Deliverable no.: D3.6

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Dissemination Level: CO

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Conceptual Design of a Food Manufacturing Research Infrastructure to boost up innovation in Food Industry


Project no.:



KBBE
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2011
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289327 (FoodManufuture)


Project full title:

Conceptual Design of a Food Manufacturing Research
Infrastructure to boost up innovation in Food Industry


Project Acronym:


FoodManufuture


Deliverable no.:


D3.6


Title of the deliverable:

Integrated summary of long and short
-
term
future

needs for research infrastructure



Contractual Date of Delivery to the CEC: 31 July 2012

Actual Date of Delivery to the CEC:
xx

August 2012

Organisation name of lead contractor for this deliverable: Campden BRI Magyarország Nonprofit

Kft.

Author(s): András Sebők, Attila Berczeli, Anita Jasper

Part
icipants(s): partners from WG3A, WG3B, WG3C and WG3D
:
Evelina Tibäck
,
Lilia Ahrné
,
Kerstin Lienemann
,
Shima Shayanfar
,
Manoj Kumar Dora
,
Hans De Steur
, Adrienn Molnár,
Ole
Madsen
,
Henrik Lauridsen

Mads Hvilshoj
,
Giacomo Copani
,
Roberto Balducchi
,
Fabio
Vitali
,
Diego
Santi
,
Antonella Del Fiore
,
Lorenza Daroda
,
Piero DeSabbata
,
Giorgio Matranga
,
Paolo Masoni
,
Alessandra Zamagni
,
Vittoria Fatta
,
Tessa Tencate

Work package contributing to the deliverable: WP3

Nature:

P

Version: 1.0

Total number of pages:


Start date of project
: 1
st

January 2012

Duration:
24
months



Project co
-
funded by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme (2007
-
2013)

Dissemination
Level

PU

Public

X

PP

Restricted to other programme participants (including the Commission Services)


RE

Restricted to a group specified by the consortium (including the Commission Services)


CO

Confidential, only for members of the consortium
(including the Commission Services)




Keyword list:
identified

needs and solutions, food processing and manufacturing sector, long and
short term future needs, necessary research infrastructure


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Table of content


1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

................................
................................
................................
.....................

3

2

INTRODUCTION

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

4

2.1

G
ENERAL OB
JECTIVES

................................
................................
................................
.......................

4

3

DESCRIPTION OF THE M
ETHOD

................................
................................
................................
....

5

3.1

D
EFINITION AND INTERP
RETATION OF
R
ESEARCH
I
NFRASTRUCTURE

................................
..............

5

3.1.1

General interpretation

................................
................................
................................
...............

5

3.1.2

E
-
infrastructure (e
-
IRG, 2010)

................................
................................
................................

10

3.2

M
ETHOD OF IMPLEMENTAT
ION

................................
................................
................................
.......

13

4

RESULTS AND ANALYSIS

................................
................................
................................
................

17

4.1

R
ESEARCH NEEDS OF THE

F
OOD
S
ECTOR AND THE
R
ELEVANT
M
ANUFACTURING
S
OL
UTIONS

.....

17

4.2

E
VALUATION OF THE LON
G AND SHORT TERM NEE
DS OF THE FOOD SECTO
R AND POTENTIAL
MANUFACTURING SOLUTI
ONS AND DEFINE NECE
SSARY RESEARCH INFRA
STRUCTURE

..............................

26

4.2.1

Evaluation by the WG Science & Technology for Food & Manufacturing

.............................

26

4.2.2

Evaluation by the WG
Industry, Knowledge Transfer and Education
................................
.....

30

4.2.3

Evaluation by the WG
Management Systems and Business Models

................................
........

36

4.2.4

Evaluation by the WG Economic, Social and Environmental Sustainability

..........................

45

4.3

V
ISION FOR THE

F
OOD
F
ACTORY OF THE
F
UTURE BASED ON THE E
NVISAGED NEEDS AND
SOLUTIONS

................................
................................
................................
................................
...................

48

4.4

I
DENTIFICATION OF NEC
ESSARY RESEARCH INFR
ASTRUCTURES

................................
.....................

53

4.4.1

Science & Technology for Food & Manufacturing

................................
................................
.

53

4.4.2

Industry, Knowledge Transfer, and Education

................................
................................
........

58

4.4.3

Economic, Social and Environmental Sustainability

................................
...............................

64

4.4.4

Management Systems and Business Models

................................
................................
............

66

4.4.5

General requirements for testing of new solutions in food production environment

..............

70

5

CONCLUSIONS

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

73

6

REFERENCES

................................
................................
................................
................................
......

75

7

GLOSSARY

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........

80

ANNEX I.

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................

85

ANNEX II.: TEMPLATE
1 FOR SHORT SUMMARIE
S ON PROBLEMS RELATE
D TO
RESEARCH / INNOVATIO
N

CHALLENGES, FOR WHIC
H MANUFACTURING SOLU
TIONS
ARE NECESSARY

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

89

ANNEX III.: TEMPLATE

2 FOR SHORT SUMMARIE
S ON PRACTICAL SOLUT
IONS
HAVING
POTENTIAL APPLICATIO
N IN THE FOOD SECTOR

................................
................................
........

91





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1

Executive Summary



Will be prepared later.


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2

Introduction

The general objective of the Work Package 3
of the FoodManufuture project is

to identify the gaps
and barriers for research infrastructures including facilities, resources and services necessary to
serve the current and future needs of the Eur
opean food industry for fulfilling the future vision
scenarios developed for the
“F
ood
F
actory
of the
F
uture


in WP2.


The future needs can’t be established without identification of the current needs of the food sector
which are not served yet with approp
riate manufacturing solutions. This provides an opportunity for
identification of those currently available manufacturing solutions which had already been
developed for other sectors but not adapted to the food manufacturing industry. Since the food
sector

is not the main and only customer of the innovative manufacturing solutions this approach
can be applied for the future as well e.g. the solutions which will be developed for the high
-
tech
sectors can be searched on
-
going for adaptation opportunities in t
he food manufacturing.
To make
that search systematic and effective appropriate mechanisms should be developed

and specific
research infrastructures have to be established, which enable and facilitate the adoption of the new
manufacturing concepts for the
challenges and problems in the food processing sector. During the
development of the new manufacturing concepts and solutions the specific requirements of the food
industry have to be considered such as the perishable nature of the fresh food and the natur
al
variation of the properties of the raw materials influenced by variety/breed, location, season, time
and genetic variability, the primary importance of the food hygiene and safety to make food
consumable, the expectations
of the consumers
for diversity
of food and the need to provide the
benefits of advanced manufacturing background for all sizes of food manufacturers ranging from
large sites to local
SMEs, to
food manufacturers. Manufacturing solutions should enable to maintain
freshness till the time o
f the consumption and also to maintain natural properties of foods
.



