Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Base
l.

Keywords: Ageing, Alzheimer

S Disease, Apolipoprotein E, Apolipoprotein
-
E
Epsilon
-
4, Blood, Blood Flow, Braak Stages, Brain, Cardiovascular, Cardiovascular
Disease, Cerebral Glucose
-
Metabolism, Cognitive Aging, Copyright, Databases,
Disease, E Polymorph
ism, E Type
-
4 Allele, Genetic, Genetic Risk, Hippocampal
Atrophy, Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Onset
Alzheimers
-
Disease, Regional Brain Atrophy, Review, Risk, Science, Systematic,
Temporal
-
Lobe Atrophy, Web of Science, Wh
ite Matter, White
-
Matter Lesions

?
Crichton, G.E., Bryan, J., Murphy, K.J. and Buckley, J. (2010), Review of dairy
consumption and cognitive performance in adults: Findings and methodological
issues.
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
,
30

(4), 352
-
361.

Abstract: Background: Diet is a modifiable factor that could be targeted as an
appropriate intervention to optimise cognitive health and well
-
being in ageing. Aim:
The aim of this systematic review was to consider current evidence for an association
b
etween dairy intake and cognitive functioning. Methods: Searches of the electronic
databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsychInfo were
undertaken to identify peer
-
reviewed journal articles that reported on associations
between dairy consu
mption and cognitive outcomes. Results: Three cross
-
sectional
and 5 prospective studies were identified. Poorer cognitive function and an increased
risk for vascular dementia were found to be associated with a lower consumption of
milk or dairy products. H
owever, the consumption of whole
-
fat dairy products may
be associated with cognitive decline in the elderly. Conclusion: Methodological
variability and study limitations do not enable conclusions regarding optimal dairy

16

intake and cognitive performance to
be drawn. Randomised controlled trials are
needed to confirm the relationship between dairy intake and cognition. Copyright (C)
2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Keywords: Adults, Ageing, Alzheimers
-
Disease, Body
-
Fat, Cognition, Cognitive
Functioning, Copyright, D
airy Food Intake, Databases, Dementia, Diabetes
-
Mellitus,
Elderly, Fat Intake, Follow
-
up, Insulin Sensitivity, Intervention, Journal, Magnesium,
Methodological Review, Methods, Outcomes, Performance, Prospective Studies,
Review, Risk, Risk
-
Factors, Science
, Systematic, Systematic Review, Variability,
Web of Science, Weight Management, White
-
Matter Hyperintensities


17

Title:
Dental Materials

Full Journal Title:
Dental Materials

ISO Abbreviated Title:

JCR Abbreviated Title:

ISSN: 0109
-
5
641

Issues/Year:

Journal Country/Territory:

Language:

Publisher:

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories:

: Impact Factor

? Bayne, S.C., Swift, E.J.

and
Thompson, J.Y. (1995),
Review of dental materials
citations: Part A, January to June 1995
.
Dental
Materials
,
11

(4), 281
-
293.

Full Text:
1995
\
Den Mat11, 281.pdf

Abstract: Objective: Electronic databases are an excellent resource for identifying
relevant references for research

and
education projects. However,

these databases are
not yet a substitute for direct inspection of the literature because: (a) there still is a
lag of many months between journal issue publication

and
updates of the database,

and
(b) most databases selectively report a portion of the ent
ire literature. The
objective was to identify

and
categorize all the dental materials citations in
biomedical journals that were published from January 1995 through June 1995.
Methods: Seventeen primary

and
56 secondary dental journals were manually
search
ed via their tables of contents to detect dental materials publications from
January to June of 1995. Denial materials citations were categorized into 17 major
sections

and
further divided into several subsections. The review excluded case
reports

and
lite
rature primarily related to dental implants or biomedical materials
outside of dentistry. Results: Three hundred
-
sixty
-
nine citations were identified. The
greatest number of citations were associated with dentin bonding, composites,

and
glass ionomers. The
re was no significant increase in dental materials publications vs.
the number reported for 1994. Significance: This list provides a comprehensive
source for review by academicians

and
researchers to bridge the gap between initial
publication

and
electroni
c citation.

Keywords: Publications, Research

?
Swift, E.J., Thompson, J.Y.

and
Bayne, S.C. (1996), Review

of dental materials
citations
: Part
B. July to December 1995.
Dental Materials
,
12

(2), 127
-
141.

Full Text:
1996
\
Den Mat12, 127.pdf


18

Abstract: Objective: A lag of many months occurs between journal issue publication

and
updates to electronic databases. The objective of this literature analysis was to
identify

and
categori
ze all of the dental materials citations in biomedical journals that
were published from July 1995 through December 1995. Methods: Seventeen
primary

and
51 secondary journals were searched using their tables of contents to
detect

and
record dental material
s publications from July to December of 1995.
Those journals that were typically rich in dental materials articles were classified as
primary ones. Citations were categorized into 17 topics

and
divided into subsections.
The review excluded case reports, mo
st literature related primarily to dental implants,

and
most articles on biomedical materials used outside of the field of general
dentistry. Results. The greatest number of citations was related to topics of dentin
bonding

and
resin
-
based restorative fill
ing materials (composites

and
glass ionomers).
There was no major change in the number of dental materials publications per year
reported from 1993 (n = 786) to 1995 (n = 751). Significance: This citation list
provides a comprehensive resource for use by a
cademicians

and
researchers to bridge
the gap between initial publication

and
access to electronic searching methods for
major databases.

Keywords: Publications

?
Attin, T., Hannig, C., Wiegand, A. and Attin, R. (2004), Effect of bleaching on
restorative
materials and restorations
:

A systematic review.
Dental Materials
,
20

(9),
852
-
861.

Full Text:
2004
\
Den Mat
20
,
852
.pdf

Abstract: Objective: Internal and external bleaching procedures utilizing 3
-
35%
hydrogen peroxide solutions or hydrogen peroxide releasin
g agents, such as
carbamide peroxide or sodium perborate, can be used for whitening of teeth. The
purpose of the review article was to summarize and discuss the available information
concerning the effects of peroxide releasing bleaching agents on dental r
estorative
materials and restorations. Sources: Information from all original scientific full
papers or reviews listed in PUBMED or ISI Web of Science (search term: bleaching
AND (composite OR amalgam OR glass ionomer OR compomer OR resin OR alloy)
were in
cluded in the review. Data: Existing literature reveals that bleaching therapies
may have a negative effect on physical properties, marginal integrity, enamel and
dentin bond strength, and color of restorative materials as investigated in numerous
in vitro

studies. However, there are no reports in literature indicating that bleaching
may exert a negative impact on existing restorations requiring renewal of the
restorations under clinical conditions. Conclusion: Bleaching may exert a negative
influence on re
storations and restorative materials. Advice is provided based on the
current literature to minimize the impact of bleaching therapies on restorative
materials and restorations. (C) 2004 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by

19

Elsevier Ltd. All rights re
served.

Keywords: 10
-
Percent Carbamide Peroxide, 30
-
Percent Hydrogen
-
Peroxide, Amalgam,
Bleaching, Bond Strength, Bonding, Composite Resin, Composite Resin Color,
Dental Materials, Impact, In
-
Vitro, Information, Isi, Literature, Mercury Release,
Papers, Pe
roxide, Pubmed, Pulp Chamber, Restoration, Review, Scanning
Electron
-
Microscopy, Science, Sources, Systematic, Systematic Review, Unbleached
Bovine Enamel, Web of Science

?
Ruse, N.D. (2008), Propagation of erroneous data for the modulus of elasticity of
p
eriodontal ligament and gutta percha in FEM/FEA papers: A story of broken links.
Dental Materials
,
24

(12), 1717
-
1719.

Full Text:
2008
\
Den Mat
24
,
1717
.pdf

Abstract: Objective. This brief review essay was triggered by the discovery of two
errors that have b
een perpetuated in the dental literature for the last quarter century
and is intended to alert the research community. Methods. An extensive search of the
published literature, using PUBMED and Web of Science search engines, electronic
journal resources, a
nd several trips to the library for manual retrievals of articles
were used to retrieve hundreds of articles reporting on finite element modeling
-

finite element analysis (FEM/FEA) involving periodontal ligament (PDL) and gutta
percha (GP). Results. The l
iterature search revealed that erroneous values for the
modulus of elasticity of PDL and GP were introduced in 1980 and in 1983,
respectively. The identified errors range between two to three orders of magnitude
and have been used in hundreds of FEM/FEA pa
pers. Significance. The finding casts
serious doubts regarding the validity of the results published in hundreds of papers
and highlights the importance of checking the references cited and citing, or at least
confirming, primary sources rather than citing

citations. (C) 2008 Academy of Dental
Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Analysis, Behavior, Bone, Citations, Dental Implants, Finite Element
Modeling
-

Finite Element Analysis (FEM, FEA), Finite
-
Element
-
Analysis, Gutta
P
ercha, Human Periodontal Ligament, Incisor, Journal, Literature,
Mechanical
-
Properties, Methods, Modeling, Modulus of Elasticity, Papers, Post,
Primary, Pubmed, Research, Review, Science, Strength, Stress
-
Distribution, Teeth,
Validity, Web of Science

?
Attin, T., Schmidlin, P.R., Weyehaupt, F. and Wiegand, A. (2009), Influence of study
design on the impact of bleaching agents on dental enamel microhardness: A review.
Dental Materials
,
25

(2), 143
-
157.

