HWM-23806 Fluid Mechanics (698,22 kb) - Wageningen UR

poisonmammeringΜηχανική

24 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 20 μέρες)

88 εμφανίσεις

Hydrology and Quantitative Water Management Group
dr.ir. A.J.F. Hoitink
dr.ir. A.F. Moene
ir. B. Vermeulen
M.G. Sassi, MSc
Fluid Mechanics
Course guide
Januari 2012
HWM 23806
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)   1
Chair Group Hydrology and Quantitative Water Management 
 
Course Guide 
 
Fluid Mechanics 
 
 
Dr. Ir. A.J.F. Hoitink 
Dr. Ir. A.F. Moene 
Ir. B. Vermeulen 
M.G. Sassi, MSc 
 
January 2012 
 
HWM‐23806 
 
 
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  2
 
a. Name and code of the course 
HWM 23806 – Fluid Mechanics 
 
 
b. Contact person 
Dr. ir. A.J.F. Hoitink  
 
Lecturers    
Dr. ir. A.J.F. Hoitink 
Dr. ir. A.F. Moene 
Ir. B. Vermeulen 
M.G. Sassi, MSc 
 
Examiner 
Dr. ir. A.J.F. Hoitink  
 
c. Language  of  instruction 
and examination 
English 
 
d. Assumed or prerequisite knowledge 
The  course  Fluid  Mechanics  builds  upon 
high‐school  level  mechanics,  and  on 
physics  and  mathematics  obtained  in  the 
first  two  years  of  the  BSc  curriculum  Soil, 
Water,  Atmosphere.  Assumed  knowledge 
includes  the  courses  BIP‐10306, 
Introductory Physics, AEW‐21306, Soil and 
Water  II,  MAT‐23306,  Multivariate 
Mathematics  Applied.  Material  of  these 
courses  can  be  obtained  from  the  WUR 
Bookshop.  Students  who  are  insecure  if 
their  knowledge  is  sufficient  to  start  the 
course  are  referred  to  the  book 
Engineering  Mechanics  –  Statics  by  J.L. 
Meriam  and  L.G.  Kraige,  John  Wiley  and 
Sons Ltd. 
 
Continuation courses:  
The  course  offers  a  general  introduction  to 
fluid  mechanics,  but  has  an  emphasis  on 
applications  in  environmental  fluid 
mechanics,  hydrology  and  meteorology.  
Continuation  courses  include  HWM‐30306, 
River  Flow  and  Morphology  (previously: 
Advanced  Environmental  Hydraulics), 
HWM‐32806,  Hydrological  Processes  in 
Catchments,  MAQ‐32306,  Boundary  Layer 
Processes  and  MAQ‐32806,  Atmospheric 
Dynamics.  
 
e. Profile of the course 
The  course  has  been  developed  especially 
for  3
rd
  year  students  of  BSc  Soil,  Water, 
Atmosphere (BBW). The course can also be 
beneficial for 3
rd
 year BSc and 1
st
 year MSc 
students  of  the  following  programmes:  (i) 
International Land and Water Management 
(BIL,  MIL),  (ii)  Environmental  Sciences 
(BMW,  MES),  (iii)  Climate  Studies  (MCL), 
(iv)  Animal  Sciences  (BDW,  MAS)  and  (v) 
Aquaculture and Marine Resources (MAM). 
 
The  course  explains  the  mechanisms 
underlying  flow  processes  operating  on 
Earth, which govern structures and patterns 
characterizing  the  landscape.  Fundamental 
laws  of  conservation  are  discussed,  which 
govern  flow  in  the  atmospheric  boundary 
layer,  in  inland  waters  such  as  rivers  and 
estuaries, and in the ocean.  Students apply 
physical  concepts  and  approaches  that  are 
used  to  describe  and  interpret  flow 
phenomena  occurring  at  and  near  the 
Earth's  surfa
ce.  Such  phenomena  are  being 
illustrated  and  explained  both  during 
lectures  and  in  KvdL  Laboratory  for  Water 
and  Sediment  Dynamics  Research. 
Laboratory  techniques  and  mathematical 
methods  are  introduced  that  Earth 
scientists commonly use to tackle problems 
of  fluid  mechanics.  In  the  practical  part  of 
the  course,  procedural  knowledge  is  being 
gai
ned by processing and interpreting data.  
 
f. Learning outcomes 
After  successful  completion  of  the  course 
students are expected to be able to:  
 
(i)  solve  problems  in  fluid  mechanics  by 
using  an  appropriate  mass,  momentum  or 
energy  balance,  both  in  the  contexts  of 
continuous fields and control volumes, 
 
