Ministry of Education Information and Communications Technology Switching Infrastructure: Policy and Standards For Schools

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Ministry of Education

Information and Communications
Technology
Switching Infrastructure:

Policy and Standards
For Schools






Version 1.2



UFBiS Group
Curriculum, Teaching & Learning Implementation
Ministry of Education
www.minedu.govt.nz
August 2011
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ICT Switching Infrastructure: Policy and Standards


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Document Information


DOCUMENT SPONSOR

Manager
UFBIS Group

Curriculum, Teaching & Learning

Implementation



DOCUMENT TITLE

Information Technology Infrastructure
Switching

Policy and Guidelines for Schools

















Standards revision

These

Standards developed by the
Ministry of Education

are updated, according to the needs
of the
Ministry taking consideration of the long term needs of schools, best industry practices
and the rules and regulatio
ns commonly applied by industry
,

by amendments or revision.
Users of
this Standard

should make sure that

they possess the latest amendments
or editions.
Representations concerning the

need for a change to this Standard should be addressed to:


Project Manager

Schools Network Upgrade Programme (SNUP)

Ministry of Education

PO Box 1666

Thorndon 6011

Wellington


Email: network.upgrades@minedu.gov
t.nz

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Table of Contents

DOCUMENT INFORMATION

2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

3

1

I
NTRODUCTION

5

1.1

P
URPOSE

5

1.2

S
COPE

5

2

D
EFINITIONS AND
A
BBREVIATIONS

6

2.1

D
EFINITIONS

6

2.2

A
CRONYMS AND
A
BBREVIATIONS

7

3

R
EFERENCE
D
OCUMENTS

9

3.1

N
EW
Z
EALAND AND
I
NTERNATIONAL
S
TANDARDS

9

3.2

R
EGULATORY
R
EQUIREMENTS AND
C
ODES OF
P
RACTICE

10

3.3

A
PPLICATION OF THE
S
TANDARDS

10

4

G
ENERAL
C
ONDITIONS

11

4.1

S
WITCHING
S
YSTEM
W
ORKS

11

4.2

S
WITCHING
E
QUIPMENT

11

4.3

M
INOR
M
ATERIALS
,

F
ITTINGS AND
C
ONSUMABLES

11

4.4

E
LECTRICAL
I
NSTALLATION
W
ORKS

11

4.5

S
ITE
C
ONDITIONS

11

4.6

C
OORDINATION WITH
O
THER
W
ORKS

11

5

S
WITCHING
S
YSTEMS
:

D
ESIGN
S
TANDARDS

12

5.1

G
ENERAL

12

5.2

M
INIMUM
S
TANDARDS

12

5.3

G
ENERIC
N
ETWORK
A
RCHITECTURES

13

5.3.1

Access Layer

13

5.3.2

Distribution and Core Layers

13

5.3.3

Internet Connectivity

14

5.3.4

Wireless LAN Interfaces

14

5.4

T
YPICAL
N
ETWORK
A
RCHITECTURES

14

5.4.1

Small Schools
(20


200 Students)

14

5.4.2

Medium Schools
(200
-
500 students)

14

5.4.3

Large Schools

(500+ students)

15

5.5

S
WITCH
S
ELECTION

16

5.6

A
LLOCATION OF SWITCHI
NG EQUIPMENT

17

5.6.1

General

17

5.6.2

Core switches

17

5.6.3

Distribution Switches

17

5.6.4

Edge switches

17

5.6.5

Switch interconnection links

18

5.6.6

Retention of existing switches

18

5.7

S
WITCH
M
ANAGEMENT

19

5.8

S
WITCH
C
ONFIGURATION

19

6

S
WITCHING
S
YSTEMS
:

T
ECHNICAL
R
EQUIREMENTS

20

6.1

G
ENERAL

20

6.2

E
DGE
S
WITCHES

20

6.3

C
ORE
S
WITCHES

21

7

S
WITCHING
S
YSTEM
I
NSTALLATION
P
RACTICE

24

7.1

G
ENERAL

24

7.2

S
AFETY

24

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7.3

Q
UALIFICATIONS OF
I
NSTALLER

24

7.4

M
ANUFACTURERS
R
ECOMMENDATIONS

24

7.5

D
OCUMENTATION

24

8

W
ARRANTY AND
S
UPPORT

25

8.1

G
ENERAL

25

8.2

M
ANUFACTURERS
W
ARRANTY

25

8.2.1

Hardware Warranty

25

8.2.2

Software Warranty

25

8.2.3

Service Level Agreements

25

9

Q
UALIFICATIONS

26

9.1

I
NSTALLER
Q
UALIFICATIONS AND
S
ELECTION

26

9.2

S
UPPLIER
Q
UALIFICATIONS

26

10

O
THER
C
ONSIDERATIONS

27

10.1

O
THER
A
SSOCIATED
S
YSTEMS

27

10.2

H
EALTH AND
S
AFETY
C
ONSIDERATIONS

27

10.3

L
ASER
S
AFETY

27

10.3.1

Protection from Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

27

APPENDIX 1: SNUP SWI
TCH REQUIREMENTS

28

1.1

S
WITCH
R
EQUIREMENT
S
UMMARY

28

1.2

S
WITCH
T
YPE
1

R
EQUIREMENTS

29

1.3

S
WITCH
T
YPE
2

R
EQUIREMENTS

32

1.4

S
WITCH
T
YPE
3

R
EQUIREMENTS

34

1.5

S
WITCH
T
YPE
4

R
EQUIREMENTS

37

1.6

S
WITCH
T
YPE
5

&

8

R
EQUIREMENTS

39

1.7

S
WITCH
T
YPE
6

&

9

R
EQUIREMENTS

42

1.8

S
WITCH
T
YPE
7

&

10

R
EQUIREMENTS

44


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1

Introduction

This document outlines the
minimum
switching
standards
adopted by the
Ministry of
Education

for
Information Technology Infrastructure
s

in New Zealand schools
.

This document is updated regularly as standards change. Prior to using this
document please confi
rm t
hat it is the latest version.
The latest version of the
document may be obtained at
http://www.minedu.govt.nz/networks


1.1

Purpose

This document has been prepared by
the
Ministry of Education

for use by New
Zealand schools and
other organisations
which
participate in
the design
, supply,

and
implementation of
information technology infrastructure
s

for
New Zealand schools
.

The
document addresses
the planning for
switching

systems
in new schools
but
applies equally to existing
scho
ols planning significant upgrades and extensions to
existing infrastructures
.


It provides guidance in the following areas:


Technical requirements for
switching

systems


Product selection and
system
dimensioning


Design, installation and testing requirements


Switching

administration and documentation

1.2

Scope

This document addresses the following areas:


Switching

system

and product selection

for use in
New Zealand
schools


Swit
ching equipment installation in New Zealand schools

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2

Definitions and Abbreviations

2.1

Definitions

Category 5 (Cat 5)

A

definition of cabling components which provide
AS/NZS

3080 Class D
performance

Category 5e

A
ny reference to Category

5e shall be interpreted
as Category

5

providing Class E performance
.