Full Text:
2009
\
Den Mat
25
,
143
.pdf

Abstract: Objectiv
e. Numerous studies investigated the impact of bleaching procedures
on enamel microhardness, The outcomes of these studies reveal inconsistencies
regarding the fact whether a microhardness reduction due to bleaching occurs or not.

20

Aim of the present review

was to summarize the existing literature of external
bleaching therapies, which used microhardness tests for evaluation of possible effects
on enamel and to weigh up different parameters of the study designs with respect to
the outcome of these studies. M
ethods. The data from original scientific full papers
listed in PUBMED or ISI Web of Science (search term: enamel and (bleaching or
peroxide) and (hardness or microhardness or Knoop or Vickers)) and received by
additional hand
-
search meeting the inclusion
criteria were included in the review.
Influences of different parameters on the outcome of the bleaching treatments were
analyzed with the Fisher

s
-
exact
-
test. Results. A total of 5S studies were identified
with 166 hardness measurements conducted directly

after bleaching and 69
measurements performed after a post
-
treatment episode. Directly after bleaching, 84
(51%) treatments showed microhardness reduction compared to baseline, whereas 82
(49%) did not yield microbardness reduction. After the post
-
treatme
nt episode, 20
(29%) treatments showed hardness reduction and 49 (71%) did not. A significant
higher number of bleaching treatments resulting in enamel microhardness reduction
were observed, when artificial instead of human saliva was used for storage of t
he
enamel samples in the intervals between the bleaching applications and when no
fluoridation measures were applied during or after the bleaching phase. Significance.
The review shows that in those studies, which simulated the intraoral conditions as
clos
ely as possible, the risk of enamel microhardness decrease due to bleaching
treatments seems to be reduced. Nevertheless more in situ
-

and in vivo
-
studies are
needed to verify this observation. (c) 2008 Academy of Dental Materials. Published
by Elsevier Lt
d. All rights reserved.

Keywords: 10
-
Percent Carbamide Peroxide, Bleaching, Bovine, Bovine Enamel,
Demineralized Enamel, Evaluation, Hardness, Human, Hydrogen
-
Peroxide, Impact,
In
-
Vitro Evaluation, Inconsistencies, ISI, Literature, Methods, Mineral
-
Content
,
Observation, Outcome, Outcomes, Papers, Peroxide, Pubmed, Remineralization
Periods, Review, Risk, Science, Subsurface Microhardness, Surface Microhardness,
Tetracycline
-
Stained Teeth, Web of Science


21

Title:
Dental Traumatology

Full Journal Title:
Dental
Traumatology

ISO Abbreviated Title:

JCR Abbreviated Title
:


ISSN:

Issues/Year:

Journal Country/Territory:

Language:

Publisher:

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories:

: Impact Factor

?
Glendor, U. (2009), Aetiology

and
risk factors related to trauma
tic dental injuries
-

A

review of the literature.
Dental Traumatology
,
25

(1), 19
-
31.

Full Text:
2009
\
Den Tra25, 19.pdf

Abstract: During the past 30 years, the number of aetiologies of traumatic dental
injuries
(TDIs) has increased dramatically in the literature

and
now includes a broad
spectrum of variables, including oral

and
environmental factors

and
human
behaviour. The aim of this study is to present an international review of well
-
known
as well as less well
-
known unintentional

and
intentional causes of TDIs. Moreover,
some models that are useful in investigating contact sport injuries are presented. The
databases of Medline, Cochrane, Social Citation Index, Science Citation Index

and
CINAHL from 1995 to the
present were used. Oral factors (increased overjet with
protrusion), environmental determinants (material deprivation)

and
human behaviour
(risk
-
taking children, children being bullied, emotionally stressful conditions, obesity

and
attention
-
deficit hypera
ctivity disorder) were found to increase the risk for TDIs.
Other factors increasing the risk for TDIs are presence of illness, learning difficulties,
physical limitations

and
inappropriate use of teeth. A new cause of TDIs that is of
particular interest i
s oral piercing. In traffic facial injury was similar in unrestrained
occupants (no seat belts)

and
occupants restrained only with an air bag. Amateur
athletes have been found to suffer from TDIs more often than professional athletes.
Falls

and
collisions
mask intentional TDIs, such as physical abuse, assaults

and
torture. Violence has increased in severity during the past few decades

and
its role
has been underestimated when looking at intentional vs unintentional TDIs. There
are useful models to prevent T
DIs from occurring in sports. WHO Healthy Cities

and
WHO Health Promoting Schools Programmes offer a broad solution for dental
trauma as a public health problem. The number of known causes of TDIs has grown

22

to alarming levels, probably because of increased

interest of the causes

and
the
underlying complexity of a TDI. Accepted oral, environmental

and
human
aetiological factors must therefore be included in the registration of TDIs.

Keywords: 12
-
Year
-
Old School
-
Children, Aged 7
-
18 Years, Anterior Teeth,
Atte
ntion
-
Deficit, Hyperactivity Disorder, Citation, Gingival Recession,
Maxillofacial Fractures, Medline, Mouthguard Use, Oral Trauma, Permanent
Incisors, Preschool
-
Children, Public Health, Risk Factors, Science

?
Magunacelaya, M.B. and Glendor, U. (2011), Su
rfing for mouth guards: Assessing
quality of online information.
Dental Traumatology
,
27

(5), 334
-
343.

Full Text:
2011
\
Den Tra27, 334.pdf

Abstract: Introduction: The Internet is an easily accessible and commonly
used source
of health
-
related information, but evaluations of the quality of this information
within the dental trauma field are still lacking. Aim: The aims of this study are (i) to
present the most current scientific knowledge regarding mouth guards used

in sport
activities, (ii) to suggest a scoring system to evaluate the quality of information
pertaining to mouth guard protection related to World Wide Web sites and (iii) to
employ this scoring system when seeking reliable mouth guard
-
related websites.
M
aterials and methods: First, an Internet search using the keywords

athletic
injuries/prevention and control


and

mouth protector


or

mouth guards


in English
was performed on PubMed, Cochrane, SvedMed+ and Web of Science to identify
scientific knowledge

about mouth guards. Second, an Internet search using the
keywords

consumer health information Internet

,

Internet information public health


and

web usage
-
seeking behaviour


was performed on PubMed and Web of Science
to obtain scientific articles seeking to evaluate the quality of health information on
the Web. Based on the articles found in the second search, two scoring systems were
selected. Then, an Internet search using
the keywords

mouth protector

,

mouth
guards


and

gum shields


in English was performed on the search engines Google,
MSN and Yahoo. The websites selected were evaluated for reliability and accuracy.
Results: Of the 223 websites retrieved, 39 were design
ated valid and evaluated. Nine
sites scored 22 or higher. The mean total score of the 39 websites was 14.2. Fourteen
websites scored higher than the mean total score, and 25 websites scored less. The
highest total score, presented by a Public Institution W
eb site (Health Canada), was
31 from a maximum possible score of 34, and the lowest score was 0. Conclusion:
This study shows that there is a high amount of information about mouth guards on
the Internet but that the quality of this information varies. It
should be the
responsibility of health care professionals to suggest and provide reliable Internet
URL addresses to patients. In addition, an appropriate search terminology and search
strategy should be made available to persons who want to search beyond t
he
recommended sites.


23

Keywords: Accuracy, Activities, Anesthesia
-
Related Information, Breast
-
Cancer,
Canada, Care, Cochrane, Consumer, Control, Education, Health, Health Care, Health
Information, Information, Internet, Knowledge, Mouthguards, Online Inform
ation,
Patients, Performance, Public Health, Pubmed, Reliability, Science, Sport, Strategy,
Trauma, Traumatic Dental Injuries, Web of Science, Websites, World Wide Web,
World
-
Wide
-
Web


24

Title:
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology

Full Journal Title:
Dentomaxillofac
ial Radiology

ISO Abbreviated Title:

JCR Abbreviated Title:

ISSN:

Issues/Year:

Journal Country/Territory:

Language:

Publisher:

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories:

: Impact Factor

?
Donald
-
Jankowski, D.S. (2003), Florid cemento
-
osseous dysplasia
: A systematic
review.
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology
,
32

(3), 141
-
149.

Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the principal features of florid cemento
-
osseous
dysplasia (FCOD) by systematic review (SR), with particular regard to comparison
of Oriental with non
-
O
riental populations, and of reports derived from pathology
files with those from non
-
pathology sources. Methods: All alternative names for
FCOD were used as search terms for two electronic databases, namely MEDLINE
and

Web of Science

. Only multiple forms

of cemento
-
osseous dysplasia occurring
in a series in the reporting authors


case load were considered. Results: MEDLINE
produced more SR
-
identified reports. The search terms

Cementoma


and

Osseous
Dysplasia


were the most effective for both databases.
One hundred and fifty
-
eight
cases of FCOD were observed in 17 series of patients reported in 16 SR
-
identified
reports. Fifty
-
nine percent of cases were found in Blacks, 37% in Orientals and 3%
in Caucasians. Ninety
-
seven percent were females. Fifty percent

of cases in the SRs
were observed incidentally. Pain was most frequent in those with presenting
symptoms, and was significantly more frequent in the Oriental series. In two studies
on the same Chinese community, those cases found incidentally on radiograp
hs alone
were significantly younger than those with symptoms in the pathology files.
Conclusion: The nomenclature for FCOD is extensive, but older and more general
terms were more effective in recalling SR
-
identified reports. Cases in a report based
on pat
hology files appear to be older than those in a report based on radiology alone
files. With the exception of a higher prevalence of pain in Orientals, mainly Chinese,
there did not appear to be any differences in presentation compared with that
observed in

Black communities.

Keywords: Authors, Benign Fibroosseous Lesions, Bone, Databases, Diffuse Sclerosing

25

Osteomyelitis, Gigantiform Cementoma, Hong
-
Kong Chinese, Jaw Lesions, Jaws,
Methods, Multiple Enostosis, Odontogenic Tumours,

Cementoma,
Odontogenic
-
Tum
ors, Origin, Osteitis, Pain, Pathology, Prevalence, Radiology,
Review, Symptoms, Systematic, Systematic Review


26

Title: Depression

and
Anxiety

Full Journal Title: Depression

and
Anxiety

ISO Abbreviated Title:

JCR Abbreviated Title:

ISSN:

Issues/Year:

Journal Country/Territory:

Language:

Publisher: Elsevier

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories:

: Impact Factor

López
-
Muñoz, F., Alamo, C., Rubio, G., García
-
García, P., Martín
-
Agueda, B.

and
Cuenca, E. (
2003
), Bibliometric analysis of biomedical pub
lications on SSRI during
1980
-
2000.
Depression

and
Anxiety
,
18

(2)
, 95
-
103.

Full Text:
2003
\
Dep Anx18, 95.pdf

Abstract: We performed a bibliometric study of the scientific publications referring to
selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The database used was EMBASE:
Psychiatry. We applied the principal bibliometric indicators: Price

s

and
Bradford

s
laws on the increase or dispersion of scientific literature, Lotka

s law on the
productivity of author
s, the participation index (Pal) of countries, the productivity
index (PI) of authors,

and
the collaboration index. By means of manual coding,
documents were classified according to type of study

and
to the Diagnostic

and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disor
ders, Fourth Edition (DSM
-
IV) or nonpsychiatric
categories. We analysed 3,622 original documents published between 1980

and
2000.
Our results show nonfulfilment of Price

s law because production on SSRIs does not
grow exponentially (r = 0.937 vs. r = 0.946
, after linear adjustment). The journal
most employed is the journal of Clinical Psychiatry (Bradford

s first zone). The
United States is the most productive country (PaI = 41.50). The documents were
distributed in four groups: experimental pharmacology (8
.38%), tolerance

and
safety
(34.94%), clinical efficacy (49.11%),

and
not specified (7.56%). The drug most
studied was fluoxetine (1,745 articles), followed by paroxetine (659). The DSM
-
IV
diagnostic categories most studied were depression (834), obsessive
-
compulsive
disorder (171),

and
panic disorder (75). The control antidepressants most used in
comparative clinical studies were amitriptyline (51)

and
imipramine (42). The results
of the present study show that the SSRIs are not solely antidepressant drugs
, but also
have a wide range of uses both within the psychiatric sphere (especially in the field

27

of anxiety)

and
outside it, which explains the considerable scientific production
generated in relation to these drugs. (C) 2003 Wiley
-
Liss, Inc.

Keywords: Ana
lysis, Antidepressant, Anxiety, Bibliometric, Bibliometric Analysis,
Bibliometric Indicators, Bibliometric Study, Biomedical, Clinical, Clinical Studies,
Coding, Collaboration, Control, Country, Database, Depression, Diagnostic

and
Statistical Manual of Me
ntal Disorders, Dispersion, Distributed, Drug, Drugs,
DSM
-
IV, Efficacy, Experimental, Field, First, Index, Indicators, Journal, Law, Laws,
Literature, Participation, Pharmacology, Productivity, Publications, Safety, Scientific
Literature, Scientific Produc
tion, Scientific Publications, Serotonin, Tolerance,
United States


28

Title:
Der Nervenarzt

Full Journal Title: Der Nervenarzt

ISO Abbreviated Title:

JCR Abbreviated Title:

ISSN: 0028
-
2804 (Paper) 1433
-
0407 (Online)

Issues/Year:

Journal Country/Territory:


Language:

Publisher:
Elsevier
Springer
-
Verlag Heidelberg

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories:

:
Impact Factor

Pantel, J.

and
Mundt, C.

(
1999
),
Über die
Evaluation von Forschungsleistungen in der
Psychiatrie: Möglichkeiten und Grenzen bibliometrischer Analysen
.
Der Nervenarzt
,
70

(3)
,
281
-
287
.

Full Text:
1999
\
Der Ner70, 281.pdf

Abstract: Recent scientific

and
economic developments have emphasized the need for
objective

and
operationalized criteria for the evaluation of collective

and
individual
research performance. In this context the present article discusses the possibilities

and
limitations of bibliometric
analysis in the evaluation of psychiatric research.
Taking into account recent scientometric knowledge, the potentials

and
pitfalls of the
so called impact factor are critically discussed with respect to its usefulness in the
evaluation of psychiatric rese
arch performance in Germany. A major criticism arises
from the observation that the unreflecting use of the impact factor may
overemphasize quantitative aspects to the disatvantage of qualitative aspects of
research. This may however lead to unwanted disto
rtions

and
misjudgements. The
critical analysis of the current use of scientometric indices in the evaluation process
emphasizes the need for alternative criteria, which should take into account
disciplinary as well as national idiosyncrasis. Accordingly,
the authors aim to induce

and
contribute to a discussion process within the scientific community, which may
lead to a more appropriate evaluation of psychiatric research performance.

Keywords:
Schlü, Sselwö, Rter Forschungsevaluation, Impact
-
Faktor, Psychi
atrische
Forschung, Szientometrie


29

Title:
Dermatologic Surgery

Full Journal Title:
Dermatologic Surgery

ISO Abbreviated Title:

JCR Abbreviated Title:

ISSN:

Issues/Year:

Journal Country/Territory:

Language:

Publisher:

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories

: Impact Factor

? Nguyen, N.Q.

and
Moy, R.L. (2000), Authors in
Dermatologic Surgery
.
Dermatologic
Surgery
,
26

(12), 1092
-
1095.

F
u
ll Text:
2000
\
Der Sur26, 1092.pdf

Abstract: Authors of scientific papers have been evaluated in the past by how frequently
the medical literature cites them. In this analysis, we specifically identify those
individuals who have cont
ributed to the field of cutaneous surgery through
publications in Dermatologic Surgery. We further analyze those publications
frequently cited in Dermatologic Surgery, allowing us to determine topics of utmost
value

and
interest. Using a citation database
provided by the Institute for Scientific
Information, we first identify all publications

and
citations from 1981 to 1999 for
Dermatologic Surgery

and
the Journal of Dermatologic Surgery

and
Oncology (the
previous name for this journal). Of the original art
icles published during this time
frame, 3099 authors published 2167 papers. We quantify the publications from each
author,

and
identify 57 authors with at least 10 original articles. When expanding the
database parameters to include original articles, revi
ews, notes,

and
proceedings (as
defined by the Science Citation Index), we find that the eight authors with the
greatest number of publications are the same individuals with the greatest number of
original articles. This reflects significant contributions
to the field of cutaneous
surgery by these authors. This analysis further identifies source papers for authors in
Dermatologic Surgery. Publications frequently cited include those papers discussing
laser surgery, with Dermatologic Surgery serving as the mo
st frequently cited
journal.

Keywords: Articles, Authors, Citation, Citations, Database, Institute for Scientific
Information, Journal, Journals, Literature, Medical, Medical Literature, Number of
Publications, Publications, Science, Science Citation Index
, Surgery, Topics


30

Title:
Dermatology

Full Journal Title:
Dermatology

ISO Abbreviated Title:
Dermatology

JCR Abbreviated Title
:

Dermatology

ISSN:

Issues/
Year:

Journal Country/Territory:

Language:

Publisher:

Publisher Address:

Subject Categories

: Impact Factor

? Didierjean, X. (2002),

Editors!
-

Check your impact factor data!

.
Dermatology
,
205

(4), 327
-
328
.

