat
command options: -a –b –c –e)

CF List Connections
(Advanced)

Packet Analyzer Same as C, plus:
telnet userid, packet counts,
elapsed time, RTT, retransmit,
and fragment data

CH List Connections
(with History)
Packet Analyzer and
stored connection
details
Same as CF, but list can also
include recently closed connections,
as well as active connections

T List Telnet
Connections


IBM Network
Management API, or
netstat (older z/OS
versions)
Host/port/luname, application,
server, and byte counts

(Includes the equivalent of output
correlated from all these onetstat
command options: -a –b –c –e -t)

TF List Telnet
Connections
(Advanced)
Packet Analyzer Same as T, plus:
userid, RTT,
retransmit, and fragment data.

TR List Telnet
Connections (NetSpy
RTM)

(TR and TRF will appear only if
you have CA NetSpy)

IBM Network
Management API or
netstat, and
CA NetSpy™ Network
Performance (SNA)
Same as T, plus:
session type, average network
response time, and average
host response time.

TRF List Telnet
Connections
(Advanced + RTM)

Packet Analyzer and
CA NetSpy™ Network
Performance (SNA)
Same as TR, plus:
session type, average network
response time, average
host response time, and packet
counts.

You can also access Connection Lists by using a command next to a STACK, on the
IP Resource Monitor (/IPMON)
 IC List IP Connections
 ICA List IP Connections for Applications
 ICF List IP Connections (Advanced)

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Filter the connections

After selecting a Connection List option, you can specify multiple criteria to filter the
list. The exact criteria differ, depending on the list type. Fill in the required fields,
then use F6=Action.

NETM20--------------- TCP/IP : Connection List Criteria -----------------------
Command ===> Function=Search

Connection List Criteria
Foreign Host .........
Foreign Ports ........
Local Host ...........
Local Ports ..........
Task Name ............ LU Name ..............
User ID .............. Application Name .....
Bytes Out ...........+ >= 0 Bytes In ............+ >= 0
Packets Out .........+ Packets In ..........+
Elapsed Time ........+ Idle Time ...........+ >= 00.00.00
Average RTT .........+ Connection Status ...+ NE +
Local Retransmit ....+ Remote Retransmit ...+
Local Fragment? ...... Remote Fragment? .....
TCP/IP Stack ........+ TCPIPXX

Connection List Options
Max Connections ...... 500 (10-9999) Sort Order ...+ FOREIGNHOST
Store and Recall Criteria
Criteria Name .......+

Example of criteria for CF List Connections (Advanced)

Examples of connection list criteria

Remember, criteria can be combined:

 Connections where bytes input
exceeds 2GB

 Connections to business application
APPL123, with elapsed time of over
an hour

 Connections idle for over 30 minutes
 Connections in CONNFAIL status

 Connections experiencing packet
fragmentation

 Connections with average apparent
RTT of more than 7 * 10ms


If you frequently use the same long and compound list criteria, store and name them so you can
recall them, and save the bother of having to retype them each time.
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Manage a Connection List

Useful things to do with a Connection List are to sort and refresh it.

NETM03--------- TCP/IP : Telnet Connections (Packet Analyzer) ---Stack: TCPIPAA
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

Line 1 of 43

Refresh Every ... Seconds
S=View I=Information CS=Statistics P=Ping T=TraceRoute NL=Lookup Z=Drop
D=VTAM Display PT=Packet Trace TPA=Transaction Path Analyzer ?=Actions
Foreign Host Port LPort LU Name Appl User ID Bytes Out Bytes In
172.16.26.198 1064 3001 CDEF0038 STNM111 ABCRO02 1074120 70374
? 172.16.26.198 1065 3001 CDEF0039 STNM111 ABCRO02 1114870 48753
172.31.184.106 1113 3001 XAEBCCV1 STNM111 XYZCL02 25944 387
172.31.184.106 1114 3001 XAECCCV1 STNM111 XYZCL02 16701 325

Example of TF List Telnet Connections (Advanced)
Enter action codes next to any connection

Sort the list

 Use F11=Right to see the additional columns.

 Use command SORT columnName to sort the list, group like connections
together, and see the longest, busiest, slowest etc. connections.
e.g.
sort bytesout


SORT ? displays all sort columns.