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  3
(ii)  calculate  hydrostatic  and  ‐dynamic 
pressures  and  resultant  forces  on 
structures  
 
(iii)  analyse  the  stability  of  a  hydraulic 
structure by setting up a force balance or a 
balance of moments of force, 
 
(iv)  analyze  flows  and  flow  fields  both  in  a 
Lagrangian and an Eulerian framework 
 
(v)  solve  problems  of  steady  flow  in  open 
channels  and  discharge  measurement 
structures, applying the energy equation in 
hydraulics 
 
(vi)  explain  the  boundary‐layer 
approximation and the effect of separation 
and  calculate  various  measures  of 
boundary  layer  thickness  for  laminar 
boundary layers, 
 
(vii) calculate water levels and flow velocity 
in  uniform  open  channel  flow  and  also 
Couette  flows,  when  cross  sectional  area, 
slope  of  the  channel  and  roughness  are 
known or can be measured 
 
(viii)  calculate  energy  losses  in  closed  pipe 
systems  by  applying  friction  coefficients 
and loss coefficients from literature 
 
(ix)  calculate  the  vorticity  of  a  given 
velocity  field  and  analyze  the  vorticity  in 
idealized  vor
tices:  forced  vortex,  free 
vortex and Rankine vortex. 
 
g. Learning materials and resources 
The  following  material  you  will  use  at  the 
course:  (i)  a  copy  of  the  book  Fluid 
Mechanics by JA Liggett ‐, (ii) an additional
reader  (iii)  a  guide  to  the  practical  part  o
f
the  course.  Each  of  the  three  items  is
available at the WUR Shop. 
 
Powerpoint  presentations  are  made 
available through EDUWEB.  
 
h. Educational  (=  teaching  and  learning) 
activities 
The  course  includes  the  following 
educational  activities:  (i)  lectures,  (ii) 
practical  assignments  in  the  Kraijenhoff 
van  de  Leur  Laboratory  for  Water  and 
Sediment  Dynamics  Research  and  (iii)  a 
series  of  seminars.  Annex 1  shows  the 
relation between the educational  activities 
and the learning outcomes. 
 
Lectures:  During  the  lectures,  the  content 
of  the  course  will  be  introduced  and 
illustrated,  aiming  to  challenge  and 
motivate  the  students,  explain  the 
rationale  behind  the  topics,  discuss  good 
and bad examples of the application of the 
theory,  and  guide  the  students  in  the 
process  of  self‐studying  the  written 
material of the course. 
 
Practical assignments: The practical part of 
the course consists  of  carrying  out a series 
of  practical  experiments  in  the  Kraijenhoff 
van  de  Leur  Laboratory  for  Water  and 
Se
diment  Dynamics  Research,  and 
working‐out the measurements. The aim of 
the  practical  part  is  to  let  the  students 
‘learn  by  doing’,  offering  experimental 
proofs  of  especially  the  counter‐intuitive 
parts of the theory, provide illustrations of 
phenomena  which  are  difficult  to  grasp 
from  written  material  (such  as  a  hydraulic 
jump),  and  give  the  st
udents  hands‐on 
experience  with  experiments  in  fluid 
mechanics,  developing  competences 
required for protocol‐based lab research. 
 
Seminars:  Students  are  asked  to  provide 
the  lecturers  with  questions  about  the 
content  of  the  lectures,  about  the  written 
material  or  about  the  worked  examples, 
either orally or via a personal email. In the 
first  part  of  the  seminar,  the  lecturers 
discuss  the  questions  raised  by  the 
students  in  a  plenary  session,  keeping  the 
person  who  asked  the  question 
anonymous.  In  the  remainder  of  the 
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  4
seminar,  the  lecturers  discuss  worked 
examples on the blackboard. 
 
i.
Examination 
The  mark  for  the  course  is  based  on 
written  examination  of  theory  and  the 
judgment  of  practical  assignments.  In  a 
non‐compulsory  mid‐term  exam,  50%  of 
the  theory  is  examined.  The  final  exam  is 
divided  in  two  parts.  The  first  part  may  be 
skipped if the mark for the mid‐term exam 
is 5.0 or higher, which is then the mark for 
part 1. The second part of the final exam is 
made  by  all  attendees.  The  final  mark  will 
be determined according to 2.5 : 2.5 : 1 for 
parts  1  and  2  of  the  final  exam  and  the 
p
ractical  assignments,  respectively.  Annex 
2  offers  a  more  elaborate  view  on  the 
assessment strategy. 
 