Category 6 (Cat 6)

A

definition of cabling components which provide
AS/NZS

3080 Class E
performance

Channel

The
end
-
to
-
end transmission path connecting two pieces of
application specific equipment

Enclosure

A

ho
using for accommodation of equipment and cabling that
includes mounting rails and protective panels

Ministry

(the)

T
he
Ministry of Education

Preferred Switch Supplier

The Ministry‟s LAN switch supplier for SNU
P
whi
c
h has been awarded

a
contract

through an open tender
process

Preferred Switching Equipment

Switching equipment provided through the
SNUP programme from the Preferred Switch Supplier

Recommended Switch Brands

LAN
switching equipment which has

been
deemed to meet the

minimum Standards required by the
Ministry and listed in the
Recommended List of Switch brands
and Suppliers

Registered Jack 45

I
n the USA RJ45 is the Universal Service Ordering Code
(USOC) for circuit con
figuration 45 (either T568
A or

T568B)
for an 8
-
position modular connector. In this document RJ45
shall mean a modular 8
-
pin connector wired according to T568A
configuration in accordance with AS/NZS

3080 Z.A.2.

Structured Cabling System

A

set of cabling and connectivity products t
hat
are constructed according to standardi
s
ed rules to facilitate
integration of voice, data, video, and other signals

Uplink

A high
-
speed connection for aggregating traffic from an edge
switch to a backbone switch or a server






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2.2

Acronyms and
Abbreviations

10GbE

10 Gigabits per second Ethernet

AC

Alternating Current

BGPv4

Border Gateway Protocol version 4

CLI

Command Line Interface

DHCP

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

DVMRP

Distance Vector Multiple Routing Protocol

EMC

Electromagnetic Compa
tibility

EMI

Electromagnetic Interference

EPR

Earth Potential Rise

GARP

GARP (Generic Attribute Registration Protocol)

GbE

Gigabit
(
per second
)

Ethernet

GBIC

Gigabit Interface Converter

Gbps

Gigabits per second

GVRP

Group VLAN Registration Protocol

HSRP

Ho
t Standby Router Protocol

HTTP

HyperText Transfer Protocol

ICMP

Internet Control Messaging Protocol

ICT

Information and Communication Technology

IEEE 802.1D

Spanning Tree Protocol standard

IEEE 802.1Q

VLAN tagging standard

IEEE 802.1w

Rapid Spanning Tree P
rotocol Standard

IEEE 802.1x

Access control standard

IEEE 802.3a

Port aggregation standard

IEEE 802.3ab

1000Base
-
T (Gigabit UTP copper standard)

IEEE 802.3ad

Trunk aggregation standard

IEEE 802.3p

VLAN Priority tagging standard

IEEE 802.3u

Fast Ethernet
standard

IEEE 802.3z

1000Base
-
SX/LX (Gigabit fibre standard)

IEEE

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers

IGMP

Internet Group Management Protocol

IP

Internet Protocol

LACP

Link Aggregation Control Protocol

LAN

Local Area Network

LC

A

small form fa
ctor optical fibre

connector

LED

Light Emitting Diode

MAC

Media Access Controller

Mbps

Megabits per second

MDI

Medium Dependent Interface

MDI
-
X

Medium Dependent Interface Crossover

MIBs

Management Information Bases. The variables accessible via
SNMP.

MMF

M
ulti
-
mode Optical Fibre

MPLS

Multi Protocol Label Switching

MT
-
RJ

A

small form factor optical fibre

connector

NTP

Network Time Protocol

OEM

Original Equipment Manufacturer

OSPF

Open Shortest Path First

PIM

Protocol Independent Multicast

PING

Packet Interne
t Groper

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QoS

Quality of Service

RFC

Request for Comment

RFI

Radio Frequency Interference

RFP

Request For Proposal

RIP

Routing Information Protocol

RJ45

Registered Jack 45 (USOC reference)

RMON

Remote Monitoring Agent

RU

Rack Units (1RU = 44.5mm)

SCS

Structured Cabling System

SFF

Small Form Factor (connector)

SFP

Small Form Factor Pluggable (alternative to SFF)

SMF

Single Mode Optical Fibre

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol

SNTP

Simple Network Time Protocol

SNUP

School Network Upgrade Programme

S
OHO

Small Office(s) and Home Office(s)

STP

Shielded Twisted Pair

TFTP

Trivial File Transfer Protocol

UPS

Uninterruptible Power Supply

USOC

Universal Service Ordering Code

UTP

Unshielded Twisted Pair (cable)

VLAN

Virtual Local Area Network

VoIP

Voice over I
nternet Protocol

VRRP

Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol

WLAN

Wireless Local Area Network

SME

Small to Medium Enterprise

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3

Reference Documents

Switching
system
s

and equipment
shall be
installed
in accordance with the
manufacturers


specification
s

and
Regulations, Codes and Standards listed below.

Where
New Zealand
and International Standards are referenced in this document the
application of the Standard shall be, unless specifically stated to the contrary, the
latest edition and amendments available o
n the date 30 calendar days prior to the
issue of any request for a quote, tender or proposal.

Where specifications or standards or any other references referred to in this
document refer in turn to other specifications, standards or documents whether whol
e
or in part, those consequential references shall apply to this specification as if they
were completely contained in their entirety in the original reference.

3.1

New Zealand
and International Standards

The work covered by th
is document
shall comply with the

following
New Zealand
and International
Standards, Specifications and Technical Bulletins.


Standard/Specification or
Technical Bulletin Number

Description

NZS 2772.1:1999

Maximum exposure levels
-

3kHz to 300GHz

(Radiofrequency Fields)

AS/NZS CISPR 22

Information technology equipment


Radio disturbance
characteristics


Limits and methods of measurement

AS
/NZS

1269

Occupational noise management

AS
/NZS

2107

Acoustics


Recommended design sound levels and
reverberation times for building interiors

AS/
NZS

2211.2

Laser safety


Safety of optical fibre communications
systems

AS
/NZS

3000

Electrical installations (known as the Australian / New
Zealand Wiring Rules)

AS/NZS 3080

Telecommunications Installations


Integrated
Telecommunications Cabling System
s for Commercial
Premises

AS/NZS 3084

Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces for Commercial
Buildings.

AS/NZS 3085.1

Telecommunications Installations Administration of
Communication Cabling System
-

Part 1: Basic
Requirements.

AS/NZS
IEC 61935

Balanced
cable testing

AS/NZS 4117

Surge protection devices for telecommunication applications


AS/NZS 61000.6.3:2007

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)


Generic emission
standard
.
Residential
, commercial and light industry.

This Standard is identical with and
has been reproduced
from CISPR/IEC 61000
-
6
-
3:1996

IEC
-
60297

Part 1 and Part 2

Dimensions of mechanical structures of the 482.6

mm (19
in) series

IEEE 802.3

Carrier sense multiple access with collision detection
(CSMA/CD) access method and physical layer
specifications

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3.2

Regulatory Requirements
and Codes

of Practice

Other than for compliance with the
Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010

and
relevant New Zealand Codes of Practice, there are NO regulatory requirements for
telecommunications
s
witching

components or design practice in New Zealand. This
includes electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
.

The Telecommunications Act 1987 gives Telecom New Zealand and any other
Network Operators the right to refuse connection or to disconnect
from their
networks

any equipment which does not comply with Telecom PTC specifications or
equivalent
.

For
equipment
connected to Telecom New Zealand‟s network, compliance with
Telecom PTC specifications is a contractual requirement.

3.3

Application of the
Standards

All school L
AN switching upgrade work undertaken through the Schools Network
Upgrade Programme (SNUP) will be in accordance with this Standard.

It is recommended that
the
s
witching

systems
be
designed and installed
in
accordance with th
is document
by inclusion
in ten
der
and
contract documents.

