Please note that, while lessons have been aligned with educational standards for certain grade levels, teachers are encouraged to explore all of the activities and modify them as desired for use with other grades!)

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14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

59 εμφανίσεις

By Lauren
J.
Hime

(
Please note that, while lessons have been aligned with edu
cational standards for certain
grade levels, teachers are encouraged to explore all of the activities and modify them as
des
ired for use with other grades!)


Grade:

K
-
2

Objectives:

Students will discuss what kinds of things make a piece of music sound “mechanical” or
“animal”

Students will identify classroom instruments by name and discuss what kinds of sounds
they make

Students will interpret music through contrasting
creative movements

Students will use these creative movements while stepping to a steady beat

Activity:


Introduction


What does the word mechanical mean? What are some mechanical sounds you can
think of? (boing, ding, etc.) Now what are some animal sounds you can think of?







Indiana Music Standards

K.2.2
Maintain a steady beat while playing an instrument in a group

K.8.1
Describe musical concepts of high or low, fast or slow, and loud or soft through moving or drawing
.

1.2.2
Maintain a steady beat on a
percussion instrument while playing in a group.

1.6.1
Show changes in tempo, dynamics, and mood using movement in response to music.

1.6.2
Identify various vocal, instrumental, and environmental sounds.

2.2.2
Maintain a steady beat and play with appropriat
e dynamic levels.

2.2.4
Learn correct names for classroom instruments and identify those associated with world cultures.

2.6.1
Identify contrasts and changes in tempo and dynamics using basic music terminology and movement.

2.6.3
Identify groups of classro
om instruments by sight and sound.

2.7.2
Listen to and compare two contrasting styles of composition using basic musical terminology.

Example Questions



W
hat instruments sound mechanical and why?



W
hat instruments sound like animals

and why?



How do animals move?



H
ow would a mechanical animal move?



How can music sound “mechanical?”



How can music sound like an animal?

Resources and Materials:


Instruments (woods, skins, metals, novelty instruments)

Musical examples

-
“Animal” music: Saint
-
Sa
ën
s “Carnival of the
Animals”

(“The Elephant” and “The Swan” are great choices!)

-
“Mechanical” music:
Arthur Honegger’s “Pacific 231”


Click the starburst to hear this piece on Youtube.com!

These selections are only examples, and can be easily replaced with other pieces

of mus
ic if you like!

ICG

Procedure

1.

Listen and Discuss:
Play

a clip from
“The
C
arnival of the Animals” and ask

students to
listen to see if

they think the music represents an animal or a machine. If animal, what
kind?

Play a clip from “Pacific 231
” and ask the same kinds of questions.

2.

Classroom Instrument Examples:
Explain

that the kinds of instruments used in a
piece of music can make a big
difference in how it sounds to the audience.
Find

some
classroom instruments that sound mechanical or like animals and discuss why they
sound that way.

3.

The Role of Context:
Some instruments may seem mechanical AND animal
depending on the context. For exam
ple, a
guiro

may sound like a grinding gear or like a
bullfrog in the swamp!

4.

Expressive Movement:
Tell

students that they will be listening to the example from
Carnival of the Animals again, but this time they can move around the room like the
animal depicted in the song. Then the students will hear

Pacific 231

and will move like
machines or robots.

5.

Qual
ities of Mechanical and Animal Movements:
When the students return to
their spots, ask “W
hat kinds of things did you do with your body to make it look like
that animal? What about to make it look more mechanical?”



Are the movements jerky or smooth?



Are
the movements big or small?



Are they fast or slow?

6.

Mechanical Movements to Steady Beat:
Ask

students to pretend that they have all
been turned into robots!
Select
a few “m
echanical” instruments and tell

the students
that when they hear
one noise (ex. f
inge
r cymbal) they will walk forward to the beat like
a robot. However, when they here this noise

(ex. c
owbell) they will walk backward to
the beat.
Begin

to play a steady beat, varying tempos and intervals between instruments.



Extensions



Select

a third instru
ment that signals students to turn in place.



Select

students to come and lead the class in movement.

7.

Optional Game:

Students sit in a circle, with one student in the middle. The Teacher
holds up two instruments, one that signals the student in the middle
to walk forward
and one that signals the student in the middle to slowly turn in place. The two
instruments are then handed out to two students in the circle. The student in the
middle hides their eyes while the teacher gives another student a token (beanb
ag,
button, etc.) to hide in their hands. All students sit with hands closed in lap throughout
the game. The middle student opens their eyes, and it is the job of the two
instrumentalists to guide him or her to the token as accurately as possible by taking

turns playing a steady beat that signals the student to walk or turn in place.



