Schedule Information, Courses of Study Graduation Requirements 2013-2014

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HAMMOND HIGH

MAGNET

SCHOOL

Main Office

985
-
345
-
7235

Fax Number

985
-
345
-
5252



ADMINIS
TR
ATION


Mr. C
had

Troxclair
, Principal

M
s.
Rebecca Edwards
, Curriculum

Coordinator

Mrs. Angela Ferrant, Assistant Principal


Mr.
Gary Porter
, Assistant

Principal

Mrs. Michelle Simmons, Discipline


INTRODUCTION


The information in this brochure is important to both
you as a student and your parents. In order for
Hammond
High

Magnet School

to provide you with the
best possible education, you must take the
responsibility of choosing subjects that will help you
achieve your goals.


This guide will provide you with graduation
requirements, scheduling requirements, course
summ
aries and other important information.


Read this guide carefully and discuss your schedule with
your parents. It is important that you make selections
that meet state requirements and that are helpful in
meeting your individual needs. You are not allowe
d to
change teachers or the courses once schedules are
issued, so you should give serious consideration to your
selections.


COUNSELING


A counselor is assigned to students at Hammond High

Magnet School

to help them during their high school
career. A stud
ent may schedule a conference with a
counselor for any number of reasons
:

vocational and
career counseling, college and scholarship consulting,
testing, written recommendations and references, and
personal problems. Strict confidentiality is maintained
ex
cept when t
here is imminent personal danger or
threat to others
.


Counselors are always available for consultation and
guidance BUT THE FINAL RESPONSIBILTY FOR
MEETING GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS RESTS WITH
THE STUDENT AND PARENTS.


MINIMUM REQUIREMENT
S

FOR

H
IGH SCHOOL GRADUATIO
N


LA CORE 4

(INCOMING FRESHMEN 2
008
-
2009 AND BEYOND)


English

4

U
nits

Shall be English I, II, III, and English IV


Mathematics

4
U
nits

Shall be Algebra I (1

unit) or Algebra

I
-
Pt. 2, Geometry,
Algebra II

The remaining unit shall come
from the following:
Financial Math, Advanced Math I, Advanced Math II,
Pr
e
-
Calculus, Calculus, Probability and Statistics,
Discrete Math, or a locally
-
initiated elective approved by
BESE as a math substitute.


Science

4

U
nits

Shall be Biology and Chemistry

The remaining units shall come from the following:
Physical Science, Integrated Science, Physics I, Physics
of Technology I, Aerospace Science, Biology II,
Chemistry II, Earth Science, Environmental Science,
Physics II, Phys
ics of Technology II,
Agriculture

II,
Anatomy and Physiology, or a locally initiated elective
approved by BESE as a science substitute.

Social Studies

4

units

Shall be ½ unit of Civics or A
P American Government,
1/2 unit

of Free Enterprise, and American H
istory

One unit from the following: World History, World
Geography, Western Civilization, or AP European
History

One unit from the following: World History, World
Geography, Western Civilization, AP European History,
Law Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or

African American
Studies


Health Education

½

unit


Physical Education

1 ½

units

Shall be
P
hysical Education I and Physical Education II,
or Adapted Physical Education for eligible special
education students.

A maximum of four units of
Physical Education
may be used toward graduation. The
substitution of JROTC is permissible.


Foreign Language

2

units

Shall be 2 units in the same foreign language or 2
Speech course
s



Arts

1

unit

Shall be Fine Arts Survey or 1
unit of Art
,

Dance, Music
,

Theatre Arts, or A
pplied Arts.


Electives

3

units


TOTAL

24 units


Note: Students may
opt out of

the LA Core 4 listed
above after completing two years of high school
.


BASIC CORE CURRICULU
M

(INCOMING FRESHMEN 2
008
-
2009 AND BEYOND)


English

4 Units

English I, II, III, IV or

Senior Applications in English


Math

4 Units

Algebra I or

Applied Algebra I
, Geometry

Remaining unit from the following: Algebra II, Financial
Mathematics, Math Essentials, Advanced Math

I,
Advanced Math

II,

Calculus
.


Science

3 Units

Biology

1 unit from the following Physical Science cluster:
Physical Science,
Chemistry I, Physics I


1 unit from the following: Aerospace Science, Biology
II, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Agr
iscience II

Agriscience I is a prerequisite for Agriscience II
and is
an elective course


Social Studies

3 Units

Ameri
can History, 1/2 unit of Civics,

1/2 unit of Free
Enterprise; and one of the following: World History,
World Geography


Health

1/2 Unit

JROTC I and II may be used to meet the Health
Education requireme
nt provided the requirements in
Section 2347 of Bulletin 741 are met.


Physical Education

1 1/2 Units

Physical Education I and Physical Education II, or
Adapted Physical Education for eligible special education
students.

A maximum of 4 units of Physical Education
may be used toward graduation

NOTE: The substitution of JROTC is permissible


Education for Careers or Journey to Careers

1 Unit

Take effect for incoming freshmen in 2010
-
2011 and
beyond


Electives

7 Units

Total

24 Units




CAREER DIPLOMA


English

4 Units

English I, English II
, English III

The remaining unit shall come from the following:

English IV

or
Senior Applications in English


Math

4 Units

One of the following:

Algebra 1 (1 unit)
o
r

Applied Algebra (1 uni
t)

The remaining units come from the foll
owing:
Geometry
, Financial Math, Math Essentials, Algebra II,
Advanced Math


Science

3 Units

Biology

1 unit from the following Physical Science cluster:
Physical Science

or
Chemistry I

The remaining unit shall come
from the following:
Allied Health Science, Aerospace Science, Earth
Science, Agriscience II, EMT


Social Studies

3 Units

American History
,
Civics (1/2 Unit)
,
Free Enterprise
(1/2 Unit)

1 unit from the following: Psychology, World History,
World Geography


He
alth

1/2 Unit

JROTC I and II may be used to meet the Health
Education requirement provided the requirements in
Section 2347 of Bulletin 741 are met.


Physical Education

1 1/2 Units

JROTC may be substituted.


C
areer and Technical Education

7 Units

Educa
tion for Careers or Journey to Careers

6 credits required for a career Area of Concentration


Total

23 Units


THE STATE BOARD OF E
LEMENTARY
AND SECONDARY

EDUCATION
(SBESE) GRADUATION E
XIT EXAM
POLICY STATES:


In addition to completing a minimum of 23/24 Ca
rnegie
Units

of credit, the students
entering high school

shall
also be required to pass the Graduation Test.


The English language arts, writing, and mathematics
components of

the

Graduation

Test shall be
administered to students in the 10
th

grade.


The s
cience and social studies components shall be
administered to students in the 11
th

grade.


END OF COURSE TESTS


For incoming freshmen in 2010
-
2011 and beyond,
students must meet the assessment requirements
below to earn a diploma:


Students must pass three

End
-
of
-
Course Tests in the
following categories:




Algebra I or Geometry



English II or English III



Biology or American History


For students with disabilities who have passed two of
the three required End
-
of
-
Course Tests and have
exhausted all opportunitie
s available through the end of
the 12
th

grade to pass the remaining required End
-
of
-
Course Test, that End
-
of
-
Course Test may be waived by
the State Superintendent of Education if the
Department of Education determines the student’s
disability significantly

impacts his/her ability to pass the
End
-
of
-
Course Test.

Schedule Information, Courses of Study

Graduation Requirements

2013
-
2014

Remediation and retake opportunities will be provided
for students who do not pass the test.


Students transferring to Hammond High
Magnet
School
are required to comply with provision
s

of the LEAP
gr
aduation

and EOC
test requirements.


TOPS


Louisiana Tuition Opportunity Programs for Students is
a comprehensive program of state scholarships and
assistance programs. Specific courses, grade point
average, ACT scores and other eligibility requirements
ar
e necessary for this program.


TOPS CORE CURRICULUM


AND REGENTS SCHOLAR
DIPLOMA


F
OR STUDENTS GRADUATI
NG 2014 AND THEREAFT
ER


ENGLISH

English I, II, III, and IV

(no substitutions)


MATHEMATICS

Algebra I

or Algebra I Part I and II
, Algebra II, and one
of the following:

Geometry, Calculus or Comparable
Advance
d

Math.


SCI
E
NCE

Biology

I or II
, Chemistry and two

of the following:
Earth Science, Environmental Science, Physical Science,
Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics, Physics II, or

Physics
for Technology. (
Agriculture

I and
Agriculture

II, (2

units) may be substituted for the one unit required from
among these science courses.)


SOCIAL STUDIES

American History, Civics

and Free Enterprise (combined
for 1 unit)

or Civics (1 unit)

and
two

of the following:


World History, Western Civilization, o
r

World
Geography.


FINE ARTS

Fine Arts
S
urvey or substitute 1 unit

of performance
courses in Music, Dance, Drama, or Theater
;

or 1 unit

of Stud
io Art or Visual Art.


FOREIGN LANGUAGE

2 units in
a single language and separate level courses.



STUDENTS MUST HAVE A 3.5 OVERALL GRADE POINT
AVERAGE TO QUALIFY FOR THE REGENTS DIPLOMA.
STUDENTS MUST HAVE A 2.5 GRADE POINT AVERAGE
IN THE 17.5 CORE CURRICULUM TO QUALIFY FOR TOPS
AND STATE AVERAGE ACT SCOR
E.




TOPS TECH COURSES


Students in the Basic Diploma Track may be eligible for
TOPS TECH pending coursework taken. Please see a
counselor or website for more information.