In the event of conflict between
Ministry

standard
s

or specification
s

and other
regulations, codes or standards the order of precedence shall be:

i)

Statutory Codes and Regulations

ii)

Standards or Specifications within the tender or
contract

iii)

This
document

iv)

Referenced
New Zealand
and International Standards

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4

General Conditions

4.1

Switching

System Works

The scope of work for
the
provision of
s
witching

systems
and equipment
in
schools
typically
include
s

design,
supply, installation, testing,
commissioning, and
documentation.

4.2

Switching
Equipment

The
switching system supplier
/reseller

shall maintain a list of equipment which
complies with these
S
tandards.

All equipment shall be new and selected to ensure satisfactory operation under the
environm
ental conditions present at the site.

4.3

Minor Materials, Fittings and Consumables

All materials and fittings or any work which is necessary for the
installation and
satisfactory functioning of the
equipment
or which is generally provided in
accordance with
accepted trade practices shall be provided or carried out as part of
the works even though such material or work may not be explicitly mentioned in this
specification or shown on the drawings.

4.4

Electrical Installation Works

All electrical power system work
shall
be underta
ken by qualified Electricians

in
accordance with the relevant
New Zealand
Standards (AS
/NZS

3000
:200
7
).

4.5

Site Conditions

Suppliers
shall undertake the necessary investigations to fully inform
themselves
of
the site conditions
which
could imp
act
the cost
of
the job
. This shall include but not
be limited to:


Available cabinet space


Environment conditions


Power provisioning

4.6

Coordination with Other Works

Where the
s
witching

system
installation and commissioning
is dependent upon or
carried out i
n conjunction with other works at
the
site such as building, electrical or
cabling
works
,

the
s
witching

system provider shall coordinate activities with
the
other works
.

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5

Switching

System
s
: Design Standards

5.1

General

Because of the diversity of school sizes, building layouts, and networking
requirements, a range of
common
switching system architectures

is
described
.
S
chools are encouraged to discuss their requirements with
a
supplier of the
Recommended

Switch

Brand

or

a s
ystem
i
ntegrator prior to purchasing hardware.

Schools should consider the following when selecting network sw
itching system

hardware:


Required number and speed of
access
ports


Requirement for up
-
link bandwidth and interface type


Present or future re
quirement of IP telephony


Requirement for network management and reporting


The
use of
proprietary and generic network
management tools


Adherence to international standards for connectivity


Need for
uninterruptible power supplies and
redundancy in the netwo
rk to
avoid “
single points of failure
” and
the
maximum
acceptable downtime of the
network


Ability to backup complex device configuration files
and to restore to
replacement devices

in the event of a failure


Total number of proposed devices (workstations, s
ervers, printers etc.) on the
network
,

network segmentation

and
network
use
which
may
impa
c
t on
other
users


Complex security requirements such as segmenting administration and
curriculum networks (protecting administration server whilst allowing Internet
access and messaging to all students an
d staff)


Requirements for bandwidth management, traffic prioritisation and traffic
filter
ing


Requirement for future growth e.g. stackability


Performance capacities of switching devices e.g. non blocking internal
bandw
i
d
th and packet buffering capacity. Many switch manufacturers offer
both SOHO and SME switch product ranges.

Schools should not employ
switches with performance capacities designed for the SOHO market.


The ability of the
switch management system

to
provi
de
health checking, error
and performance monitoring
, and reporting


Ability of supplier to support product and respond to faults

Some of the above considerations can be particularly complex and
will
involve
specialist product and network skills.

A systems

integrator

should be used to ensure
that value for money is obtained when purchasing complex
networking solutions
.

5.2

Minimum Standards

The
Ministry
‟s minimum

standard for new
switching
installations is based on
providing Gigabit Ethernet (GbE)

over the backbone
and between the switches and
servers
,

and
100BASE
-
T to the desktop.

It is likely that
10 Gigabit Ethernet
(10GbE) backbone
s

will be required in the future.

The
Ministry has developed a list of
Recommended
S
wit
ch B
rands and s
uppliers
whi
ch meet the minimum required Standards and
offer a selection of switching
solutions which simplify the integration of applications and ensure cost
-
effective
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reliability and optimum performance across the entire network.
This list is available
at:
http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/Schools/Initiatives/ICTI
nSchools
/ICTInitiativesAndProgrammes/SNUP/IndependentUpgrades/RecomSuppli
ers.aspx


Integrated software provides built
-
in functionality for end
-
to
-
end integration,
including bandwidth aggregation.

The Fast Ethern
et and Gigabit Ethernet switching architectures

descr
ibed below
provide a combination of high data transfer rates, manageability, and expandability
ideally suited to schools. A selection of switches also has the ability to support
networks that integrate data, voice, and video applications. Support for IP
telephony
applications, such as unified messaging, desktop

integration, and e
-
learning, requires
fast LAN switches with QoS capabilities and high
-
availability components.

5.3

Generic
Network Architecture
s

The network hierarchy
for large installations
includes
three functional divisions

or
layers
:
edge or
access, distribution, and core.
In smaller installations one or more of
these layers may be “collapsed” into a single layer.

Unless able to be included very cost effectively,
built in
redundancy may be
conside
red a luxury for most schools. However, careful design can minimise the
“single points of failure” in the network and the impact of failure of a component on
the rest of the network
, f
or example
, the use of Spanning Tree Protocol, and
uninterruptible powe
r supply to the core switch and server.

5.3.1

Access Layer

The access layer provides the first level of access to the network

and provides
terminal device addressing and attachment
.

Layer 2 switching, security, and QoS
reside at this layer.

These switches shou
ld be manageable to provide for the
detection and resolution of problems such as broadcast storms, auto
-
negotiation
failures, excessive collisions and other transmission errors which may arise.

Because architectures up to Layer 2 allow end station connecti
vity, it is
possible
to
construct a Layer 2

only network, providing simple, inexpensive, high
-
performance
connectivity

for
small installations
.

However, Layer 2 does not
generally
extend
beyond the school boundary and Layer 3 (routing) capabilities are re
quired to
connect to the Internet.

5.3.2

Distribution and
Core Layer
s

All school networks need a “core” switch to connect to servers and support
management for the detection and resolution of problems which may arise such as
broadcast storms and auto
-
negotiation

failures
.

The core is the backbone of the network. This layer is designed to be highly reliable,
and stable. The core may provide load balancing, fast convergence, and scalability.

The distribution layer
,

which fits between the access and core layers,
a
ggregates
wiring closets and provides policy enforcement.
Layer 3 protocol

switches offer
benefits such as load balancing, fast convergence,
granular security
and
greater
scalability.


This layer
can also provide

first hop default gateway redundancy to en
d
stations.

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Simplicity is the key
-

“Switch where you can; route where you must”. Keeping the
network architecture simple offers the advantages of easy support and
troubleshooting. Only the largest schools are likely to have the need for a layer 3
(routi
ng) switch architectures. Since these switching systems will require specialist
design they are not discussed in detail here.

5.3.3

Internet Connectivity

Layer 3 (routing) functionality is required for network connection to the Internet.
Routing is included in

Layer 3 switches but is typically performed in a separate
router for this particular application.

5.3.4

Wireless LAN Interfaces

Wireless LAN (WLAN) equipment conforming to the IEEE 802.11 standards is
progressively being deployed

as an access technology at the
network edge
.
Wireless
bridges and routers are also available for access between buildings and campuses
where wired Ethernet is not a cost effective option.

WLAN equipment is not considered in detail in this
document because of the
requirement for special
ist design and the much lower performance than wired access
.
However, WLANs may be used to provide a cost effective alternative to extending
the coverage of existing network infrastructures
where reduced performance is
acceptable.