2.1

General objectives


This document is summarising the findings of four working groups covering the different aspects of
the food processing, such as Science Technology for Food &

Manufacturing; Industry,
Knowledge
Transfer and Education; Management Systems and Business Models, Economic, Social and
Environmental Sustainability.
The purpose of this document is to
describe to future needs of the
food processing sector and the manufac
turing sector for reserch infrastructures. First

the future and
current needs and problems of food sector
are identified,
which require manufacturing solutions
(inventory of long and short term needs of the food sector) and also
paralelly

the currently ava
ilable
and future envisaged manufacturing solutions. Based on these needs and solutions the necessary
research infrastructures are identified to meet the future long term needs of the food manufacturing
sector and the manufacturing industry related to the
food factory of the future within the project
FoodManufuture.
This is used as a reference material for identifying the gaps in the necessary
research infrastructures, what is described in an other set of documents (D3
.7


D3.10 for the
working groups and D
3.11 for the summary).
Input is provided to the inventory of the available
manufacturing solutions for the food processing sector.


The purpose of this document id to provide a discussion material for consultation with the
representatives of food and manuf
acturing sectors, throughout Europe both at national and
European level. Based on the comments, proposals received during the consultations this document
will be reviewed, extended to provide a basis for the Design study of the Research Infrastructures.



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3

Description of the method


3.1

Definition and interpretation of Research Infrastructure


3.1.1

General interpretation


Research infrastructures (RIs) in this project are defined as



facilities,



resources,



related services

used by the scientific community to conduct

top level research in their respective fields. These
resources, facilities and related services should be
essential

to the scientific community.


They cover:




major

scientific equipment or sets of instruments;



knowledge based resources, such as
collections, archives, databases, structures for scientific
information


these should be large scale



enabling ICT
-
based infrastructures, or



any other entity of
unique

or
rare

nature,
essential

to achieve excellence in research.


RIs are:



Large undertaking
s, whether in physical size or level of organisations (networks),



They require a
significant level of investment
to build or set up and
corresponding level of
funding for operation
, in other words high construction and operation costs compared to
research
costs in their respective fields.

(Typical construction costs: 2
-

1100
MEuro, typical operation costs: 1.4 MEuro/year


118
MEuro/year)



They need to have a
long term perspective

(of at least decades) to be effective.


This definition includes the
associated human

resources, but human resources in themselves
without the facilities are not classified as research infrastructures in the context of the European
Research Programmes.


Research infrastructures can be:



single sited (a single resource in a s
ingle location)



distributed (an organised network of distributed resources)



virtual (the service is provided electronically)



represent an added value in strengthening and structuring of the European Research area a
n
d
resulting in a significant improvement
of the relevant scientifi
c and technological fields at
international level



deliver, contribute to scientific discoveries and technological developments, offer
unique

research services;



be
open to external researchers
, attract the best researchers from all
over the world;

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attract young people to science;



have a clear European dimension on added value.


RIs help to create a new research environment, in which all researchers


whether working in the
context of their home institutions or in national or
multinational scientific initiatives


have (open)
shared access to unique or distributed scientific facilities regardless of their type and location in the
world (European Commission).


RIs are at the centre of the knowledge triangle of research, educatio
n and innovation.



producing knowledge through research;



diffusing it through education;



applying it through innovation (EU 2012).


Typical purposes of the infrastructures proposed in a report of the SCAR (2010) in a descending
order of the frequency of pr
oposals (69 in total received from 13 European countries in the field of
agri
-
food research for a request for suggestions):




experimentation




(73.9 %)



conservation and distribution

(gene
-
banks, repositories, collections, databases)

(15.95 %)



observation
, monitoring



(4.35 %)



data processing, modelling



(4.35 %) ?



knowledge transfer* . infrastructure for

provision of technical training and knowledge

(1.45 %)

(* only 1 proposal) In the case of the Food Factory of the Future this can be interpreted as p
hysical
resources, like pilot equipment, test beds, sets of installations, which can enable practical training
on the use of such facilities together with the relevant human resources.


This definition can be interpreted better in the context of the FoodMa
nufuture project if some
elements and notions of the concepts of the Business Models and competence based perspective of
sustainable, competitive advantage of companies are applied.


Following the Business Model concept the Value propositions offered by
the Research
Infrastructures are





the access to
the unique research services,

(in terms of novelty and performance) based on
physical assets and related human resources and services,



the assistance to shape scientific communities through attracting best r
esearchers from all
over the world,



attracting young people to science


Key resources are physical
-

extended with related human and financial resources, which require
significantly larger efforts on European or international scale in complexity, cost and

complement
it, than those, what an individual research organisation can offer and operate on its own. Key
partnership is represented by acquisition of particular resources.


(Note: this description will be developed further)

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Although the management conce
pts applied for the sustainable competitive advantage of the
companies (
Hafeez

et al 2002) can’t be applied directly to the process of identification of the
necessary research infrastructures of the Food Factory of the Future in Europe, but we can adapt th
e
structured methodology. By considering that the primary objective of the development of the
research infrastructures is to enable excellent scientific activities, but in the context of the Food
Factory of the Future the results of the excellent research
should be implemented within a relatively
short time span for enhancing the leadership of the European food processing and manufacturing
industry sectors through innovation at least some apparent similarities can be identified, which can
be used for distin
guishing capabilities and competencies from basic elelments of RIs.


The
competence based concept defines:




Resources

as inputs into the production process (Grant 1991); Resources include

-

physical assets,

-

intellectual assets

-

cultural asserts (Hafeez et al

2002)



Capabilities
: as the (dynamic) ability to make use of resources to perform some task or
activity (
Hafeez

et al 2002), in other words the capacity to deploy resources that have been
purposely integrated to achieve a desired end state (Gellynck, Molnar 2009).



Competencies
: as valuable capabilities in terms of “enabling the firm to deliver a
fundamental custom
er benefit”. (Hamel 1994). Competencies are based usually on the
integrated and harmonised use of several capabilities. In a food chain approach these are
interpreted as the harmonised and combined use of resources and capabilities (Gellynck at al
2006).