Full Text:
2002
\
Dermatology205, 327.pdf

Keywords: Impact, Impact Factor


31

Title: Desalination

Full Journal Title:
Desalination

ISO Abbreviated Title: Desalination

JCR Abbreviated Title: Desalination

ISSN: 0011
-
9164

Issues/Year: 8

Journal Country/Territory: Netherlands

Language: Engl
ish

Publisher: Elsevier Science BV

Publisher Address: PO Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, Netherlands

Subject Categories:

Engineering, Chemical: Impact Factor 0.434, 62/110 (1999), Impact Factor 0.658,
48/123 (2001), Impact Factor 0.517, 62/126 (2002), Impact F
actor 0.694, 48/119
(2003), Impact Factor 1.057, 34/116 (2004); Impact Factor 0.955, 45/116 (2005)
;

Impact Factor
0.875
,
51
/
114

(2007)
;
Impact Factor
1.155
,
42/116

(200
8
)
;
Impact
Factor

2.034
, 28/126 (2009)

Water Resources: Impact Factor 0.518, 28/47
(2000), Impact Factor 0.658, 22/50 (2001),
Impact Factor 0.517, 30/53 (2002), Impact Factor 0.694, 26/55 (2003), Impact Factor
1.057, 15/55 (2004); Impact Factor 0.955, 26/57 (2005)
;

Impact Factor
0.875
,
37
/
59

(2007)
;
Impact Factor
1.155
,
26/60

(200
8
)
;

Imp
act Factor

2.034
, 6/66 (2009)

Urano, K. (1986), Water reuse with granular activated carbon.
Desalination
,
23

(1
-
3)
,
533
-
540.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination23, 533.pdf

Abstract: Carbon adsorption process has become a f
easible

and
reliable process for
reuse of wastewater. This paper discribes the present status

and
some topics of
granular activated carbon, water reuse processes with it

and
regeneration technics of
spent carbon in Japan. Japanese activated carbon for wate
r treatment had been
improved

and
become good performance. There are about 200 plants of wastewater
treatment with granular activated carbon in Japan. The 50,000 m
3
/day domestic
wastewater reclamation plant is under constraction,

and
the 30,000 m
3
/day
industrial
wastewater reclamation plant is satisfactorily operated. Many types of furnaces not
only multihearth furnace but also moving bed furnace

and
two stages rotary kiln are
developed for regeneration of spent carbon.

Hanmin, Z.

and
Ruowen, F. (1986),

The adsorption characteristics for the various metal
ions in aqueous solutions using activated carbon fiber.
Desalination
,
58

(2)
, 169
-
170.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination58, 169.pdf

?

Adhikary, S
.
K
.,

Tipnis, U
.
K
.,

Ha
rkare, W
.
P
. and

Govindan, K
.
P
.

(198
9
),

32

Defluoridation during desalination of brackish water by electrodialysis
.
Desalination
,
71

(
3
)
,
301
-
312
.

Full Text:
1989
\
Desalination71, 301.pdf

Abstract
:
Studies have
been conducted to defluoridate brackish water containing 2120,
3020, 4260 and 4800 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) and 5, 10, 15 and 20 ppm
fluoride by means of electrodialysis. A Laboratory electrodialysis stack containing
15 cell pairs of cation
-
and ani
on
-
exchange membranes of 80 cm2 effective
cross
-
sectional area is used. Data have been collected under different flow rates and
current densities. Optimum operational conditions have been determined for
obtaining product water containing 600 ppm TDS and 1.
5 ppm fluoride, which is
acceptable for use as potable water. Brackish waters up to 5000 ppm TDS containing
fluoride up to 15 ppm can be reduced to ca. 600 ppm TDS and 1.5 ppm fluoride. This
approach is found suitable for desalination and defluoridation of

water having TDS
up to 5000 ppm and fluoride up to 10 ppm with an energy requirement of <1 kWh/kg
of salt removed.

Keywords: Brackish Water, Defluoridation, Desalination, Electrodialysis

Pansint, M.

and
Colella, C. (1990), Dynamic data on lead uptake from

water by
chabazite.
Desalination
,
78

(2)
, 287
-
295.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination78, 287.pdf

Abstract: The possibility of using chabazite, a natural zeolite exchanger, for lead
removal from water is examined, testing

fixed beds made of Campanian tuff, a
volcanic rock rich in such zeolite.

Lead breakthrough curves, as a function of pollutant concentration

and
influent flow
rate, are determined

and
dynamic parameters connected with ion exchange operation
calculated.

The

considerable selectivity of chabazite for lead

and
the good performances of the beds
in the process investigated are emphasized, obtaining also useful indications on the
operating conditions under which such processes should be carried out.

Jeppesen, B. (
1996), Domestic greywater re
-
use: Australia

s challenge for the future.
Desalination
,
106

(1
-
3), 311
-
315.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination106, 311.pdf

Abstract: Under a grant from the Urban

Water Research
Association o
f Australia, the
Brisbane City Council has advanced Australian research into domestic greywater
re
-
use. This hard work has established that domestic greywater does contain
chemicals

and
microorganisms that can be harmful to public health

and
the
environmen
t. Greywater can even emit noxious odours. However, if domestic
greywater could be re
-
used to water lawns

and
ornamental gardens, the average
household potable water usage could be reduced by between 30
-
50%. Public
acceptance of the principle is high, but
this must be balanced against the incorrect

33

perception that greywater is innocuous. The challenge now facing Australian Water
Authorities is how to fully utilize this valuable resource without: compromising
public health, causing detrimental impact to the
environment or down grading the
livability of our residential areas. Only through total management

and
public
awareness of the issues is this possible. To help achieve these goals the Brisbane City
Council is presently developing guidelines for the applica
tion of domestic grey, vater
re
-
use for sewered areas in Australia. This paper provides a brief overview of this
research

and
atl insight into the direction of these proposed guidelines.

Anderson, J.M. (1996), A possible regulatory framework for water recy
cling in
Australia.
Desalination
,
106

(1
-
3), 331
-
333.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination106, 331.pdf

Abstract: Different regulatory frameworks for water recycling have evolved in each
state in Australia. This paper discu
sses the features

and
weaknesses of the existing
regulatory framework. A uniform national approach is proposed.

Keywords: Water Recycling

Fabiani, C., Ruscio, F., Spadoni, M.

and
Pizzichini, M. (1997), Chromium(III) salts
recovery process from tannery wast
ewaters.
Desalination
,
108

(1
-
3), 183
-
191.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination108, 183.pdf

Abstract: Chromium(III) salts are the most widely used chemicals for tanning processes
[1], but only 60% of the total chromium
salt reacts with the hides. Therefore, about
40% of the chromium amount remains in the solid

and
liquid wastes (especially spent
tanning solutions). The presence of chromium(III)

and
salts in the sludges of both the
wastewater biological treatment plants o
r the chemical plants for recycling spent
tanning liquors, represents an inconvenience for the safe reuse of these sludges

and
a
cost forming factor for their disposal. Among the several proposed methods for
chromium recovery [1
-
6], lime or sodium hydroxid
e precipitation

and
filter
-
pressing
of the chromium hydroxide is the usual way to recover chromium salts from spent
process solutions or from leaching solutions of residues of hides. However, usually
the chromium salts quality must be improved for their re
use in tanning processes [7].
The integration of membranes in the treatment process for chromium recovery
reduces the environmental impact, favours the reuse of both the protein residue

and
the biological plant sludges, reduces the consumption of chemicals

and
decreases the
costs of waste disposal.

Keywords: Aqueous
-
Solutions, Adsorption, Chromium Recovery, Tanning Processes,
Microfiltration, Ultrafiltration

Doyen, W. (1997), Latest developments in ultrafiltration for large
-
scale drinking water
applications
.
Desalination
,
113

(2
-
3), 165
-
177.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination113, 165.pdf

Abstract: In view of the implementation of ultrafiltration for large
-
scale drinking water

34

applications, the properties of the membranes,
the types of modules

and
the mode of
operation had to be reviewed. In this respect the surface porosity

and
adsorption
characteristics of the membranes were improved, module sizes were adapted,

and
the
semi
-
dead operational mode was pioneered. Thus treatme
nt costs could be lowered
to about DM 0.2
-
0.4/m
3

of treated permeate. This makes ultrafiltration a very
promising unit operation for the next century. In this paper the most recent
large
-
scale applications of the players in this field will be discussed.

Ke
ywords: Membranes, Ultrafiltration, Drinking Water, Membrane, Module

? Morawski, A.W.

and
Inagaki, M. (1997), Application of modified synthetic carbon for
adsorption of trihalomethanes (THMs) from water.
Desalination
,
114

(1), 23
-
27.