Grade:
3
-
4


Objectives:


Students will identify classroom instruments by name and discuss what kinds of sounds
they make

Students will discuss what kinds of things make an instrument sound “mechanical” or
“animal”

Students will create their own mechanical animal and
assign it an appropriate instrument
sound

















Activity:

Introduction

In “Mooch the Magnificent,” Mr. Spinks runs a zoo full of mechanical animals.

What does

the word mechanical mean? What are some mechanical sounds you can think of?

Now what are some animal sounds you can think of?


Procedure


1.

Animal Qualities:
Ask students to think of a dog. Have students describe some
elements that make a dog an animal (th
ey have fur, they bark, they love dog food, etc.)

2.

Mechanical Qualities:
Now ask students to pretend that the dog they were just
describing has been turned into a robot or mechanical dog. What is the same? What is
different? What are some of the elements of a mechanical animal?

Indiana Music Standards

3.2.4
Use correct names for classroom instruments including those from world cultures.

3.3.3
Perform a composition with opportunities for free improvisation at various intervals.

3.3.6
Use voices and instruments to improvise appropriate sound effects or accompaniments to a poem or
short story.

3.8.3
Select and play a classroom instrument to describe an object or interpret a concept in a picture or literary
work.

4.3.6
Use voices and inst
ruments to create appropriate sound effects or accompaniments to a poem or short
story.

4.8.3
Use classroom instruments to orchestrate an original piece of writing such as a description of a favorite
literary character or a paragraph about a given subject
using descriptive words.


Resources and Materials:
Classroom instruments, paper and colored pencils, story script (see below)

3.


Draw Your Favorite Animal:
Ask students to think

of their favorite animal and
write the name at the top of a piece of drawing paper. Then ask them to draw the
animal underneath the name.

4.


Turning Animals to Mechanicals:
Tell the students that they are going to create
their very own mechanical animals by

turning the paper over and drawing the same
animal as a robot. The students may want to give their new robot animal a name like
“Robo
-
Koala” or “Lion
-
o
-
Matic” to write at the top of the page.

5.


Selecting Mechanical Noises:

When all drawings are finished,
have students choose
one instrument that they feel best represents their new robotic animal.

6.


Activity Instruction:
Collect all of the drawings and have the students come back to
their spots. Ask them to listen very carefully to your story, and to play th
eir robot
animal noise when they see their picture.

7.


Interactive Story Time:
You may read the following story or create your own to
read to the class! The spots marked with an “X” indicate a place where you can choose
one or more pictures from the collect
ed pile, show them to the class, and say the name
of the animals to signal individual instrument sounds.


“Once upon a time, there was a man named Mr. Spinks who had a zoo full of mechanical
animals. He had all kinds of animals, including an “X.” One day a

girl named Mooch came
to the zoo to show she could work on the robot animals. She tinkered with the “X,”
oiled up the joints on the “X,” polished the “X,” and replaced some gears on the “X.”
Mr. Spinks thought she did such a good job that he asked her to
stay at the zoo. Mooch
continued to work on the animals, and, as she did they became wilder. The “X” got
sharp teeth, the “X” could finally roar, and the “X” began to wonder what a child might
taste like! When Mooch was finished, even the “X” looked almost

like a real animal! The
wilder the animals got, the more they wanted to go and live in the wild. Mr. Spinks was
scared to go into the wild
s
, but Mooch convinced him and they left the zoo with all of
the animals (all instruments play) for a new life in the

wild
s
.

8.


Conclusion:

You may choose to pass the drawings back, or post them around the
classroom.


To add a technology element to this lesson, complete the drawings in Kid Pix or other digital
drawing software to create mechanical animals an
d sounds. Click the starburst to be redirected
to the ROK website where you can email your drawings. Check back to the “Submit Your
Creations” page often and you may see your drawing!

To add a science extension to this lesson, create a graphic organizer ab
out the animal you choose

with an interactive inquiry project from ReadWriteThink.org. Students can research their
favorite animal and explore animal facts, animal babies, interaction with others and habitats


ICG

ICG


Grade:

5
-
6


Objectives:



Students will create an original rap based on a written synopsis

Students will notate their composition and perform it on non
-
pitched percussion
instruments

Students will compose accompaniments in the form of ostinato and will perform the
completed composition as a class.