5.4

Typical Network
Architectures

5.4.1

Small Schools

(20


200 Students)

For a school with less than about 50 edge ports, the core and distribution layers
are
typically
combined into a single layer. This limits scale to a small number of access
switches.

A very small school
,

typ
ically contained within one building,
may have a
single
12, 16, or 24 port
switch which provides all required network
ing and
management

functionality.


Fig 1: Typical Small Size School Network

5.4.2

Medium School
s

(200
-
500 students)

For school
s

with
more than
about
50
edge ports

network performance
and priority
becomes an issue as
users compete for
limited network resources s
uch as:


Core switching capacity

Gbps

Gbps

Gbps

Gbps

D

a

t

a



G

e

n

e

r

a

l

Server

Layer 2 or Layer 3 “manageable”

Gigabit core switch

Layer 2 “manageable”

10/100Mbps access switches

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File server processor and data transfer performance


Bandwidth on links between switches


Bandwidth on links to file servers


Internet connection bandwidth

To ensure the network fabric is n
ot a
bottleneck, three design opportun
ities are
available:

1.

Optimisation of
network
performance
may be
effected by putting terminals in
the same network
VLAN or subnet
as the servers they use.
For medium to large
sized schools it is recommended that
VLANs

are used to segment the network
logically into well
-
defined broadcast groups and for application and security
management.
VLAN groups should have no more than 250 users. Separate
VLANs should be assigned for
;

(1) network

and switch

management, (2) school

administration, (3)
specialist applications such as video conferencing, and (3)
general purpose users.

Networking for a medium school is designed for high
availability, performance, and manageability.
The
core switch
may
also
use
layer three switching or

overlapping VLAN layer 2 constructs

to allow devices
in different VLANs or subnets to communicate with each other and with
common resources
.

2.

Optimisation of network performance by prioritising critical traffic with QoS
prioritisation mechanisms.

3.

Increased

network bandwidth
by increasing Ethernet speeds or aggregating ports
and links between devices.

Fig 2: Typical Medium Sized School Network

5.4.3

Large
Schools

(500+ students)

A typical large school network connects multiple buildings with each other across a
high
-
performance, switched backbone

and may
have requirements for high
availability, performance, and manageability in handling high bandwidth
applications, and services such as video, IP multicast
, and increasingly voice
.

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While voice and video traffic may

be relatively low bandwidth applications, the key
issue for networks carrying real
-
time applications is latency. Unlike
normal
data
traffic, voice and video are real
-
time applications unable to tolerate delay or
retransmission of packets. Prioritisation

of real
-
time traffic by QoS prioritisation
mechanisms ensures timely delivery of
voice and video packets ahead of other less
sensitive traffic.

Where
IP
telephony
is of interest
,

consideration should be given to switches that
support POS (Power over Ether
net) to provide power to telephones.

A

separate distribution layer
will
allow for
flexibility and
future growth.
Layer 2
Backbone designs are commonly used when cost effectiveness is a high priority.
R
edundant
links and data paths help ensure high availa
bility. Redundancy may be
achieved by using redundant paths and
R
STP or by IEEE

802.11ab port trunking.



Fig 3: Typical Large Size School Network

5.5

Switch Selection

Network architects will generally choose switching products according to the
formula

provided in the next section.

The Ministry has selected a number of
Recommended Switch B
rands which will be
able to provide the performance and functionality
required by these Standards. This

list of
Recommended Switch Brands

may change from time to time a
nd an up to date
list is available at:

http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/S
chools/Initiatives/ICTI
nSchools/ICTStrategy/SNUP/IndependentUpgrades/RecomSuppliers.aspx

The Ministry may also from ti
me to time call tenders for a Preferred Switch Supplier

of switching equipment specifically for use in the Schools Network Upgrade
Program
me (SNUP). These are the switches which will be used in all schools
participating in this programme.

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5.6

A
llocation of switching equipment

5.6.1

General

The Ministry, through a centralised bulk purchasing agreement,

will provide schools
with its Preferred S
witch
ing
E
quipment which will meet the minimum requirement
for the SNUP programme. Should schools wish to install switching equipment other
than the preferred option, but within the list of approved switches, they must bear the
full cost of those alternate switche
s. The installation of switching equipment outside
of the Ministry‟s approved list of switching equipment will not be supported.

5.6.2

Core s
witches

All core switches shall have 1Gbps access ports
.

All servers
, Network Area Storage (NAS) devices, and Wireless
Controllers

should
be connected to a core or dedicated
centralised server
switch at a minimum of 1Gbps
speeds.

Multiple 1Gbps links are often used where
load sharing to a server is
required
.

5.6.3

Distribution Switches

The distribution layer of switches is gener
ally only required for the largest schools.
Where a large number of edge switches are required they provide the additional high
speed up
-
link capacity and
a
traffic consolidation point
.

They provide a higher level
of network traffic management and the abil
ity to reroute tr
affic in case of link failure
or

congestion.
Generally there could be one distribution switch connecting a number
of edge switches in a particular school block. Networks are often created without the
distribution layer where the edge switc
hes are connected directly to the core switch.


5.6.4

Edge switches

The minimum design (for each cabinet) shall include a 1 x 24 port 10/100 e
dge
switch with 2 x 1Gbps ports
.

In medium to large schools, the installation of 1Gbps edge port switches is
recommended

for computer suit
e
s and large administration/teacher work areas where
24 or more access ports are required.

As a general rule, the number of edge ports provided across a school should be close
to 50% of the installed TOs. This includes both retained and n
ew TOs. This could

also

mean that at times there will be less than half the number of ports available for
TOs on a per cabinet basis. As an alternative rule, where the number of existing
connected devices is approaching 50% of TOs, the number of existing
a
ctive ports
should be retained or
replicated.

Switch allocation shall be as follows:


For a cabinet requirement of less than 49
ports
, there shall be 1 or 2 x 24 port
switches installed.


For a requirement of between 49 and 72
ports
, there shall be 1 x 24 port
switch plus 1 x 48 port switch.


In excess of 72 ports there shall be 2 x 48 port switches.

For a standard classroom configuration of up to 8 TOs, general purpose 10/100Mbps
edge switch ports shall be provided.

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Under SNUP w
here

a wireless system has been deployed

by the school
, or, where
one is intended to be deployed, and the number of TOs in classrooms is set at 4 or
less, then those TOs can be provided with 1Gbps edge ports. Otherwise the general
provision of 1Gbps ports wi
ll be at full cost to the school. This solution will be
provided for a block by block solution at a minimum, it shall not be provided as a
classroom by classroom solution.

Under SNUP s
chools requiring PoE at the switch ports will be required to fully fund
the alternative switch costs. Alternatively, PoE injectors can be purchased by the
school.

Uplink ports between edge switches and distribution or core devices should be
minimum 1Gbps connections.

VoIP and video conferencing client end devices should be con
nected to 100Mbps
switch ports.

Existing wireless AP‟s of SOHO grade (single radio) should be connected at
100Mbps speeds. New SOHO grade installations are not recommended but may be
acceptable for small schools and casual application (Note: the provision
of the
Wireless Access Point is currently not in scope for the SNUP).

Wireless AP‟s of commercial grade (multi radio) should be connected to a 1Gbps
switch port

where available
.

Where the school (via the Project Manager) can present an evidence based case
for
the general installation of 1Gps switches, this will be considered by the Ministry
SNUP team for inclusion in the SNUP upgrade.