*IT IS SUGGESTED THAT YOU CONTINUE TO
CHECK THE STATE’S WEBSITES FOR UPDATES TO
TOPS.


Students and parents should check the requirements of
any university which the student may plan to attend.
L.S.U., private schools and most out
-
of
-
state
in
s
t
it
utions have special requirements that may not
necessarily meet the Louisiana graduation
re
quirements.


ACT


Scores from the ACT test are used by most colleges and
universities
as part of entrance and scholarship
requirements
.

Some a
ccommodations may be available
to students wit
h special need
s

see ACT guidelines
.

The LA DOE is requiring
all
juniors to take t
he ACT
beginning Spring 2013.


INDIVIDUAL GRADUATIO
N

PLAN


Beginning in the 1998
-
1999 school year, by the end of
the eight
h grade
, each student shall develop, with

the
input of his/her family, an Individual Graduation

Plan
.
Such a plan sha
ll include

a sequence of courses which is
consistent with the student’s
stated goals for
their four
years in high school and
one year after graduation.
Each student’s Five Year Education
al Plan shall be
reviewed

annually by the student, parent, and school
advisor and revised as needed.


ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP
S


The NC
A
A has specific requirements for students to
receive athletic scholarships to
Division I and
Division II
universities. These requirements involve grade point
averages and ACT scores. Students who

feel they may
be interested in pursuing athletic scholarship
s

should
consult with the Athletic Director or
website
(www.ncaa.org)

for the information. They should do this
when they enter the ninth grade or early in the tenth
grade.



SCHEDULING: SELECTIO
N

AND
CHANGES


During the spring semester, students select their
courses for the coming year with the help of their
individual counselors.
Th
is schedule of classes is sent
home for parent approval and signature and returned to
the school. During the late sp
ring and early summer,
students are scheduled into classes.


Students are not allowed to change schedules after
students are dismissed for the summer break. Selection
of teachers is not permitted at any time. Classes may
be change
d

by the principal in orde
r to balance or to
change a student who has previously passed a course.


HHMS

GRADING SCALE


A
-
4 pts.

9
0
-
100%


B
-
3 pts.

8
0
-
8
9%


C
-
2 pts.

7
0
-
79
%


D
-
1 pt.

60
-
69
%


F
-
0 pts.


0
-
59
%



FOR INCOMING FRESHME
N 2008
-
2009 AND
THEREAFTER:


0

5.5 units

9
th

grade


6

10.5 units

10
th

grade


11

16.5 units

11
th

grade


17 + units

12
th

grade



HONORS COURSES
:



Courses listed as hon
ors will be graded on
the
grading

scale listed above.
Honors courses will

be identified on
transcri
pts/cumulative cards with
an asterisk in
front of
the course title.


CRITERIA FOR ADMISSI
ON INTO HONORS
COURSES (GRADES 9
-
12) REQUIREMENTS:

MUST
MEET 3 OF THE 5

BELOW

1.

Minimum overall grade point average

(GPA)
of 2.8
and

2.

Minimum subject area average of 3.0

3.

Mastery or Advanced
in required subject a
rea
on
LEAP, GEE or EOC Test
.

4.

Teacher recommendation

5.

Student/Parent Evaluation Form


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:


N
ote that content, requirements, fees are subject to
change as stipulated by the state and/or parish.


ENGLISH


ENGLISH I

Grade: 9

English I
emphasizes reading comprehension which
includes basic grammar, usage, sentence structure and
paragraph development. It also includes a study of
general literary works in the areas of the short story,
the novel, poetry, biography or nonfiction and drama.
An
other integral part of the course includes orientation
to the basic research in the library.


HONORS ENGLISH I

Grade: 9 Prerequisites: Honors requirements

This course goes into
greater depth than an average
class. The subject matter includes the study of
g
rammar, the short story, poetry, mythology, and a
library orientation unit. In addition, the course of study
covers drama, the novel, and sentence and paragraph
writing. Outside reading is required
.



ENGLISH II

Grade: 10 Prerequisite: Successful
c
ompletio
n of
English I

English II is a course designed to enhance the student’s
knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of
literature including the novel, short story, poetry,
nonfiction, and drama. The course is also designed to
review the foundations of Engli
sh grammar and usage
and to provide the student with opportunity for growth
in writing skills including sentence and paragraph
development. Outside reading is required.


HONORS ENGLISH II

Grade: 10 Prerequisit
es
: Successful completion of
English I and
h
ono
rs requirements

The student who plans to pursue a college education
should enroll in this course which goes into greater
depth than the average class. Beginning with a review
of usage, the student studies sentence variety and
errors in structure. He writes

different types of
paragraphs the first semester to enable him to work on
longer compositions and creative writing the second.
The study of literature includes the short story, drama,
nonfiction, the novel, and poetry. Vocabulary and
spelling are stressed

throughout the course with special
emphasis on proofreading and revision in the writing
sector. Outside readings are required.



ENGLISH III

Gra
de:
11 Prerequisite: Successful completion of
English II

English III is a balanced combination of grammar,
composition, and literature. The grammar is
a
review of
basic facts and an application of these facts in a series
of composition assignments. The
l
iterature content
includes the study of the short story, po
etry, essays,
non
-
fiction, drama, and the novel.

Outside reading is
required.


HONORS ENGLISH III

Grade: 11 Prerequisites: Succ
essful completion of
English II

and
h
onors requirements

English III for the college
-
bound student combines the
study of grammar, writing, and American
l
iterature.
This study goes into great
er depth than
the
average
classes.
The first semester includes the study of
grammar, paragraph writing, essay writing and
analysis, the short story, and vocabulary. The second
semester includes the study of grammar, vocabulary,
poetry, the novel, drama and the research paper. A
minimum of two outside reading
s

by American authors
are required each semester.


ENGLISH IV

Grade:

12

Student
s

will increase their ability to think critically and
analytically through intense
rea
ding and writing.
Student
s

will enhance

comprehensive skills through the
study of literature (old English through modern
literature) and perfect composition s
kills by improving
sentence structure and by writing essays. The course
emphasizes vocabulary skills and outside reading is
required.


HONORS ENGLISH IV

Grade: 12 Prerequisites:
H
onors requirements.

Honors English IV is a course designed for students who
plan to attend college. Through intense reading and
writing activities, students will develop expository and
creative writing skill
s
. The course will emphasize
vocabulary development, correct grammar usage and
mechanics, and sentence improvement in order t
o
improve a student’s composition tec
hniques and writing
abilities.
Through a thorough study of English literature,
from its beginnings to modern times, students will
perfect reading comprehension and analytical skills.
The course requires numerous writin
g and outside
reading activities each six weeks, as well a
s at least one
research paper.


SENIOR APPLICATIONS

Grade: 12

any student working towards the Basic or
Career Diploma

Students will extend basic and technical vocabulary,
write compositions and essa
ys, interpret writings, draw
conclusions and make inferences utilizing American,
British and world literature and teacher
-
selected topics.
Focus on life skills such as Personal Identity, Survival,
Life Lessons, Citizenship, Living in a Community,
Becoming

an Adult, and Finding Connections will also be
explored.





PUBLICATION
S

I

(YEARBOOK)

Grade
s
: 10
-
1
1

Prerequisite: 2.5 or higher
GPA

and B or
better in English
, teacher approval

Students must be available occasionally before or after
school to complete
assignments. Students must sell
ye
arbook ads to area businesses.

Students must fill out
a yearbook application and be approved by the sponsor.


PUBLICATION
S

II

(YEARBOOK)

Grades: 11
-
12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of
Publications I
, teacher
approval

Student must meet the same requirements as
Publications I. Student must attend the summer River
City

W
orkshop in Baton Rouge and the one day seminar
in the fall semester.


SPEECH I

Grades: 9
-
10

S
peech

I

is an introductory course to Public Speaking.
Students will be exposed to communication theory and
will be provided with the opportunity to develop skills
through practical application, with the emphasis on
development of practical, everyday skills. The

keys that
tie the course together are “ethics” and “responsibility;”
as students communicate with others, they must learn
to make responsible ethical choices. In addition to
Interpersonal Communication, students will have
practical experiences in the pre
sentation of the various
types of formal speeches and in peer evaluation.


MATHEMATICS


MATH ESSENTIALS

Grades: 9


This course is for entering 9
th

grade students who
have not scored at least Basic on the Math
component of the 8
th

grade LEAP test.

This
course is designed to assist students in building
basic math skills as well as preparing students for
Algebra I with pre
-
Algebra concepts.



ALGEBRA I

Grade: 9


This course is for entering 9
th

grade students who
have scored Basic or above on the 8
th

grade

LEAP
test.

This course follows the comprehensive curriculum and
covers the following topics: understanding numeric
values, variability and change, proportions and linear
equations, linear functions and their graphs, rates of
change and applications, linea
r equations, inequalities
and their solutions, systems of equations and
inequalities, measurements, exponents, exponential
functions and non
-
linear graphs, and data and chance.


HONORS ALGEBRA I

Grade: 9 Prerequisite: Honors requirements

This course is

designed especially for the student who
elects to take a college preparatory curriculum and who
has an excellent background in the fundamental
operations of rational numbers, integers, and the
concepts of the number system. The course extends
topics and
concepts taught in regular Algebra I.