C
ore competencies

are those competencies, which enable a chain member to outperform its
rivals (Gellynck, Molnar 2009). Resources and capabilities and their harmonised combined
use can result in a competitive advantage.


If we adjust the definitions to the

task of identifying the necessary research infrastructures for the
Food Factory of the Future we get the foll
owing working definitions:



Resources

are inputs into the research processes.



Capabilities

are represented by the capacity to deploy resources that have been purposely
integrated to perform the targeted research tasks or activities or related supporting, enabling
activities.



Competencies

are the harmonised and combined use of resources and capa
bilities, which
enable the research team to deliver a fundamental user (researcher) / consumer benefit
through the use of specific element/function of the research infrastructure.



Core competencies

are those competencies, which make the specific element/fu
nction/site
of the research infrastructure unique/or rare and valuable to enable excellent research and
successful innovation.


At this interpretation some resources,
mainly the physical ones and some of the related others are
part of the RIs. Capabilities

and competenciestogether with some additional resources do not form
RIs in themselves, but these are important for delivering the expected functions of the RI effecti
vely
such as diffusing the new knowledge through education and applying it through innova
tion.
Therefore it is worth to distinguish that.


Resources

are inputs into research process.

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Categories of resources:


1. Physical


Research facilities, which form the basis of the RIs:



Research installations



Tailor
-
made experimental installations



Testin
g facilities



Assembly of equipment



Pilot plants



Computing facilities



Data banks, collections, data facilities



Instruments



Assembly parts, which are supported by additional resources, that do not form a research
facility on themselves.



Specific materials, m
aterials for experimental installations



Housekeeping and maintenance services


Additional, complementary requirements for testing of new solutions in food produc
tion
environment include the following
functions:


-

Storage of raw materials for product
testing/ by
-
products/ final test products

o

Cold storage



Chilled



Frozen

o

Ambient storage

-

Changing rooms (segregated one for High Risk/ high Care zones for ready to eat food
products)

-

Cleaning and disinfection of equipment, tools, facilities

-

Chilled hall/ room

for manufacturing experiments with significant part of the different types
of food products, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, produce, etc.

-

Segregated high risk/high care area as necessary

-

Handing of food waste


Experimental equipment and devices for the differe
nt type of food manufacturing operations

-

Simulation of continuous material flow

-

Batch manufacturing

-

Product packaging (at least manual)



2. Technological



Technology / specific technology based on the use of the physical assets of the RI (Part of
the RI)


3. Human



Trained staff with relevant technical skills, which is able to operate the facilities and provide
services (part of the RI)

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Other human resources, which can be used to build the related capabilities and
competencies, but do not form RIs in themse
lves.

o

Skills



Additional technical



Communication and dialogue skills

o

Knowledge



Understanding industry and commercial practice (in food and manufacturing
sectors)



Understanding capabilities and limitations of the industry to produce
materials, equipment, sen
sors, control systems, software, communication
systems, packaging materials, food ingredients, food products, etc.



Understanding legal constraints


4. Organisational



Network of complementary, distributed RI parts including “a common, single management
boar
d and governance structure providing one access point for users although its research
facilities have multiple sited” (ESFRI 2011), part of the RI)



Additional organisational resources, which can support the capabilities (do not form an RI in
themselves)

o

M
ultidisciplinary team

o

Network to involve stakeholders (industry, research)

o

Communication networks

o

Trustworthiness

o

Collective research management structures


5.
Financial



Funds to (pre)finance research (Part of the RI)



Capabilities
(related to the RI, but

do not form an RI in themselves)
:

Types of capabilities, which can be applied for different research areas:



Idea generation



Producing knowledge through research



Carrying out experimental testing



Applying research results through innovation (centre of kno
wledge transfer)



Structuring knowledge



Diffusing research results through education



Converting knowledge into practical solutions



Dissemination of knowledge



Sharing knowledge



Providing assistance to meet legal requirements



Providing assistance to access fu
nding



Project management



Related services


analytical services, analytical laboratory testing (accredited)*

* all capabilities can be used as in
-
house and services provided



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3.1.2

E
-
infrastructure (e
-
IRG, 2010)

E
-
Infrastructure is increasingly recognised as an

essential facilitator of research and innovation. The
sharing of ICT infrastructure across the research projects creates significant opportunities.


E
-
infrastructure includes: networking, authentication and authorisation, grid, cloud and
virtualisation,
high
-
performance, computing, remote access and remote instrumentation computing,
data infrastructures and persistent storage, and virtual research communities and collaboration.


There are many real benefits that stem from a common e
-
Infrastructure across
the European

Research Area (ERA), including:



avoiding diverting resources for research into ad
-
hoc basic ICT service provision



avoiding unnecessary duplication in provision of ICT solutions



leveraging existing expertise and experience



facilitating the
integration and interoperation of different communities and RI



broadening engagement across Europe and internationally



encouraging and supporting open research and innovation


Collaboration between RI and e
-
Infrastructures should be actively supported at a
ll levels, to their
mutual benefit. This collaboration can be facilitated by the emerging focus on service
-
oriented
delivery models that encourage the c
reation of well
-
defined services that can be exploited and
developed at the same time. It is clear that
ICT technology will continue to develop rapidly. The
major research challenges are global in nature, the projects are already global in scale. Climate
c
hange must be considered on a global scale. E
-
Infrastructure tools and resources must be
developed in a
global context to support researchers’ global endeavours.


Different e
-
Infrastructure areas:


1.

High quality networks



innovation, interconnection and interoperability in a multi
-
domain environment



New RI are recognised as ‘innovation engines’ in network evol
ution and are encouraged
to participate in networking coordination bodies to define, test and use new networking
services.


Research networks have
already been transformed into ‘hybrid’ networks, providing high
-
quality
Internet services as well as direct p
oint
-
to
-
point connections, such as ‘lightpaths’, which ensure
dedicated data transfer to and from specific locations (for example, from one researc
h lab to
another).

From a user perspective, networks should provide a ubiquitous, hassle
-
free, end
-
to
-
end dat
a path for
use anytime, anywhere.

To facilitate the seamless networking increasingly demanded (and required) by users, networks
must interoperate, and thus network providers must work together to develop globally accepted
standards.

Close interaction betwe
en network providers, other e
-
Infrastructure providers and the user
community will be crucial to the timely creation of this new integrated work space.


The main technical drivers for network innovation are:



the broad uptake of hybrid networking, which is
enabling high
-
quality and high
-
bandwidth point
-
to
-
point connections besides the normal routed Internet services,



emerging technologies for broad and ubiquitous wired and wireless access to networks,

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the associated need for advanced security provisions.


