Content Management System

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Content Management System

Introduction: CMS and DMS

Content


content

is
information

and experiences that may
provide value for an end
-
user/audience
in
specific
contexts.


Content may be delivered via any
medium

such as the
internet, television, and audio CDs, as well as live
events such as conferences,….


The author, producer or publisher of an original source
of information or experiences may or may not be
directly responsible for the entire
value

that they attain
as content in a specific context.


Media production and delivery technology may
potentially enhance the value of content by formatting,
filtering and combining original sources of content for
new audiences with new contexts.

Document


It

is

commonly

said

that

“a

document

can

either

be

represented

in

electronic

form

(i
.
e
.

Word

document,

Spreadsheet

file,

Movie

file,

Sound

clip,

etc
.
)

or

as

a

traditional

hardcopy

consisting

of

one

to

thousands

of

pages”
.



Document


Official

documents,
Reports
,
Contracts
, text
file
, a computer file
that contains text.



Documents are sometimes classified as secret, private
or public.


There are accepted standards for specifi
c applications in various
fields, such as:


Thesis, paper, journal


Business and accounting: financial: invoice


Research: RFP, Proposal, Report


Law and Politics: License, Certificate


Government and Industry: Instructions


Media and marketing


Content Life Cycle


Organization
-

Workflow
-

Creation
-

Repository
-

Versioning
-

Publishing


Archives


Content Management


is the set of processes and technologies that
support the collection, managing, and
publishing of information in any form or
medium.

C
ontent Management


Create/edit/delete content in a shared
repository (database)


Organize content


Content can be published/visible or not based
on conditions (workflow, access permissions)


Layout control through CSS (+ template of
some kind)


Document Life Cycle

Document Life Cycle

Document Life Cycle

Document Life Cycle

Document Life Cycle

Document Management



“Document Management includes every
action taken with a document within an
organization, with respect to the creation,
distribution and deletion of documents


Document Management


Document management is the capture,
storage and retrieval of documents. With or
without a document management solution,
your organization already captures, stores and
retrieves documents every day. For many
organizations, this process is amazingly time
consuming and too often ignored.


Content Management System


is a computer program that allows publishing,
editing and modifying
content

as well as
maintenance from a central interface. Such
systems of
content management

provide
procedures to manage workflow in a
collaborative environment. These procedures can
be manual steps or an automated cascade.



An integrated set of software tools that support
the content management functions


Document Management System


is a computer system (or set of computer
programs) used to track and store
electronic
documents
. It is usually also capable of
keeping track of the different versions
modified by different users (history tracking).

Synonyms of DMS

Document management has been named differently


DMS (Document Management Systems),


DIS(Document Information Systems),


IDM(Integrated Document Management),


EDM(Electronic Document Management),


ECM(Enterprise Content Management),


Content Management and Knowledge
Management.


Document Management System (also known by
some as a "paperless office" system or content
management system),

Benefits of DMS


Document management software gives an agency
the ability to retrieve and manage
electronically
generated
information. The software allows
documents to be associated with indexes and
metadata
that describe
the file and enable
revision tracking. The
document
management
system facilitates
quick retrieval
of the records
.


For medium and large law firms, with hundreds
of thousands
of documents, using a document
management program
to organize, index and
control
their documents
is an absolute necessity.

Capabilities of a DMS


FIND:
Find documents and files in seconds rather than hours.


SHARE:
Allow more than one worker access to the same document at
the same time.


VERSION CONTROL:
Version control gives you the ability to mange
document changes and revisions
--
including going back to a previous
version of a document.


CENTRALIZATION:
Store department or workgroup documents in a
central storage area.


SECURITY:
Set document security for who can view and update files.


AUDIT:
Verify who viewed and made updates to documents.


ARCHIVING:
Set
retention

periods for documents, and schedule
archival or removal processes.

Types of CMS


web content management system



component content management system



Enterprise content management


web content management system



(WCMS) is a CMS software, implemented as a web
application, for creating and managing HTML content.


It is used to manage and control a large, dynamic
collection of web material.


It provides website authoring, collaboration, and
administration tools designed to allow users with little
knowledge of web programming languages to create
and manage website content with relative ease.


It is a bundled or stand
-
alone application to create,
manage, store and deploy content on Web pages.


component content management
system


A (
CCMS
) is a CMS that manages content at a granular
level (component) rather than at the document level.
Each component represents a single topic, concept or
asset (for example an image, table, product
description, a procedure).


The CCMS must be able to track "not only versions of
topics and graphics but relationships among topics,
graphics, maps, publications, and deliverables."


Components can be as large as a chapter or as small as
a definition or even a word. Components in multiple
content assemblies (content types) can be viewed as
components or as traditional documents.


Enterprise content management


(
ECM
) is a formalized means of organizing and
storing an organization's documents, and
other content, that relate to the organization's
processes. The term encompasses strategies,
methods, and tools used throughout the
lifecycle of the content.