GEOMETRY

Grade:

10 Prerequisite: Successful completion of
Algebra I

This course follows the comprehensive curriculum and
covers the following topics: geometr
ic

patterns and
reasoning, proofs, parallel and perpendicular
relationships, triangles and quadrilaterals, similarity and
trigonometry, area, surface area and volume, circles
and

spheres, and transformations.


HONORS GEOMETRY

Grade: 10 Prerequisites: Succ
essful completion of
Algebra I and honors requirement
s

This course is designed especially for students who elect
a college preparatory curriculum. This course covers all
the material in regular geometry with emphasis on
proofs and more challenging problem
s.


MATH ESSENTIALS

Grades: 11
-
12
for classes of 2014 and 2015
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and
Geometry

This course is designed for students who have
completed Algebra I and Geometry but need that extra
stepping
-
stone before moving on

to Algebra II. Topics
covered include: Ratio and Proportion, Probability,
Statistics, Linear, Absolute Value Functions and
Quadratic Functions, and other math topics.


ALGEBRA II

Grade: 10
-
11
Prerequisites: Successful completion of
Algebra I and Geome
try

This course follows the comprehensive curriculum and
covers the following topics: functions, polynomial
equations and inequalities,
rational equations and
inequalities,
radicals and the complex number system,
quadratic and higher order polynomial func
tions,
exponential and logarithmic functions, advanced
functions and conic sections.


HONORS ALGEBRA II

Grade
s
: 10
-
11 Prerequisites: Successful completion of
Algebra I and Geometry and honors requirements

Students should have exhibited superior mathemati
cal
ability and maturity in previous courses. This course
will extend the concepts taught in regular Algebra II at
a faster rate, allowing time for more topics and more
depth of coverage.


ADVANCED MATH

Grades: 11
-
12 Prerequisite: Successful completion
of
Algebra II

This course follows the comprehensive curriculum and
covers the following topics: functions, polynomial and
rational functions, exponential and logarithmic
functions, trigonometry of triangles, trigonometric
functions, and conic sections.



F
INANCIAL MATHEMATICS

Grades: 11
-
12

This course follows the comprehensive curriculum and
covers the following topics: gross income, net pay,
checking and saving accounts, cash purchases, earning
potential
and
credit, transportation, housing,
investments, i
nsurance and record keeping.


CALCULUS

Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of
Honors Advanced Math

This course is designed for those students who have
exhibited superior mathema
tical ability in Advanced
Math
. Topics explored are limits,
derivatives and their
applications, exponential functions, logarithmic
functions, anti
-
derivatives and their applications.


SCIENCE


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENC
E

Grade: 9

beginning 2013
-
2014 school year

Grade: 11
-
12 prior to entering Fall 2013

This
E
nvironmental

Science course for high school
students is being implemented in an effort to raise the
level of environmental literacy among Louisiana’s
citizens. The content of this course is presented within
the framework of well
-
founded physical and biological
princi
ples. This course is designed to use basic
scientific principles to familiarize the student with the
processes of the environment from a broad perspective;
to identify both natural and man
-
made activities that
contribute to changes in the environment; and

to
isolate the political, legal, economic, and social aspects
of the environment.



BIOLOGY

I

Grade: 10

This course is organized to present the study of living
things with emphasis on cellular biology, genetics,
human anatomy and physiology, microbiology
(Protists), and the phylogenetic approach to the plant
and animal kingdoms. Laboratory investigations include
using the microscope, chemicals, and living and
preserved specimen.


BIOLOGY II

Grades
: 11
-
12

Biology II is a progressive study beginning with t
he
simple cell and ending with the systems of the body
which make up the complex human being. This course
is designed not only to relay facts but also to instill in
the student an intangible feeling for the need to adhere
to the signals which the body giv
es. During this course,
the student has the opportunity to participate in several
dissections with finale being the dissection of the cat.


PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Grade: 11 for classes of 2015 and thereafter

Course goal is to develop scientific literacy in the
areas
of Earth Science and Physical Science. Areas of
emphasis will include the development of positive
attitudes, process skills, concepts, and social aspects of
science and technology.

CHEMISTRY

Grades: 10
-
12 Prerequisites: Currently enrolled in
Algebra

II or successful completion of Algebra II.

Topics include:
descriptive chemistry

and

the
mechanics of chemistry,
structure of matter and the
periodicity of the elements
, t
he mole concept.

This
approach facilitates the early introduction of laboratory
work.

The behavior of matter in terms of acidity,
oxidation
-
reduction, and electrical potential is
addressed. It concludes with descriptive material in
nuclear, organic, c
olloid, coordinate
and analytic

chemistry. Problem solving is stressed.


PHYSICS

Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of
Algebra I,

Geometry and Algebra II

This course follows the comprehensive curriculum and
covers the following topics: measurement and symbolic
r
epresentation, forces and linear motion, motion in two
dimensions and periodic motion, energy transformation
and conservation, interactions of energy and
matter/waves/electricity and magnetism.



SOCIAL STUDIES


WORLD GEOGRAPHY

Grade: 9

World Geography off
ers a study of the Earth’s natural
environment
-
such as its continents and oceans, rivers
and lakes, mountains and plains, soils and weather.
Also, world geography offers a study about the Earth’s
human environment
-
such as its population and
resources, nati
ons and cities, migration and
transportation, and ways of making a living. This course
will develop an understanding of the total environment
of the world, both physical and cultural geography, and
the impact of human environment interaction on our
planet.


CIVICS

Grade: 10

Civics is the study of the practical, everyday aspects of
our governmental structure and functions at all levels,
local, state, and national, including the impact on
government of current developments at home and
abroad.


Major emphasis
is on the role of the citizen in
our American democracy, to include duties and
responsibilities as well as rights. Coursework also
explores our place in an international community during
this era of globalization. Studies of our Free Enterprise
economic sy
stem are incorporated into the course.


UNITED STATES
(AMERICAN)
HISTORY

Grade: 11

United States History offers a study of the history of our
nation from the Industrial Revolution until the
present.


Through content reading, independent
research, and
collaborative projects, s
tudents explore
the American culture through a chronological survey of
major issues, movements, people, and events in United
States.


Coursework is rigorous and relevant in
preparation for End of Course testing. (EOC)



AP UNITED S
TATES
(AMERICAN)
HISTORY
(APUSH)

Grade: 11 Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA in Honors World
Geography and English I and II

This course is designed for the dedicated student who
can provide time for research, is self
-
motivated, and
has excellent writing skills. The
student will study the
history of the United States with emphasis on
interpretive readings and journal articles as well as the
usual textbook involvement.


Students will also be
prepared to take the College Board test in the spring
which consist of objecti
ve questions, document
-
based
questions and free response questions answered in
essay form.


There is a fee of


$76.00 for the test but it
will be collected only from students who wish to attempt
the test and try for college credit. Coursework includes
the
Pre
-
Columbian through the Post Modern Period


WORLD HISTORY

Grades: 11
-
12

This elective course is primarily a content area readings
course designed to prepare students for entry into
universities. There is also an emphasis on independent
research projects
and will stress research techniques,
writing skills, and collaboration.


Studies include the
pre
-
historical period through our current post
-

modern
period, with an
emphasis on technology and its impact
on changing culture through time. This course explore
s
a modern global perspective of our planet and gives
consideration to international relations and current
events which are examined in the context of a survey of
World History
.

WESTERN CIVILIZATION

Grades: 11
-
12

Western Civilization is an elective course

that introduces
the history of the “Western World” from pre
-
history to
the current post
-
modern era.


Topics include the
civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, the rise of
Christianity during the Middle Ages and its spread
during the Period of Explorati
on and

Colonization, the
emergence of the early nations in western Europe, as
well as the Renaissance and transitional periods to the
Modern Era.


Significant political, socioeconomic and
cultural developments will be

explored, with
consideration given to
developments in technology and
its impact on changing Western culture through time.
The West and its relations with the rest of the world
today will be examined in the

context of a survey of the
history of Western Civilization.


*DIPLOMA PROGRAMME COURSES


Prerequisite for *Diploma Programme
courses:


Successful completion of the prerequisite Pre
-
Diploma Programme Course

Students who transfer to Hammond High Magnet School
will interview with the IB Coordinator
Designate.

Acceptance will be based on curric
ular

cohesiveness in addition to application requirements.



*Pending verification:

Hammond High Magnet School is
a Candidate

School for the IB Diploma Programme.


CAREER


JOURNEY TO CAREERS

G
rade 9
-
12 Requirement for
any student in th
e Basic or

Career Di
ploma

Journey to Careers is a course used to explore and
understand the framework of the Louisiana Career
Education Model. Students will explore the 16 Career
Clusters, create an individualized graduation plan, and
learn how to research careers of their c
hoice.


AGRICULTURE


Vocational
Agriculture: In addition to offering th
e
courses described below, vocational

agriculture students
participate in parish federation day, state conventions,
national conventions, summer leadership activities and
may join judging teams in al
l

areas of agriculture and
cooperative agriculture education.


AGRI
CULTURE

I

Grade: 9

Agricul
ture

I provides students with basic knowledge of
agriculture and its history, and the science applications
in agriculture. This course includes units in animal
science, soil science, plant science, agriculture
mechanics, basic carpentry, food science techn
ology,
and agricultural leadership. Mathematics, science,
English, biology, and human relations skills will be
reinforced in the course. Work
-
based learning strategies
appropriate for this course are school
-
based
enterprises, field trips, and internships.
Supervised
Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs and the FFA
leadership activities are integral components of the
course and provide many opportunities for practical
application of instructional competencies. Students
will
be required to fulfill requireme
nts for earning the
Green
h
and Degree as stated in Section C of Article V
I

of
the FFA Constitution and Bylaws. To be
e
ligible to
receive this degree, students must: be enrolled in
Agricultural Education and have plans for an SAE; learn
and recite the FFA c
reed, motto, salute, and Mission
Statement; describe and explain the meaning

of the
FFA emblem and colors; demonstrate a knowledge of
the
history of the FFA organization; personally own or
have access to an official FFA Manual.