Activity:

Introduction

Ask students to talk about what a “rap” is. Who are some of their favorite rappers? Are words
sung or spoken in a rap? What are some of the distinctive qualities of

rap in regards to rhythm,
rhyming, and word choice?


Procedure


1.

Introducing the Plot:
Pass out pencils and paper and ask students to listen carefully as
you read the synopsis for “Mooch the Magnificent.” As they listen, encourage them to
write down any wo
rds or thoughts that catch their attention.

2.

Word Bank:
Tell students that, as a group, they will be creating their own synopsis of
the opera in the form of a rap. Create a word bank on the board drawing from the
students’ word lists.

3.

Creating Topic Senten
ces:
Using the word bank, create some topic sentences that
outline the plot of the opera.



Example

o

Mr. Spinks runs a zoo full of robot animals, including a lion and a unicorn

o

Mooch comes to help him fix the robots

Indiana
Music
Standards

5.2.3

Play instruments independently or in a group to accompany singing.

5.4.1
Plan and perform rhythmic speech compositions with text based on themes such as names, states, or famous
people. Include performance indicators such as tempo and dynamics.

5.4.2
Plan

and arrange accompaniments to given melodies within teacher guidelines.

5.5.2
Identify and notate rhythms and melodies from aural examples.

6.2.5
Play melodies, accompaniments, and ensemble parts expressively with correct rhythms, tempos, and dynamics,
in
dependently or in ensembles
.

6.4.1
Plan and perform a rhythmic speech composition with text based on themes such as teams, cars, or places.
Include performance indicators such as tempo, dynamics, and changes in vocal timbre.

6.5.2
Identify and notate rhyth
ms and melodies from aural examples.


Resources and Materials:

“Mooch the Magnificent” synopsis, pencils and paper

Non
-
pitched
percussion instruments (woods, skins, metals, novelty instruments)


o

Mooch makes the robots more and more like
animals

o

The animals want to go outside where they can be wild but Mr. Spinks
doesn’t like that idea because he thinks the outside is dangerous

o

Mooch convinces Mr. Spinks to come with her and the animals out into the
wild
s
.

4.

Finding Rhymes:

Then, still using

the word bank, identify rhyming words or create
new rhyming words that are applicable to the story (Ex. wild/child, zoo/do, dome/home)

5.

Creating a Rap:
Allow students to come up with their own rap in groups or as a class.
Guide them by providing a prompt o
r an idea for the first line. The completed rap
might look something like this


Mr. Spinks has animals, made of gears and springs

Mooch comes to help him out with all the broken things

The animals get wilder and want to go outside, but

Mr. Spinks is too
scared and wants to run and hide

Mooch helps Mr. Spinks see that outside of the dome

They’ll run and play in fields and streams and find a brand new home


6.

Adding an Ostinato:
For an extra challenge, add a student
-
created spoken ostinato.
Half of the class
can recite the rap while the other half repeats the ostinato

7.

Instrument extension:

The rap and accompaniments can be notated and transferred
to non
-
pitched percussion instruments. Students may wish to create a bordun to
accompany the poem. Using classroom
instruments, arrange and perform the piece with
voices, instruments, or both!

8.

Closure:
Compare and contrast the class rap with another example of rap music.



To add a technology element to this lesson, record your compositions with a digital
recorder to
create an MP3 file. Click the starburst to be redirected to the ROK website where you can email
your class compositions. Check back to the “Submit Your Creations” page often and you may hear
your composition on the website!















ICG


Grade:

6
-
8


Objectives:




Students will define and explore the use of metaphor in “Mooch the Magnificent”

Students will read an opera synopsis and discuss possible metaphors present in the story


Students will explore the nature of fear through personal experiences


Students will create a story that could act as a sequel to the opera























Activity:

Introduction

In “Mooch the Magnificent,” the mechanical animals live in a dome
shielded from the outside
world. The characters in the opera believe that this world is very dangerous, but soon decide
to venture

outside the dome to discover the wonders of nature
.


Procedure


1.

Synopsis:
Allow students to read the synopsis for “Mooch the

Magnificent.”

Indiana English Stand
ards

6.3.7
Explain the effects of common literary devices, such as symbolism, imagery, or metaphor, in a variety of
fictional and nonfictional texts.