2.

Authentication and authorisation technologies and policies,



which allow users to establish their identity to access a specific e
-
Infrastructure and to
perform certain operations, are fundamental for the successful operation of RI.




Improved usability, low
ering the threshold for researchers to use the services.



Improved security and accountability, which often conflicts with the usability
requirement.



Leveraging of existing identification systems, such as that of the employing
organisation.



Enhanced sharing
, allowing willing users to minimise the burden of policy enforcement.



Reduced management costs, freeing resources for other service or research activities,
and providing a sound basis for accounting.



Improved alliance with the commercial Internet, which a
lso improves interaction
between scientists and society


3.

Computing



Stronger collaboration between computing service providers and researchers is needed.



Research is increasingly dependent on computational resources, and many scientific
domains increasingl
y



growing use of computational methods, simulation, and data analysis,


Computing infrastructures: laptop or desktop, local computer services at the department or institute
level, as well as national or international computing infrastructure.

The requirem
ents of innovative research


including large data volumes and complex data
processing


should drive development of computing resources (the so
-
called ‘science case’), there
is an increasing need to balance this with increased resource accessibility and u
sage.


4.

Middleware



Within e
-
Infrastructure there are many types and kinds of middleware.



In a distributed computing system, for example, middleware is defined as the software
layer lying between the operating system and the applications.



A central theme of middleware development is the promotion of interoperability and
standardisation of networked resources through a common base of protocols and
services.



Examples of middleware include infrastructures and software services that:

o

Authentic
ate and authorise secure access to resources (compute, storage, data,
etc.).

o

Manage software life
-
cycles.

o

Support collaboration within members of VOs (e.g. attribution of roles and rights
to VO members Instant Messaging, etc.).

o

Support open standards to al
low the interoperability of different implementations
(e.g. middleware repositories and parameter registration).

o

Train and support scientists and support personnel.



New, more general middleware solutions continue to emerge, virtualising computing
resources

and making them available through different interfaces: local, grid, or cloud.
Such middleware support user interactions through traditional local or grid requests, and
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also via the Open Cloud Computing Interface (OCCI) standard, making it possible to
all
ocate compute, storage and network resources on a pay
-
as
-
you
-
go basis.


5.

Remote access and remote instrumentation



Remote use of scientific equipment enables cost
-
effective sharing can substantially
reduce the human and financial costs of research.



The deve
lopment and spread of remote instrumentation techniques and technologies will
also open new opportunities for scientific communities.



Full exploitation of these opportunities requires more effective integration of data
acquisition infrastructures with data

processing infrastructures through standard
interfaces to sensor networks and remote instrumentation, the so
-
called ‘Internet of
Things’.


6.

Data infrastructures and persistent data storage



Supporting the identification and promotion of common (long
-
term) d
ata
-
related
services across different RI, and encourages, through policy and facilitation, the
development of community practices and standards that assist researchers in exploiting
multiple data resources, within and across disciplines.


Data and informat
ion are growing not only in volume but also in complexity, as researchers
increasingly require information derived from multiple sources and formats.

As data is created, stored and used in new and often unsystematic ways, we must also deal with the
incompa
tibilities that inevitably come from independent and autonomous creation and organisation
of data.


7.

Virtual Research Communities (VRCs)



a group of geographically dispersed researchers to work together through the use of
information and communications techn
ologies,



Integration of distributed research capacities/resources, virtual mobility of physically
distant researchers, better access to research results, and regional and global
collaboration and partnerships.


8.

Grid, Cloud and Virtualisation



Science is
increasingly global, and the rise in distributed research teams working with
distributed data sources will continue to drive the need for distributed data processing
and storage.



To service this need, the research sector has developed and deployed grid ser
vices in
Europe and around the world, supporting standards
-
based access to computers, storage,
software, data and other non
-
IT resources, regardless of geographical location,
administrative affiliation, and local management tools.



Another approach to distr
ibuted computing is that of ‘cloud computing’.


The main drivers for future grid and cloud innovation are:

o

Standards to facilitate interoperability and support freedom in choosing a service provider,

o

Integration of existing grid layers with the on
-
demand d
elivery model typical of commercial
clouds,

o

Virtualisation and service
-
orientation supporting better resource utilization, increased
flexibility, and enhanced provision of user
-
focused environments,

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o

Governance models appropriate to driving open standards
-
b
ased interoperability and
integrated user services, and

o

Finance models to support delivery of user
-
focused services leveraging a cost
-
effective
shared infrastructure provision.


Generic Issues


o

Digital Divide issues
: Access to and via e
-
Infrastructure for
researchers in remote or
developing areas is an on
-
going challenge.


o

New user induction
and user training have been identified as common requirements


o

Cost effectiveness


o

Green IT
is a growing issue and one we should expect to become increasingly important

at
both a policy and practical level. Green IT includes the dimensions of environmental
sustainability, the economics of energy efficiency, and the total cost of ownership, which
includes the cost of disposal and recycling. For e
-
Infrastructures, this is
linked to operation
of the different components, and can be interpreted as being mostly related to energy
efficiency (reducing electricity consumption/reducing carbon emissions), and the use of
renewable sources either directly (e.g. for cooling) or indire
ctly (e.g. use of energy from
renewable sources).


o

Software

is essential to the operation of e
-
Infrastructure. The cost of developing and
sustaining effective software should not be underestimated. Development costs are often
hidden, since researchers may spend significant ‘research’ time writing software. Poorly
written software can bring a significant cost in terms of maintenance, which can require
more investment than the initial software writing. Today, almost all software faces the new
challenge of exploiting the multi
-
cored and multi
-
CPU systems increasingly
deployed in
systems from desktops to the most powerful supercomputers.


3.2

Method of implementation


The vision scenarios from WP2 and the envisaged operation of food factories were analysed by 4
working groups within the WP3
,

made up of the representatives of the two (food
processing
and
manufacturing) sectors to identify the overall needs for manufacturing solutions, available options
for appropriate solutions, which have already been promising in other industries and yet not

or
rarely applied in food processing,
or which are forecasted to by available in the future with a
realistic chance
and the related necessary research infrastructures.

Working groups were organized to assign specific responsibilities for considering diffe
rent aspects
of research infrastructures to different WP
members

to ensure that all these aspects be assessed
systematically.