AGRI
CULTURE

II

Grade: 10

Pr
erequisite: Successful completion of
Agriculture

Agriculture

II provides students with basic knowledge of
agriculture and science applications in agriculture. This
course includes units in animal science, soil science,
plant science, agricultural mechanics
, and agricultural
leadership. Mathematics, science, English, biology, and
human relations skills will be reinforced in the course.
Work
-
based learning strategies appropriate for this
course are school
-
based enterprises, field trips, and
internships. Super
vised Agricultural Experience (SAE)
programs and the FFA leadership activities are integral
components of the course and provide many
opportunities for practical application of instructional
competencies.

AGRICULTURE

III

Grade:
11 Prerequisite
s
: Successful

c
ompletion of
Agriculture

I and II.

This course is an advanced study in
Agriculture

based
upon the local agricultural workforce and economic
needs of the community. The major areas of study
should include personal development skills, animal
systems, plan
t systems, environment issues, and
mechanical skills. Mathematics, science, English,
biology, and human relation skills will be reinforced in
this course. Work
-
based learning strategies appropriate
for this course are field trips, school
-
based enterprises,

and job shadowing. Supervised Agricultural Experience
(SAE) programs and the FFA leadership activities are
integral components of the course and provide many
opportunities for practical application of instructional
competencies.


SMALL ANIMAL CARE AN
D MAN
AGEMENT

I/II (
½

CREDIT EACH)

Grades:

10
-
12 Prerequisite: Biology I

This course is designed to provide students with an
introduction to the care and management of small
animals. This course will be aligned with a student’s
career path in

either

the Anima
l Scienc
e, Vet Technician
field or Pre
-
Veterinary major. Topics for study in the
semester course include an orientation to the
agriculture

industry in Louisiana and the FFA student
organization and introduction to small animal care, with
emphasis being on
the history and classification of
domesticated animals,
p
hysiology
,

and careers in the
veterinary industry. Topics for study in the full credit
course include an orientation to the
agriculture

in
dustry
in
Louisiana and the FFA student organization,
introdu
ction to care and management of specific small
animals with emphasis on anatomy, nutrition
requirements, classifications
,

breed characteristics,
handling/training, grooming, and reproduction.
Scientific, mathematical, economic, technical, and
moral/ethical

principles are reinforced, as are
communication and critical thinking skills. Work
-
based
learning strategies appropriate for this course include
internships, field trips and activities

in

the school lab
facility. Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE)
p
rograms and FFA leadership activities are integral
components of the course

and provide many
opportunities for practical application of instructional
competencies. Upon completion of the full credit course

under the direction of a
certified instructor, st
udents
may receive an industry
-
based
certification (IBC) with
the Continental Kennel Club Canine Care and Training
Program (CCTP) Level One.


VETERINARIAN TECH

Grade
: 12 Prerequisite: Agriculture I
I

This course introduces students to the general concepts
and principles related to veterinary science and
associated processes, industries, and occupations.
Emphasis is placed on career opportunities, handling
and restraint of animals, and animal nutrition, health
and management. Work
-
based learning strategies

appropriate for this course are field trips, job
shadowing, school
-
based enterprises, and cooperative
education. Supervised agricultural experience (SAE)
programs and the FFA leadership activities are integral
components of the course.


B
USINESS


INTRODUCTION TO BUSI
NESS COMPUTER
APPLICATIONS

Grades 9
-
12

This is the first of tw
o

courses designed to provide
students with basic computer application skills.
Students will be introduced to the touch method of
operating a keyboard to produce business doc
uments.
Emphasis is placed
on

basic computer concepts
,
hardware and software, word processing, presentation,
and spreadsheet applications. Students will be working
with

Microsoft Office 200
7
.



DESKTOP PUBLISHING

(
½

CREDIT)

Grades: 10
-
12 Prerequisite: S
uccessful completion of
Introduction to Business Computer Applications

This course is designed as an introductory course
covering the concepts, procedures, and applications of a
word processing program. Emphasis is placed on skill
development and efficien
t operation of the program in
creating, storing, retrieving, editing, printing, and
manipulating documents. Skills in keyboarding and
critical thinking are reinforced in this course as students
format, create, and proofread brochures, newsletter,
power po
int presentations, and manuscripts.


COMMUNICATIONS


COMMUNICATIONS

Grade: 9

This course is designed to assist students in identifying
and relating to the proper forms of communications in
different settings and in using different modes. Topics
will
include but are not limited to: code switching for
different settings, technology usage, formal and
informal communications, and characteristics of an
individual who are successful in a global society.


TECHNOLOGY


COMPUTER ARCHITECTUR
E

G
rades: 11
-
12

Thi
s course is to prepare students as entry
-
level service
technicians and develop skills required to pass the
industry standard A+ certification test. Topics include
but are not limited to: Operating Systems (upgrading,
maintenance, and configuration), and
System
Architecture (bus speed configuration, installing
components, and external ports).


COMPUTER SCIENCE I

G
rade
s:

10
-
12;
P
rerequisites: successful completion of
Algebra I

This course is addresses the structure and power of
programming languages.
Emphasis will be placed on
development of language syntax, control statements,
algorithms and logical solution structure, including the
use of visual organizers in the design process. The
JAVA language will be used to code problem solutions.
Components c
overed are: Input/output, control
structures, data types, mathe
matical formulas, arrays,
search, sorts and graphs.


COMPUTER SCIENCE I
I

G
rades: 11
-
12;
P
rerequisites: successful completion of
Computer Science I and/or concurrent enrollment in
Algebra II

T
his is a continuation of computer science I in which
students will develop coding proficiency in JAVA,
creating robust programs with increased emphasis on
design, style and clarity of expression and
documentation for ease of maintenance, program
expansion,

reliability, and validity. Topics include:
recursion, advanced data structures, and a variety of
search and sort technique.


VISUAL AND PERFORMIN
G ARTS


ART I

Grades: 9
-
12

This course is designed f
or students with no previous
art

instruction or students
interested in developing their
artistic skills. Emphasis during the first semester is on
drawing, developing perceptual skills, and
understanding art elements and principles. Also
included are units in painting, sculpture, printmaking,
and crafts. Various

artists and their wor
ks are
introduced

as they relate to each unit. Art supplies are
purchased in volume to provide the lowest possible
price.


ART II

Grades
:

10
-
12 Prerequisites:
C or better in Art I

This course continues studies begun in Art I by
introd
ucing advance
d

techniques and concepts in
drawing, sculpture, and printmaking. New materials and
techniques such as pen and ink, calligraphy, and hand
-
built ceramics are introduced
.


ART III

Grades: 11
-
12 Prerequisites:
C or better in
Art I
I

This class is for the experienced art student. The
student is given more responsibility for the
development and execution of assignments. Advanced

work is given in drawing, printmaking, and painting.
New media such as oil
s
, acrylics, metalworking, and
sil
k
-
screening are introduced.


ART IV

Grade: 12 Prerequisites:
C or better in

Art III

This class is designed as a self
-
study course for the
student interested in pursuing art beyond high school.
Projects are developed as a cooperative effort between
the
teacher and student. The student is encouraged to
experiment with new media and develop individual
interests and strengths.




FINE ARTS SURVEY

Grades: 11
-
12

This is a two
-
semester elective course which addresses
the needs of the “non
-
performance” arts stu
dent

in

this case the study of the four arts, their relationships
and how they touch ou
r

daily lives, without the pressure
of artistic performance or display. Hands
-
on experience
is vital; assisting the students in developing “aesthetic
sensitivity” to wor
ks of art and involves two process
es

perception

and reaction. Evaluation for this course will
not be based on quality of artistic performance.


CHOIR

Grades: 9
-
12

A beginning or training chorus for students who have
not had choral experience or who have so
me particular
vocal difficulties but still show potential. In this class
students learn how to sing parts and how to sing in
tune. The music is of a lighter and less demanding
nature.


PIANO I, II, III, IV

Grades: 9
-
12

The study of the performance techni
ques of the piano,
taught in a class setting in the same manner as band.
The emphasis will be placed on development of
fundamental keyboard knowledge and skills and
acquaintance with selected piano literature.


BEGINNING BAND

Grade: 9

This course is open
to students who do not play a
musical instrument. Students will be instructed in
music and instrument. Student must supply an
instrument.


ADVANCED BAND

Grades: 9
-
12 Prerequisite
s
: prior band experience and
approval of instructor by audition

This is a st
udy of the literature of the period of music
with rehearsal and performance on the highest level
achievable. This band performs at all football games
and other activities concerning the school that require
the presence of a band. Attendance and attitude
are
very important.


GUITAR I

Grades: 9
-
12

Students are responsible for supplying their own
acoustic guitar and

prescribed guitar study book.
Students will be introduced to the study of instrumental
music as they learn standard performance practices on
the

guitar. Areas of instruction will include music
theory,

how to

recognize and interpret the various
melodic and chord notation systems such as staff
notation, chord grids and symbols, and
tablature

techniques, fundamentals of

musicianship,
tone production,

proper posture, music literacy

and
basic care and repair of the guitar.