7.3.7
Explain the effects of common literary devices, such as symbolism, imagery, or metaphor, in a varie
ty of
fictional texts.

8.3.6
Identify significant literary devices, such as metaphor, symbolism, dialect or quotations, and irony, which define
a writer's style and use those elements to interpret the work.

6.5.1
Write narratives that:

• establish and de
velop a plot and setting and present a point of view that is appropriate to the stories.

• include sensory details and clear language to develop plot and character.

• use a range of narrative devices, such as dialogue or suspense.

7.5.1
Write biographica
l or autobiographical compositions that:

• develop a standard plot line
-

including a beginning, conflict, rising action, climax, and denouement
(resolution)
-

and point of view.

• develop complex major and minor characters and a definite setting.

• use

a range of appropriate strategies, such as dialogue; suspense; and the naming of specific narrative
action, including movement, gestures, and expressions.

8.5.1
Write biographies, autobiographies, and short stories that:

• tell about an incident, event, or situation, using well
-
chosen details.

• reveal the significance of, or the writer's attitude about, the subject.

• use narrative and descriptive strategies, including relevant dialogue, specific action, physical
description,
background description, and comparison or contrast of characters.


Resources and Materials:

“Mooch the Magnificent” synopsis


2.

Discussion and Journaling:
The following questions can be discussed as a class or used as
a journaling prompt.


a.

What could this dome represent to the characters? Do you think the dome could be
a metaphor for something? What is a metaphor?

b.

T
he cha
racters in the opera were hesitant to leave the comforts of the dome, even
though some hade memories of the beautiful wilds outside
.
Talk about what
activities you enjoy doing inside, what are the benefits of being inside?

c.

Now think about things you
like to do outside. How are these activities different?

d.

It has been said that modern day technologies and comforts have decreased the
amount of time that children (and adults) spend outside. Why do you think this is?
Why is it important to spend time in na
ture?

3.

Write Your Own Sequel:
At the end of the opera, the audience is left wondering what
happens to the characters after they decide to leave the dome and venture into the wild
s
.
As a class or in small groups, write a short sequel to “Mooch the Magnificen
t” that includes
all the elements of a complete plot.

a.

What happens after the characters leave the dome?

b.

What is the world outside like?

c.

Did the animals have trouble adjusting to the wild
s
?

d.

What does

Mooch grow up to be?




After writing their own sequels to “Mooch the Magnificent,” students can
create a comic strip
that shows what happens to the characters after they leave the dome
. Click the starburst to
see the ROK website page with instructions on how students can bring
t
heir sequels to life!

ICG

Snit:

a state of agitation

Afflict:

to distress so severely as to cause persistent suffering or anguish

Duffer:

an incompetent, ineffectual, or clumsy person

Gizzard:

a large
muscular part of the digestive tube (as of a bird or insect) which has a horny lining and
in which food is churned and ground into small pieces

Temperamental:

marked by excessive sensitivity and impulsive mood changes

Assurance:

something that inspires or
tends to inspire confidence

Insurance:

a means of guaranteeing protection or safety

Bungle:

to act or work clumsily and awkwardly

Ominous:

foreboding or foreshadowing evil

Mythical:

existing only in the imagination, having qualities suitable to myth

Forlor
n:

being in poor condition, miserable, wretched

Lurk:

to lie hidden, to lie in wait in a place of concealment especially for an evil purpose

Mischievous:

irresponsibly playful

Cantankerous:

difficult or irritating to deal with

Absurd:

ridiculously unreason
able, unsound

Narwhal:

an arctic cetacean (
Monodon monoceros
) about 20 feet (6 meters) long with the male having a
long twisted ivory tusk

Mare:

a female horse or other equine animal

Sassafras:

a tall eastern North American tree that is related to t
he laurels and has fragrant yellow
flowers and bluish black berries;
also
:

its dried root bark used former
ly in medicine or as a flavoring

Click the starburst for a printable
word search

that includes

these vocabulary words

ICG



Grade
: K
-
2


Objectives:


Students will differentiate between speaking and singing voices

Students will respond to a sung pattern by matching or utilizing appropriate pitches
(depending on grade level)

Students will compare and contrast the telephone
conversation in the scene from the
opera and conversations in day
-
to
-
day life.



Activity:

Introduction

Ask a question like “Do you like
talking on the telephone?” to begin the lesson. Students may
discuss their experiences talking on the telephone and what they know about phone
conversations. Then introduce the video.