Refresh the list

 Use F6=Refresh to refresh the list once.

 Enter a number in the Refresh Every _ Seconds field (minimum 30
seconds) to automatically refresh the list at regular intervals.

Refresh is most useful when looking at columns where the values may change
frequently, such as Bytes Out, Bytes In, RTT.
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Use Connection List actions

The real convenience of Connection Lists is in the actions that you can use on each
connection. Type ? next to any connection, to list its available actions.

Trace-related actions IP actions More data actions
SmartTrace packet traces
VTAM buffer traces
SNA traces
CISCO Telnet LU traces

Ping
Traceroute
Name lookup
Drop connection
Transaction Path Analysis
Connection details, traffic
throughput, & more
(not all actions are available for all connections – depending on connection type and region configuration)

Example of I action, Connection Information

NETMST----------------- TCP/IP : Connection Information ----------------------
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

Connection Details
Local IP address:port ..... 172.16.65.11:3001
Remote IP address:port .... 172.31.122.52:1159
Connection state .......... ESTABLISHED
Connection started ........ 25-MAR-2007 17:24:20
Idle time ................. 00:00:28
Bytes sent/received ....... 1110722 / 35535
LU name (SLU) ............. SYDFF04
Application (PLU) ......... NETM111
User ID ................... USER001
Connection type ........... SERVER
Turn count ................ 656
RTT min/max/avg (1/100ths) 0 / 65 / 29
TCP Segmentation Offload:
Outbound packets using offload .... 29%
Average segments generated ........ 2.4
Last segment min/max/avg .......... 3 / 1452 / 701

Packet Information Local Details Remote Details
Average application resp time (secs) 0.04 0.40
Min/Max application resp time (secs) 0.00 / 7.58 0.00 / 76.44
Fragmentation? ...................... NO NO
Retransmissions ..................... 112 1
Maximum segment size option sent? ... YES YES
Maximum segment size ................ 1452 1460
Window scale option sent? ........... NO NO
Window scale ........................ 0 0
Current window size ................. 32760 64512
Min/max window size ................. 31394 / 32768 63063 / 64512
SACK permitted option sent? ......... NO YES
SACK option sent? ................... NO NO
Timestamp option sent? .............. NO NO
Option syntax error? ................ NO NO
Window close count .................. 0 0
Window close time ................... 0 0
Window probe count .................. 0 0

Example of Connection Information for a Telnet Connection

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Example of CS action, Connection Statistics
(Byte & Packet throughput)

NETMST ----------------- TCP/IP : Connection Statistics -----------------------
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR


Connection Details
Local IP address:port ..... 172.16.65.11:2610
Remote IP address:port .... 172.31.122.101:1566
Connection state .......... ESTABLISHED
Connection started ........ 25-MAR-2007 18:03:16
Turn count ................ 775

Bytes Bytes Packets Packets
Statistics for last 5 minutes In Out In Out
19.59 215 415 5 10
19.58 258 498 6 12
19.57 258 498 6 12
19.56 312 538 7 13
19.55 263 577 6 12

Bytes Bytes Packets Packets
Statistics for last hour In Out In Out
20.00 1043 1949 24 47
19.55 2032 14532 44 74
19.50 1728 9987 39 71
19.45 1533 3557 34 64
19.40 1965 13469 42 71
19.35 1290 2490 30 60
19.30 2409 15146 51 78
19.25 1290 2490 30 60
19.20 1290 2490 30 60
19.15 1672 7417 38 67
19.10 2860 11399 64 90
19.05 2533 3780 61 90

Bytes Bytes Packets Packets
Connection duration In Out In Out
Total ..................... 45927 222K 1012 1675
Payload only .............. 5439 152K - -

Example of Connection Statistics,
showing current real-time throughput in one and five minute intervals.






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SmartTrace a connection

Activate the trace

Use the PT (Activate Packet Trace) command next to any active connection, on
any Connection List: T, TF, TR, TRF, C, CF or CH.


If you just want to run a trace and don’t care that much about the other connection list data, use
the simplest list, i.e. T or C.

Use F6=Action to start the trace.

(Trace a connection with current traffic activity, so there is something to see. To
find one, use F11=Right and look at the Bytes Out and Bytes In counts.)

