analytic tools for online habits

pucefakeΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

30 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

64 εμφανίσεις

Personal Transparency and self
-
analytic tools for
online habits


Mark Johnson

David Sherlock

David Griffiths

The

Institute for Educational Cybernetics

The University of

Bolton


There is a video presenting this work at


http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=
-
8245163214778145509&ei=Bn0JSYXQNYr82w
Kn06CeCg&q=trackme&hl=en&so=1


Making effective use of

technology in learning


Opportunities are available to Learners, e.g.


T
o seek out resources


Networking with other learners


Finding learning opportunities


Using tools available outside the institution


These are very useful skills, even in a very
traditional educational environment


Similar situation in business

A digital divide?


Not all users are equally able to deal with the
opportunities of new technologies


Those who are skilled are empowered, those
who are not are excluded


Widely recognised that learners and teachers
need


Knowledge (what is available )


Skills (how to use what is available)


We provide courses to provide these things

Disposition and attitude


Learners and teachers also need an
appropriate disposition and attitude towards
technology


Often this is


Unrecognised as a significant factor


Seen as something we can’t fix


There is a
‘long tail’ of disengagement with
technologies

Natives and Immigrants?


Prensky’s

proposed the Digital Native / Digital
Immigrant metaphor


This suggests that we can’t do anything about
attitude and disposition, it is determined by
early experience of technology


This determinist view is not supported by the
past history of technological change, current
use of technology, or the experience of
educators


Habit


The SPLICE project proposes that
technological
habits may be transformed from
a position of disengagement to
engagement


Focused
on identifying the mechanisms
involved


A key
to this
is to understand
the nature of
‘habit



Habits give some
people a new way of
operating and new
power

Engaging in the online world


Self publishing is a huge opportunity


A personal
amplifier


Builds “social capital”


Many build careers
on
this, in business, academia, music…


If
everyone is amplifying then you
also need to
attenuate


Tools and ways of working can manage this


RSS readers can manage the
information feeds which they
receive, simplifying the task for users


L
earners need to develop habits which enable them to
act effectively in their technological environment



TrackMe


TrackMe

is a tool developed by the SPLICE
project


Built

in
the

Flock

browser


Designed to make unconscious
technological
practices more
conscious through providing a
range of analytical
tools


categorization
and management of
web
-
history


sharing
of practices through
social networks


visualization
of increasing online
identity


Transparency


Social software increases personal transparency


Transparency is not always comfortable


TrackMe

extends
personal transparency
in a small
group, and supports comparison with others


Learners identify effective technological habits


Transparency encouraged using


micro
blogging (
via Twitter)


social bookmark
(via Delicious)


comparing user
profiles with other users of
TrackMe


Using

these

tools

provides

insight
, and
also

practical

skills

Using

twitter

to

get


different

views

on

a
resource


Timeline of learner’s

resources for
a task


Analytics


Analytics
on a
personal level


Between users


How
their resources compare with other users



Random Resource’
helps
users discover new
resources


Aim to help users identify
the things they do
with
technology
that have a positive effect on their learning
process.


Further self reflection is provided by integration with
the
Touchgraph

Google
browser which
offers a visual
representation of a learners engagement and activity
on the web
for easy
analysis.


TouchGraph


The
TouchGraph

Google Browser shows the
network of connectivity between websites, as
reported by Google's database of related sites


TrackMe

uses
TourchGraph

to generate a map of
a learner’s online activities and the connections
between them


Opportunity

to

reflect

on



How online activities interact with each other.


H
ow

activities

have

benefited

from

transparency and
openness by showing which of the learners


TouchGraph

map of a learner’s online
activities and connections



A

post at Blogger has acted as a catalyst between two
resources resulting in a explosion of learner interaction


Questions


On exploring the analytical
some of the questions are


How
effectively do your technological actions meet the
goals you establish?


How
much repeated effort do you use in accessing multiple
webpages
?


To
what extent do you find yourself getting ‘distracted’ by
online engagement?


Can
you remember all your passwords?


How
much time do you spend ‘
refinding
’ things that you
have previously found?


Can
you detect any change in your habits?


Is
your online profile rising as you explore the internet?


Practical

recommendations


In relation to each of the questions above, some
practical suggestions:


Using RSS to aggregate frequently visited web pages


Developing more effective search habits and saving
them


Using Identity management techniques to manage
passwords


Using Social Bookmarking services


Making more effective use of public social action
(
Youtube
, etc)

Work

with

learners


Mixed
group of learners from Multimedia and
Visual
Art courses
at a Further Education
institution in
Wales


Liked mapping
personal presence on the
web
with
TouchGraph


Learners can see how increased
engagement with
social software services
can impact
on
social
position


Basis for
talking about
bigger
issues
of
technology, technological habit and personal
empowerment


What

is

the

real
problem
?


When people experience technological
difficulties we have found that these often do
not have their origin in technology


They have their origin in deeper personal
things


Often it is a reluctance to reflect on and
change habits

Autonomous

reflection


not

adopted

by

learners


TrackMe

envisaged as a tool which would
encourage autonomous reflection of
technological habit.


Reluctance to reflect on and transform
technological habits lead to a
relucance

to use
TrackMe


Results indicate that
TrackMe

is ineffective in
this. Learners
were
not convinced of the
benefit
not
of
the tool,
or even the argument


But

TrackMe

gives

us


something

to

talk

about



TrackMe

offers a way of talking about something
which would otherwise be very difficult to
experience and articulate


Exposes the connection between individual
human action (especially with technology) and
increased connectedness and social capital.


The
issues
raised by
TrackMe

were still being
talked about by learners in the
group well after
the end of the project


G
radually
new practices emerge with those
discussions