One or more
performance recitals will be given by students.



GUITAR II

GRADES: 10
-
12 Prerequisite: Su
ccessful completion of
Guitar I and

teacher approval
Students are responsible

for supplying their own acoustic guitar and

prescribed
guitar study book.


Guitar II is a

continued and more advanced

study of

the
elements of Guitar I.


One or more performance recitals
will be given by students.


Students must provide their
own guitar a
nd prescribed guitar studies book.


FOREIGN LANGUAGE


SPANISH I

Grade
s:

9
-
12


This course is an introduction to the Spanish language
and its culture. The elements of pronunciation are
stressed while communication skills are developed
concurrently in four

areas: listening comprehension,
speaking, writing and reading. Cultural activities are
presented throughout the duration of the course.


SPANISH II

Grades: 10
-
12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of
Spanish I

This course consists of intensive drills i
n listening
comprehension, speaking, writing, and reading in the
target language. The elements of pronunciation and
the essentials of grammar and syntax are taught.
Cultural activities are presented throughout the
duration of the course.





SPANISH III

Grade: 12 Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish II

This course emphasizes advanced communication skills
in four areas: listening comprehension, speaking,
writing and reading. Students apply skills presented

and mastered in levels I and I
I to real life s
ituations.
The elements of pronunciation, grammar, syntax,
vocabulary and cultural activities are presented
throughout the duration of the course.



HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUC
ATION
AND JROTC


HEALTH (
½

CREDIT)

Grade: 10

This course is designed to
enable students to learn a
variety of important life skills which will help them to
develop and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Topic areas
include drugs, alcohol, nutrition, personal hygiene,
disease awareness and precautions, and first aid.


PHYSICAL EDUC
ATION I

Grade: 9

Physical Education I will offer to the students a variety
of stat
e

approved team sports. The
following will be
offered to our students: Flag Fo
otball, Volleyball, Track
& Field, Softball, Golf, Tennis and Aerobics. Only the
basic fundam
entals will be stressed. Game play will be
included as part of the overall course. Students
must
dress in an approved uniform.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION I
I

(
½

OR 1

CREDIT)

Grade: 10

Physical Education II will be a continuation of P.E. I.
Review of fundamental

skill
s

will be stressed as well as
more advanced team work. The activities offered are
also state selected and will include the following:
Volleyball, Physical Fitness, Archery, Softball and
Health. Uniforms required.




JUNIOR RESERVE OFFIC
ER TRAINING C
ORPS

I
-
IV

OVERVIEW:

The Army Junior was established by the
National Defense Act of 1916. For almost ninety years
it has served the nation by providing unmatched
citizenship training and community
-
based practicum in
the American public school system and ha
s served the
Hammond community, specifically Hammond High
School since 1993. In return, the Tangipahoa
community has been the beneficiary of their character
and leadership training and their significant
contributions to society. Junior ROTC provides intrin
sic
value to our community and national values.


PURPOSE: JROTC will provide a quality citizenship,
character and leadership development program, while
building and maintaining partnerships within the
community and Hammond High School.


SCOPE: The JROTC Pr
ogram is a cooperative effort on
the part of the Army and the host institution to provide
secondary school students the opportunity for total
development. Control of the curriculum at host
institutions is the prerogative of school officials and
faculty. Sa
tisfactory completion of the program can lead
to advanced placement credit in the Senior ROTC
Program or to advanced rank in the armed forces. Total
development is achieved through a myriad of
experiences including uniform requirements, drill and
ceremony,

participation in the Presidential Fitness
Challenge, leadership roles, community involvement
(color guards and parades), and voluntary
extracurricular participation and competition at the
local, regional and national level.


MISSION: The mission of Army J
unior ROTC program is
“To Motivate You
ng People
to

Be Better Citizens

i
n the
most effective and efficient manner possible.


REQUIREMENTS: Students are issued a complete Army
Regulation Uniform with all accouterments. In
accordance with the curriculum, stu
dents are required
to wear and maintain their individual uniforms.
Complete uniforms must be turned in upon completion
of their coursework or students will be charged for
missing items. Minimal class fees may be charged to
offset the cost of a class t
-
shir
t for wear at drill
competition and during the Presidential Fitness
Challenge. Course requirements include mandatory
participation to several school and community events,
in uniform, as specified in the syllabus.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER
SCIE
N
CES


CHILD DEVELOPMENT

(½ Credit)

Students will study the physical, intellectual, social, and
emotional growth and development of children from
birth through early childhood. Topics will include
prenatal development; preparation for birth and the
birth proce
ss; impacts of heredity, environment, and
family on development of the child; and meeting
children’s needs for food, clothing, shelter, and care.
Emphasis is on helping students create an environment
for children that will promote optimum development.
Wor
k
-
based learning strategies appropriate for this
course are service learning, field trips, and internships.


ADVANCED CHILD DEVELOPMENT

(
½ Credit)

This course builds on the foundational skills introduced
in Child Development. Advanced Child Development
addresses more complex issues of child development
and early childhood education with emphasis on guiding
physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and
cultural development throughout childhood, including
school age children.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER
S
CIENCE I

Grades: 9
-
10

This is a comprehensive course that is an orientation
to
FHA and includes material on
: food and nutrition,
consumer education, clothing selection, care and repair;
housing and resource management, personal
development, family relation
s, and child development.
Laboratory experiences required.


ADULT RESPONSIBILTIE
S
(
½

CREDIT)

Grades: 11
-
12

This course prepares students for some of the
responsibilities of adulthood: career preparation, adults
in a consumer society, financial resource man
agement,
building and strengthening family relationships, and
parenting roles and responsibilities.


PARENTHOOD

(
½

CREDIT)

Grades: 11
-
12

Students are introduced to the rewards, responsibilities,
and challenges involved in the parenting role. The
importance

of the decision to become a parent is
reinforced in each unit. Topics include: human
reproduction, pregnancy, heredity, medical care,
childbirth, caring for a newborn, emotional adjustments,
nutrition, discipline, budgeting, childcare, balancing
work and
family responsibilities amongst other topics.
This course may include field trips, job shadowing, and
school
-
based enterprises.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUC
ATION I

Grade: 11

This course prepares students to work with children
birth to age eight. Emphasis is place
d on enhancing the
development of young children while providing early
education and car
e
. Stages of child development,
health, safety, guidance and
developmentally
appropriate activities are reinforced. Skill
development
projects and FCCLA leadership act
ivities provide the
opportunity to apply competencies and workplace
readiness skills

to meet requirements for CDA (C
hild
De
velopment Associate) credential and for work as an
elementary school teacher.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUC
ATION II


Grade: 12

This course
prepares students for employment in early
childhood education and child
-
related careers.
Emphasis is placed on enhancing the development of
young children while providing early education and
care. Topics include: planning and guiding
developmentally app
ropriate activities for young
children; developmentally appropriate practices of
guidance and discipline, application of basic health and
safety principles when working with children;
management and operation of licensed child care
facilities; state child
care regulations and licensing
requirements; and employability skills. Foundation skill
development is included for students to meet
requirements for CDA (Child De
velopment Associate)
credential and for work as an elementary school
teacher.


NUTRITION AND FOOD
(
½

CREDIT)

Grades: 10
-
12

This course covers the basic principles of nutrition, meal
planning, preparation and service of simple meals,
optimal use of the food dollar and job opportunities in
food
-
related occupations at the entry level. F
ood
laboratory experiences required.


ADVANCED NUTRITION A
ND FOOD
(
½

CREDIT)

Grades: 10
-
12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of
Nutrition and Food

This course addresses more complex concepts in
nutrition and food preparation with emphasis on social,
psyc
hological, and cultural influences on food choices
globally.
Laboratory experiences are required and are

not limited to field trips, job shadowing and service
learning.



PROSTART

I

Grades: 11
-
12 Prerequisites: 2.5
GPA
, instructor
approval, Nutrition and F
ood, and Advanced Nutrition
and Food

T
his course if the first of two courses focused on
preparing students for careers in the food
service/hospitality industry. Emphasis is on obtaining
skills for the industry
-
based certification and
preparation for intern
ships in the industry. The course
utilizes ProStart I text and curriculum by the National
Restaurant Association’s Educational Foundation.


PROSTART II (2
.0

CREDITS)

Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion
of
ProStart

I, 2.5
GPA
, and instructor appro
val

This course is the second of two courses that prepares
students for careers in the food service/hospitality
industry. It provides opportunities for application of
industrial competencies through projects and Family,
Career, and
C
ommunity Leaders of Am
erica’s (FCCLA)
leadership activities. Students may earn National
ProStart certification by completing a 400
-
hour paid
internship and meeting the national Restaurant
Association requirements.


ENGINEERING


INTRO TO ENGINEERING

Grades 9
-
10

Prerequisite
s
:
"C" or better in Math and
Science classes

and must be enrolled in Algebra I or
higher mathematics course.


This course is a prerequisite for the engineering
cluster and the robotics class/team.

The major
focus of the course is to expose students to the design
process, research and analysis, teamwork,
communication methods, engineering standards, and
engineering careers. This course gives students the
opportunity to develop skills and understandi
ng of
course concepts through activity
-
based, project
-
based,
and problem
-
based (APPB) learning.


ENGINEERING DESIGN I

(ROBOTICS)

G
rade
s
: 10
-
12


P
rerequisite
s:


T
eacher

approval, and
Robotics criteria;
overall 2.8 GPA or better
.