Full Text:
1997
\
Desalination114, 23.pdf

Abstract: The synthetic carbon spheres derived from phenol resin (APT, APT
-
P

and
GP
-
30) were used for water purification from trihalomethanes (THMs). All samples
as prepared were inactive in
adsorption of THMs from water solution, Presented
chemical modification of carbon spheres by nitric acid permits us to obtain a useful
carbon adsorption material, in which the chemical character of the surface is
drastically changed by the aforementioned t
reatment. The resulting THMs adsorption
data indicate a new environmental application of the modified synthetic carbons.
APT carbon has a good future for an application as a powdered activated carbon
(PAC), whereas APT
-
P might be used as a granular activat
ed carbon (GAG) or
shaped hard carbon material of different equipment for removal of THMs from
drinking water.

Keywords: Activated Carbon, Adsorption, Carbon, Chemical, Chemical Modification,
Drinking Water, Environmental, Modification, Nitric Acid, Phenol
, Powdered
Activated Carbon, Purification, Synthetic Carbon, Synthetic Carbons for Thms
Adsorption, Treatment, Water, Water Purification from THMs

Lounici, H., Addour, L., Belhocine, D., Grib, H., Nicolas, S., Bariou, B.

and
Mameri, N.
(1997), Study of a new technique for fluoride removal from water.
Desalination
,
114

(3), 241
-
251.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination114, 241.pdf

Abstract: A new technique based on the combination of an
activated alumina column

and
an electrochemical system for fluoride removal from water is reported in this
study. In the first step, the optimization of the process was achieved under various
experimental parameters (volumetric flow, temperature
, pH,

initi
al fluoride
concentration

and
hardness) with a synthetic solution. The comparison of the
performance of the current activated alumina process

and
the electrosorption system
proved to be more efficient than the latter in removing fluoride from water. Thus,
the
fluoride sorption capacity at the breakthrough point of the activated alumina column
reached 3.8 mg F
-
/L. It was increased by about 60% by means of the electrochemical

35

process than the results obtained in current mode. Moreover, it was found that the
e
lectrosorption system could be utilized to regenerate the saturated activated alumina.
In the second step, the electrosorption process was utilized to treat Sahara drinking
water naturally contaminated with fluoride (3 mg/L) under optimum conditions
previo
usly determined. The electrosorption process coupled with activated alumina
column has been successfully applied for fluoride removal from drinking water.

Keywords: Electrosorption, Fluoride, Activated Alumina, Optimization, Drinking Water,
Treatment, Colu
mn, Ions

? Morawski, A.W.

and
Inagaki, M. (1998), Application of modified synthetic carbon for
adsorption of trihalomethanes (THMs) from water (vol 114, pg 26, 1997).
Desalination
,
115

(1), 108.

Full Text:
19
98
\
Desalination115, 108.pdf

Keywords: Adsorption, Carbon, Synthetic Carbon, Water

Grebenyuk, V.D., Verbich, S.V., Linkov, N.A.

and
Linkov, V.M. (1998), Adsorption of
heavy metal ions by aminocarboxyl ion exchanger ANKB
-
35.
Desalination
,
115

(3),
239
-
254.

F
ull Text:
D
\
Desalination115, 239.pdf

Abstract: Selectivity of polyampholyte ANKB
-
35 for Ni, Cu, Zn

and
Cd ions was
studied. The exchange capacity of the resin did not depend on concentration of
counterions in di
lute solutions. Parameters of ion adsorption from highly
concentrated solutions such as pH, concentration

and
flow rates of solutions were
established in order to determine regeneration conditions of the resin. The influence
of the size of polyampholyte gr
anules on adsorption efficiency was studied. After
calculation of ion diffusion coefficients in resin samples with different granule radii
it became apparent that the rate of ion exchange in the resin was limited by diffusion
in gel phase. Change in soluti
on pH

and
deformation of polymer chains of the resin
during cation adsorption led to variation in moisture content

and
change in the water
state in it. These parameters were quantified based on endotherms of ice melting in
the resin.

Keywords: Ion
-
Exchange

Resin, Heavy Metal Ions, Adsorption, Sorption, Kinetics,
Water

Lebeau, T., Lelievre, C., Buisson, H., Cleret, D., Van de Venter, L.W.

and
Cote, P.
(1998), Immersed membrane filtration for the production of drinking water:
combination with PAC for NOM

and
SOCs removal.
Desalination
,
117

(1
-
3),
219
-
231.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination119, 219.pdf

Abstract: The use of microfiltration (MF) or ultrafiltration (UF) processes is expanding
rapidly as an alternative to
conventional clarification

and
filtration processes to meet
increasingly stringent regulations related to the treated water quality

and
in particular

36

to pathogens such as Giardia

and
Cryptosporidium. The membranes used in these
processes do not remove colo
r, natural organic matter (NOM) or synthetic organic
chemicals (SOCs). MF

and
UF must be combined with other conventional
technologies such as activated carbon adsorption

and
coagulation to overcome some
of these limitations. In this context recent advance
s in immersed membranes
configurations offer an opportunity to develop new combined treatment processes. In
most of these systems, shell
-
less hollow fiber membranes are directly immersed in
the reaction vessel receiving the water to be purified

and
operate
d under slight
negative pressure (whereas they are traditionally housed in pressure vessels in
conventional MF

and
UF systems). The membranes represent a positive barrier
between a

reaction zone


where adsorption, biodegradation or coagulation can be
carr
ied out

and
the water treated. The system offers a great flexibility of operation by
allowing operation at high suspended solids concentrations

and
to adapt the type

and
age of the suspension to the required treatment. The association of immersed
membranes

and
powdered activated carbon provides the following benefits: (1)
better physical removal of NOM

and
SOCs through optimal use of PAC, (2)
biological removal of the biodegradable fraction of NOM, (3) reduced sludge
volumes,

and
(4) absolute containment of

the PAC within the system independent of
process conditions. The very high concentration of PAC (10
-
20 g/L) carried in the
reactor offers the required buffer capacity. The present research program, carried out
at Compagnie Generale des Eaux Research Labor
atory (in Maisons
-
Laffitte, France),
has examined the use of immersed membranes for significantly enhancing SOCs

and
NOM removal at bench

and
pilot scales. An onsite pilot
-
study was conducted in
Granville (Normandie) over one year to evaluate the immersed
membrane process on
river water. The process was first evaluated as a polishing microfiltration/PAC slurry
reactor, after conventional coagulation/flocculation

and
sedimentation. In a second
phase, the process was directly used on raw water with in
-
line co
agulation, in that
case, the coagulated matter

and
the PAC were allowed to co
-
exist in the membrane
tank. The results of these studies show that the combination of immersed membranes
with PAC and/or coagulant provides (1) excellent water quality through si
gnificant
enhancement of particulate matters as well as NOM

and
SOCs removal, (2) excellent
response to variations of the feed water quality

and
(3) suitability for plant upgrading
by conversion of existing clarifiers or sand filters into membrane reactors
.

Keywords: Microfiltration, Immersed Membranes, NOM

and
SOCs Removal, PAC
Slurry, Coagulant, Plant Retrofitting

Ma, W.T., Sun, Z.C., Wang, Z.X., Feng, Y.B., Wang, T.C., Chan, U.S., Miu, C.H.

and
Zhu, S.C. (1998), Application of membrane technology for dri
nking water.
Desalination
,
119

(1
-
3), 127
-
131.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination119, 127.pdf


37

Abstract: In order to provide high
-
quality drinking water to the residents, Daqing City
started the High
-
Quality Water Supply
Project in 1994. In the first phase, seven
polishing water treatment systems consisting of preozonation, microfiltration (MF),
activated carbon (AC) adsorption, ultrafiltration (UF) or reverse osmosis (RO)

and
postozonation were installed in various reside
ntial districts. The existing low
-
quality
tap water is used as feed water,

and
the treated water is distributed to the customers
through an independent network or with bottles for drinking

and
cooking purposes.
The total treatment capacity of the seven sys
tems is 620 m
3
/d. The seven systems
were commissioned separately from September to November 1997

and
have been
running smoothly. The performance of the systems meets the design requirements,

and
the treated water quality meets the European Union Drinking W
ater Standard.
Economically, both capital investment

and
operating costs are within the initial
budgets

and
at rational levels.

Keywords: Membrane, Ultrafiltration, Microfiltration, Ozonation, Activated Carbon

Amor, Z., Malki, S., Taky, M., Bariou, B., Mam
eri, N.

and
Elmidaoui, A. (1998),
Optimization of fluoride removal from brackish water by electrodialysis.
Desalination
,
120

(3), 263
-
271.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination120, 263.pdf

Abstract: The study showed that
desired potable water can be easily obtained by
electrodialysis from fluoride
-
rich brackish water. Studies have been performed to
defluoridate brackish water containing 3000 ppm of total dissolved solids (TDS)

and
3 ppm of fluoride using electrodialysis. T
he behaviour of water parameters (ion
contents, TDS
, pH,

total hardness) with electrodialysis parameters (duration, now
rate, temperature, voltages) is followed. Optimal operational conditions for obtaining
desired potable water have been proposed.