According to the scope of the activities of the WGs,
WG 3.A was responsible for the
science and
technology aspects for food and m
anufacturing, for
identification of future research needs of the
food industry and the related frontier research needs of the manufacturing industry. In addition, WG
3.A identified needs for reaching scientific excellence, attracting young people to scienc
e, enabling
them t
o network among facilities and needs to establish an innovation
-
focused education system.
Processing technologies
were
reviewed systematically.

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Activities

of

WG 3.B on
industry,
innovation
, education

and knowledge transfer

aspects

were
f
ocused on
solutions available or
identification of technical problems in the food industry where
solutions from the manufacturing industry might help
, and existing options for manufacturing
close
to the market or
, which can be tr
an
sformed or adapted from o
ther sectors
. Regarding the innovation
process, the activities of WG 3.B were directed at identifying different methods of knowledge and
technology transfer, including education and training, that were relevant for meeting the short and
long term innovatio
n needs of the food manufacturing sector.

WG 3.C was responsible for

management systems and business models. This included

the
identification of potential supply chain management and business model solutions including the
assurance of protection and exploitation of intellectual property rights, to enhance entrepreneurship
in the food sector, to improve chain governance, suppl
y capacity and operation performance, to
consider safety of the entire food chain and collaboration along the chain and between peers.

WG 3.D
was responsible for economic, social and environmental sustainability aspects, This
included the identification of

the necessary sustainability and financial measures, user access,
liabilities as well.


The main steps of the process are indicated on Figure 1. In the flowchart steps 1.
-
11. cover the
scope of the activity in Task 3.1” Identification of the future needs
for research infrastructure”.


The common work instruction described in D3.1 was followed. The work instruction included a
checklist covering the specific scope of the activities for each WG (Annex
I
.), the flowchart (Figure
1
.
) of the implementation of th
e activities and two templates (Annex
II
. and Annex
III
.). Template 1
(Annex
II
.) was used for description of an identified need of the food processing sector and
Template 2 (Annex
III
.) was used to describe an existing or envisaged manufacturing solution.


Each WGs explored its dedicated scope of aspects systematically and prepared a checklist listing
the main topics which had to be covered.

All WGs considered the main aspects of key enabling
technologies such as sustainable food manufacturing, new Eco
-
Fac
tory mode, ICT enabled
intelligent manufacturing, exploiting new materials.


At first the Vision Scenarios developed in WP2 were reviewed to get an overview considered for
understanding the challenges represented by them. Key documents were also analysed,
such as the
draft Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) of the of ETP Food for Life (2012),
Strategic Roadmap of ETP Manufuture (2010), Outcomes of the EUREKA interdisciplinary
collaboration programme for collaboration of the food sector with the

manufacturing, ICT, water
and energy sectors for enhancing innovation (2012) and the envisaged functions of Future Internet

(SmartAgriFood

FP7 project)
.


A joint workshop was organised with the participation of all WP members, where the methodology
was di
scussed, refined and demonstration examples described in D3.1.


An interactive process was started within each WG. WG members described their ideas (or
problems, needs of the food sector) were discussed
within

each WG to initiate transdisciplinary
thinkin
g. In each WG
,

members described their ideas for problems, needs of the food sector and
the
manufacturing

sector

to solve problems of the food sector (step 1. and step 2.)


These templates were collected by the WG leaders and summary tables

(Table 1.)

were

prepared to
provide an overview of what aspects were covered from the checklist of the WG and which
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needs/challenges of the food sector have matching available of envisaged manufacturing solutions.
These summary tables together with the collected template
s were circulated between the WG
members and the different WGs to generate further ideas and to enhance the development of
matching responses to the listed needs and solutions. These steps (Step 1.


3.) were repeated in 2
rounds. This process helped to g
enerate matching responses from the WGs.


The content of the templates describing the needs of the food sector were analysed (Step 4.) and
summarised by each WG as a chapter for the “Inventory of long and short term future needs of the
food sector (Step
5.).


The needs of the food sector were compared with the collection of the available/envisaged (filled in
Templates 2), analysed and categorised, whether the solution is available or if it is not available yet
it
c
an
be foreseen to be available.


Partner
s identified which manufacturing solutions are available or can be developed or adapted
soon without any additional research infrastructures (Step 7.), and collected these into a separate
Inventory of available solutions (Step 8.) with descriptions of thei
r functions, capabilities in such
details that food manufacturing experts can identify their potential applications.


The next step was to analyze and categorize the unsolved problems and the currently not available
solution
s

whether further research
is
necessary or not
to develop knowledge, which can be used as a
basis for developing appropriate solutions
(Step 9.). If research is not necessary, those solutions
were listed into the Inventory of solutions available in short term (Step 10.a). Where further

research is necessary, partners described envisaged manufacturing solutions and related food
processing applications and collected them in Inventory of envisaged manufacturing solutions (Step
10.b).

The end of the Task 3.1, the necessary research infrastr
uctures and priorities were defined (Step 11.)

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1. Identification of problems of the
food sector to be solved by
manufacturing solutions
2. Identification of manufacturing
solutions which can be used to solve
problems for the food sector
3. Exchange of views in several rounds
4. Needs of the food sector
6. Compare, match
problems and solutions
7. Is solution
available/ can be
adapted soon?
8. Inventory of available
solutions
10.a Inventory of solutions
available in short term
Yes
No
Yes
No
11. Identification of necessary
research infrastructure
12. Is this
infrastructure
available?
14. Is this
infrastructure
necessary /
feasible?
13. Current research
infrastructure
Stop
No
Yes
Yes
5.
Inventory of long and
short term future needs
of the food sector
17. Priorities, potential
obstacles and required
resources/infrastructures
19. Verification of all
documents through
national discussions
(9 countries)
20. Verification of all
documents at European
Level
21. Finalisation of all
documents
10.b Inventory of envisaged
manufacturing solutions
9. Is additional
infrastructure
necessary for further
research to develop
a solution?
No
15. Draft inventories of gaps
in the infrastructure by
WGs
16. Screening of feasibility,
potential to improve
competiveness
No
18. Summary inventory of
gaps in research
infrastructure
Figure I.
Flowchart of identification of gaps in research infrastructures
in WP3
Figure I. : Flowchart of identifiction of gaps in research infrastructures in WP3

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4

Results and Analysis


4.1

Research needs of the Food Sector and

the Relevant Manufacturing Solutions


Table 1.

shows the matching between identified problems and solutions collected with the filled in
Templates. A code was added to each Template as a short indication for better tracking during
summarizing. The code co
nsists of first the indication of the WG (A,B,C or D) and the number
depending the place which is taken originally by the template in the finalized list. The nature
whether it is a
need (
Template 1
)

or

a solutions (Template

2
)

is

indicated with T1 or T2.