NETMIP------------- TCP/IP : Telnet Connections (Netstat) --Stack/Card: TCPIPXX
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

Line 1 of 11 Refresh Every ... Seconds
S=View I=Information CS=Statistics P=Ping T=TraceRoute NL=Lookup Z=Drop
D=VTAM Display PT=Packet Trace TPA=Transaction Path Analyzer ?=Actions
Foreign Host Port Lport LU Name Appl Status Server
PT 172.16.122.143 3485 23 A11XX012 ABC11 ESTABLISHED TCPIPXX
172.16.212.130 1219 1123 A11HH546 STNMGEN ESTABLISHED *PT*
172.16.212.130 1253 1123 A11HH547 STNMGEN ESTABLISHED TCPIPXX
172.16.5.176 1396 23 A11XX007 ABC11 ESTABLISHED TCPIPXX

Example of using PT command on Telnet Connection List.
*PT* appears in the Server column, to show a connection is being traced.


View the trace output

Use the PTV (View Packet Trace) command next to the connection, to look at the
trace while it is running.

NETMIP-------------- SmartTrace : Connection Packet List ----------------------
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

S/V=View P=Print
Stack .... TCPIPXX Total Traced 67
Local Host 172.16.65.11 <--> Foreign Host 172.16.212.130
Local Port 1123 Foreign Port 1219
Protocol TCP

Dir +Time Bytes Summary Information
0001 -> - 43 Ack Psh Win=32760 Seq=430743691 Ack=3841600792
0002 <- 0.253 43 Ack Psh Win=65072 Seq=3841600792 Ack=430743694
0003 -> 0.246 40 Ack Psh Win=32765 Seq=430743694 Ack=3841600795

Example of a Connection Packet List, resulting from a PTV command.
This lists the individual packets in this trace.



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Select an individual packet, to see its contents.

 If you are not authorized to see packet data, you will only see the headers.
 If IPSEC is implemented, the packet data may be encrypted.


NETM01------------- SmartTrace : Formatted Packet Display ---------------------
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

********************************* Top of data *********************************
PKT Packet # ........ 0022 Direction .......... Send
Date ............ 28-SEP-2006 Time ............... 21:59:21.915263
Link Name ....... OSA

IP Source Addr ..... 172.16.65.11 Destination Addr ... 172.31.122.75
IP Version ...... 4 Header Length ...... 20
Type of Service B'00000000' Total Length ....... 0
Identification X'7A79' Flags .............. B'000'
Frag Offset ..... 0 Time To Live ....... 64
Protocol ........ TCP Header Checksum .... X'0000'

TCP Src Port ........ 20 Dest Port .... 2255
Rel Seq Num ..... 36001 Rel Ack Num .. 1
Seq Number ...... 486120694 Ack Number ... 1749316344
Data Offset ..... 32 Flags ........ ACK PSH
Window .......... 32768 Checksum ..... X'E44A'
Urgent Pointer 0

TCP Option Value
---------- -----
No Operation
No Operation
Time Stamp Value X'E792D68E'
Echo Reply X'0002842F'

+----------- TCP Data ------------+ +--- EBCDIC ---+ +---- ASCII ---+
+0000 20202020 20202053 50414345 20202020 & SPACE
+0010 20202020 20202020 20202020 20202020
. . .


Example of an individual formatted packet.


Deactivate the trace

After viewing the trace, use F3 to return to the Connection List and use the PTI
(Inactivate Packet Trace) command to stop the trace.

Show Connection List traces

Use F12=Traces to list all traces started with a PT command. This includes
traces that have been inactivated, but not yet deleted. Traces started by all users
are listed.

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Use the WebCenter Connection Lists

Access the WebCenter Connection Lists

Connection Lists are also available on WebCenter, from these places:

1. WebCenter Menu
options

2. IP Resource Monitor commands



3. IP Node Diagnostics tabs



Filter the connections

WebCenter supports the same criteria as the 3270 interface.


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for TCP/IP Handbook

- 31 -

Manage a Connection List

Once you have a WebCenter Connection List, you can resize and sort it.

Sort the list
Use the Column Heading indicators to
sort in ascending or descending order
of that column.

Use the Results Sort button and dialogue
to sort on multiple columns.




