Dean Ford – Workforce Skills segment - National Council For ...

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February 10, 2011

Workforce Development



the Automation Competency
Model as the catalyst


Dean Ford, CAP

Glenmount Global Solutions, Inc.

Vice President
-

Project Management

Chair


AF Communications Committee




2

Session Objectives


What is the Automation Competency Model (ACM)


Creation of the Model


The Future


Who Benefits



3

Competencies and Competency Models


A competency is the capability to apply a set of
related knowledge, skills, and abilities to successfully
perform “critical work functions” in a work setting


Required for success


Criteria for metrics


Basis for skill standards


Competency Models are collections of competencies
that collectively define successful performance in a
defined work setting

4

Why Did AF Develop the ACM?


A little history:


ISA, the founding member of AF, discovered among their
members that automation, a very broad profession, could
not be easily defined!


“The creation and application of technology to monitor and
control the production of goods & services…” Great for
cocktail party conversation, but bad for promoting a
profession!


How could AF, the “Voice of Automation”, advocate for a
profession in which there is no universally accepted
definition?


5

Why Did AF Develop the ACM?


A look at the Present and to the Future


Practicing Automation Professionals primarily reached their
positions, training, and experience by accident


Many are approaching retirement age and the workforce
cannot replace them


Other than Technical College programs, there is no direct
path to this profession


This profession is essential to the success of American
manufacturing in the global market

6

Creating the ACM


AF Chairman commissions author of “A Guide to the
Automation Body of Knowledge” to produce a straw
man model by populating the ETA advanced mfg CM
framework.


Worked with ETA personnel to understand the meaning of
the tiers and the meaning of terms


Basis heavily rooted in ISA CCST and CAP certifications


AF Chairman works with ISA & AF volunteers and
staff to compile a list of subject matter experts
covering all the competencies projected as relevant

7

Creating the ACM


Arranged a face to face meeting of subject matter
experts to be volunteer led but facilitated by ETA
personnel.


Establish ground rules, philosophy, terms, desired result


Hear all viewpoints, drive to a conclusion


Challenge the straw man


Do not try to complete the entire model in one meeting. Two
additional meetings were required.


Participants varied somewhat per meeting

8

Navigating the Automation
Competency Model


General to Highly Focused Tier Structure


1
-

Personal effectiveness


2
-

Academic


3
-

Workplace


4
-

Industry
-
wide technical


5
-

Industry
-
sector technical


6 through 9 Specialization within specific occupations

9

The Result: ACM and 6 Occupation Descriptions for
Automation Professionals

http://www.careeronestop.org/CompetencyModel
/

10

11

Creating the ACM


Three meetings to complete the ACM


Living Document


Annual updates


3
-
year critical reviews


Tested the model with several highly regarded Automation
Professionals in their work environment


ETA Rollout Web Seminars were conducted to
institutions around the country

12

How the ACM development team and
AF saw it being used.


Automation Career Definition


Automation Curriculum Development Tool


Automation Career Selection Guide


Automation Competency Assessment


Automation Career Professional Development Guide




13

Managing Automation

PM100 Award Winner 2009 and 2010

14

What lies ahead for the ACM?


ACM now exists to provide more opportunities to be
a catalyst for program development to help
educators
,
industry
,
technical

societies
,
workforce
investment boards
,
governments

and their agencies
,
and
guidance counselors

lead students toward
lucrative and relevant automation careers!


In short, ACM has been and will continue to be….


the gift that keeps on giving!

15

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Overall lack of understanding of what Manufacturing
is and its needs


Public, Government, Academia, Industry



The Automation Competency Model provides a
building block for discussions and education of
Manufacturing needs


Common need across all industries


16

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Individuals
-

Students and Their Parents


Clear articulation of employer expectations for skills,
knowledge and character in the chosen endeavor


Planning for education, internships, and work experience to
build skills needed


Explore career options within the profession

17

Examples


Career Days


Hosting Career Days for High school and College Students


2009


North Carolina Colleges


2010


Lee College


Working with groups involved to improve Science
Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) education


Alliance with FIRST (For the Inspiration and
Recognition of Science and Technology)


18

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Individuals
-

Workers


Charts a path to the vast Automation Career


Identifies the skills required to move into other roles or
strengthen existing position


Guide professional development efforts


Reference of standards, certifications, and practices

19

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Individuals
-

Veterans


Mapping of existing Military Occupational Codes into the
model


Identifies gaps in the skills already achieved through military
experience and training


Charts a path to the vast Automation Career


Guide professional development efforts


Reference of standards, certifications, and practices

20

Examples


5
-
Clicks Program


Working with US Department of Veterans Affairs and US
Department of Labor, and ISA Sections


Web program for veterans to identify job openings, mentors
and training


Obtaining US Department of Veterans Affairs Facility
Code to provide formal training to veterans

21

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Business and Industry


Clear statement of workforce needs


Requirements for success at all levels


Skill gap analysis


Provides metrics in performance reviews


Guide professional development efforts


Reference of standards, certifications, and practices

22

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Educators and Training Providers


Guide for skilled worker curriculum development


Clearly articulates the competencies required for a very
broad profession


As an evergreen document, provides guidance for course
adjustments reflecting emerging and declining skill
requirements, reviewed by professionals


I.D. competencies in highest demand


I.D. and develop situational training courses

23

Examples


American Association for Community
Colleges


Program Development with Cleveland Community College


Automation Center of Excellence


Introduction of the ACM to community colleges across the
country


Durham Public Schools


Development of high school level Automation Curriculum




24

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Professional Societies: ISA, AF & Individual AF
Member Organizations


Provides a detailed definition for the broad profession of
automation


Facilitates development of programs related to the
profession


Certifications, technical and professional certifications, P.E.
licensing, publications, and training


As a valuable tool to work with or partner with stakeholders
to advance automation as a workforce development
endeavor

25

Examples


ISA creation of the Education Division


ISA Professional Development Department


Workforce Development Committee


AF Workforce Education Committee


Certified Automation Professional (CAP)


Certified Control System Technician (CCST)


Control System Engineer (CSE)

26

Who Benefits from the ACM?


Governments and Their Agencies


To provide standardized job descriptions


To identify the role of automation in policymaking


To identify skills needed and the people trained for industrial
cybersecurity, safety systems, & other specialties relevant to
national security


27

Examples

US
-
European Union Roundtable Discussion on
Economic Recovery


Skills for Growth and Jobs in the Economic Recovery and
Beyond


28

Thank you! For further information or
requests for assistance, contact:


Dean Ford, Glenmount Global Solutions


(443) 876
-
5217
dean.ford@glenmountglobal.com



Michael Marlowe, Automation Federation


(919) 314
-
3937

mmarlowe@automationfederation.org