j.
The principal themes of the contents 
The  course  focuses  on  the  fluid  flows  of 
water  as  well  as  air  and  the  associated 
static  and  dynamical  forces.  The  three 
most  important  conservation  laws  are 
being  discussed:  conservation  of  mass, 
conservation  of  momentum  and 
conservation  of  energy.  The  subjects  of 
circulation  and  vorticity  are  being  treated 
in  detail.  The  basic  differences  between 
water  (incompressible)  and  air  (semi‐
incompressible) and their consequences on 
the  fluid  flow  characteristics  are  being 
explained.  The  course  offers  an  elaborate 
introduction  to  kinematics,  dimensional 
analysis,  laminar  flow,  boundary  layer 
theory  and  open  channel  hydraulics.  The 
theory  will  be  applied  to  natural  and  man‐
made  systems,  e.g.  atmospheric  and  open 
channel  flows,  flow  in  closed  conduits  and 
discharge measurement structures. 
 
The  course  will  provide  an  elaborate 
introduction to eight principal themes:  
1. kinematics 
2.  conservation  laws  for  mass,  momentum 
and energy 
3.  dimensional analysis and similitude  
4. hydrostatics  
5. laminar flow  
6. energy equa
tion in hydraulics  
7. shallow water flow  
8. rotation and vorticity 
Each  of  the principal  themes of  the  course 
has an equal weight. 
 
k.
Outline and schedule of the programme of 
the course 
Annex 3  provides  the  timetable  of  the 
course  Fluid  Mechanics.  It  gives  the 
planning  of  the  lectures,  the  seminars  and 
the practical assignments.  
 
 
 
 
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  5
Annex 1 Contribution of educational activities to the learning outcomes 
 
Learning outcome
 
Educational activity
 
Lectures 
Seminars 
Practical 
assignments 
solve problems in fluid mechanics by using an appropriate mass, 
momentum or energy balance 
x

x

x
calculate hydrostatic and ‐dynamic pressures and resultant forces on 
structures 
x

x

x
analyze the stability of a hydraulic structure by setting up a force 
balance or a balance of moments of force
x

x

analyze flows and flow fields both in a Lagrangian and an Eulerian 
framework 
x

x

solve problems of steady flow in open channels and discharge 
measurement structures, applying the energy equation in hydraulics 
x

x

x
explain the boundary‐layer approximation and the effect of separation 
and calculate various measures of boundary layer thickness for laminar 
boundary layers 
x

x

calculate water levels and flow velocity in uniform open channel flow 
and also Couette flows 
x

x

calculate energy losses in closed pipe systems by applying friction 
coefficients and loss coefficients from literature 
    x
calculate the vorticity of a given velocity field and analyze the vorticity 
in idealized vortices: forced vortex, free vortex and Rankine vortex. 
x

x

Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  6
Annex 2 Assessment Strategy 
 
Learning outcomes 
List of learning outcomes  Where assessed 
 
A. Mid‐term exam 
B. Practical assignments 
C. Final exam 
solve problems in fluid mechanics by using an appropriate 
mass, momentum or energy balance 
x    x 
calculate hydrostatic and ‐dynamic pressures and resultant 
forces on structures 
x    x 
analyze the stability of a hydraulic structure by setting up a 
force balance or a balance of moments of force 
x    x 
analyze flows and flow fields both in a Lagrangian and an 
Eulerian framework 
x    x 
solve problems of steady flow in open channels and 
discharge measurement structures, applying the energy 
equation in hydraulics 
  x  x 
explain the boundary‐layer approximation and the effect of 
separation and calculate various measures of boundary 
layer thickness for laminar boundary layers 
  x  x 
calculate water levels and flow velocity in uniform open 
channel flow and also Couette flows 
  x  x 
calculate energy losses in closed pipe systems by applying 
friction coefficients and loss coefficients from literature 
  x  x 
calculate the vorticity of a given velocity field and analyze 
the vorticity in idealized vortices: forced vortex, free vortex 
and Rankine vortex. 
    x 
Contribution to the final mark  5/12  
(or 0/12) 
2/12  5/12 
(or 10/12) 
 
The mid‐term exam is non‐compulsory, and examines the same material as that first part of the final 
exam. The first part of the final exam may be skipped if the mark for the mid‐term exam is 5.0 or higher. 
  