T
he
descriptions are provided in Annex IV. Collection of the description of needs and solutions.


The findings of the working groups on research
needs of

the food processing and the manufacturing
sectors can be grouped around the following main subjects:


(1)

Sustainable food manufacturing



New

Eco
-
Factory

Mode



Waste Utilisation and Valorisation



Recovery of resources and

valuable materials



Capacity utilisation sources from seasonal nature of production



0
-
km

Supply Chain



Business models enhancing local (internat
ional) district markets



Sustainability methods, indicators



Ergono
mic techniques for healthy employees in the food industry


(2)

Smart process design, process control, ICT enabled manufacturing



ICT enabled intelligent manufacturing and tools for transparency



A
utomatisation and robotisation



Web applications and services for the end consumers



Intelligent network for equipment within a processing line and along the food supply
chain


(3)

Advanced food process equipment and technologies



Novel packaging materials and fo
rms


(4)

Food hygiene, food safety and quality



Rapid detection



L
atest findings from nanotechnology



Food, health and safety



Serving consumer’s needs, transparency

(5)

Ensuring freshness, increasing shelf
-
life

(6)

Innovation methods, knowledge and technology transfer


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In the summary table (Table 1.) the relevance for the above listed main subjects is indicated by
reference codes (1)


(6). These main subjects can be used as a guidance for identification of RIs
made of integrated elements.


Table 1.:

Summary Table
-

List of
the collected needs / problems of the food sector and the
collected manufacturing solutions by the 4 WGs


No.

Aspects listed in
the checklist

(A)

Template 1:

Needs / challenges of the food
sector

(B)

Template 2:

Manufacturing solut
ions
having potential applications in
the food sector

Science & Technology for Food & Manufacturing

1

Sustainable food
manufacturing

(advanced food
processing
equipment and
technologies)


A01T1
-

Over processing in food
factories

(3), (1)



2

A02T1
-

Shelf
-
life
-
elongation by
production technique

(5)


3


A01T2
-

Ultrasound cutting

(3)

4


A02T2
-

Low fat food production
using high pressure
homogenisation

(3)

5

A03T1
-

Mouldiness of the surface
of bakery products

(3), (4)


6

A04T1
-

Uneven

cutting surface
(3)



7


A05T1
-

Maintaining shelf
-
life
through global distribution chains

(5)


8

A06T1
-

Cleaning in open areas

(1)


9

A07T1
-

Intelligent use of
disinfectants

(1)


10

A08T1
-

Need for improved shelf
life of food products
(5)


11

A09T1
-

Food safety and hygiene
problems at industrial cutting
(4)


12


A03T2
-

Development of
efficient barrier
-
technology (for
better shelf life)

(5)

13


A04T2
-

Freeze protection using
PEF
(3)

14


A05T2
-

Surface pasteurisation
with infrared heating

(3), (5)

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15


A06T2
-

Mild drying using
supercritical CO
2

(3)

16

New Eco
-
Factory
Mode

A10T1
-

Recovery of (latent) heat
from dust loaded gas streams
(1)


17

A11T1
-

Decontamination of
factory surfaces without water
use
(1), (4)


18


A07T2
-

Baking
with infrared
heating

(3)

19

ICT enabled
intelligent
manufacturing and
tools for
transparency and
traceability


A08T2
-

Intelligent data
acquisition and processing in
industrial environment applying
WSN technology
(2)

20


A09T2
-

Enhanced traceability;
radio
-
frequency identification
(RFID)

(2)

21

A12T1
-

ICT enabled intelligent
manufacturing

(2)


22


A10T2
-

Advanced sensing and
control

(2)

23


A11T2
-

Control system
development for highly non
-
linear manufacturing processes

(2)

24

Exploiting new
materials through
manufacturing

(waste utilisation)

A13T1
-

By
-
products technology

(1)


25


A12T2
-

Additive manufacturing

(3)

26

Membrane
technologies
(recovery of new
co
-
products)

A14T1
-

Technological water
wastes
-

membrane sieving

(1)


27

Rapid
detection

A15T1
-

On
-
spot detection of the
nutrients in the final product

(4)


28

A16T1
-

Difficulties on detection
of foreign bodies

(4)


29


A13T2
-
Hyper spectral and
Multispectral Imaging System

(4)

30

Latest findings
from
Nanotechnology


A14T2


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33

A19T1
-

Novel packaging
materials
to be applied in HPTS

(3)


34

A20T1
-

Biodegradable/compostable
packaging materials suitable for
long
-
life ambient stable thermally
processed foods

(1)


35

Web applications
and services for
end customer


A15T2
-

Virtual Supermarket

(2),
(4)

36

Automation and
robotics

A21T1
-

Automatization of
counting of food products

(2)


37


A16T2
-

Manufacturing assistants
or Robotic co
-
workers; Mobile
Manipulators

(2)

38


A17T2
-

Modular Manufacturing
Systems (MMS)
(2)

39

Establishing
innovation
focused
education system

A22T1
-

Research in nutrition



40

Food health &
safety

A23T1
-

Effective decontamination
of all food ingredients including
powders and fresh produce

(4)


41

A24T1
-
Non
-
fouling or easy to
clean surfaces

(3)


42

A25T1
-

High
level of hygiene and
food safety Cleanroom and Zoning
Technology

(4)


43


A18T2
-

Compartition, Zoning,
Cleanroom technology, air
preparation

(4)



Industry, Knowledge Transfer, and Education

1

Sustainable food
manufacturing,
including New
Eco
-
Factory

Mode


B09
-
T1 Increased efficiency in food
production processes

(1)



2

B10
-
T1 Membrane technologies,
BAT (Best Available Technologies)

(1)



3

B18
-
T1 Packaging
-

Use within the
supply chain

(1), (5)



4



B29
-
T2 Printing technology for
the
production of powders

(3)

5


B30
-
T2 Superheated steam
drying

(3)

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6

ICT enabled
intelligent
manufacturing


B13
-
T1 Process control based on
weight checking

(2)



7

B15
-
T1 Smart storage and
commission/depot systems

(2)



8



B25
-
T2 Vision systems for
robot
guidance and food inspection

(2),
(4)

9



B26
-
T2 Smart greenhouse
management systems

(2)

10

Smart process
design: automation

B11
-
T1 Man machine interfaces
(2)