(Show video clip)








Guide the students to compare and contrast the scene from the opera with a similar situation
in day
-
to
-
day life.


Indiana

Music Standards:

K.1.1
Match pitches in a limited vocal range.

K.1.2
Echo short melodic patterns sung by the teacher.

K.6.3
Compare vocal tone qualities such as whispering, singing, and speaking

1.1.1
Match simple pitch patterns in expanding ranges.

1.2.1
Echo short melodic and rhythmic patterns.

1.3.1
Respond to sung or played musical questions by singing and using body percussion, found items, and
instrumental sounds.

2.1.2

Sing a cappella and with accompaniment, independently and in groups.

2.3.2
S
ing short questions to be answered by classmates.

2.3.3
Respond to teacher or student questions by singing and using body percussion, movement, found items,
instruments, or electronic sounds.


Resources and Materials:
video cli
p from Menotti’s “The Telephone,” beginning at 3’12.

Click the starburst to see the YouTube.com clip from “The Telephone”

Example

“In this video there is a telephone convers
ation just like the
conversations we were just talking about, but there is something a little
different. See if you can figure out what that is difference is.”

ICG














Procedure


1.

Speaking vs. Singing
: Guide students in differentiating between speaking and singing
voice “In
opera, people sing the things they would usually say



2.

Speaking Call and Response:

Inform students that now they all have imaginary
telephones, and that you are going to call all of them to say hello, and that they can say
hello back.



T: “Ring, ring…Hello
boys and girls!”



S: “Hello (teacher’s name)!”

3.

Singing Call and Response:

Teacher suggests that they make their telephone calls
more like the opera, and asks students to sing their responses this time.



T: “Ring, ring…Hello boys and girls”



S: “Hello (teache
r’s name)”

4.

What is Arioso
?

Define the word “Arioso,” and what it means in opera.

5.

Suggest that they make their phone calls longer and choose one student to telephone
(Arioso or simple pitch patterns may be used).



T: “Ring, Ring…Hello Carlos”



S: “Hello
(teacher’s name)”



T: “How are you today?”



S: “I’m doing very well”



T: “Oh, good! How’s your dog?”



S: “She had puppies last week”



T: “That is great but I must go, good bye Carlos”



S: “Goodbye (teacher’s name)

6.

Solos or Think
-
Pair
-
Share
: every student individ
ually for assessment purposes, or
may split the students into pairs. Students can telephone each other and make up their
own arioso conversations.

7.

Closure:

When the students come back to their spots, ask about what they learned
about their partner during their telephone conversations.





Example Questions



What do you th
ink is happening in this video?




How was this different than teleph
one conversations you have
had?



How was

it similar?



What kinds of thin
gs do you say on the telephone?



-
Hello?



-
How are you?



-
I’m fine how are you?




Grade:

3
-
4


Objectives:


Students will discuss a piece of music using musical terms


Students will demonstrate recognition of repeated themes


Students will work as a class to diagram the form of the piece


Students will create movements for diff
erent sections


Students will compose a rhythm or instrument piece using the same form



Activity:

Introduction

After introducing some basic information about the piece, the teacher asks students to think of
musical terms to describe the song they are about to hear. After he
aring a minute or two of
the piece, the class may offer words and opinions on what they have just heard. The teacher
introduces the lesson.








Indiana Standards

3.5.1
Read and perform quarter, eighth, half, dotted half, sixteenth, and whole notes, and quarter, half, and whole
rests in meters of two, three,
and four using rhythm syllables.

3.6.2
Identify and describe AB, ABA, and rondo forms using movement and symbols.

3.7.2
Listen to and discuss or write about two contrasting compositions using appropriate terminology.

4.5.1
Read, notate, and perform
quarter, dotted quarter, eighth, half, dotted half, sixteenth, and whole notes, and
quarter, half, and whole rests in duple and triple meters using rhythm syllables.

4.4.1
Compose a melody for a verse of a selected poem and notate it using traditional or e
lectronic means.


4.6.2
Identify and describe AB, ABA, theme and variations, and rondo forms using movement and symbols.


4.6.1
Describe tempo, dynamics, articulation, and rhythmic and melodic elements through movement, writing, or
illustration, including
how these elements might convey an expressive mood
.

4.7.1
Explain personal preferences for specific musical works and styles using appropriate terminology.

Resources and Materials:
video clips from Menotti’s “The Telephone”

beginning at 3:12 and

7:26.