The main focus of this
course is to expose students to
the design process, research and analysis, teamwork,
communication methods, global and human impacts,
engineering standards and technical documentation.
Students enrolled in this class will design a robot and be
expected to

fulfill all requirements of the Robotics
Team. Extensive out
-
of
-
class work is required including
afterschool, weekends and holidays.



ENGINEERING DESIGN I
I (ROBOTICS)

G
rade
s

11
-
12


P
rerequisite
s
: successful completion of
Engineering

Design

I,

teacher ap
proval
, and Robotics
criteria
;
overall 2.8
GPA

or better
.

This course exposes students to major concepts
encountered in post
-
secondary engineering courses of
study. Students will employ engineering and scientific
concepts in the solution of engineering de
sign problems.
All expectations and requirements of the Robotics team
as the fall semester continue
s
.

Outside work is required
at a minimum of 30 hours.


ROBOTICS

Grade:
12 Prerequisites:
Overall 2.8

GPA
, s
uccessful
completion of
Engineering Design I and
II,
at least one
year as an act
ive member of the Robotics Team, and
teacher approval

This course is designed for engineering students who
plan to continue the study of engineering through
robotics and the FIRST Robotics competition.
The
course teaches the
skills necessary to build a robot
including mechanical skills, robot design, website
design, and other engineering skills.
Outside work is
required at a minimum of 30 hours.






MEDICAL


ALLIED HEALTH I

G
rade: 9

A
ll students
entering the Health Science
Cluster

This course is designed to determine the health care
career most suited to the student's goal by learning
specifics of each role and the factors that affect
professional performance. Education and
responsibilities of various health careers will be

explored along with basic concepts of: medical
terminology, safety and accident prevention,
professionalism, legal aspects, computers in health
care, and an introduction to anatomy and physiology.


ALLIED HEALTH

II

G
rade
s:

10
-
11

A
ll students in
Health S
cience Cluster;


P
rerequisi
te: Successful completion of Allied Health I
;
Overall 2.0 GPA

This course is designed to prepare students with
general entry
-
level skills and knowledge common to
many allied health care areas. Clinical skills provided in
this
course include: vital signs, height and weight,
lifting, positioning, and ambulating of patients as well
as employability skills. Certification in CPR and First Aid
may be available for students who successfully pas
s the
written and skills test.


FIRST R
ESPONDER


G
rade
:

11


P
rerequisites:
must submit a certification
application and pay fee to the Bureau of EMS

see
counselor; 16 years of age by Dec. 1, overall gpa 2.
5
,
good physical health, and additional requirements as
outlined by State Department and B
ureau
of EMS

completion of required BEMS coursework and
successfully pass the state approved exam
.

This course is designed to improve the quality of
emergency medical care rendered to victims of
accidents and illnesses. As the first person at the
emergenc
y scene, it is crucial for one to be proficient in
providing basic life support and taking any other actions
necessary to minimize the patient's discomfort and
prevent further complications. Topics include: airway
management, hemorrhage control, bandaging
, simple
spinal immobilization, simple splinting, and infection
control. Students must be CPR
-
BLS for Health Care
Provider with the American Heart Association prior
to
First

Responder certification. First Responder
certification is possible upon succe
ssful completion of
this course and passing the state approved exam.


EMERGENCY MEDICAL TE
CHNICIAN (EMT)


G
rade
:

12

P
rerequisites:
17 years to enter the program
and 18 years of age by Sept. 1 following graduation,
physical ability, First Responder, and ad
ditional
requirements as outlined by the State Department and
Bureau of EMS

see the Medical Specialist for
application

and requirements

fees are required and set
by the Bureau
. Industry Based Certification
requirements included completion of required BEM
S
coursework, successfully passing the state approved
National Registry computer
-
based didactic and practical
exam, and must be 18 years of age prior to taking the
exam.

This course is designed to provide the student with
advanced instruction to improve th
e quality of
emergency medical care rendered to victims of
accidents and illnesses. Topics include anatomy and
physiology, disease processes, assessment and patient
stabilization, and proper use of equipment such as
automatic external defibrillators, bloo
d glucose
monitors, MAST trousers, airway adjuncts, ext4raction,
ambulance protocols, and practical skills session.
Sixteen hours of vehicular experience will be required.
Students must be certified in CPR
-
BLS Health Care
Provider with the American Heart

Association prior to
EMT
-
Basic certification. This course is designed to
prepare students for the EMT
-
Basic National Registry
Exam.


MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

Grade: 11

Prerequisite: Overall 2.0 GPA

This course provides students with the ability to identify

me
dical terms by analyzing their components.

Emphasis is placed on defining medical prefixes, root

words, suffixes and abbreviations. The primary focus is

on skill development, both oral and written, of language

utilized for communication in health care prof
essionals.








CERTIFIED NURSING AS
SISTANT (CNA)

(2
.0 CREDITS)

G
rade
:

12

P
rerequisites:
M
edical
T
erminology
, overall
2.0 GPA, 17 years of age by January 31
st
, good physical
and mental health, and updated immunizations.

Students will be required to
have a TB test and a
background check.

To obtain Industry Based
Certification the student must successfully complete the
DHH required coursework, complete 100 clinical hours
and pass the DHH exam.

This course is designed to prepare students as Certified
Nu
rsing Assistants for jobs in the hospital, nursing
home and other healthcare facilities.
Students will
learn the language of the health science profession.
They will be exposed to the concepts, materials and
skills necessary to earn national CNA certific
ation based
on course work and clinical hours.
Clinicals are in the
spring
semester. Fees and supplies generally cost
$100

subject to change.


PHARMACY TECHNICIAN


G
rade
:

12
Requirements
:
Must turn 18 by July 1 of
graduating year, overall 2.5
GPA
, minimum of 3.0 in
science and math, ACT score of 20 or better or overall
3.2
GPA
, medical terminology

This course is designed to prepare senior students to
take the National Pharmacy Technician Certification
Board examination. The course introduces stud
ents to
the different areas of pharmacy technician practice:
pharmacology, drug dosage calculations, pharmacy law,
stock inventory, infection control, compounding,
maintaining records, anatomy and physiology, and
pharmacy terminology.


SPORTS MEDICINE I (
½

CREDIT)

G
rades
:

10
-
12


P
rerequisite:
succe
ssful completion of
Allied Health I

and overall 2.0 GPA
; concurrently
enrolled in Biology I and Medical Terminology or Allied
Health II

This course is designed to provide an overview of the
field of sports medici
ne as well as expose students to
the fundamental skills involved in a sports medicine
healthcare setting. Students will learn about the study
of medicine and how the field of sports medicine is
unique in its focus and delivery of healthcare.


SPORTS MEDIC
INE II (
½

CREDIT)

G
rades 10
-
12;
P
rerequisite:
Allied Health I;
successful
completion of Sports Medicine I

and overall 2.0 GPA
;
concurrently enrolled in Biology I and Medical
Terminology or Allied Health II.

This course is designed to provide students with

an
overview of the pathology of sports injuries and the
basic management skills. Students will learn about the
body’s response to an injury and how to apply basic
emergency action principles and skills. An emphasis is
placed on an athlete’s psychologica
l and sociological
response to an injury and basic coping strategies
utilized by healthcare professions to assist them to
recovery.


SPORTS
MEDICINE

III

G
rades 11
-
12;
P
rerequisite:
Allied Health II or Medical
Terminology;
successful completion of Sports M
edicine
I
and
II
, Biology I,
and overall 2.0 GPA

This course is designed to provide a knowledge base on
the management techniques of athletic injuries and
illnesses used by professional healthcare providers. It
also allows students the opportunity to sele
ct their own
sports medicine topics for further study.


SPORTS MEDICINE IV

Grade 12

Prerequisite:


Allied Health I and successful completion
of Sports Medicine I and II, Sports Medicine III, Biology
I, and Medical Terminology and overall 2.0 GPA.
Students must have CPR certification prior to enrolling
in this course.


This course is desi
gned to provide a knowledge base on
the management techniques of athletic injuries and
illnesses used by professional healthcare providers.


It
also allows students the opportunity to select their own
sports medicine topics for further study.

This course
i
ncludes a classroom component, athletic trainer lab
sessions and clinical experiences outside of the
classroom. A primary focus will be placed on the upper
extremity of the body.






TEST PREP


ACT PREP

(½ CREDIT)

Grades: 10
-
12
Prerequisites: 10
th

grade
rs

spring
semester and must be enrolled in Algebra II or higher
mathematics course

This course is designed to prepare students for the ACT
test. Emphasis is placed in the following areas:
English, Math, Reading, and Science Reasoning.
Released practice i
tems and practice tests are utilized
throughout the course. Students are required to take
the ACT test as part of the class.


OFFICE AIDE

(
0
CREDIT)

Grade 12 Prerequisites:
12th grade level and
completed teacher, counselor, and student and parent
consent form meeting those criteria listed.

Office aides are assigned to a specific office with one or
more assigned tasks: answering phones, filing, copying,
or any other as requested. STUDENTS DO NOT
RECEIVE ANY CREDIT FOR THIS CLASS. Students are
to r
eport directly to this office as with any other class
and attendance will be taken.


SCHOOL LEVEL PROCEDU
RE FOR
ADDESSING INDIVIDUAL

STUDENT
NEEDS PREFACE


Federal and state laws require all school systems to
have a procedure for identifying, evaluating, a
nd
accommodating individual student needs. The
Tangipahoa Parish School System (TPSS) procedure for
addressing individual student needs utilizes a School
Building Level Committee (SBLC), a Section 504
Committee of Knowledgeable Persons (504 Committee),
an
d Special Education Pupil Appraisal services when
indicated.