Keyword
s: Ion
-
Exchange Membrane, Defluoridation, Electrodialysis, Defluoridation

Hichour, M., Persin, F., Molénat, J., Sandeaux, J.

and
Gavach, C. (1999), Fluoride
removal from diluted solutions by Donnan dialysis with anion
-
exchange membranes.
Desalination
,
122

(1), 53
-
62.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination122, 53.pdf

Abstract: Too many or too few fluoride ions in drinking water are harmful to the
consumer

s health. The acceptable fluoride concentration is generally in the range

of
0.5 to 1.5 mg.L
-
1
. In the present study, Donnan dialysis (DD) with an anion
-
exchange
membrane (AEM) was applied for the defluoridation of diluted NaF solutions. The
initial concentration of the feed solution was maintained at 10
-
3

mol.L
-
1
,
correspondin
g to a 19 mg.L
-
1

fluoride concentration. Five kinds of AEMs (DSV,
AFX, AFN, AMX, ACS) were tested. First, membrane properties were studied at
equilibrium. The values of the exchange capacity of the membranes in Cl
-

and
F
-

form, water content, selectivity c
oefficient for the Cl
-
/F
-

exchange, diffusion

38

coefficient of Cl
-

and
F
-

ions in the membrane, were determined for each membrane.
DD experiments, performed using a laboratory cell, showed that the DSV membrane
is the most effective AEM, despite its electrol
yte leakage. Subsequently, a
pre
-
industrial pilot with a total membrane area of 1760 cm
2

was used to study the
different physico
-
chemical

and
hydrodynamic parameters of the process. As the
driving ion, the chloride ion is more efficient than the sulfate io
n. At flow rates lower
than 0.6 L.h
-
1
, the fluoride concentration remains lower than the permitted values
despite the presence of others anions generally present in ground water such as
chloride, sulfate

and
bicarbonate ions.

Keywords: Fluoride Ion, Donnon

Dialysis, Anion
-
Exchange Membrane, Defluoridation,
Diluted Solution, Transport
-
Properties, Water, Defluoridation, Enrichment, Ash

Marques, P.A., Pinheiro, H.M., Teixeira, J.A.

and
Rosa, M.F. (1999), Removal
efficiency of Cu
2+
, Cd
2+
, Pb
2+

by waste brewery
biomass: pH

and
cation association
effects.
Desalination
,
124

(1
-
3), 137
-
144.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination124, 137.pdf

Abstract: In this work two distinct (flocculent

and
non
-
flocculent) yeast wastes from
Portuguese breweries were used for the selective removal of Cu
2+
, Cd
2+

and
Pb
2+

from aqueous solutions. One of the goals was to establish both the pH pro files for
the removal of each metal ion (1.0 mM)

and
the effect on the biomass biosorption
capacity of

pH adjustment during the process. The effect of the presence of multiple
metal ions, in the 0.1
-
1.0 mM range, on metal removal efficiency was also studied.
The results showed that, in the absence of pH adjustment, the optimum initial pH for
the removal of

three cations was in the 4.5
-
5.5 range for both types of biomass.
However, a gradual pH increase was observed during the removal process, up to a
final equilibrium value of 7.0
-
8.0. Regarding the biomass efficiency for metal
removal in multi
-
cation system
s, it was verified that only Cu
2+

was significantly
affected by the presence of the other metals in solution

and
only when the
non
-
flocculent yeast biomass was used as biosorbent. Cd
2+

was only slightly affected
by the presence of both Cu
2+

and
Pb
2+
,

and
P
b
2+

removal was not affected by the
presence of any or both of the interferent metals for the two biosorbents used in this
work. The highest

and
lowest metal removal yields were obtained for Pb
2+

and
Cu
2+
,
respectively.

Keywords: Biosorption, Multiple
-
Cati
on Systems, Cadmium, Copper, Lead,
Non
-
Viable Yeast Biomass
, pH,

Heavy
-
Metal Biosorption, Ions

?

Padilla, A.P.

and
Tavani, E.L.

(1999),
Treatment of an industrial effluent by reverse
osmosis
.
Desalination
,
126

(1
-
3),
219
-
226
.

Full Text:
1999
\
Desalination126, 219.pdf

Abstract: The treatment of tanning wastewater was studied by means of reverse osmosis

and
ultrafiltration. Tests were carried out on laboratory scale using membranes of

39

polyamide (reverse osmosis)

and
of polysulfone (ultrafiltration). The evaluation of
the system was performed by chemical analysis, pH measurements

and
visible
spectrophotometry. Effects of the protein contained in the industrial effluent, the
applied pressure

and
the feed temperature

on the permeate flux were analyzed. The
polyamide membrane used allowed us to obtain permeates with a low chromium(III)
content (7
-
10 mg/L) but with appreciable amounts of SO
4
-

(1
-
3 g/l), Cl
-

(9
-
14 g/L)

and
Na
+

(5
-
10 g/L). The presence of chromium(III)
polymers was determined in the
original effluent

and
in the concentrates obtained by reverse osmosis. Finally, it was
established that during the operation of reverse osmosis, the transport of H
+

(H
3
O
+
)
from the concentrate to the permeate was produced.

Ke
ywords: Tanning Wastewater, Reverse Osmosis, Ultrafiltration, Chromium(III),
Recovery, Leather, Hydrolytic Polymerization, Aqueous
-
Solution, Waste
-
Water,
Chromium(III), Tannery, Disposal

?

Padilla
,

A
.
P
.

and
Tavani
,

E
.
L
.

(
1999
),
Treatment of an industrial e
ffluent by reverse
osmosis
.
Desalination
,
1
26

(1
-
3),
219
-
226
.

Full Text:
1999
\
Desalination126, 219.pdf

Abstract: The treatment of tanning wastewater was studied by means of reverse osmosis

and
ultrafiltration
. Tests were carried out on laboratory scale using membranes of
polyamide (reverse osmosis)

and
of polysulfone (ultrafiltration). The evaluation of
the system was performed by chemical analysis, pH measurements

and
visible
spectrophotometry. Effects of the

protein contained in the industrial effluent, the
applied pressure

and
the feed temperature on the permeate flux were analyzed. The
polyamide membrane used allowed us to obtai
n permeates with a low chromium
(III)
content (7
-
10 mg/L) but with appreciable
amounts of SO
4
-

(1
-
3 g/l), Cl
-

(9
-
14 g/L)

and
Na
+

(5
-
10

g/L). The presence of chromium
(III) polymers was determined in the
original effluent

and
in the concentrates obtained by reverse osmosis. Finally, it was
established that during the operation of rever
se osmosis, the transport of H
+

(H
3
O
+
)
from the concentrat
e to the permeate was produced.

Keywords: Tanning Wastewater
,

Reverse Osmosis
,

Ultrafiltration
, Chromium
(III)
,

Recovery
,

Leather
,

Hydrolytic Polymerization
,

Aqueous
-
Solution
,

Waste
-
Water
,

Ch
romium(I
II), Tannery, Disposal

Pervov, A.G., Dudkin, E.V., Sidorenko, O.A., Antipov, V.V., Khakhanov, S.A.

and
Makarov, R.I. (2000), RO

and
NF membrane systems for drinking water production

and
their maintenance techniques.
Desalination
,
132

(1
-
3), 315
-
321.

Full T
ext:
D
\
Desalination132, 315.pdf

Abstract: Elaboration of drinking water supply strategies is closely connected with
expansion of private housing, as well as country farms

and
industries that require
water treatment facilities. As a rule, the majority of ground well waters does not meet
modern drinking standards due to high content of iron, hardness, strontium, nitrates,

40

fluoride

and
TDS. Thus, a special respect should be given
to small portable

and
economically reasonable point
-
of
-
entry water treatment systems that produce quality
water meeting WHO standards. Membrane treatment techniques are based on
simultaneous rejection of all types of ionic

and
molecular water species by
se
mipermeable (RO) polymeric membranes which is more advantageous compared
to conventional treatment techniques. The continuous theoretical

and
experimental
research conducted in VODGEO research institute from 1992 to 1999 resulted in
development of drinking

water production techniques from different natural waters,
using Russian
-
made

and
foreign polymeric membranes. Computer calculation
techniques are developed that enable us to determine optimum characteristics of
membrane water treatment systems, such as p
ressure, recovery, membrane type etc,
corresponding to optimum quality water composition (required hardness, fluoride,
chloride

and
TDS content). As a result, water purification techniques were developed
providing facilities with operational guidelines to
reduce greatly membrane fouling

and
simplify pretreatment. This demonstrates considerable cost savings

and
membrane efficiency compared to conventional iron removal

and
ion exchange
softening techniques.

Keywords: Nanofiltration, Membrane Systems, Product
Concentration, Rejection,
Concentration Ratio, Computer Calculation, Operational Guidelines

?

Marcucci
,

M
.
, Nosenzo
,

G
.
, Capannelli
,

G
.
, Ciabatti
,

I
.
, Corrieri
,

D
.

and
Ciardelli
,

G
.