5.6.5

Switch interconnection links

Uplink allocation
is recommended
as follows:


1 x

1Gbps uplink is required for each 24 and 48 x

10/100Mbps edge port switch.


1

x 1Gbps link for a 24 x 1Gbps edge port switch.


2 x

1Gbps links for a 48 x 1Gbps edge port switch.


3 x 1Gbps links for a pair of stacked 48 1Gbps edge port switches.

Where there is more than one uplink from a cabinet, it

is recommended they form a
LAG (Link Aggregation) as opposed to an STP (Spanning Tree Protocol) ring so as
to increase bandwidth availability.

Where a LAG comes from a stack of switches, that LAG should be spread across the
stack to increase resilience.

5.6.6

R
etention of existing switches

The decision as to whether or not to replace existing switching equipment should be
based on the following criteria:

a)

Swit
ches greater than 5 years old
-

replace

b)

Switches
with no management function or those
based

on websmart

configuration only
-

replace

c)

Switch
es

which do

not support SNMP and/or MIBS
-

replace

d)

Switches

that are at

EOL (end of life), outside of warranty
and

are
no longer

supported by the manufacturer
-

replace

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e)

Switches whi
ch are 10/100Mbps edge switches and comp
liant
-

retain

f)

Switches which are non
-
stackable
-

should not be retained for core switch use
in medium to large schools
but can be redeployed in appropriate locations
where stacking ability is not a requirement.

5.7

Switch Management

Switches may be managed or

u
nmanaged
. Unmanaged
switches have no
configuration interface or options. They are
plug and play

and

typically
used in

home,
SOHO
, or small businesses

networks
.
Whilst coming at a lower cost and
simple to use, they are not recommended for school applications
.

The operation of a managed switch

may be modified using common management
methods including
: a
command
-
line interface

(CLI) accessed via
serial console
,
telnet

or
Secure Shell
, an embedded
Simple Network Management Protocol

(SNMP)
agent allowing management from a remote console or management station, or a web
interface for management from a
web browser
.

For medium to
large schools, a
centralised management ability will result in

significant savings in administrative time and effort.

Minimum management features for the various switch types are provided in Tables 1
& 2.

5.8

Switch Configuration

Switch configuration will in
general be un
dertaken by the switch supplier

off
-
site
with prior knowledge of the network topology required.

Typically this work will include
:

a)

Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (
RSTP
)


b)

Broadcast storm control

c)

Link aggregation
(LAG)

d)

System Name


includes school

number and
s
witch description from network
diagram e
.
g. 1234_Edge70

e)

IP Address, subnet, gateway address

f)

Enable GUI and set a default Login
ID and Password

g)

Labelling all switches with IP Address, Cabinet and switch name

h)

Any
QoS and VLANs
requirements










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6

Switching
System
s:

Technical Requirements

6.1

General

A variety
of Ethernet switches from a number of
Recommended Switch Brands

have
been selected by the Ministry for deployment in schools
.

The range cover
s

edge or
access
workgroup
switches
and core switches
for
all school
s,
and distribution
switches required
for
larger installations.

Each switch will have features specific to that model which
will

determine the
selection for particular situations.

6.2

Edge
Switches

Basic
edge switches are
typically used as workgroup switch
es

at
small to medium
sized
school
s
. The basic Layer 2 models are typically fixed configuration, no
n
-
blocking switches with from
12

to 48 ports for creating cost effective LANs with
high performance and functionality. The 10/100Mbps auto
-
sensing and auto
-
negotiating
ports support
QoS

for prioritizing different traffic streams
. Switch
management

is typically by direct
RS232
connectio
n.

At least one m
odular
or fixed
uplink interface which support
s

Gigabit Ethernet
transmission
over

Category 5 or higher
copper
cable
and
single
-
mode and multimode
optical fibre
cables are a feature of some models
.

Advanced edge switches are typically used

as workgroup switches at medium to
larger sized schools. The advanced Layer 2 models are typically fixed configuration,
non
-
blocking switches with from 12 to 48 ports for creating cost effective LANs with
high performance and functionality. The 10/100Mb
ps auto
-
sensing and auto
-
negotiating ports support QoS for prioritizing different traffic streams. A
greater
range of switch management options are available.

At least two modular uplink interfaces which support Gigabit Ethernet transmission
over Category

5 or higher copper cable and single
-
mode and multimode optical fibre
cables are a standard feature.

Some models are stackable to provide high density
switching in the wiring closet.

Features and standards
which should be
supported as a minimum by this ra
nge of
switches
are provided in Table 1
.

Table 1: Minimum specifications for Edge Switches

Feature

Specifications

Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

Power supply

Internal 230V

External UPS

-

Stackable

Yes

Speed

10/100+

2xGb slots

IEEE N
-
way auto
negotiation, Speed,
duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation

Yes

Gigabit port options

1000Base
-
T

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1000Base
-
SX

1000Base
-
LH

Web browser manageable (HTTP)

Yes

SNMP V
3

manageable

Yes

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

Telnet management

Yes

CLI management

Yes

Configuration files loadable via TFTP

or web interface

Yes

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

Port Mirroring

Yes

Layer

2

VLAN Security options

IEEE 802.1q

IEEE 802.1x

IP Address setting

Static

& dynamic

IP
filtering for management security


Yes

Minimum number of VLANs

100

Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

Minimum size of Packet buffers

16Mbytes

Minimum size of MAC address tables

8K

IGMP
V1,
V2

& V3


Yes

Multicast Streaming

Yes

ICMP Ping send and

receive

Yes

Status LEDs

Link

Speed

Activity

QoS Queues

4

Traffic Classification

Yes

Broadcast Storm Control

Yes

IEEE standards

802.1p

802.1Q

802.1AD (Q in Q)

802.3x

802.3a
e

802.3ab

802.3z

802.1D

802.1w

RSTP

8002.1s

MSTP

IPV6

802.1x


6.3

Core
Switches

Basic core switches are typically used as
the core

switch at
small to medium sized
schools

and
as
distribution switches at large schools
. The basic
core switch
models
are typically fixed configuration, non
-
blocking switches with from 12 to
24
10/100
/1000
M
bps auto
-
sensing and auto
-
negotiating ports
.

To avoid a traffic
bottleneck from occurring between the 10/100Mbps switches at the edge of the
network and its core, Gigabit Ethernet is used at the core of the network. Multiple
Gigabit Ethernet up
-
links can

be used to provide redundant connections to the
backbone and ensure high network availability for users connected at the edge.

Each switch
can support at least two modular Gigabit Ethernet interfaces

for a range
of copper and Optical Fibre cable types
.

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Ad
vanced
Core Switches would be typically used as a core switch at a large
school.
For networks of more than about
200

users, networks where the deployment of IP
telephony is planned, Layer 3 switching should be provided in the backbone. Layer
3 switches a
re essentially wire
-
speed routers. These devices are ideally suited to
delivering high
-
performance routing between VLANs or LAN segments. Layer 3
switches also provide advanced security services, such as access control lists

and
advanced quality of servi
ce features to support real
-
time applications such as IP
Telephony
.

These features may not be required in small schools and hence a layer 2
core switch may be used as a core switch.

Features and standards
which should be
supported as a minimum by this range of
switches
are provided in Table 2.

Appendix 1 provides additional information on
switch requriments.