Resize the list
Use the Hide Criteria / Show Criteria
button to hide the criteria and leave
more room for the results

Use the Results Preferences button to
change the number of connections per
page.





Use Connection List Actions

Actions are available from the pull-down list.


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Where is Netstat?

You can easily use the onetstat command from NetMaster for TCP/IP.

What’s the difference between netstat and onetstat?
onetstat accesses the z/OS IP environment information from UNIX System Services.
netstat is a TSO invocation of onetstat.

onetstat information is ‘built in’ to many displays

Some NetMaster for TCP/IP displays correlate and present information from
the equivalent of multiple onetstat commands.

Connection Lists
(/IPCON)
combine active connection information (from onestat –c)
with byte counts for each connection (from onetstat –b), and
data from other onetstat commands

Device Links List
(DL command against
an /IPMON stack)
combines device link information (from onetstat –d) with
interface names (from onetstat –h)

VIPA displays

combines multiple onetstat VIPA related commands from
different systems


Use the onetstat command for more information about many areas

Use NetMaster Command Entry to enter the onetstat command.
All options are supported (
onetstat -?
will show you a list), including:

-f
(stack configuration)
-r
(stack routing table)
-u
(TCP/IP start time)
-o
(port reservations) -
h
(home addresses)
-d
(device links)
-S
(IP & protocol stats)
-v
(dyn.VIPA,VIPARoute)
-k
(intrusion detection)

To run Command Entry, just type
cmd
at any ===> prompt. E.g.

DENM44------------------
Command ===> cmd onetstat -?

The advantages of staying in NetMaster and using the onetstat command
from Command Entry (as opposed to onetstat from OCS or OMVS, or
netstat from TSO) include:
- The often lengthy output is retained, and can be scrolled
- A FIND command can be used, and commands can be retrieved
- onetstat commands can be issued to other linked LPARs

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Chapter 4.
Explore the IP Node Monitor


The IP Node Monitor regularly checks IP node availability, stores IP node
performance data, and creates alerts when IP nodes are unavailable or exceed
performance thresholds.

It provides a single central screen from which you can enter many diagnostic and
performance commands against IP nodes.
Access the IP Node Monitor


To access the IP Node Monitor

3270 Use /IPNODE (M.IN)
WebCenter Menu option Monitoring, IP Nodes


This shows the availability and recent PINGRTT values of all of your critical nodes.
Use F11=Right for more details. The display is updated dynamically, whenever a
node is sampled.

CANETM------------------------ IP Node Monitor -----------------------SYSX-0001
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

P=Ping TR=TraceRte TN=Telnet RT=Routing Table SI=System Info ?=List Cmds
Max .-Last Ping-. Next Ovr
IP Node Name Host Name Status Sev Avg Max Time Samp
WEBSPHERE-1 name1.xx.com Error - - - - 22:17
TESTLPAR name2.xx.com Timeout 1 - - 22:07 22:17
FTP-EXT1 name3.xx.com Ok - 275 291 22:07 22:17
NMDCIP2 name4.xx.com Ok - 2 3 22:07 22:17
MELB-OFFICE name5.xx.com Ok - 275 292 22:07 22:17
X25RT1 X25RT1 Timeout - - - 22:07 22:17
X25RT2 X25RT2 Timeout - - - 22:07 22:17
Example of the IP Node Monitor, first screen.
Use F11=Right to see Ping averages by period, RTT and timeout data.
The colors indicate the status of each IP node.

To set up the IP Node Monitor, see Chapter 12, “Best Practices for IP Node
Monitoring”.
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Use IP Node Monitor commands

You can enter commands against any node. Type ? next to any node, to see its
available commands.

 Try the P (Ping) and TR (Tracerte) commands

 Use the H (Display Performance History) command, followed the D, S or H
commands, to see recent performance history for any attribute of a node.



The S=Summary command against PINGRTT shows hourly averages and their baselines.
Use the Zoom actions to change the scale.


 If the color and/or Alert columns indicate there are current alerts open for this
node, use the AL command to see what they are

 You can run Packet Traces from the IP Node Monitor.
SmartTrace commands (PT, PTV, PTI and PTD) are supported from the IP Node
Monitor, against any node.
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- 35 -

SmartTrace an IP node

Activate the trace

Use the PT (Activate Packet Trace) command next to any IP node.