CMS


Open source CMS that are highly recommended
by the web developers and users
community are
:


Drupal

(
http://drupal.org
)


DotNetNuke

(www.dotnetnuke.com) *


CMS
Made
Simple (
www.cmsmadesimple.org)


Joomla
! (www.joomla.org)


SilverStripe

(
www.silverstripe.com)


WordPress

(
www.wordpress.org)

Technology Platform

Drupal

Joomla!

Plone

Operating

System

*nix, Windows,

OS X

*nix, Windows,

*nix, Windows,
OS X

Programming
Language

PHP

PHP

Python

Database

MySQL

MySQL

Zope

(Object
oriented)

Content Management System

Information and Knowledge Management

Information Concepts
:


Data, Information, and Knowledge

27


Data:

raw facts


Alphanumeric, image, audio, and video


Information:
collection of facts organized in
such a way that they have additional value
beyond the value of the facts themselves


Value of Information

is directly linked to how it
helps decision makers achieve their organization’s
goals and can be measured


in time required to make a decision


Increased profits to the company








28

Data, Information, and Knowledge

The Characteristics of Valuable
Information

29

The Characteristics of Valuable
Information (continued)

30

Information Management


(
IM
) is the collection and management of
information from one or more sources and the
distribution of that information to one or more
audiences.


Management means the organization of and
control over the planning, structure and
organizing, controlling, processing, evaluating
and reporting of information activities in order to
meet client objectives and to enable corporate
functions in the delivery of information.

Information Management


(IM
)Is the management of the way an organization collects,
stores, processes, evaluates and distributes information.


Information Management is not so much concerned with
the content of the information as such (e.g. whether the
information is about finance, customers, potential markets,
policies, technical details of products and so on) but with
the way organizations controls the information flows,
structures the processes to collect, process and share
information.


i.e., the organization's ability to process information, is at
the core of organizational and managerial competencies.
Consequently, strategies for organization design must be
aiming at improved information processing capability.

Areas in the scope of IM in EXIN

Information Management Model

Information Management Model

Rick
Maes

(
Maes
, 1999)

This model has:


two axes, one axis showing the business and the ICT (the supply and
demand sides), with Information Management in the middle. The other
axis represents the different levels within both organizations (or
organizational units).


The middle row and column reflect the translation of the strategy into
operations and the translation of the business objectives into ICT
requirements (and vice versa).


In organizations that already are taking their approach to Information
Management seriously the role of the IT provider is changing. However,
the responsibility of translating business requirements into technical
capabilities remains. Technicians are unlikely to become the counterpart
of the Information Manager on the business side. What is needed is a
service manager with business awareness, who can understand and
articulate the information requirements of the customer.


Information Management Model

Information Manager

Skills and competencies needed in Information Management are not
only related to understanding the role of information in business
processes or how to use information technology, but more
specifically how to organize the Information Management
processes and how to define an information strategy and
architecture.

But what is needed most of all are the business and soft skills to bring
people and ideas together and get commitment in implementing,
maintaining and improving the management of information in an
organization. This involves strong communication skills,
understanding of the business, strategic thinking and directional
capabilities.

a shift from technical knowledge towards understanding what

information can do for an organization and how technology can be

deployed to identify and exploit business opportunities

Information Life Cycle


The
information lifecycle is the “change in the
value of information” over time.

Information Life Cycle

When data is first created, it often has the highest value and is used
frequently. As data ages, it is accessed less frequently and is of less value
to the organization. Understanding the information lifecycle helps to
deploy appropriate storage infrastructure, according to the changing value
of information.

in a sales order application, the value of the information changes from the
time the order is placed until the time that the warranty becomes void.
The value of the information is highest when a company receives a new
sales order and processes it to deliver the product.

After order fulfillment, the customer or order data need not be available for
real
-
time access. The company can transfer this data to less expensive
secondary storage with lower accessibility and availability requirements
unless or until a warranty claim or another event triggers its need. After
the warranty becomes void, the company can archive or dispose of data to
create space for other high
-
value information.


data

information

knowledge
hierarchy


The data

information

knowledge hierarchy
has its roots in traditional IT methods and
begins typically by identifying requirements


From these requirements, users and IT experts
distil data from these requirements


Data are facts and observations, which in a
particular context become information


Information used to take decisions forms
knowledge upon which people base actions to
achieve results

data

information

knowledge
hierarchy

The major problem associated
with the hierarchy is the
conceptual model when
attempting to separate data
from information and
information from knowledge

knowledge

information

data (KID)


The knowledge

information

data (KID) model
reverses the existing hierarchy, which suggests
knowledge is a product of data and
information