Click the starburst to view a YouTube clip of “The Telephone”

Example

“Today we are going to find out how this piece is put together, and
then you are going to compose a
piece with the same form.”

ICG



Procedure


1.

Review of musical form:
Review any previous lessons on musical form, or may
present the concept to the students before beginning.

2.

Diagramming the form:
Listen to the musical example. Ask students to raise their
hand each time they hear a big musical change throughout the song. As they raise their
hands pause the clip and ask what letter should be assigned to that section. You may
also want to diagram the
text or melody that is repeated with each section (ex. “And
how are you” for both B sections).

3.

Adding the coda:
As students discover that the very last section does not match any
previous parts, prompt the students to think about what this musical device
is called and
label it “coda.”

4.

Creating movements for each section:
Once the entire song has been
diagrammed, the students can form small groups and each group is given one section for
which they will create a movement. Groups will take turns teaching the
rest of the class
their movements. During a final listening, all students will show the appropriate
movement when each section begins.

5.

Creating melodies for each section:
While they are still in small groups, ask
students to create a short melody (
four beats) for their section and notate it
accordingly. Melodic and rhythmic complexity will depend on the grade level and skill
set of each class. When all groups have finished their melody, return to the form
diagram for “The Telephone.” Each group will

play their composed melody (on
recorders or classroom instruments) when their section comes up.

Click the starburst to be redirected to an easy notation website from Classics for Kids.

Groups can use the site to create their melody, and the teacher may wi
sh to put the
melodies all together using this feature on a SMARTboard or classroom computer
.


6.

Extension:

The melody cards may be place at the front of the class and labeled A, B, C,
or Coda. Lead the students all together through the entire form (AABCACB Coda).


Short guide to the form of “Hello! Oh, Margaret It’s You.”

Clip starts at 3:12


A

Hello, Hello 3:
17

A
1 Hello, Hello (minor) 3:46

(You may choose to exclude this section and just call the first part “A”)

B

How are you 4:16

C

Uh huh 4:48

A

Good bye 5:17

C

Yes? Uh Huh 5:48

B

How are you 6:07

Coda

6:31

ICG




Grade:

5
-
6


Objectives:


Students will discuss different moods created by musical elements


Students will create a short composition in groups


Students will set their composition to words


Students will perform/sing their compositions in groups for the class


Activity:

Introduction


Students will watch two clips from Menotti’s “The Telephone.” Ask students to listen
for musical elements that contribute to the mood of each selection before
watching (tempo,
major/minor, dynamics, etc.). Afterwards, discuss what the students heard and what
emotions/moods were depicted by the music. Inform students that, just as Menotti’s work was
based on telephone conversations, they will create their own com
position based on text
messages!


Procedure


1.
Introducing the text composition lesson:
Tell the students that they will be
receiving a “text message” and that it is their job to create a melody/composition of
appropriate length that reflects the mood of
their text through the use of the musical
elements described earlier.

2.
Composing in groups:
Have students form small groups to create their text
-
inspired
compositions. All groups have the option of adding I, IV, and V chords as accompaniment,
if appropr
iate for the level of the class.

3.
Formative performance:
If time allows, have students perform their compositions
(although this step can be skipped if necessary).

Indiana
Music
Standards

5.3.4
Independently and cooperatively improvise successive melodic phrases to create a song.

5.4.3
Create a song in an appropriate meter to accompany an original descriptive text of at least four
phrases.

5.4.4
Collaboratively plan and perform a vocal or instrumental melody and accompaniment within established
guidelines.

6.4.2
Compose melodies to be sung or played with a given ostinato or accompaniment.

6.4.3
Create a song in an appropriate meter
to accompany an original descriptive text of at least four phrases.

Resources and Materials:
video clips from Menotti’s “The Telephone”

beginning at 3:12 and 7:26.

Click the starburst to view a YouT
ube clip of “The Telephone”


ICG

4.
Text setting:
Define the words “libretto” and “librettist.” Inform the students that th
ey
will be acting as librettists today, and setting their composition to text. Groups will use
the text message that they were assigned earlier as their text. Students may change some
things in their composition, if desired, but should try to stay as close

as possible to the
given text.

5.
Performance:
After a period of group work, students will perform their melodies by
singing or playing on classroom instruments.

6.
Extension
: Discuss Menotti’s use of English in this opera, and the difficulties in
writing a
libretto in a foreign language. For an extra challenge have the students translate their
compositions into another language using dictionaries or Google translate.