The character T in the Ovr column indicates an IP Node is being traced.

NETM20------------------------ IP Node Monitor -----------------------CA11-0001
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

P=Ping TR=TraceRte TN=Telnet RT=Routing Table SI=System Info ?=List Cmds
Max .-Last Ping-. Next Ovr
IP Node Name Host Name Status Sev Avg Max Time Samp
Node1 host1.xx.com Error - - - - 23:37 T
PT Node2 host2.xx.com Timeout 1 - - 23:27 23:37


An Optional Trace Criteria panel lets you can restrict the trace by local host/ports
and IP protocol.

NETM20---------- SmartTrace : Activate Packet Trace (NODE2)
Command ===>

Optional Trace Criteria

Local Host ..........
Local Ports .........

IP Protocol ........+ TCP
Create Multiple TCP Connection Trace? NO (Yes or No)

Note

A Multiple TCP Connection Trace creates multiple traces, one for each
new connection that starts after tracing is activated.



Use F6=Action to start the trace.

View the trace

Use the PTV (View Packet Trace) command next to the IP Node, to look at
the trace while it is running.

Deactivate the trace

After viewing the trace, use F3 to return to the IP Node Monitor and use the
PTI (Inactivate Packet Trace) command to stop the trace.
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Use the WebCenter IP Node Monitor

The IP Node Monitor is also available on WebCenter, option
Monitoring, IP Nodes.

All the major commands are supported, including SmartTrace functions.
Like its 3270 equivalent, this web page maintains an asynchronous data feed to the
NetMaster region, and updates dynamically.



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Chapter 5.
Explore the Alert Monitor
The Alert Monitor is a consolidated
dynamic display of alerts raised by
NetMaster monitoring functions. Alerts
are fault notifications. Alerts may come
from multiple LPARs, different
NetMaster products, and external
products.

From this display, you can close and
update alerts, and get details of the
affected resources.

The Alert Forwarding and Trouble
Ticket features let you send alert
details to email, message functions,
and external management products.


How the NetMaster Alert Monitor works
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- 38 -
Access the Alert Monitor


To access the Alert Monitor

3270 Use /ALERTS (M.A)
WebCenter Menu option Monitoring, Alerts


By default, this displays all open alerts, from all systems linked to this region.
The title line summarizes the number of alerts of each severity.

This display updates dynamically, whenever an alert changes.

CANETM (22.33.49)------ Alert Monitor (16: 1 4 5 6 ) -------------------------
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

S/B=Browse T=Track N=Notes A=Analyze TT=TroubleTicket C=Close ?=More
Time Description Resource Track
22.27.39 IPNODE: NETSTATUS is Timeout DEVLPAR
22.27.44 STACK: ipAddrErrors Low, 0 < limit of 1 TCPIPXX
22.27.41 STACK 172.16.*: ConActiveByNet High, 2 TCPIPXX
22.27.23 TCP Port 1414 No listener available, I 1414
20.57.41 EVENT LOGGER HAS TERMINATED REASON: NOR EVENTLOG
22.27.50 OSA 6003: DeviceStatus is Online OSA-01
09.30.30 GSVX321W (MVSDATA) Threshold JOB JOBCPU WEBSPH03
21.07.51 ICMP Unreachable: Communication Adminis 172.16.89.61 USER102
21.03.41 ICMP Redirect for Host from router:141. 172.16.65.1
20.57.22 IPCP15L10 Channel Card NMDCIP2: Socket
22.27.44 STACK: udpDgrmsReceived High, 23396 > l TCPIP11
22.27.43 STACK OSA: ifOutBytes High, 20324972 By TCPIP11
22.27.43 STACK HIPERLFF: ifOutBytes High, 695232 TCPIP11
22.27.37 ASMON A11APPL2: TotalCPU Low, 0 ms < li A11STNM2
21.42.44 STACK LOOPBACK: ifOutBytes High, 1504 B TCPIP11
20.57.35 101 data extents on DSNHLQ.CANETM.ALERT ALERTH
**END**
Example of the Alert Monitor, first screen.



Use F11=Right to see more columns.

