Why War? Peace Studies in the 21 Century.

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16 Φεβ 2014 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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Why War? Peace Studies in the 21
st

Century.

International Conference to be held as part of the 40
th

Anniversary
Celebrations of the Division of Peace Studies, University of Bradford, 1
-
3

May

2014
.

Keynote speakers:

Dr Saeb Erekat, Chief Palestinian
Negotiator
.

Dr

Helen Frowe, Director of the Sto
ckholm Centre for Ethics of War and Peace,
University of Stockholm.

Ms Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Laureate and Peace Activist.

Professor John Paul Lederach, Professor of International Peacebuilding, University

of
Notre Dame.


Call for Papers.


Peace Studies at the University of Bradford is celebrating its 40
th

anniversary in 2014. To mark the
occasion we are hosting an international conference, and are seeking presenters to give papers on
the future of peace st
udies in the 21
st

Century. The conference is organised around eight themes:
Disarmament; Participation; Conflict Resolution; Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding; War and Peace in
Africa; Peace Education; Philosophy and War; and the Security
-
Development Nexus.


Why War? A Historical Debate

In

1931
and

1932, a correspondence occurred between two of the greatest intellects of the day,
Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud, on the question, “Why War?”
1

Einstein initiated the
correspondence, as part of an initiative to p
romote the contribution of intellectuals to public life.
The plan was to initiate debate amongst a network of intellectuals, whose ponderings would be
published in the popular press, with the goal of
exerting “a significant and wholesome moral
influence on

the solution of political problems”.


The project of harnessing theoretical and intellectual debate to the resolution of political and policy
problems is one that has animated the Department of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford
since its
foundin
g

in 1973. Co
nsequently, as the finale of our 40
th

anniversary year, we are proud to
host an international conference examining the state of peace studies in the 21
st

Century and the
contribution peace studies can make to public policy in the contemporary
world.


In their original correspondence, in response to a proposal by the League of Nations, and reflecting
the historical era in which they wrote, Einstein and Freud focused on the problem of inter
-
state war.
Einstein
is revealed as

an idealist, proposin
g the establishment of an international judicial body to
arbitrate disputes. Freud responded, as one might expect, with an exegesis on human nature, in
which the drive to violence is described as innate.
However Freud also
discusses war and peace as



1

Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud,
The Einstein
-
Freud Correspondence, 1931
-
2,
available at
http://www.public.asu.edu/~jmlynch/273/documents/FreudEinstein.pdf
, accessed 6 November 2014.

effect
s of power,
point
ing

out that wars can be prosecuted for emancipatory ends where peace


or
the rule of law


is an effect of class domination. In this he prefigures Johan Galtung’s later work on
structural violence and positive peace


work which has been

regarded as the foundations of peace
studies as a field of study. Freud also discusses the emergence of rule of law as an effect of ethnic
and national identity, and points out the potential for ‘othering’ inherent in such a process.


Despite the lofty a
ims with which their correspondence began, it was never widely published. By the
time a print run was prepared in 1933, Hitler was in power and Einstein was in exile. Freud followed
him in 1938. Only 2000 copies of the correspondence were ever circulated.
Interestingly, also, the
correspondence
is silent on

many pressing problems of the day
. N
either writer reflects on economy
as a cause of war despite the fact that they wrote in the midst of the Great Depression. Neither
comments
on
contemporary independenc
e movements

in colonised countries

such as India
, Libya
and

Vietnam. Although Freud comments briefly on Bolshevism, neither writer discusses the
ideological struggle between fascism and communism that was about to tear Europe apart.


In its ambition and i
ts failure and in what it says and what it
ignores
, the correspondence reveals
much not only about war and peace but also about the potential contribution of theorists and
intellectuals to public policy and to the constraints
that inhibit

that contribution
.
On the 100
th

anniversary of the start of the First World War and the 25
th

anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall,
we would like to devote our 40
th

anniversary celebrations to a contemporary discussion of these
questions.



Call for Papers.

We are
calling for further papers to be delivered in panel sessions, which will be organised around
eight themes:


Disarmament

Agency, Activism and
Participation

Conflict Resolution

Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding

War and Peace in Africa

Peace Education

Philosophy

and War

The Security
-
Development Nexus.


Within each theme, the aim is to generate discussion over the state of peace studies, future
challenges and directions, and the relationship between theory and practice.

The conference thus
aims to emulate the spir
it animating the Einstein
-
Freud correspondence, while focusing on
contemporary theoretical and political issues.


Paper abstracts of up to 250 words should be submitted to the organising committee by
14 February

201
4
. The submission must state the title, a
uthor(s) name and affiliation, and the relevant thematic
stream. Applicants will be notified by 28 February if the
ir paper has been accepted for presentation
at t
he conference.


Conference participation is free but no travel or accommodation grants can be
provided.

Registration for the conference opens on 1 December 2013 and continues until 31 March 2014.


Enquiries should be emailed to
peacestudies40@bradford.ac.uk

For further details see
http://www.bradford.ac.uk/ssis/events
-
and
-
podcasts/events/peace
-
events/peace
-
studies
-
international
-
conference
-
may
-
2014.php