(2001),
Treatment

and
reuse of textile effluents based on new ultrafiltrat
ion

and
other
membrane technologies
.
Desalination
,
138

(1
-
3),
75
-
82
.

Full Text:
2001
\
Desalination138, 75.pdf

Abstract: Different membrane processes were experimented on at pilot scale to verify
the possibility

of reusing textile wastewater. The pilot plant used sand filtration

and
ultrafiltration (UF) as pre
-
treatments for a membrane process of nanofiltration (NF)
or reverse osmosis (RO). UF was obtained by the installation of an innovative
module designed on f
lat membranes operating under vacuum; the configuration of
the NF

and
RO membranes was spiral wound. The efficiency of the various
treatments in removing pollutants from textile wastewater from an activated sludge
plant was tested on the reduced scale to o
ptimize the industrial plant design. The UF
module tested works at low operating pressure (that involves low energy costs)

and
guarantees a constant permeate (feed of the next membrane process of NF or RO).
The RO permeate can be reused in the dyeing proce
sses as demonstrated by many
yam dyeing tests on the industrial scale. NF does not reach the retention behaviour of
RO (total hardness removal of 75%

and
> 90% for NF

and
RO respectively).
Nevertheless, a change in the freshwater treatment (at present an i
on
-
exchange resin
softening) downstream from the use of process water in the factory would decrease
the secondary effluent salinity, so the design of the advanced purification industrial

41

plant could reasonably foresee a NF treatment instead of RO, allowing

a reduction of
the costs.

Keywords: Flat
-
Membrane Ultrafiltration, Nanofiltration, Reverse Osmosis, Textile
Wastewater, Colour Removal, Water Reuse, Waste
-
Water Treatment

Kurihara, M., Yamamura, H., Nakanishi, T.

and
Jinno, S. (2001), Operation

and
reliab
ility of very high
-
recovery seawater desalination technologies by brine
conversion two
-
stage RO desalination system.
Desalination
,
138

(1
-
3), 191
-
199.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination138, 191.pdf

Abstract: A reverse os
mosis (RO) seawater desalination system has many advantages
such as saving energy

and
using less installation space,

and
has become regular
technology to obtain fresh water from seawater. A significant way to lower energy

and
installation space is to raise

system recovery,

and
we have developed anew RO
seawater desalination system which provides 60% recovery of fresh water for 3.5%
seawater. The new technology is called a brine conversion two
-
stage SWRO system
(BCS). This system includes several new technol
ogies such as system configuration,
energy recovery, operating condition, etc., high
-
performance membrane technology,
anti
-
biofouling technology

and
a new analysis method. A pilot plant has been
operated successfully at Toray

s Ehime plant site since 1997.

The first commercial
plant of 4500 m
3
/d (1.2mgd) has been operating successfully since March 1999 in
Mas Palomas (Gran Canaria, Spain). The Tortola

and
Curacao plants in the
Caribbean have been installed with the fall BCS (first
-

+ second
-
stage RO system)
,

and
also operated under good conditions. A new application of the BCS, installed at
the Muroto plant in Japan, has been in operation to obtain bottled drinking water

and
high concentrated mineralized water from deep seawater. Furthermore, other plants
ar
e under construction in Spain

and
the Caribbean. The BCS is presumed to be the
standard SWRO system for the 21st century.

Keywords: Seawater Desalination, Higher Recovery, BCS, Saving Energy,
High
-
Performance Membrane, Anti
-
Biofouling, Membranes

Al
-
Jayyous
i, O.R.

and
Mohsen, M.S. (2001), Evaluation of small home
-
use reverse
osmosis units in Jordan.
Desalination
,
139

(1
-
3), 237
-
247.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination139, 237.pdf

Abstract: This paper aims to evaluate the wa
ter quality of domestic RO units used in
Jordan along with bottled

and
tap water. Analyses of the quality of water sources
(RO, bottled

and
tap)

and
water cost are carried out. The methodology of this
research is based on both lab experimental analysis

and

field survey of several RO
units. It was concluded that all samples from the three sources are in compliance with
Jordanian Standards. However, one type of bottled water

and
RO produced water are
below the allowable limits with regard to all chemical
properties. Tap water exceeds
the allowable limit with regards to both total hardness

and
TDS, but is still below the

42

allowable limits in case no better resource is available. However, with regard to pH

and
chloride concentrations, tap water is below the a
llowable limits. Based on quality

and
cost, it was found that RO produced water provides water within the allowable
limits with a relatively reasonable price.

Keywords: Reverse Osmosis, Jordan, Water Quality, Bottled Water, Microbiological
Quality, Water

?

Chauhan, G.S., Guleria, L.K.

and
Mahajan, S. (2001), A study in sorption of some
metal ions on novel hydrogels based on modified cellulosics

and
2
-
acrylamido
-
2
-
methyl propane sulphonic acid.
Desalination
,
141

(3), 325
-
329.

Full Text:
2001
\
Desalination141, 325.pdf

Abstract: New polymeric backbones were synthesized from cellulose extracted from
pi
-
ne needles, a renewable resource of the Western Himalayas. Conditions for
optimum network yield
were evaluated as a function of irradiation dose,
concentrations of monomer

and
crosslinker

and
amount of water for interpenetrating
networks (IPNs) of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) with 2
-
acrylamido
-
2
-
methyl
propanesulphonic acid (AAmPSA). N, N
-
methylene
bisacrylamide was used as
crosslinker. At optimum conditions thus evaluated, IPNs of cellulose

and
other
cellulosics like cyano
-
ethylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose,
hydrazinodeoxycellulose

and
cellulosephosphate were synthesized. These hydrogels
were use
d in sorption of Fe
2+
, Cu
2+

and
Cr
6+

metal ions. The results of ion sorption as
partitioning of ions between polymeric matrices

and
liquid phase are reflected in
high values of partition coefficients for Fe
2+

and
Cu
2+
.

Keywords: 2
-
Acrylamido
-
2
-
Methyl Propa
nesulphonic Acid, Cellulose, Cellulosics, Cr
6+
,
Cu
2+
, Hydrogels, Hydroxypropylcellulose, Interpenetrating Networks, Ion, Ipns,
Irradiation, Partition, Partition Coefficients, Partitioning, Pine, Pine Needles,
Polymeric, Polymeric Matrices, Retention Capaci
ty, Sorption, Water, Yield

?
Benito
,

Y
.

and
Ruíz
,

M
.
L
.

(2002),
Reverse osmosis applied to metal finishing
wastewater
.
Desalination
,
14
2

(
3),
229
-
234
.

Full Text:
2002
\
Desalination142, 229.pdf

Abstract: The
electroplating industry is a great water consumer and, as a consequence,
one of the biggest producers of liquid effluent. The metal finishing industry presents
one of the most critical industrial waste problems. There is therefore growing interest
in devel
oping methods for reclaiming metals from plating waste stream

and
recovery
of water using membrane technology [1,2]. The application of reverse osmosis (RO)
to the global effluent from the electroplating industry has been studied in this paper.
The results

obtained show that there is 75
-
95% recovery of water

and
nearly total
removal of metals in the permeate.

Keywords: Reverse Osmosis, Electroplating Wastewater, Pilot Plant, Membrane

de Lint, W.B.S., Benes, N.E., Higler, A.R.

and
Verweij, H. (2002), Derivat
ion of

43

adsorption parameters for nanofiltration membranes using a 1
-
pK Basic Stern model.
Desalination
,
145

(1
-
3), 87
-
95.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination145, 87.pdf

Abstract: The ion retention

and
flux of nanofiltratio
n (NF) membranes are to a large
extent determined by the membrane surface charge. This surface charge is in turn
strongly influenced by adsorption of ions from the solution onto the membrane
material. A 1
-
pK adsorption model with a Basic Stern electrostati
c double layer
model is used to describe ion adsorption,

and
the sensitivity of this model for various
parameters is discussed. From a non
-
linear regression analysis of literature data [1, 2]
regarding the surface charge

and
the zeta
-
potential, adsorption
parameters for the I
pK model are obtained for sodium chloride on gamma
-
alumina. The 1
-
pK Basic
Stern model could predict the surface charge well, except for the highest
concentration of 1000 mol/m
3
. Reasonable agreement is found between the measured
zeta
-
potentials

and
the model predictions.

Keywords: Specific Adsorption, Nanofiltration Membranes, Zeta
-
Potential, Surface
Charge, Gamma
-
Alumina, Electrical Double
-
Layer, Multicomponent
Electrolyte
-
Solutions, Solid
-
Solution Interface, Oxide
-
Water Interface,
Su
rface
-
Ionization, Reverse
-
Osmosis, (Hydr)Oxides, Alumina, Charge, Ions

Han, B.B., Runnells, T., Zimbron, J.

and
Wickramasinghe, R. (2002), Arsenic removal
from drinking water by flocculation

and
microfiltration.
Desalination
,
145

(1
-
3),
293
-
298.