Some alerts are ‘recurring alerts’. This means when an alert condition occurs, a
new alert is not raised each time – instead, the Occurs and Elapsed fields of an
existing alert are updated. To see these fields, use F11=Right.

Use the WebCenter Alert Monitor

The Alert Monitor is also on WebCenter, option Monitoring, Alerts.

Like its 3270 equivalent, this page maintains an asynchronous alert feed to the
NetMaster region, and updates dynamically.

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Use Alert Monitor commands

You can enter commands next to any alert. Type ? to see its available commands.

 Use S=Browse to see the alert details.
These may include recommended actions.

NETM01------------------ Alert Monitor : Alert Display -----Columns 00001 00079
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR
Alert Description
STACK OSA: ifOutBytes High, 34705128 Bytes > limit of 1000 Bytes

Alert History
Created at .................. TUE 02-JAN-2007 07.56.23
Last Updated at ............. TUE 02-JAN-2007 07.56.23
Number of occurrences ....... 59
Elapsed time ................ 14 hours 30 minutes
Last occurred at ............ TUE 02-JAN-2007 22.26.23

Alert Identification
Severity ............ 4 (Low)
System .............. DENM18
Application ......... TCP/IP Services
Alert Class ......... IFMONHIGH
Class Description ... Interface Workload Upper Limit Status
Resource ............ TCPIP11

Alert Text
Counter attribute ifOutBytes measures Outbound bytes.

Alert Explanation
High Value or High Rate condition detected for attribute ifOutBytes,
resource STACK - OSA.

The latest sample value or rate is 34705128 Bytes.
An alert is raised when a sample value or rate exceeds the specified
high value of 1000 Bytes.

For counter or total attributes, the sample value is converted to a
projected hourly rate before it is compared to the limit.

continues...

 Use C=Close to close an alert.
 Use T to indicate that you are tracking an alert.
Your user id appears in the tracking column.
 Use F4=History to look at the Alert History. Alert History shows you all alerts –
active and closed – which have been opened over the last N days. Commands:
- date –1 or date -2 etc show alerts from previous days.
date YYMMDD shows alerts from a specific day
- sort resource or sort s sort the alerts by resource name or severity

More information:
To set up the Alert Monitor, see Chapter 16, “Best Practices for Alert
Management”. This describes how to set up alert filters, how to send alert
details to other places, and how to set up Alert History.

An Alert Monitor on a newly set up region may be full of unwanted alerts you don’t understand.
Don’t worry – in Part 2, you’ll also delete unwanted resources and refine the alert conditions.

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Chapter 6.
Explore Connection Event History

NetMaster for TCP/IP stores and records details of individual connection events. You
can list search, sort, print and export TCP/IP connection events from up to the last 7
days.

What are the connection events?

Event Types Subcommands /
Actions

IP Connection CN Connection INIT Start connection
TERM End connection

FTP Connection FC FTP client
FS FTP server

LOGN Log on failure
RETR Retrieve
STOR Store
REN Rename
APPE Append
DELE Delete

Telnet Connection TC Telnet client
TS Telnet server

LOGN Log on
LOGF Log off
Connection event history data can be helpful for problem determination and
planning. It is also valuable for audit or security purposes.

How are Connection Event History Lists and Connection Lists
different?

NetMaster for TCP/IP
Connection Event History Lists
NetMaster for TCP/IP
Connection Lists

Historical information,
stored for up to 7 days

Real-time information, not stored
Data comes from stack SMF APIs Data comes from NetMaster Packet
Analyzer or stack API

More than one entry per connection (one
for each connection event)

One entry per connection
FTP and Telnet throughput data is only
available from SMF ‘end’ events, issued
after the connection terminates
All throughput data is available real-time,
figures updated while connection is active


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Access the connection event history


To access the connection event history

Use /IPHIST.B (H.I.B)
This shows the available Connection and Event History lists and searches.


/IPHIST.B List Options and the events they display

List All Connections

CN Connection
INIT Start connection
TERM End connection

List All FTP Events

FC FTP client
FS FTP server

LOGN Log on failure
RETR Retrieve
STOR Store
REN Rename
APPE Append
DELE Delete

List All TCP/IP Events

(combined list of All Connections,

All FTP Events, and All Telnet
Connections)
CN Connection
FC FTP client
FS FTP server
TC Telnet client
TS Telnet server

All events

List All Telnet Connections

TC Telnet client
TS Telnet server
LOGN Log on
LOGF Log off

List Failed File Transfers

FC FTP client
FS FTP server

LOGN Log on failure
RETR Retrieve
STOR Store
REN Rename
APPE Append
DELE Delete


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Filter the connection events

Connection events lists can be very long. To restrict a list, select one of the searches.

