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5 Φεβ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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A Framework for
Understanding Poverty

Ruby Payne


presented


by

Margaret Hinton and Amy Kirchner

Poverty
is the extent to which an
individual does without resources
(financial, emotional, mental,
spiritual, physical, support
systems, relationships/role
models, and knowledge of hidden
rules).


A Framework for Understanding Poverty

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.



Situational Poverty

is defined as a lack of
resources due to a particular event such
as death, chronic illness, or divorce.

Resources:

Individuals in situational
poverty often bring more resources with
them to the situation than those in
generational poverty.





A Framework for Understanding Poverty

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.


Generational Poverty

is defined as
having been in poverty for at least two
generations; however, the
characteristics begin to surface much
sooner than two generations if the
family lives with others who are from
generational poverty.


Resources:

Many resources are not
available to those living in generational
poverty.


A Framework for Understanding Poverty

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.


Financial Resource


Having the money to
purchase goods and services


Is there enough money for a
roof over one’s head, food to
eat, and transportation?

Emotional Resources


Emotional resources are the most important
of all resources because they allow the
individual not to return to old habit patterns.


Can the individual be alone or does s/he always
need people around?


Is there evidence that the individual has
persistence?
This persistence is proof that
emotional resources are present.


Does the individual have coping strategies for
adverse situations that are not destructive to
self or others?


Mental Resources


Can the person read, write, and
compute?


Can the individual plan?


Can the individual problem solve?


Can the person do cause and effect
and then identify consequences?

Spiritual Resources


Does the person believe in divine
guidance and assistance?


Does the person have a
church/synagogue/mosque
affiliation?

Physical Resources


Can the person take care of him/her
self without help?


Does the physical body allow the
individual to work and to learn?

Support Systems Resources


Who is available to help this
individual with time, money,
know
-
how, and advice?


What connections are available
to this person?


How much time is available for
this person to devote to school
and learning?

Relationships/Role Models

Resources


Who in the household cares
about this person?


Who does this person care about
in this household?


Is there someone who cares
about this person who is not
destructive to self or others?

Knowledge of Hidden Rules
Resources


Schools operate from middle class
norms and values and hidden rules
may not be known by all students.


Staff members need to explicitly
teach students in a respectful manner
the importance of switching from
street/home culture to school culture
i.e. language use.


Why go to school?


If you get your education, you will be
more in control.


If you get your education, you will be
smarter than others.


If you get your education, you can use
your mind as a tool rather than a
weapon.


If you get your education, it will be
harder for someone to cheat you.

Characteristics of Generational Poverty


Multi
-
aged family members live together.


Momma is the most powerful position in
the family even though two of the children
are nearly 50 years old.


Mother decides guilt and punishment/not
some outside authority.


Mother leans on being moral and
Christian, and her strongest belief of
Christianity is one of unconditional love for
her family.



A Framework for Understanding Poverty

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.



Reality is in the present. There is little
consideration of the future.


i.e. Teacher example: “These kids have
no money for the fieldtrip but they come
dressed to the nines.”



There is an attitude of fatalism…this is
the way it is.




A Framework for Understanding Poverty

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.



Characteristics of Generational
Poverty
(con’t)

First Register of Language

Formal Register


All state, SAT’s, and ACT’s are in formal
register.


To get a well
-
paying job, it is expected to
use formal register.


Formal register uses an extensive
vocabulary.


One has knowledge of sentence structure
and grammar in formal register.




A Framework for Understanding Poverty Lecture

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.



When one tells a story, one has a beginning,
middle, and an end.



One understands spatial relationships:
right, left, East, West, beyond, present,
future.



One sees patterns.



One can organize thoughts sequentially.



First Register of Language


Formal Register


Second Register of Language

Casual Register


Students in generational poverty communicate verbally,
but much of the meaning of the communication comes
from non
-
verbal assistance. We, as educators, need to
value this casual register rather than put it down.



Writing an essay or paper without non
-
verbal
assistance is almost impossible.



Persons living in generational poverty find it difficult to
jump back and forth from casual to formal register.



A Framework for Understanding Poverty

Lecture
by
Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.

Conferences

People in generational poverty
know the teacher better than the
teacher knows the parent…just as
women often know men better
than men know women.

A Framework for Understanding Poverty

Lecture
by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.

People living in
generational poverty
speak and write around
an issue before getting
to the point.




A Framework for Understanding Poverty Lecture

by Ruby
K. Payne, Ph.D.

Conferences


Since relationship is vitally
important with persons living in
generational poverty, parents
will heed the wisdom of a teacher
if he or she trusts this teacher.
Relationship is never to be
underestimated
.

A Framework for Understanding Poverty Lecture

by Ruby K.
Payne, Ph.D.

People in generational poverty need
more time at conferences.


First, the parents do not have time
to tell their story because the
teachers want to get to the point,
having no time to beat around the
bush.


The parents feel rushed, and they do
not feel they are listened to.


A Framework for Understanding Poverty Lecture

by Ruby K.
Payne, Ph.D.


Because of lack of time, the parents
tell the teachers what the teachers
want to hear. For example, the
parents will tell the teacher that
they will talk to “Johnny” and
support the teacher. However, the
student comes back to school
without any change in behavior
because the parents went home and
did what they wanted to do.


Second, the teachers are
frustrated because they
think the parents should
realize they are on a tight
time limit.

What should we say at conferences?

“I am very sorry that we do not have
any more time than 5 (20 or 25)
minutes. It may seem disrespectful to
you that we have to hurry through this
important material. I don’t mean to be
disrespectful. If you need more time at
another date, I will be happy to
accommodate you.”












A Framework for Understanding Poverty Lecture

by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.