11

Smart process
design: hygienic &
flexible plant
design

B17
-
T1 Complete elimination
of
fouling development in heat
exchangers

(3)



12

Smart process
design: product
flow management



B23
-
T2 Effective Maintenance
system based on TPM

(2)

13

Smart process
design: automation



B24
-
T2 Robotics for increased
automation flexibility in food
manufacturing

(2)

14

Smart process
design: Decision
support and
modelling tools



B31
-
T2 Mathematical modelling
to predict process time

(2)

15

Smart process
design: automation


B32
-
T2 Internal logistics
automation and management

(2)

16

Smart process
design:
automation:
application of
Lean
Manufacturing



B27
-
T2 Application of overall
equipment effectiveness in food
SMEs

(2)

17

Smarter process
control, tracking &
tracing



B33
-
T2 Supply chain
management with RFID

(2)

18

Smarter
process
control, tracking &
tracing



B22
-
T2 Sensor technology for
the food industry

(2), (4)

19

B14
-
T1 Multifunctional and flexible
foreign body detection system

(2)



20

Exploiting new
functionalities
through
manufacturing



B34
-
T2 3D Food printing
technology

(3)

21

Food hygiene &
food safety

B16
-
T1 100% compliance in
hygiene procedures
(4)


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22


B19
-
T1 Safe manufacture of
powdered food ingredients

(3), (4)


23

B21
-
T1 Validation of allergen
cross
-
contamination

(4)


24

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer

B01
-
T1 The Innovation Factory

(6)



25

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer

B02
-
T1 The virtual business

(6)



26

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer

B03
-
T1 Value Chain
Integrator

(6)



27

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer

B05
-
T1 Technology transfer
management

(6)


28

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer

B17
-
T1 Cooperation food
processors, machine builders &
RTD institues

(1)



29

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer

B20
-
T1 Networking of SMEs
oriented to finding solutions for
common technological threats and
problems

(1)



30

Innovation
methods:
knowledge &
technology transfer



B28
-
T2 Assessment for SMEs

31

Innovation
methods: training
& education

B06
-
T1 Trademark management

(6)



32

Innovation
methods: training
& education

B07
-
T1 Accessing knowledge and
trademark skills

(6)



33

Innovation
methods: training
& education

B08
-
T1 Food nutritional quality
management



34

Innovation
methods: training
& education

B12
-
T1 New training method based
on 3D virtual design

(2), (6)





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Management Systems and Business Models

1

Supply chain
management

Business model

C01T1
-

Transfer of Process
excellence method to

food industry

(1)

C01T2
-

Method for the effective
knowledge and technology
transfer (mediators)

(6)

C02T2
-

Process excellence
methods for food industry

(1)

C03T2
-

Supply chain design
tools

(1)

C04T2
-

Operational oriented
business models

(3)

C05T2
-

Pay per availability
Business Model

81), (3)

2

Supply chain
management

Business model

C02T1
-

Collaborative chain pricing

(1)

C06T2
-

Methodology for joint
SC/technology/business model
design

(1), (3)

3

Supply chain
management

C03T1
-

Open innovation/Co
-
innovation

C07T2
-

Legal frameworks for
international business networking

(1), (2)

4

Supply chain
management

C04T1
-

Addressing differences in
agribusiness chain stakeholders’
楮ie牥獴⁦潲灴 浡氠瑲m湳灡牥湣y
sy獴敭s

⠴E


R

p異灬y
c桡楮i
浡湡ge浥湴

C〵吱M
-

m牯灥爠灲潢汥洠摥晩湩瑩潮o
a湤⁧oa氠獥瑴l湧 景f灴 浡氠
瑲t湳灡牥ncy⁳y獴敭s

⠱E


S

p異灬y c桡楮i
浡湡ge浥湴

C〶吱M
-

f湴e汬楧e湴e瑷潲欠o映
e煵楰qe湴⁷楴桩渠愠灲潣e獳s湧 湥
a湤⁡汯lg⁴桥⁦潯搠獵灰oy cha楮

⠲E


T

䵡c桩湥hy
潲楥湴敤⁢畳楮n獳s
浯摥汳

C〷吱M
-

m牯扬r洠潦⁣a灡c楴y
畴u汩獡瑩潮⁳潵牣e搠晲潭⁳敡獯湡氠
湡瑵牥映灲潤畣瑩潮

⠱E

C〸吲M
-

may⁰e爠畳r⁢畳 湥獳s
浯摥m

⠱E


C〹吲M
-

may⁰e爠灡牴⁢畳楮敳猠
浯摥m

⠱E

C㄰吲N
-

c汥l楢i汩ty
-
潲oen瑥搠
扵獩湥獳潤ol
⠱EⰠ⠳I

U

B畳楮敳猠u潤o汳

C〸吱M
-

B畳楮敳猠u潤ol猠sx灬潩t楮i
瑨攠灯瑥湴na氠潦l眠瑥ch湯汯n楥i

⠱EⰠ⠳I


9

p異灬y c桡楮i
浡湡ge浥湴

C〹吱M
-

〠歭⁳異灬y⁣桡楮i
浡湡ge浥湴

⠱F

C〲吲M
-

m牯re獳⁥sce汬e湣e
浥瑨潤猠景m⁦潯 ⁩湤畳瑲y

⠶F

C03T2
-

Supply chain design
tools

(1)

10

Supply chain
management

Machinery orieted
C10T1
-

Shelf
-
life
-
elongation by
production technique

(5)

C11T2
-

Cleanroomtechnology
renting business model

(4)

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business models

11

Supply chain
management

C11T1
-

Interoperability
infrastructure for

supply chain
integration

(1)


12

Territory/district
-
based business
models


C12T1
-

Business models enhancing
local districts (international) markets

(1)

C12T2
-

Glocal business model

(1)

C13T2
-

Value chain integrator

(1)

13

Machinery
-
oriented
business
models



C14T2
-

Pay per Ingredient
business model

(1)

14


Consumers
-
oriented business
models



C15T2
-

Personalized food
consumption business model

(4)




Economic, Social and Environmental Sustainability


1

Methods,
indicators and
tools for
environmental,
social and
economic
sustainability
analysis

D 01.1 T1
-

Sustainability
assessment based on a life cycle
approach

(1)



2

D 01.2 T1
-

Methods, indicators and
tools for environmental, social and
economic sustainability analysis

(1)