/IPHIST.B Search Options and their criteria

Search
Connections


From and To Date/Time, Application, Job and User name,
input/output bytes over or under, remote and local IP
address/port
Search File
Transfers

From and To Date/Time, bytes over or under, duration, remote
address, user, dataset

Examples: (e.g. ‘all FTP activity last month for FTP user
ANONYMOUS’),
Search Telnet
Connections

From and To Date/Time, bytes over or under, duration, LU,
user, remote address, local host, Telnet Server type (IBM,
CISCO, CA TCPAccess)
Perform Custom
Search

Set up a general Boolean expression including any field values
Sort the connection event history

Sort connection event history displays to group like events together, or to order
them on duration or throughput.

Sort a list that specifies dates, to see things like ‘the longest Telnet connections
this month’ or ‘the busiest FTP transfer yesterday’.

NETM48-------------------- TCP/IP : All FTP Events --------------------143/2769
Command ===> Scroll ===> CSR

S/B=Browse
Type Cmnd Time Date Userid Byte Count RemoteIPAddress
FS RETR 14:16:18 12-MAR-2007 DB1DB01 13 172.16.152.102
FS RETR 14:16:19 12-MAR-2007 DB1DB01 13 172.16.152.102
FC STOR 02:01:13 13-MAR-2007 IMSHYPER 25 172.31.10.91
FS RETR 19:10:08 12-MAR-2007 ABCKR01 51 172.16.122.132
FS RETR 12:06:27 15-MAR-2007 PTFSYS1 67 172.31.7.199
FS RETR 17:47:52 12-MAR-2007 MANRI02 82 172.31.181.245
FS RETR 11:25:33 12-MAR-2007 XYZMI01 84 172.31.125.66
FS RETR 11:25:33 12-MAR-2007 FTPSUP 84 172.31.125.66
FS STOR 15:32:08 15-MAR-2007 WXYER03 105 172.31.245.10
Example of FTP Events, sorted by bytes to show the smallest FTP transfers

 Use F11=Right to see the additional columns.
 Sort the list.
− Use command SORT ? to present the sort fields.
− From the resulting NDB Field List, type in a sort field number. This places
a sort command (e.g. SORT $IPBYTESOUT) in the command field.
− Press Enter to run the sort command. Fields are sorted in ascending order.

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Other connection event functions

Printing Connection Events

/IPHIST.P (Print Connection and Event Details and Summaries)
Use this to print summary or detail reports of connection events. This can be
a useful step in your audit processing.

This option uses the NetMaster Print Services Manager (PSM). PSM prints to
z/OS JES or VTAM printers. If you have no z/OS attached printers, PSM can
also easily print (via exits) to MVS datasets, or SMTP email.

For more information about PSM, see the Administrator Guide.

Export Connection Events

/IPHIST.EX (Extract All TCP/IP Events to Dataset)
Use this to export all events to a sequential CSV dataset.

Alert on FTP events

You can also raise alerts when specific FTP command failures occur.

See Chapter 13, “Best Practices for Event Monitoring”.

More information:
Connection Event History recording must be properly set up.
See “Connection Event History Recording” in Chapter 13.
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Chapter 7.
Explore the Performance Data
Real-time performance data

Stack Traffic Statistics

This display shows real-time byte and packet throughput data for a stack, which can
be broken down and grouped in very useful ways:

Application Local TCP Port


Stack Home Address


Stack Interface


Remote Network

Protocol Protocol by Stack Home
Address
Protocol by Stack
Interface

This data is available for:
 The last five minutes, in one-minute intervals
 The last hour, in five-minute intervals



To access the Stack Traffic Statistics display

3270 From /IPMON enter TRS next to a stack
WebCenter Menu options Diagnostics, IP Stacks then Traffic tab



NETM01------------ TCP/IP : Application Traffic Statistics -------------TCPIPAA