The School Building Level Committee and the Section
504 Committee should be comprised of the following
persons:

1.

S
BLC and 504 Chairperson(s)

2.

Person(s) knowledgeable of dyslexia. ADD/ADHD
and
other learning difficulties.

3.

Principal or designee

4.

Teacher and other referring person, if applicable

5.

Any other person deemed appropriate, including
parent


Committee membership may be modified when
considering specific cases. However, all placement
decisi
ons are to be made by a minimum of three
persons who must be knowledgeable about the student,
the suspected disability, and placement options.


The established procedure is a general framework for all
r
eferrals. Once referrals are made, decisions regardin
g
each

s
tudent are made on an individual basis by
appropriate personnel at the school level.


If the student does

not qualify as disabled under
Section 504, the e
valuation coordinator schedules a
confer
ence with the parent/g
uardian and completes Part
1 of
the “Oral
I
nterpretation of Section 504 Evaluation.”

If the committee determines that the student is
disabled under
S
ection 504, the “Section 504
Accommodation Plan” shall be completed by the
S
ection
5
04 C
ommittee. In cases of suspected dyslexia,
“Criteria

for
D
etermination of Program Eligibility (Multi
-
sensory Reading Program)” shall be completed and
attached to the evaluatio
n report and followed by Parts
I

and
II

of the “Oral Interpretation of Section 504
Evaluation.”


SPECIAL EDUCATION


Special courses a
re provided for students who have met
the criteria as established by the parish special
education department.



STUDY SKILLS

This course of study is designed for students at the high
school level who are eligible for Resource Room services
and a regular hi
gh school diploma. The goal of this
course is to enable special education students to better
function in the regular classroom setting by developing
necessary study skills.


Students are provided a practical and direct approach to
the use of study skills a
nd the development of the basic
skills needed to establish a productive approach to
studying. Areas covered include organization, review
techniques, note taking, self tutoring and remediation.
Study
Skills I, II, III and IV

as

determined by each
student’s
IEP (
I
ndividual Education Program).


LAA 1 STUDENTS

This
curriculum

addresses the needs of the students
with significant cognitive disabilities. It is designed for
students whose instructional IEP objectives focus on
functional academics. These students also address daily
living skills in the classroom and community that

support their progress.


LAA 2 STUDENTS

Grades 9 and 10

This curriculum is a competency based approach to
teaching survival skills to students with varying abilities
and learning modalities. Emphasis is placed upon the
relevant real
-
life skills students n
eed to function as
active members of society. The program consist
s

of

modules that cover life skills areas as follows: consumer
economics, health, community resources, livin
g
independently,
making choices, pursuing meaningful
careers, and addressing the r
egular education electives.

SCHOOL
-
TO
-
WORK

Grades 11 and 12

School
-
to
-
work is a program for students who have a
current IEP and are being
served

in a special education
program. This course is designed to help students with
special needs prepare themselves

in the world of work.
The course content will cover many areas essential for
success in the world of work; types of jobs available,
making career choices, future planning, work
information, family issues, getting along with others,
compromise, worker righ
ts, self concept, personal
habits, safety, money management, baking, housing,
using leisure time, agencies to use for assistance,
dealing with handicaps, identifying individual abilities,
interests and values, how to set goals, and how to work
toward the g
oals we set. The students work in the
community to gain real
-
life and hands
-
on experiences.



VIRTUAL SCHOOL


Hammond High Magnet School and the LA

Department
of Education offer
several virtual means by which
students can earn high school credit. LVS also

offers AP
classes that are not available on campus.
. Students
must be motivated, self
-
disciplined, and have approval.

Students should see their counselor for information
.


POLICY STATEMENT


The
F
amily
E
ducational
R
ights and
P
rivacy
A
ct of 1971
(
P.L
. 93
-
380) protects the privacy of educational and
personal records pertaining to students. It establishes
the right of parents and students to inspect and review
these records, and it provides guidelines for challenging
and correcting inaccurate, inappropriat
e or misleading
data.


Hammond
High S
chool c
omplies with provisions of P.L.

93
-
380. Questions concerning school records may be
referred to the principal or a guidance counselor. W
hile

a
permanent transcript of grades is maintained, many
records such as gui
dance folders, discipline records and
others are destroyed at regular intervals as established
by school board policy.


EDUCATION

FOR ALL STUDENTS


It shall be the policy of the Tangipahoa
P
arish
S
chool
S
ystem and Hammond
H
igh
S
chool to provide equal
opportunities without regard to race, color, national
origin, sex, age, disabling condition, or veteran status in
its educ
ational programs and activities.


T
his includes,
but is not limited to, admissions, educational services,
financial aid and employment
.





HAMMOND HIGH MAGNET
SCHOOL

CLASS FEE SCHEDULE*


HOMEROOM FEES

................................
..

$10.00

Course catalog, mailings, postage,


student copies, lock rental, etc.,


ACT

................................
.......................

$25.00

Class supplies


AGRISCIENCE DEPARTMENT

..................

$15.00

Class
supplies


ART DEPARTMENT

................................
.

$30.00

Art I, II, III, IV supplies


BUSINESS DEPARTMENT

..........................

$5.00

Class supplies


COMPUTER SCIENC
E

..............................

$25.00

Class supplies


ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

............................

$
5.00

Class supplies


FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE

..............

$20.00

Class supplies & labs


FINE ARTS SURVEY

................................

$15.00

Class supplies

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEP
ARTMENT

..........
$5.00

Class supplies


ENGINEERING
/ROBOTICS……………………..
5.00

Class supplies & labs


MATH DEPARTMENT

................................
.
$5.00

Class supplies and consumables


MUSIC DEPARTMENT


Band

................................
.....................

$35.00


Piano

................................
....................

$10.00


PARKING

................................
...............

$30.00

2011
-
2012 Permit


PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

.....

$20.00

P.E. uniform & class fee


ROTC

...................

No fee unless uniform is lost.


SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

...........................

$15.00

Class supplies & labs


SLU MATH

................................
..............

$20.00

Class supplies



SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

..............

$10
.00

Class supplies


*All fees must be paid
with:


Check or money order only

all
checks must have
name, address, and phone number.

NSF checks or checks drawn on closed accounts will be
sent to a collection agency.


2013
-
2014 List of Career Clusters

This list of available Career Clusters is designed to serve as a guide for students entering in the 2013
-
2014 academic school
year. As required by state law, all students must create an Individual Graduation Plan (IGP), which serves as their roadmap
toward
s graduation. Regular meetings with school counselors and carefully following this plan will ensure that students meet
all requirements necessary for graduation. A student will only be permitted to make changes to his/her Career Cluster at the

end of an a
cademic year. However, it is important to note that making changes at any point can result in a possible delay in
graduation.

In order to successfully complete a selected career cluster and pathway, a student must complete a minimum of 4 units in
Primary
Electives and a minimum of 2 units in Related Electives, of which one unit must be a computer course. The only
substitution that will be allowed will be if a student completes 5 units in Primary Electives and one unit of a related cours
e.
Several industry
-
based certifications are available to students choosing a career cluster; please consult a counselor for more
information on these opportunities.

Students wishing to meet TOPS course requirements must adhere to specific requirements listed.

Please see the course description guide and to more information about the courses offered and their
prerequisites.

Please note that course options and availability are subject to change. Students consult with counselors on a
yearly basis to ensure they ca
n successfully meet their chosen career cluster.

A more detailed four
-
year scheduling cluster outline can be found on the

Hammond High Magnet website under scheduling.



Career Cluster: Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Area of Concentration: Agri
culture Production, Management, & Entrepreneurship


This career cluster prepares students for postsecondary education programs in Agricultural Sciences, Farm and Ranch Managemen
t, Agricultural
Production, Food Science and Technology, Forestry, and other related sciences. Students choosing this career cluste
r will be prepared for careers in
various agricultural occupations such as Agricultural Product Inspections, Fish and Game Officer, Fisheries Manager or Techni
cian, Forest Worker or
Logger, Park Manager or Technician, or Water Monitoring Technician.


Prim
ary Electives
:

Agriculture I, II, III (at least 1 course required)

Related Electives
:


Advanced Nutrition & Food

IBCA (required)


Journey to Careers


Foreign Languages


Nutrition & Food


Environmental Science



Biology II


Physics


Nutrition & Food



Busi
ness English


World Geography


Small Animal Care


Chemistry


Financial Math




World History


Fine Arts Survey



Career Cluster: Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources

Area of Concentration: Animal Science


This career cluster prepares students for postsecondary education programs in Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Animal Heal
th, and Breeding
Genetics. Students choosing this career cluster will be prepared for careers in various agricultural occupations s
uch as Vet Tech, Veterinarian, Animal
Scientist, Feed Sales Representative, and Animal Nutritionist.


Primary Electives
:

Veterinarian Asst. I, II * (At least 1 required)

Related Electives
:

Speech I


Agriculture I, II, III


Biology II



Journey to
Careers


IBCA (required)


Small Animal Care I & II


Financial Math



Nutrition & Food



Career Cluster: Arts, A/V Technology, and Communication

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Liberal Arts


This career cluster best serves students who wish to b
e involved in the school band or choir throughout high school, or those wishing to pursue
college majors in Music, English or Fine Arts.