Click the starburst to be redirected to Google translate where you can choose
from a variety of
languages.



ICG



Grade:

6
-
12


Objectives:


Students will examine the use of personification in “The Telephone”


Students will discuss character roles and
relationships within the opera


Students will explore themes within the storyline


Students will create short skits featuring parallel themes











Activity:

Introduction

“The Telephone” features the subtitle “L’Amour à Trois” (a love triangle). Lucy and Ben are the
two main characters in this opera, but the telephone also plays a starring role.


Procedure


1.

Plot Summary:
Read the synopsis and watch t
he attached clip from “The Telephone.”

2.

Describing Characters:
As a class, discuss the roles of all three characters. Who are
the protagonists/antagonists?

3.

Pass out the attached synopsis and libretto selection

4.

Define or review the concept of
“personification”

5.

Examples of Personification:
Working in small groups, analyze the libretto and find
examples of text where the telephone is given human characteristics.

6.

The Telephone:
Collectively describe the telephone as a character, and how Lucy and
B
en’s feelings about it change throughout the opera.

Resources and Materials:
Synopsis of Menotti’s “The Telephone”
(9:30
-
12:50)

Click the starburst to view a YouTube clip of “The Telephone”



YouTube clip (
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDq1953_qB4
) 8:36
-
12:51




Indiana English Standards

9.3.1
Analyze interactions between characters in a literary text and explain the
way those interactions affect the
plot.

10.3.3

Evaluate interactions between characters in a literary text and explain the way those interactions affect the
plot.

11.3.2
Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or com
ment on life, using
textual evidence to support the claim

12.3.4
Analyze ways in which poets use imagery, personification, figures of speech, and sounds to evoke readers'
emotions.

ICG

7.

Exploring Themes:
Discuss any themes that feel like social commentary. How are
these characters portrayed and what messages come across in the text?

8.

Creating Skits:
Working in the same small groups, hav
e students create a short skit
with two high
-
school aged characters and a cell phone. The skits should include all basic
plot elements, but should be adapt
ed to be as modern as possible.








9.

C
losure:
Present skits to class.


Click the starburst to create an interactive story map from ReadWriteThing.org about “The
Telephone” or
original

skit
s
. This story map should include details about the characters, the
conflict, the resolution of the
conflict, and the setting of your story.



This popular opera has been interpreted and performed in a variety of ways. Two very
different interpretations are featured
on the ROK Interactive Curriculum for “The
Telephone”
.

Click the starburst to be redirected to this page where you will find suggestions
and links for
a lesson on comparing and contrasting with graphic organizers
.



Selected Lyrics from “The Telephone”

Ben:

Listen, Lucy, Listen, now don’t you cry, don’t you
cry.

There is something I must tell you.

Listen, Lucy, Listen, don’t you cry, don’t you cry.

Lift your face and dry your tears.

Listen, Lucy, listen, dear, don’t you cry, don’t you cry


Lucy:
Oh, you don’t understand! Let me go and get a handkerchief.


Ben: Try again and again. What else can a man do except wait and then try and wait and then
try once again? I’d rather contend with lover, husband, or in
-
laws, than this two
-
headed
monster who comes unasked and devours my day. For this thing can’t be chall
enged, can’t be
poisoned or drowned. It has hundreds of lives and miles of umbilical cord.


(He notices a pair of scissors on a table. He arms himself with them and approaches the telephone
slowly and menacingly. Suddenly the telephone rings out loudly an
d desperately, like a child crying for
help. Lucy rushes in and takes the telephone protectively in her arms).

Lucy: You wicked man! What were you doing to it?

Ben: I was only trying…

Lucy: The poor thing! Shame on you! Put them down!

Ben: I assure you it
was all in self
-
defense.

Example:

A girl has a crush on her lab partner, but every time she
attempts to ask him to go to the dance with her he receives a
text message and she is interrupted. After much frustration, she
sneaks off to the bathroom and texts him her request.


ICG

ICG

Lucy: You must have hit it first!

Ben: Lucy, can we two have a quiet talk?

Lucy: Yes, dear, but first I must call up Pamela.

Ben: Pamela? Why must you call her now?

Lucy: I must tell her of my quarrel with George.

Ben: Can’t you te
ll her afterwards?

Lucy: Oh no, I must get hold of her before she hears it from somebody else.