  Assessment 
 
When  Who 
A.  Mid‐term exam  Week 4  A.J.F. Hoitink and A.F. Moene 
B.  Practical assignments  Week 8  B. Vermeulen and M.G. Sassi 
C.  Final exam  Week 8  A.J.F. Hoitink and A.F. Moene 
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  7
 
During the first lecture, the students are informed about the assessment strategy. The non‐compulsory 
mid‐term  exam  by  the  end  of  the  fourth  week  has  been  introduced  to  stimulate  the  students  to  start 
studying  right  from  the  start  of  the  course.  It  is  a  two‐hour  exam  during  which  4  of  the  8  principal 
themes of the course are being examined, each in a question that can be answered within 30 minutes. 
During  the  first  seminar  after  the  mid‐term  exam,  the  lecturers  discuss  the  answers  to  the  exam 
questions in a plenary session. The final exam lasts 3 hours, and examines 6 of the 8 principal themes, 
from which 3 coincide with the themes examined during the mid‐term exam. The latter may be skipped 
if the student has passed the mid‐term exam with a 5.0 or higher. 
 
The practical assignments start in the third week of the course, when one of the two plenary meetings is 
scheduled during which the students receive information about the experiments. The students receive a 
guide  with  an  introduction  to  the  experiments,  and  a  step‐by‐step  procedure  that  should  be  followed, 
per experiment. The students fill out forms for each of the experiments, completing tables, graphs and 
answering  questions  posed  in  the  practical  guide.  To  be  able  to  fill  out  the  forms  based  on  the 
experimental  results,  the  students  need  to  use  the  book  and  the  additional  reader,  which  contain  the 
theoretical background. The experiments are carried out in groups of three or four, but each student fills 
out  the  forms  individually.  After  the  last  experiment,  the  student  hands  in  the  completed  practical 
guide, which is then being examined. 
 
If  the  student  does  not  pass  the  course  after  the  final  exam,  the  result  of  the  mid‐term  exam  will 
become  invalid,  and  the  student  needs  to take  the  full  re‐exam.  A  positive  assessment of the practical 
assignments will remain valid for 6 academic years. 
 
Study Guide Fluid Mechanics (HWM‐23806)  8
Annex 3 Time table Fluid Mechanics 
 
Week  Day  Lecturer  Topic  Content 
1  Monday  Moene  Introduction  Ligget 1.1 1.2 1.6; A1‐4 
  Wednesday  Moene  Tensors; mass and momentum  Ligget 1.1 1.3 1.4; A1‐6,A8 
  Thursday  Moene  Stress, strain and energy  Ligget 1.5 1.7 1.8 1.9; A7 
  Friday  Moene  Seminar I  Quest. Liggett 1.1‐1.9 
2  Monday  Hoitink  Dimensional Analysis  Ligget 2.1 2.2 2.3 
  Wednesday  Hoitink  Similitude  Ligget 2.4‐2.7 2.10 2.11 
  Thursday  Hoitink  Fluid statics  Reader H1 
  Friday  Hoitink  Seminar II  Quest. Liggett H2 / Reader H1 
3  Monday  Hoitink  Energy in hydraulics I  Reader H2 
  Tuesday  Vermeulen  Explanation practicals    
  Wednesday  Hoitink  Energy in hydraulics II Reader H3 
  Thursday  Hoitink  Seminar III  Questions H2/H3 Add Reader 
  Friday  Moene  Vorticity and Bernoulli  Ligget 1.10 1.11 1.12 
4  Monday  Moene  Seminar IV  Quest. Liggett 1.10‐1.12 
  Tuesday  Vermeulen  Explanation practicals    
  Wednesday  Moene  Laminar flow I  Ligget 6.2‐6.4 
  Thursday  Vermeulen  Mid‐term exam  H1, H2 Ligget + Reader H1 
  Friday  Moene  Laminar flow II  Ligget 6.5 6.7 6.10 
5  Monday  Moene  Seminar V  Questions Liggett H6 
  Wednesday  Hoitink  Open channel flow  Reader H4 
  Friday  Hoitink  Seminar VI  Integrated questions hydraulics 
6  Monday  Moene  Circulation  Ligget 9.1‐9.3 
  Wednesday  Moene  Seminar VII  Quest. H9 Liggett 
7  Wednesday  Moene/Hoitink  Sample exam   
9    Moene/Hoitink  Final Exam   
 
The  schedule  above  includes  lectures  and  seminars,  which  last  2  lecture  hours  each.  The  laboratory 
experiments,  supervised  by  B.  Vermeulen  and  M.G.  Sassi,  are  scheduled  in  the  remainder  of  time 
available within the time slots allotted to the course. All students will conduct 3 experiments, scheduled 
in 2 lecture hours per experiment. Typically, the practical work can be scheduled in weeks 3 through 6 
for all groups. In case of a number of participants exceeding 40, several groups may be asked to do the 
final experiment in week 7, because of the limited capacity of the laboratory.