Primary Electives
:

Art I, II*

Related Electives
:


Financial Math


Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced Band*



IBCA
(required)


Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced Choir*



Foreign Languages


Journey to Careers



Publications


Fine Arts Survey


Studio Piano


Speech I


(*At least one course required in any of these areas.)


Career Cluster: Arts, A/V Technology, and
Communication

Area of Concentration: Journalism


This career cluster prepares students for postsecondary options in Journalism. Related occupations are Broadcast Technician,
Editor, Publisher,
Journalist, and Reporter.


Primary Electives
:

Publications I, II*

Related Electives
:


Financial Math


Journey to Careers



Art I


Speech I



IBCA (required)


(*At least one course required in any of these areas.)

Foreign Languages




Social Studies elective




Career Cluster: Government and Public
Administration

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in JROTC


This career cluster is suitable for students who wish to pursue careers in the military field or major in Criminal Justice at

the college level. Students
who enroll in JROTC throughout high s
chool are eligible to apply for college scholarships upon graduation.


Primary Electives
:

JROTC I, II, III, IV (at least 1 course required)


Related Electives
:


Advanced Math


World Geography


Journey to Careers



Physics


IBCA (required)


World Geography



Biology II


First Responder




Financial Math


Speech I




Social Studies elective


World History




Career Cluster : Health Science

Area of Concentration
:
Career Pathway in Emergency Health Care


Students in this career pathway are prepared for such careers as an EMT, Athletic Trainer, First Responder, or Paramedic. Stu
dents will also be
prepared for college majors in Allied Health, Biology, Nursing, Sports Medicine, and Pre
-
Med.


Primary Elective
s
:

EMT


Basic*


Related Electives:

Advanced Math

Calculus


First Responder*



Early Childhood Ed


Advanced Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Allied Health Services I


Algebra II

Financial Math




Journey to Careers



Biology II


Physics


Medical Terminology



P.E. III


Speech I


Nurse Assistant


(*At least one course required in any of these areas.)




Career Cluster: Health Science

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Health Professionals


Students in this career pathway are prepared for such health careers as a Surgical Technologist, Medical Assistant, Lab Techn
ician, Pharmacy
Technician, Healthcare Administrator, or Health Information Coder. Students will also be prepared for college major
s in Allied Health, Biology, and
Pre
-
Med.


Primary Electives
:

Allied Health Services I, II*


Related Electives
:

Advanced Math

Financial Math


Medical Terminology*



IBCA (required)


Advanced Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Biology II


Algebra II

Nutrition &

Food (.5 cr)


Journey to Careers



Calculus

Physics


EMT


Basic


Chemistry

Speech I


Nurse Assistant



Early Childhood Ed

Child Development


Pharmacy Technician


Sports Med I, II


(*At least one course required in any of these areas.)




Career Cluster:

Health Science

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Nursing


Students in this career pathway are prepared for such health careers as an LPN, Nursing Assistant, Home Health Aide, or Regis
tered Nurse. Students
will also be prepared for college majors

in Allied Health, Biology, and Nursing.


Primary Electives
:

Nurse Assistant* (At least one course required.)

Related Electives
:

Advanced Math

IBCA (required)


Allied Health Services I



Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Advanced Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Medical Terminology



Biology II or elective

Physical Ed elective


Journey to Careers



Chemistry

Physics


EMT
-

Basic



Early Childhood Ed

Psychology


First Responder



Financial Math

Speech I


Pharmacy Technician

Career Cluster: Health Science

Area of
Concentration: Career Pathway in Pharmacy


Students in this career pathway are prepared for health careers in Pharmacy and Pharmacy Technician. Students will be prepare
d for college majors in
Pharmacy and Pre
-
Med.


Primary Electives
:

Pharmacy
Technician* (Required)


Related Electives
:


Advanced Math

Financial Math


Biology II



Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Advanced Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Medical Terminology



Calculus

Physics


Journey to Careers



Speech I


Chemistry




Career Cluster: Health

Science

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Sports Medicine


Students in this career pathway are prepared for health careers in Physical Therapy and Athletic Training. Students will also

be prepared for college
majors in Sports Medicine, Biology, an
d Kinesiology.


Primary Electives
:

Sports Me
dicine I, II, III* (At least 1

unit required.)


Related Electives
:

Advanced Math

Speech I


Allied Health Services I



Biology II

IBCA (required)


Medical Terminology



Calculus

PE III


Journey to Careers



Chemistry

Physics


First Responder



Financial Math


EMT


Basic


Nurse Assistant


Nutrition & Food/Adv. Nutrition & Food




Career Cluster: Hospitality and Tourism

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Culinary Arts


Students in this career pathway are prepared for careers as a Cook, Caterer, and Executive Chef. Students will be prepared fo
r college majors in
Culinary Arts, Food Services, and Restaurant, Food and Beverage Services.


Primary Electives
:

ProStart I, II*
(required)


Related Electives
:

Art I

Fine Arts Survey


Nutrition & Food



Chemistry

IBCA (required)


Advanced Nutrition & Food



FCS elective

Psychology


Journey to Careers



Financial Math




Career Cluster: Human Services

Area of Concentration: Career

Pathway in Child Development Services


Students in this career pathway are prepared for such careers as Childcare Assistant, Preschool Teacher, or Teacher’s Assista
nt. Students will also be
prepared for college majors in Early Childhood Development.


Pri
mary Electives
:

Early C
hildhood Ed I, II* (At least 1

cour
se required
)

Related Electives
:

Art I

IBCA (required)


Adult Responsibilities (.5 credits)



Nurse Assistant


Advanced Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)


Consumer Home Economics


Nutrition & Food (.5 cr)

First Responder


Journey to Careers



Chemistry

Physics


Parenthood Ed (.5 credits)



Environmental Science

Speech I


Child Development



Financial Math

FCS elective




Career Cluster: Information Technology

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Computer Science


Students in this career pathway are prepared for such careers as Computer Programmer, Operating Systems Designer, and Game Pr
ogrammer.
Students will also be prepared for college majors in Compute
r Science and Computer Engineering.


Primary Electives
:

Computer Science I, II* (At least
1 course required
)

Related Electives
:

Financial Math



Computer Architect



Foreign Languages



Advanced Math



IBCA



Journey to Careers



Speech I


Physics










Career Cluster: Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics

Area of Concentration: Career Pathway in Engineering


Students in this career pathway are prepared for careers in Architectural, Civil, Mechanical, and Industrial Engineering. Stu
dents will also be prepared
for college majors in various areas of Engineering.


Primary Electives
:

Advanced Math*

Related Elect
ives
:

Art I

Financial Math


Biology II*



Algebra II

Fine Arts Survey


Physics*


Biology II


World History


Engineering Design I, II*



Chemistry

Geometry


Journey to Careers



English IV

IBCA


Calculus



Environmental Science

Physics


Computer Science I,
II



Psychology

World Geography


*At least
one

of these courses is required.




Career Cluster: Education

Area of Concentration: Advanced Studies


This career cluster is designed for students who either: 1.) Have transferred from another high school and

do not meet requirements of any other
career cluster; 2.) Will meet Core 4 requirements and does not wish to pursue any other career cluster. A wide range of prima
ry and related courses are
available for this cluster, therefore, students must have approva
l from counselor before choosing this career cluster.


Primary Electives
:

Advanced Math


Related Electives
:

Art I


Biology II



Biology elective


Physics



IBCA


Journey to Careers



Speech I


Calculus



Science elective


Chemistry



Foreign Languages


Environmental Science


Computer Science I, II


Fine Arts Survey


World Geography


World History




Career Cluster: Education

Area of Concentration
:
General Studies


This career cluster is designed for students who either: 1.) Have transferred from
another high school and do not meet requirements of any other
career cluster; 2.) Will meet Core 4 requirements and does not wish to pursue any other career cluster. A wide range of prima
ry and related courses are
available for this cluster, therefore, stu
dents must have approval from counselor before choosing this career cluster.


Primary Electives
:

Agriculture I


Related Electives
:

Financial Math


Art I



Biology elective


IBCA



Pro Start I


Journey to Careers



Publications


Speech I



Science elective


Parenthood Ed (.5 credits)



Foreign Languages


Adult Re
s
pon
sibility
(.5
c
redits)








LA CORE 4 CURRICULUM


Students not interested in pursuing any of the career clusters offered at Hammond High Magnet School can choose this option a
nd still meet
graduation requirements.

Please note that if a student fails to meet the LA Core 4 requirements and he/she has not s
elected
and completed
an Area of Concentration, he/she could possibly delay his/her graduation.


LA CORE 4 FAST TRACK

CURRICULUM


Students not interested in pursuing any of the career clusters offered at Hammond High Magnet School and who wish to accelera
te their plan
of study can choose this option to meet graduation requirements in three years instead of four.



















EXTRA
-
CURRICULA


Athletics:






Boys:






Baseball

Basketball

Cross
Country

Football

Golf

Soccer

Swimming

Tennis

Track and Field




Girls:

Basketball

Cross Country

Golf

Soccer

Softball

Swimming

Tennis

Track and Field

Volleyball

















Student Activities:


Band







Beta

Bible

Cheerleading

Choir

Dance
Team

Drama

Earth Club

FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes)

FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders
of America)

FFA (Future Farmers of America)

Flag Corps

4
-
H

Guitar

HHACC (Hammond High Astronaut Cadet Core)

Interact

JROTC

Key Club

Martial Arts

NHS
(National Honor Society)

Piano

Robotics


SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions)

Spanish

Step Team

Student Council

Yearbook