Table 2: Minimum specifications for Core Switches

Feature

Specification

Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

Power

supply

Internal 230V

External UPS

Yes

Redundant power supply option

Yes

Stackable

Optional

Chassis based system

Yes

Hot card swap

Yes

10Gbps ports

2


16 desirable

10/100/1000T ports

12
-
96 scalable

1Gbps SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T

24
-
96

IEEE N
-
way
auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex & MDI
-
X

All ports

Manual override of auto negotiation

Yes

802.3ad Port aggregation

(LACP)

Yes

Gbps port options

1000Base
-
T

1000Base
-
SX

1000BaseLX

Web browser manageable (HTTP)

Yes

SNMP V
3

Manageable

1, 2, 3, & 9

RMON
management

1,2,3 & 9

Telnet management

Yes

CLI management

Yes

Configuration
backup and restore
support

Yes

LLDP

Yes

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

Port Mirroring

Yes

OSI
Layer

support

3

VLAN Security Options

802.1X

IP Address setting

Static

& Dynamic

IP filtering
for
secur
e
management

Yes

Minimum number of VLANs

100

Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

All ports

Minimum size of Packet buffers

16MB

Minimum size of MAC address
tables

8kB

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IGMP
V1,
V2
& V3

Yes

Multicast support

Yes

ICMP Ping send and

receive

Yes

Status LEDs

Link

Speed

Activity

QoS Queues

8

Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

Diffserv (DSCP)

port
-
based

MAC Address

IP Address

TCP/UDP port No.

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

Network Security

802.1x port and MAC,

RADIUS,

SSH,

TACAS,

Access Control List

MAC,

VLAN,

802.1p,

Diffserv (DSCP),

IP Address,

Protoclo Type,

TCP/UDP, destination port No.

Event log

Syslog

Routing

RIP 1 & 2

OSPF,

DVMRP,

Static Routing,

Wire Speed Routing

Yes

Broadcast storm control

Yes

DHCP
forwarding

Yes

IEEE standards

802.1p

802.1Q

802.1AD (Q in Q)

802.3x

802.3ae 10Gig E

802.3ab

802.3ad

802.3z

802.3u

802.1D

802.1w

RSTP

802.1s

MSTP

802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

Radius accounting

Guest VLAN


Routing

RIP V1, V2

OSPF

DVMRP,PIM,(DM & SM)

Static Routing

Router resilience

VRRP/HSRP

IPV6

Yes

ROHS Compliant

Yes

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7

Switching
System Installation Practice

7.1

General

The switching system supplier
/reseller

shall supply all labour, materials and
equipment required for installing, testing and commissioning the network.

The supplier shall include a copy of all relevant specifications, compliance reports,
documentation
and diagrams including the switch IP addre
ss assignments
for
installation in an “as
-
built” document manual.

7.2

Safety

Any electrical work will be carried out by a registered electrician.

IEEE 802.3 compliant transformer coupled MDI and MDI
-
X ports
may be
an
important consideration if UTP copper cable

is to be used to connect switches in
separate buildings which have their own earth connections.

7.3

Qualifications of Installer

Switching infrastructures
shall
be installed only by organisations accredited by the
manufacturer of the
switches
and by personnel

properly
trained and certified by the
manufacturer to install their products
.

7.4

Manufacturers Recommendations

All equipment shall be installed
and performance tested
in full accordance with
manufacturer

s
and distributor‟s
recommendations and instructions.

7.5

Documentation

The Vendor
should produce
,

p
re and post installation
,

a
full network dia
gram with IP
a
ddresses and VLANs detailed
. Also required,
within one week of
the
site visit
, is a
commissioning report
,

excel spread
sheet containing equipment serial num
bers

and a
complete
d

Network Switch site Sign
-
off form
.

A backup of all device configurations should be produced and retained by the vendor
with a copy remaining at the school for general use.

Any of the original switches retained after a network upgrade
must be configured or
reconfigured so as to be consistent with the upgraded network.




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8

Warranty

and Support

8.1

General

The switching system
s
upplier shall warrant that products will operate to the
standards and specifications claimed by the manufacturer and
that the product is free
from any defects in materials or workmanship.

The
s
upplier shall make technical and user documentation o
n the product available to
the s
chool.

8.2

Manufacturers Warranty

8.2.1

Hardware Warranty

T
he supplier
shall
provide a
limited
lifetime r
eplacement warranty on the s
witch and
associated hardware.

Warranty provisions
shall include on
-
site repair or replacement
and t
he
s
upplier sh
ould
hold sufficient replacement stock in New Zealand to deliver a
replacement unit
to
any
school
suffering a fai
lure
no later than „next
business
day‟
.

8.2.2

Software Warranty

The supplier shall provide limited lifetime software support on the switch and free
access to firmware upgrades within the firmware feature set purchased.

8.2.3

Service Level Agreements

Quotations for service support may include an option for a Service Level Agreement.
In event of hardware failure the Service Level Agreement should stipulate within
what time frame a replacement unit will be dispatched to the school. Premiums will
be char
ged for service outside normal business hours. Quotations may be formulated
to include financial penalties for failure to meet the agreed SLA.

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9

Qualifications

9.1

Installer
Qualifications

and Selection

The specialist contractor engaged to design, supply, insta
ll, and commission the
selected switching system shall be approved as a reseller and certified as an installer
by the manufacturer or distributor of the equipment in New Zealand prior to
commencing work on the installation. The specialist contractor shall

also be capable
of maintaining the selected switching system.

When calling for tenders or requesting quotations schools should invite responses
from resellers/installers who can provide documentation detailing their level of
manufacturer/distributor certi
fication together with the following information:


Company overview and profile


Copy of warranty certification statements from the manufacturer


Customer reference letters with contact details (3 required)


Company staff details

and number of certified engine
ers


Full
-
time staff & responsibilities


Part
-
time contractors & responsibilities


Training


Industry specific training
(
e.g. Cisco, Allied
Teles
is
, D
-
Link,
HP
)


Manufacturer/distributor certification held by the reseller/installer


Manufacturer certification he
ld by the New Zealand supplier/distributor


Type, make and model of testing equipment used e.g.

-

UTP and Fibre cable certification equipment

-

Traffic performance analysers

-

Packet capture and protocol analyses tools

-

IP addressing audit tools

9.2

Supplier
Qualific
ations

The New Zealand
specialist supplier/distributor approved by the
equipment
manufacturer as a qualified supplier
/distributor

shall provide second level support
services to the
reseller/i
nstaller of the switching system.

The supplier
/distributor

shall

maintain an
engineering staff specifically to support
their resellers.


The

e
ngi
neering staff
shall
be certified

to install and maintain the
selected switching systems.

The
i
nstaller shall provide documentation detailing the level of
manufacturer
certifica
tion held by their supplier
/distributor

when submitting quotations and tender
responses.

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10

Other Considerations

10.1

Other Associated

Systems

The following systems and peripheral components should be considered in
conjunction with the design and implementation of

the
switching
system:


UPS system capacity requirements, accommodation, battery maintenance and
life span


Fire sprinklers in server and communications rooms


Smoke detection in server and communications rooms


IP telephony systems
/server


Video conferencing

s
ystems


Access to the Internet and associated firewall


Wireless Controller and Wireless Access Points


Network Area Storage devices


IP surveillance cameras and recording devices


Printers and printer servers


Equipment room alarms and climate control


Security
and alarm systems


Building management systems


10.2

Health and Safety Considerations

10.3

Laser Safety

All switch equipment capable of fibre optic connections should
be

equipped with

fibre terminal

dust cover
s

(or equivalent) to avoid accidental exposure to laser light.
These covers should remain

in place until such time as a cable connection is in place.