In other words, instead of a bottom up
approach to identify knowledge, the concepts
are reorganized to be top down, with
knowledge leading to information which
determine data


knowledge

information

data (KID)

knowledge

information

data (KID)


Knowledge


In the KID model, the term ‘knowledge’, refers to
explicit knowledge

that which can be codified,
structured and communicated easily


Explicit knowledge is used to achieve higher order
organizational objectives and generate capabilities that
create sustainable advantage


People craft shared meanings and develop shared
schema for the creation, use, transfer, sharing, and
disposal of explicit knowledge across functional
communities rather than within functional parts of a
traditional value chain



knowledge

information

data (KID)


Information


Information is what people or systems need to
be able to carry out work practices


Information is organized, analyzed,
interpreted to be meaningful by and within
work practices that “should be”
to fulfilled to
address stakeholders’ expectations


knowledge

information

data (KID)


Data


Data are the constituent elements of
information


This is exemplified by the information
‘customer’s name’


Constituent data elements include ‘title’,
‘forename’, and ‘last name’


Data includes algorithms and formulae
embedded in software


47

APO’s KM Definition

KM is an
integrated approach
for creating,
sharing, and applying knowledge to enhance
organizational
productivity, profitability, and
growth
.

Major Elements of the
Framework

Vision and Mission

Accelerators

Knowledge Process

Outcomes

Store

O
UTCOMES

KNOWLEDGE
P
ROCESS

A
CCELERATORS

People

Processes

Leadership

Technology

Team

Capability

Organizational

Capability

Individual

Capability

Societal

Capacity

APO KM Framework

Knowledge in people and networks

Captured

Knowledge

Individuals

& Teams

Goals

Results

Using

Knowledge

Learn

during

Learn

after

Learn

before

BP’s original holistic knowledge
management framework

£$

Leadership

& Culture

49

There’s a hole in my bucket...

Project

Review Meeting

Learning

captured

in lessons

learned report

Report stored...

...somewhere!

Project

Completed!

Learning

in the

heads of

the team

Unasked questions

Loss of context, summarisation, loss of emotion,

post
-
rationalisation, legal restrictions...

New

Project

?

New project executes

50


C A P T U R E

When you capture knowledge, you kill it.

Rupert Brun

51

52

شناد چيپرام
(
،يچوا هکات و اکانون
1995

)



ي
ريذپ هعماج
(

ي
زاس يعامتجا
)
Socialization
:


ينمض شناد هب ينمض شناد ليدبت


داتسا ميلعت قيرط زا اه تيلاعف نيرمت و ديلقت ،تايبرجت رد تکراشم


رد نانکراک نيب لماعت رد اي اهرانيمس و اه سنارفنک رد تکرش ،يدرگاش
تحارتسا ياه نامز



ي
زاس نودم ،يشخب تينيع
(

ي
زاس ين
و
ريب
)
Externalization
:


حيرص شناد هب ينمض شناد ليدبت



ي
زاسدنتسم اي شرازگ



ي
زاس راشتنا
(
بيکرت
)
Combination
:


حيرص شناد هب حيرص شناد ليدبت

‡
صاخ ه
ز
وح دشرا يسانشراک ه
ر
ود



ي
زاس ين
و
رد
Internalization
:


ينمض شناد هب حيرص شناد ليدبت


لکشم اي تيعقوم اب ههجاوم رد شناد
ي
ريگراکب



Knowledge Management System
Cycle


Creates knowledge through
new ways of doing things


Identifies and captures new
knowledge


Places knowledge into context
so it is usable


Stores knowledge in repository


Reviews for accuracy and
relevance


Makes knowledge available at
all times to anyone

Disseminate

Components of Knowledge
Management Systems


Technologies


Communication


Access knowledge


Communicates with others


Collaboration


Perform groupwork


Synchronous or asynchronous


Same place/different place


Storage and retrieval


Capture, storing, retrieval, and management of both explicit and
tacit knowledge through collaborative systems

Components of Knowledge
Management Systems


Supporting technologies


Artificial intelligence


Expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic, intelligent agents


Intelligent agents


Systems that learn how users work and provide assistance


Knowledge discovery in databases


Process used to search for and extract information


Internal = data and document mining


External = model marts and model warehouses


XML


Extensible Markup Language


Enables standardized representations of data


Better collaboration and communication through portals


©
2005
Prentice Hall, Decision
Support Systems and
Intelligent Systems,
7
th Edition,
Turban, Aronson, and Liang

9
-
56

Knowledge Management System
Implementation


Challenge to identify and integrate components


Early systems developed with networks, groupware, databases


Knowware


Technology tools that support knowledge management


Collaborative computing tools


Groupware


Knowledge servers


Enterprise knowledge portals


Document management systems


Content management systems


Knowledge harvesting tools


Search engines


Knowledge management suites


Complete out
-
of
-
the
-
box solutions


Content Management System

Information
Planning