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26 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

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Encasing Services

Level 2 Diploma unit CC 2009K

QCF 10

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Please do not add your own
sound effects !!!!!

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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By the end of this session


All of you will be able to recall the steps
required to clad a beam.


Most of you will be able to describe how to
clad around pipes


Some of you will be able to accurately
work out how much material would
required to clad a beam

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Encasing Services


This section has been designed to provide you
with the knowledge and understanding to
correctly encase a variety of services and
structures.


The phrase ‘encasing services’ usually refers to
the carcase, framework and trim that cover
RSJs, service pipes, cables, steel and concrete
columns.


In some instances, unsightly spaces such as
where a bath is situated or where the bulkhead
for a staircase cuts into a room

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Beams and columns


In some buildings RSJ’s have
to be clad to protect them from
the effects of fire.



The amount of protection
required will depend upon the
function and location of the
beam.


New Terminology


RSJ stands for rolled steel
joist, often used to provide
load
-
bearing supports in a
building because the shape is
very resistant to bending

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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How to clad a beam

If a beam to be clad is made of
timber, or even concrete, it can
have a frame fixed to it and then
facing material put on to the

frame, or the facing material can
be fixed directly to it.


The bigger problem is to clad

a steel beam, often an RSJ used
as a load bearing support

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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How to clad a beam

Step 1

Fix
noggings
between the rolled
edges of the beam. This can be
done by accurately cutting lengths
of 50 mm x 50 mm timber to match
the vertical gap in the side of the
RSJ.

Then drive them vertically into the
gap on both sides of the beam so
they wedge in place.

They will provide attachment
points for a cradle so should be no
more than 600 mm apart.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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How to clad a beam

Alternatively, timber supports can be
fitted in the gap along the whole

length of the beam and then bolted
into place through holes in the beam

(some come with them or they can
be drilled). These similarly provide

attachment points for a cradle.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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How to clad a beam

Step 2

Create a cradle using 50 mm
×

25
mm treated softwood.

Screw the cradle to the bearers. (If
the noggings or timber supports
come flush with the sides of the
metal beam it is possible to
dispense with a cradle by fixing
additional timber supports along the
beam near the top and bottom as a

support for facing material.)

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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How to clad a beam

Step 3

Run soffits along the length
of the joist, fastening them
into the cradle.

The facing material can now
be fixed to the soffits to
conceal

the sides of the beam.


New Terminology


Soffit, a horizontal surface
usually found in roof’s,
beams and reveals of
windows


11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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How to clad a column

Cladding columns is a similar procedure to
beams and many of the tasks involved are
duplicated, the only real difference is that it is
carried out vertically as opposed to horizontally.


Concrete or steel columns are clad by
constructing a set of framed grounds (either
two or four) slightly larger than the column
itself. These are generally shaped like a ladder
and made from rough sawn timber. They are

assembled around the column and adjusted
until plumb. Any slackness is taken up, using
wedges or packing pieces with a screw or nail
driven into them to stop them slipping. Facing
material is then fixed to the framed grounds.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Service pipes and cables are
hidden from view whenever
possible. However, there are
occasions when it is not
possible to do so; when the
circuit of pipe work has to go
from one storey to another for
instance.


When this occurs they should
be encased behind a timber
stud frame.


The method is very similar to
cladding a column.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Step 1

Measure how far the services
protrude.


The framework that is about to
be fitted should not stand
excessively from the object to
be encased.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Step 2

By using halving joints or

by butt nailing or screwing,
construct two sets of framed
grounds or ladders.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Step 3
Fix
battens to the
wall with plugs
and screws or
masonry nails.

Step 4
Fix the
framed grounds
to the battens

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Step 5
Clad with appropriate material for finish required,
scribing to the wall if necessary
.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

A corner casing for a large pipe

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Method showing how to
cut around a soil pipe,
the same principal can
be used for any branch
pipe within a casing or
cladding.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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Service pipes and cables

Here are two more examples of covering small bore
pipes or even electric cables
.

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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QUICK QUESTIONS

11/26/2013

paul kent QCF 10

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