10.3.1

Protection from Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

The Ministry of Education acknowledges that the heal
th and safety of children in our
schools is of primary importance. As such
it

regularly monitor
s

New Zealand
standards, international standards and credible research on Wi
-
Fi technology and
radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as they become available.


C
urrent advice from the National Radiation Laboratory (part of the New Zealand
Ministry of Health) states that:

“the health research carried out to date shows that working and studying in areas
with WiFi equipment poses no health and safety risks to adults
or children.


Although
no special precautions are needed, if individuals are concerned and wish to reduce
their exposures, they can take simple steps to do so:


Place the wireless access point up on a high shelf or away from where people
might sit and work.


When working with a WiFi
-
enabled laptop, place it on a table rather than
directly on the lap.”


For further advice about safe use of Wi
-
Fi in the workplace, please visit
:


http://www
.nrl.moh.govt.nz/faq/radiationintheworkplace.asp

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Appendix 1
:

SNUP Switch Requirements

1.1

Switch Requirement Summary

The table below provides
a summary of the switch requirements for the SNUP.


Item

Typical Usage

Description

Type 1

Core Switch

Very Large
Schools

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable Chassis style

Layer: 3 or 3+

10gb XFP Ports: 2 or more

1gb Ports: 48 or more (fibre and RJ45 interchangeable or multiple fixed
form
-
factor cards acceptable)

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

Other: Hotswap n+1 Power Supply, Hot swappable switch Modules

Type 2

Core Switch
Large/Med Schools


Distribution Switch
Very Large Schools

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 3 or 3+

10gb XFP Ports: 2 optional

1gb Ports: 24 or more (fibre and RJ45

interchangeable)

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

Other: Hotswap n+1 Power Supply, Hot swappable switch Modules

Type 3

Core Switch
Medium Schools


Distribution Switch
Large Schools

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 3 or
3+

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

1gb Ports: 24 SFP (fibre and RJ45 interchangeable)

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: Optional

Type 4

Core Switch Small
Schools


Distribution Switch
Medium Schools

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 3 or 3+

10gb XFP
Ports: N/A

1gb Ports: 24 * 10/100/1000 RJ45 + 4 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: Optional

Type 5

Core Switch Small
Schools


Access Switch
General

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 2

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

1gb Ports: 24 10/100/1000 RJ45
+ 4 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

Type 6

Access Switch High
Density Users or
Administration

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 2

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

1gb Ports: 48 * 10/100/1000 RJ45 + 4 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non
blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

Type 7

Access Switch For
powered PoE
devices

(VoIP, WiFi, CCTV)

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 2

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

1gb Ports: 24 * 10/100/1000 PoE (min 20@7.0w) RJ45 + 4 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

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Type 8

Core Switch Small
Schools


Access Switch
General

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 2

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

Ports: 24 10/100 RJ45 + 2 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

Type 9

Access
Switch High
Density Users or
Administration

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 2

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

Ports: 48 * 10/100 RJ45 + 2 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual

Type 10

Access Switch For
powered PoE
devices

(VoIP,
WiFi, CCTV)

Form Factor: 19” Rack Mountable 1RU

Layer: 2

10gb XFP Ports: N/A

Ports: 24 * 10/100 PoE (min 20@7.0w) RJ45 + 2 * SFP

Blocking: Fully non blocking

Stacking: True not Virtual


N.B Any items listed above that require a software license upgrade
or additional fee and
are not included in the base unit is to be clearly stated in the excel compliance sheet
under Appendix C and the price to include these licences added to the price.


1.2

Switch Type 1 Requirements

Legend: M = Mandatory; HD = Highly desira
ble; D = Desirable.


Core Switch Features

Requirement

Compliance

Type 1

Mandatory

Part Number





Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

M

Number of RU

Vendor to state



Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Power supply Hot Swappable

Yes

HD

Power supply
redundancy

Yes

M

Switching Modules/Cards Hot
swappable

Yes

HD

Stackable (with dedicated stacking
interface)

Yes

D



Stacking cable included





Stacking module included



10gb Ports
(Note 1)

2 to 16 scalable

HD

10/100/1000T Ports

(Note 1)

12 to 96
scalable

M

1gb SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T)

(Note 1)

24 to 96 scalable

M

IEEE N
-
way auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

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PoE

N/A



Web browser
manageable (HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

3

M

VLAN

Security options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams supported

Vendor to state



IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic
Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support

N/A



ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN
Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

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802.1D

M

802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M







802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

M

OSPF

M

DVMRP, PIM (DM & SM)

M

Static Routing

M

MPLS

D

Router resilience

VRRP/HSRP

M

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

M

SNTP IPv6

M

802.1X

M

AAA/Radius

M

CIDR RFC4632

M

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

M

Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

M

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

M

Path MTU discovery

M

Neighbour discovery

M

SLAAC

M

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

HD

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency
1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate





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1.3

Switch Type 2 Requirements

Core Switch Features
+

Requirement

Compliance

Type 2

Mandatory

Part Number





Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

M



Vendor to state



Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Stackable (with dedicated stacking
interface)

N/A





Stacking cable included





Stacking module included



Power supply Hot Swappable

Yes

HD

Power supply redundancy

Yes

M

Switching Modules/Cards Hot
swappable

Yes

HD

10gb Ports
(Note 1)

2

HD

10/100/1000T Ports

(Note 1)

12 to 48 saleable

M

1gb SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T)

(Note 1)

24 to 48 saleable

M

IEEE N
-
way auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex, &
MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

PoE

N/A



Web browser manageable (HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI
management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

3

M

VLAN Security options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

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IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams supported

Vendor to state



IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support

N/A



ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

802.1D

M

802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M







802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

M

OSPF

M

DVMRP, PIM (DM & SM)

M

Static Routing

M

MPLS

D

Router
resilience

VRRP/HSRP

M

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

M

SNTP IPv6

M

802.1X

M

AAA/Radius

M

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CIDR RFC4632

M

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

M

Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

M

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

M

Path MTU discovery

M

Neighbour discovery

M

SLAAC

M

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

HD

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating
Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate




1.4

Switch Type 3 Requirements

Core Switch Features

Requirement

Compliance

Type 3

Mandatory

Part Number





Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

M



Vendor to state



Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Stackable (with
dedicated stacking
interface)

N/A





Stacking cable included





Stacking module included



Power supply Hot Swappable

Yes

HD

Power supply redundancy

Yes

M

Switching Modules/Cards Hot
swappable

Yes

HD

10gb Ports
(Note 1)

N/A



10/100/1000T Ports

(Note 1)

N/A



1gb SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T)

(Note 1)

24

M

IEEE N
-
way auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

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IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

PoE

N/A



Web browser manageable

(HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

3

M

VLAN Security
options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo
frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams supported

Vendor to state



IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support

N/A



ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

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802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

802.1D

M

802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M







802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest
VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

M

OSPF

M

DVMRP, PIM (DM & SM)

M

Static Routing

M

MPLS

D

Router resilience

VRRP/HSRP

M

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

M

SNTP IPv6

M

802.1X

M

AAA/Radius

M

CIDR RFC4632

M

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

M

Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

M

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

M

Path MTU discovery

M

Neighbour discovery

M

SLAAC

M

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

HD

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency
1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate




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1.5

Switch Type 4 Requirements

Core Switch Features

Requirement

Compliance

Type 4

Mandatory

Part
Number





Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

M



Vendor to state



Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Stackable (with dedicated stacking
interface)

Yes

HD



Stacking cable included

HD



Stacking module included

HD

Power supply Hot Swappable

Yes

HD

Power supply redundancy

Yes

M

Switching Modules/Cards Hot
swappable

Yes

HD

10gb Ports
(Note 1)