Full Text:

D
\
Desalination145, 293.pdf

Abstract: Arsenic removal from drinking water is a major problem in many parts of the
world. We have investigated arsenic removal by flocculation

and
microfiltration.
Ferric chloride

and
ferric sulphate have been used as flocculants. The use of small
amounts of cationic polymeric flocculants, as flocculation aids in the presence of
ferric ions, has also been investigated. The results obtained here show that
flocculation prior to micro
filtration leads to significant arsenic removal in the
permeate. Further, the addition of small amounts of cationic polymeric flocculants
lead to significantly improved permeate fluxes during microfiltration. The residual
turbidity, after flocculation

and
microfiltration, may be used as a guide to the level of
arsenic removal. Since energy requirements for microfiltration are low

and
fluxes
high, compared to other membrane processes such as reverse osmosis

and
nanofiltration, flocculation

and
microfiltratio
n may be a cost effective method for
arsenic removal from drinking water.

Keywords: Arsenic, Cationic Flocculant, Drinking Water, Ferric Ions, Flocculation,
Microfiltration, Adsorption, Ferrihydrite

? Kim, D.S., Kang, J.S., Kim, K.Y.

and
Lee, Y.M. (2002),
Surface modification of a
poly(vinyl chloride) membrane by UV irradiation for reduction in sludge adsorption.

44

Desalination
,
146

(1
-
3), 301
-
305.

Full Text:
2002
\
Desalination146, 301.pdf

Abstract: N
-
vinyl
-
2
-
pyr
roldinone was grafted by the UV
-
irradiation process onto the
porous surface of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane to increase the surface
wettability

and
to decrease the adsorptive fouling. The graft yield of the modified
PVC membrane was maximum at 5 min

UV exposure time

and
20 wt% aqueous
NVP solution. The specific resistance (alpha(c)) of the adsorbed cake layer decreased
with the increase of the grafting degree of NVP. In the dead
-
end filtration
performances of membranes, although the mutual repulsive
interaction between
sludge

and
the surface of the PVC
-
g
-
PNVP membrane was weak with the increase of
the grafting degree, the low adsorption of sludge with the increase of NVP grafting
was affected by the contribution of the higher hydrophilicity due to gra
fting NVP
rather than by the contribution of interaction between sludge

and
the membrane
surface.

Keywords: Activated Sludge, Adsorption, Chloride, Exposure, Filtration, Fouling,
Grafting, Interaction, Irradiation, Membrane, Membranes, Modification,
N
-
Viny
l
-
Pyrrolidinone (NVP), Poly(Vinylchloride), Porous, PVC, Reduction,
Resistance, Sludge, Specific Resistance, UV, UV Irradiation, UV
-
Irradiation,
Wettability, Yield

?
Minhalma, M.

and
de Pinho, M.N. (2002), Development of nanofiltration/steam
stripping sequ
ence for coke plant wastewater treatment.
Desalination
,
149

(1
-
3),
95
-
100.

Full Text:
2002
\
Desalination149, 95.pdf

Abstract: The present work proposes the optimisation of an integrated process that
consists in

the coupling of Nanofiltration (NF) with Steam Stripping for the
treatment of ammoniacal wastewaters contaminated by cyanides ions

and
phenols.
These wastewaters are fractionated by NF into an ammonium concentrate

and
an
ion
-
containing permeate stream. Th
e concentrates are further fractionated in the
steam stripping column. The NF experiments were performed with a DSS plate

and
frame Lab
-
Unit 20, equipped with a HR
-
98
-
PP membrane. The NF experiments were
run in concentration mode to optimise the
concentrate ammonium content/permeate
flux as a function of water recovery ratio (RR). The optimisation of the NF/steam
stripping integrated process was carried out with a sequential process simulator. The
optimisation study showed that the NF should work
at a recovery ratio of 40%. At
this RR the ammonium can be efficiently concentrated

and
purified from cyanides at
reasonable permeate flowrates. The column steam consumption was also optimised
as a function of the NF concentrates flowrate. The integrated p
rocess leads to an
increase of the stripping efficiency

and
to significant energy savings (0.698
EURO/m
3

treated water).


45

Keywords: Ammonia Removal, Ammoniacal Wastewater, Coke Plant Wastewater, Coke
Plants, Cyanides, Ion
-
Exchange, Nanofiltration, Phenols,
Steam Stripping,
Wastewater, Water, Zeolite

? Velizarov, S., Reis, M.A.

and
Crespo, J.G. (2002), Integrated transport

and
reaction in
an ion exchange membrane bioreactor.
Desalination
,
149

(1
-
3), 205
-
210.

Full Text:
2002
\
Desalination149, 205.pdf

Abstract: The removal of low molecular mass charged compounds from water streams
in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB) was studied. This integrated
membrane process combines continuous ion exchange transport (D
onnan dialysis) of
the pollutant through a non
-
porous membrane, selective for the transport of
mono
-
anions,

and
its simultaneous bioconversion to harmless products in a
biocompartment. The mechanism of the process, governed by the Donnan
equilibrium princi
ples, allows for regulation of the direction

and
magnitude of flux of
the individual anions present by adjusting the ratio of the impermeable co
-
ions
between the biocompartment

and
polluted water compartment. Therefore, transport
of a charged pollutant aga
inst its concentration gradient is possible. Experimental
results, obtained for nitrate removal from drinking water are reported as a case study
in order to evaluate the potential of the integrated process compared to that of other
membrane
-
assisted biopro
cesses as well as with Donnan dialysis operated as a single
process. It was found that the IEMB process allows for the most selective removal of
the target pollutant simultaneously avoiding microbial

and
secondary contamination
of the treated water stream.

The advantages, possible limitations

and
some
recommendations for a successful IEMB process application are also briefly
outlined.

Keywords: Charged Pollutants, Donnan Dialysis, Drinking Water, Drinking
-
Water
Denitrification, Integrated Process, Ion Excha
nge, Ion Exchange Membrane
Bioreactor, Nitrate Removal

Ucun, H., Bayhan, Y.K., Kaya, Y., Cakici, A.

and
Algur, O.F. (2003), Biosorption of
lead
(II)

from aqueous solution by cone biomass of
Pinus sylvestris
.
Desalination
,
154

(3), 233
-
238.

Full Text:
D
\
Desalination145, 233.pdf

Biosorption of lead
(II)

from aqueous solution by cone biomass of Pinus sylvestris

Abstract: Biosorption of lead
(II)

onto a cone biomass of Pinus sylvestris was studied
with variation in the parameters of pH, initial metal ion concentration

and
impeller
speeds. Lead removal rate was increased at pH 4.0

and
was sharply decreased when
pH of the solution was decreased to 2
.0. Impeller speed studies indicated maximum
lead biosorption at 150 rpm

and
the biosorption equilibrium was established after
about 1 h. The adsorption constants were found from the Freundlich isotherm at
25
°
C. An increase in lead/biomass ratio caused a d
ecrease in biosorption efficiency.

46

The cone biomass, which is a readily available biosorbent, was found suitable for
removing of lead in aqueous solution.

Keywords: Biosorption, Lead, Heavy Metal, Wastewater Treatment, Cone Biomas,
Pinus Sylvestris, Heavy
-
Metals, Removal

? Amara, M.

and
Kerdjoudj, H. (2003), Modification of cation
-
exchange membrane
properties by electro
-
adsorption of polyethyleneimine.
Desalination
,
155

(1), 79
-
87.

Full Text:
2003
\
Desalination1
55, 79.pdf

Abstract: A cation
-
exchange membrane has been modified by fixation of
polyethyleneimine on its surface. This fixation was carried out under an electric field
effect, thus it is called electro
-
adsorption. The polycation formed in an acidic
medium

migrated toward the membrane

and
a charged layer was deposited on the
surface,

and
the selectivity towards divalent ions decreased, yielding to the increase
of the proton transfer. When the amount of adsorbed PEI increased, the electrical
resistance of th
e membrane increased

and
the transport number of zinc decreased.
However, suitable conditions like pH, current density

and
electro
-
adsorption time
were controlled in the order to obtain membranes with better selectivity

and
low
electrical resistance.

Keywo
rds: Acid, Density, Electro
-
Adsorption, Electrodialysis, Membrane, Membranes,
Metallic Divalent Salts, Pei, Permeability, Permselectivity
, pH,

Polyethyleneimine,
Properties, Proton Transfer, Recovery, Resistance, Selectivity, Surface, Transport,
Transport
-
Properties, Zinc

?
Vaaramaa
,

K
.

and
Lehto
,

J
.

(2003),
Removal of metals

and
anions from drinking water
by ion exchange
.
Desalination
,
155

(
2
),
157
-
170
.

Full Text:
2003
\
Desalination155, 157.pdf

Abstract: Five
organic

and
two inorganic ion exchangers were evaluated for the removal
of metals

and
anions from water of two drilled wells. Sodium titanate (CoTreat)

and
a chelating aminophosphonate resin were the most efficient exchangers in removing
transition metals
from the total of 1800 bed volumes processed, CoTreat was the best