3

D
01.3 T1


䑥癥汯灭en琠潦t
a杧牥gate⁩湤 ca瑯牳

⠱F


4

䐠〱⸴⁔ㄠ
-

oe扯畮搠bffec瑳映t潯搠
灲楣e⁣hanges

⠱F


R

䐠〱⸵⁔ㄠ


f湤楲nc琠ta湤⁵獥
c桡nge
䥌啃r

⠱F


S

䐠〱⸶⁔ㄠ


oe摵d楮g⁦ 潤⁷o獴攠
a湤⁨n湣e⁩湣 ea獩sg⁳畳 a楮慢楬ity
摵物湧⁰牯ce獳sng⁢y
畳u湧⁡ ca牢潮r
景潴灲楮i整桯摯汯 y

⠱F


T

䐠〱⸷⁔ㄠ


Ca牢潮r景潴灲楮p

⠱E



U

䐠〱⸸⁔ㄠ


呯潬猠景q⁴ e
a獳敳獭敮琠潦⁳畳 a楮慢楬ity

⠱E


9

䐠〱⸹⁔ㄠ


p業灬p晩f搠d潯汳⁦潲
獵獴a楮慢楬ity a獳敳獭敮s

⠱E




䐠〱⸱〠aㄠ


ii晥⁣ycle
-
扡獥搠
a灰牯pche猠瑯⁴桥⁥va汵慴楯渠潦i

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social aspects in the food sector

(1)

11

Industrial
symbiosis


D 02 T2


f湤畳n物r氠䕣o汯ly
灥牳灥c瑩癥 景f⁴桥 ag牯
-
f潯搠
獥c瑯t

⠱E



䵥瑨潤t⁡湤⁴潯n猠
景f
c潭o畮楣u瑩湧
獵獴a楮慢楬ity
a湡ly獩s

䐠〳⁔ㄠ


C潭o畮楣u瑩潮o
潦o
獵獴a楮慢楬ity⁰e牦o牭r湣e⁡汯lg⁴桥
景潤fc桡楮

⠱E
㐩





䐠〳⁔㈠


兵楣欠ke獰潮獥⁃潤o
景f⁰牯 畣瑳⁥湶t牯湭r湴n
c潭o畮楣u瑩潮o

⠱E



c潯搠獡fety

䐠〵M吱


f浰牯癥搠景潤o獡晥ty 楮
c汥l渠牯n浳
⠴F




p潣楡氠楳i略

䐠〶⸱M吱q


䕲g潮潭oc猠瑥t桮楱略h

景f 景潤f 楮摵i瑲y f潲o 桥a汴hy
e浰moyees

⠱E




䐠〶⸲⁔ㄠ


C潬oa扯牡瑩癥⁣桡楮i
灲楣楮i

⠱E




䐠〶⸳⁔ㄠ


噡汯物獩ng
浡湵mac瑵物tg⁳潬畴u潮猠o桲潵h栠瑨e
a湴nc楰慴楯渠潦⁣潮獵oe爠湥e摳d

⠴E




ieg楳ia瑩癥
浥m獵牥猠s湤n
oeg畬慴潲y f獳略s





䑥癥汯灩ng⽓瑲ta
浬楮i湧ⁱ畡汩ty
a獳畲s湣e
獴慮摡牤r



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4.2

Evaluation of the long and short term needs of the food sector and potential
manufacturing solutions and define necessary research infrastructure


Each need
was checked for

match
ing

relevant solution and all needs
were

generally divided into
two groups of long and short term needs. The basis of this this division is the availability of
solutions for these needs within a reasonable time. As short term needs will be solved in imminent
p
eriod of time, while the long term needs are required more time or even more research to be
solved. Hence the latter probably highlights the necessity of new infrastructures.


4.2.1

Evaluation by the WG Science & Technology for Food & Manufacturing


The followi
ng list is related to step 5 on the flowchart and tries to match the needs to the suggested
solutions.



Table 2.:

Inventory of long and short term needs of the food sector


S/L
term
need

Needs / challanges of the food sector

Template 1

Keywords

Short Term N
eeds

A01T1
-

Over processing in food factories



non thermal processing



PEF



mild processing,



HPP

A03T1
-

Mouldiness of the surface of bakery
products



Infrared light



mouldiness,



bakery industry



shelf life

A04T1
-

Uneven cutting surface



ultrasound cutting



meat industry



cutting surface

A06T1
-

Cleaning in open areas



cost reduction,



sustainability



disinfectant

A07T1
-

Intelligent use of disinfectants



Sustainability



disinfectant

A09T1
-

Food safety and hygiene problems at
industrial
cutting



cross contamination,



ultrasound cutting

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A10T1
-

Recovery of (latent) heat from dust
loaded gas streams



heat exchanger



heat recovery



energy recovery

A15T1
-

On
-
spot detection of the nutrients in the
final product



fast detection

A16T1
-

Difficulties on detection of foreign
bodies



foreign body detection



X
-
ray detectors

A22T1
-

Research in nutrition



micronutrients benefits

A23T1
-

Effective decontamination of all food
ingredients including powders and fresh produce



decontamination



powder



dry products

A24T1
-
Non
-
fouling or easy to clean surfaces



food processing



contamination reduction



new surface structures

A25T1
-

High level of hygiene and food safety
Cleanroom and Zoning Technology



food hygiene



market expansion



clean label

A21T1
-

Automatization of counting of food
products



food processing



quality control

Long Term Needs

A02T1
-

Shelf
-
life
-
elongation by production
technique



distribution, shelf life,

A05T1
-

Maintaining shelf
-
life through global
distribution chains



shelf life,



waste reduction



transport,



enhanced quality

A08T1
-

Need for improved shelf life of food
products



shelf life,



waste reduction



PEF

A11T1
-

Decontamination of factory surfaces
without water use



dry cleaning



non
-
aqueous
decontamination



pulsed light



cold plasmas

A12T1
-

ICT enabled intelligent manufacturing



consumer’s information



ICT

A13T1
-

By
-
products technology



waste reduction

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A14T1
-

Technological water wastes
-

membrane
sieving



waste water reduction



membrane

A17T1
-

Nanotechnology for improving cleaning
efficiency



surface, cleaning



nanotechnology

A18T1
-

Novel packaging materials prevent the
weight loss for traditional salamis



Shelf life



weight loss



packaging,



salami

A19T1
-

Novel packaging materials to be
applied
in HPTS



packaging



HPTS

A20T1
-
Biodegradable/compostable packaging
materials suitable for long
-
life ambient stable
thermally processed foods



packaging,



barrier properties



When matching the needs with relevant suggested solutions, in some cases

more than one solution
was suggested