N/A



10/100/1000T Ports

(Note 1)

24

M

1gb SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T)

(Note 1)

4

M

IEEE N
-
way auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual
override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

PoE

N/A



Web browser manageable (HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

3

M

VLAN Security options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

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IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams

supported

Vendor to state



IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port

No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support

N/A



ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

802.1D

M

802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M







802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

M

OSPF

M

DVMRP, PIM (DM & SM)

M

Static Routing

M

MPLS

D

Router
resilience

VRRP/HSRP

M

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

M

SNTP IPv6

M

802.1X

M

AAA/Radius

M

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CIDR RFC4632

M

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

M

Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

M

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

M

Path MTU discovery

M

Neighbour discovery

M

SLAAC

M

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

HD

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating
Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate





1.6

Switch Type 5

& 8

Requirements

Edge Switch Features (V0.1)

Requirement

Compliance

Type 5

& type 8

Mandatory

Part Number





Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

M



1RU

HD

Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Stackable (with

dedicated stacking
interface)

Yes

M



Stacking cable included

M



Stacking module included

M

10gb Ports

N/A

N/A

10/100/1000T Ports

(only type 5)

24+

M

10/100/1000T Ports

(only type 8)

24+

M

1gb SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T)

4+

M

IEEE N
-
way auto
negotiation,
Speed, duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

PoE

N/A



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Web browser manageable (HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

2

M

VLAN Security options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP
filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams supported

Vendor to state



IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC
Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support IEEE 802.3af

N/A



ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

802.1D

M

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802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M







802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

N/A

OSPF

N/A

DVMRP, PIM (DM &
SM)

N/A

Static Routing

N/A

MPLS

N/A

Router resilience

VRRP/HSRP

N/A

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

HD

SNTP IPv6

HD

802.1X

HD

AAA/Radius

HD

CIDR RFC4632

D

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

D

Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

D

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

D

Path MTU discovery

D

Neighbour discovery

D

SLAAC

D

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

D

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate




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1.7

Switch Type 6

& 9

Requirements

Edge Switch Features

Requirement

Compliance

Type 6

& type 9

Mandatory

Part Number





Rack mounting

19 inch rack mountable

M



1RU

HD

Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Stackable (with dedicated stacking
interface)

Yes

M



Stacking cable included

M



Stacking module included

M

10gb Ports

N/A

N/A

10/100/1000T Ports

(only type 6)

48

M

10/100

Ports

(only type 9)

48

M

1gb SFP (MMF/SMF
or 1000T)

4+

M

IEEE N
-
way auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

PoE

N/A



Web browser manageable (HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

2

M

VLAN Security options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams supported

Vendor to state



UFBiS Unit

ICT Switching Infrastructure: Policy and Standards


Version 1.2


43


IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support IEEE 802.3af

N/A



ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

802.1D

M

802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M







802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

N/A

OSPF

N/A

DVMRP, PIM (DM & SM)

N/A

Static Routing

N/A

MPLS

N/A

Router resilience

VRRP/HSRP

N/A

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

HD

SNTP IPv6

HD

802.1X

HD

AAA/Radius

HD

CIDR RFC4632

D

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

D

UFBiS Unit

ICT Switching Infrastructure: Policy and Standards


Version 1.2


44


Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

D

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

D

Path MTU discovery

D

Neighbour discovery

D

SLAAC

D

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

D

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate




1.8

Switch Type 7 & 10 Requirements

Edge Switch Features

Requirement

Compliance

Type 7

& type 10

Mandatory

Part Number





Rack mounting

19

inch rack mountable

M



1RU

HD

Power supply

Internal 230V

M

Stackable (with dedicated stacking
interface)

Yes

M



Stacking cable included

M



Stacking module included

M

10gb Ports

N/A

N/A

10/100/1000T Ports

(only type 7)

24+

M

10/100

Ports

(only type 10)

24+

M

1gb SFP (MMF/SMF or 1000T)

4+

M

IEEE N
-
way auto negotiation,
Speed, duplex, & MDI
-
X

All ports

M

Manual override of auto
negotiation

Yes

M

IEEE 802.3ad Port aggregation
LACP

Across the stack

M

PoE

YES

M

Web browser manageable
(HTTP)

Yes

HD

SNMP V3 manageable

Yes

M

RMON management

1,2,3 & 9

M

UFBiS Unit

ICT Switching Infrastructure: Policy and Standards


Version 1.2


45


Telnet management V2

Yes

M

CLI management

Yes

M

Configuration backup and restore
support

Yes

M

LLDP

Yes

M

Firmware upgradeable

Yes

M

Port Mirroring

Yes

M

Layer

2

M

VLAN Security
options

IEEE 802.1X

HD

IP Address setting

Static & Dynamic

M

IP filtering for management
security

Yes

M

Maximum supported number of
VLANs

Vendor to state



Non Blocking & Wire Speed
operation

Yes

M

Size of MAC address tables

Vendor to state



Jumbo
frame support

Vendor to state MTU supported

M

IGMP V1,V2 & V3

Yes

M

Number of Concurrent Multicast
streams supported

Vendor to state



IGMP querier

Yes

HD

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

Number of QoS Queues

Vendor to state



Traffic Classification

(COS) defined on:

TOS

M

Diffserv (DSCP),

M

switch port

M

MAC Address,

M

IP Address,

M

TCP/UDP port No.

M

Broadcast storm control

Yes

M

PoE support IEEE 802.3af

Minimum 20 ports at 7.0w

M

ICMP Ping send and receive

Yes

M

IEEE standards

802.1p

M

802.1Q VLAN Tagging

M

802.1AD (QinQ)

HD

802.3x

M

802.3a 10 Gigabit Ethernet

M

802.3ab 1000Base
-
T Auto Negotiation

M

802.3z Ethernet over Fibre
-
Optic at 1 Gbit/s

M

802.1D

M

802.1w RSTP

M

802.1s MSTP

M



802.3at PoE+ 25.5w supply to PD

D

UFBiS Unit

ICT Switching Infrastructure: Policy and Standards


Version 1.2


46


802.1x

Dynamic VLAN

M

Radius Accounting

M

Guest VLAN

M

Routing

RIP V1, V2

N/A

OSPF

N/A

DVMRP, PIM (DM & SM)

N/A

Static Routing

N/A

MPLS

N/A

Router resilience

VRRP/HSRP

N/A

IPv6

ICMPv6 with MLDv2 support for IPv6 Mcast

M

IPv6 QoS

M

IPv6 ACL

M

SNMP IPv6 for Dead or Alive monitoring

HD

SNTP IPv6

HD

802.1X

HD

AAA/Radius

HD

CIDR RFC4632

D

IPv6 Basic RFC2460

D

Dual Stack IPv6 IPv4 support

D

IPv6 over v4 tunnelling

D

Path MTU discovery

D

Neighbour discovery

D

SLAAC

D

OSPF IPv6 RFC4552

D

IPv6 Certification

IPv6 Ready Phase 1 Certification

HD

IPv6 Ready Phase 2 Certification

HD

MTBF

Manufacturer must stipulate

M

Operating Temperature

0
-
40 degrees Celsius



Noise

<50dB

HD

Latency 10Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 100Mbps

Vendor to state



Latency 1000Mbps

Vendor to state



RoHS Compliant

Yes

M

Maximum current draw

Manufacturer must stipulate



Maximum heat dissipation

Manufacturer must stipulate