RISK ASSESSMENT INFORMATION PACK

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Anchor Training Ltd © Septem
ber 2006





In association with





RISK ASSESSMENT

INFORMATION PACK


HOW TO COMPLETE THE

RISK ASSESSMENT FORM

&

WORKED HAZARD EXAMPLES













Anchor Training Ltd © Septem
ber 2006


HOW TO COMPLETE THE
RISK ASSESSMENT FORM


Production Number


This
is a unique
number
that is

us
ed by assessors

to identify
the
risk
assessment
.



Site / Location Address


This identifies the exact location of where the Risk Assessment took place
.


Work Activity/Area being Assessed


This defines the task/activity
/area to be assessed e.g.
“Carrying out filming opera
tions in
Main
Street
,

London, N31
.”


Date Prepared / Review Date


This is the date the assessment was prepared by the assessor and the date the assessment is due
for review. The review process may vary from daily, weekly through to biennial, depending on t
he
definition of the assessment, whether it be “Generic” or “Specific”.


Step 1


Identify the Hazards (How people can get hurt)


This is to assist the assessor in identifying hazards that may be associated with their workplace or
work activity. This is

not an exhaustive list and additional items can be added.
(Also refer to
“Worked Hazard Examples”)


Step 2
-

Groups Particularly at Risk


Additional to staff

/ students
, this identifies persons who may be at additional risk of being harmed
by the task/act
ivity, either directly or indirectly, (due to vulnerability, lack of knowledge etc). The
presence of any of these groups may affect the level of risk associated with the hazards you have
identified and extra safety controls may need to be considered.


St
ep 3


Assessment, Control Measures, Risk Levels, Responsibility and Completion


For each hazard identified on the checklist (step 1) an assessment should be undertaken. These
assessments should take account of all existing controls already in place to red
uce risk
-

these
include both physical barriers and softer controls such as training. Where a specific group or work
activity that may present a greater risk, additional control measures may be required.


Once the control measures have been identified, an
assessment of the remaining risk level for the
activity / area can be made. By using an assessment risk rating matrix we aim to:




Prioritise items for action



Standardise records


Using the Matrix


The assessor needs to use the matrix of “likelihood of harm

versus severity of harm” to judge the
level of the existing risk as High, Medium or Low. The level of existing risk includes taking into
account controls already in place. Once you have decided the level enter it onto the assessment.












PAGE 3 OF 5

V
ersion

2

01.04.2003

Anchor Training Ltd © Septem
ber 2006




RISK R
ATING MATRIX


LIKELIHOOD

SEVERITY



Very Unlikely



Unlikely



Possible



Likely



Very Likely



Negligible

(No visible injury


no pain)

Low



Low



Low



Low



Low




Slight

(Minor cuts,
bruises


no
long term
effects)

Low



Low



Low



Medium




Medi
um





Moderate

(Heavy bruising,
deep flesh
wound)

Low



Low



Medium



Medium



Medium




Severe

(Major injuries)

Low




Medium




Medium



High



High




Very Severe

(Long term
disability or
death)

Low




Medium




Medium



High



High




Example of
Risk Rating Scoring


Likelihood

(Possible) X
Severity

(Severe) =
MEDIUM RISK



Definitions of Risk Levels:


HIGH RISK



This level of risk requires immediate acti
on and must be referred to the
R
esponsible
L
ecturer

(RL)
.

The activity
must not

go ahead or ce
ase
immediately until adequate controls are implemented to reduce to a level that is
considered reasonable.

In certain circumstances ‘high risk’ activities may be
allowable, however prior to undertaking such activities further advice

must

be
taken.


MEDIU
M RISK



This level of risk indicates that additional control measures may be required to
reduce it to low risk. However in certain circumstances or higher risk environments
within th
e organisation e.g. “Studios
”, MEDIUM risk could be deemed as
reasonable.

Where Medium risks cannot reasonably be lowered further advice can
be taken.


LOW RISK




This level of risk is considered as acceptable.


If additional control measures are required to reduce the risk, (particularly for High or Medium risks)
record the
m on the form for consideration. These would include elimination, improved procedures,
training or personal protective equipment, (e.g. what more can be done which is reasonable,
practicable and proportionate to the risk?).


The RL

remains responsible for
ensuring these actions are implemented to reduce risks to an
accep
table level. However the assessor

may assign the task of completing these actions to a
specific person

(who has the relevant skills and knowledge to do so)
; formal timescales must be
establi
shed and compliance achieved within this target date.

Anchor Training Ltd © Septem
ber 2006






Step 4
-

Assessor and Managers Sign Off


The assessment is not to be signed until it is complete. This is when steps 1 to 3 have been
completed by the assessor. Any further actions identified in s
tep 3 do not have to be compl
eted at
sign off but the RL

must monitor until all actions are completed.


The assessor may have to explain the assessment

to the RL

and
resolve any concerns they
may have
. The
RL

signature confirms his/her agreement with the a
ssessment and taking
forward the action items.


Communicating the Assessments


The assessor

must ensure the assessments are fully communicate
d to all those involved

and any
third parties

affected by the hazards identified by the risk assessment
.

1



LIST OF
HAZARD EXAMPLES



1.


Access (safe means of access to and egress from place of work)

2.


Animals (proximity to and handling of animals)

3.


Asbestos (potential exposure to asbestos)

4.


Audiences

5.


Driving & Mobile Phones

6.


Communications

7.


Compressed gas (storage and us
e of gases and cryogenics)

8.


Confined spaces (resulting in potential lack of oxygen)

9.


Construction work (CDM implications associated with building work)

10.


Costumes & Make
-
up

11.


Derelict Buildings

12.


Display Screen Equipment (DSE)

13.


Electricity (including portabl
e appliances and electrical maintenance)

14.


Fire (precautions in place to ensure building fire safety)

15.


Flammable materials (and other fire hazards)

16.


Food hygiene (preparation and consumption of food)

17.


Hand tools (including razor blades, knives and portable
power tools)

18.


Hazardous substances and CoSHH
(including waste disposal)

19.


Heights (including ladders, stepladders, scaffolding and scaffold towers)

20.


Lasers / Stroboscopic effects

21.


Lifting equipment (including che
rry pickers, jigs, hoists, hydraulic platform
s
)

22.


Location Catering

23.


Lone working (working in isolated
conditions
)

24.


Manual handling operations
(
e.g.

carrying prop’s, scenery, lighting, camera’s
)

25.


Noise exposure
(equipment, music and headphones)

26.


Office equipment (photocopiers, fax machines
etc.
)

27.


Pres
sure systems (separate inspection schedule required)

28.


Radiation (RF, microwave and radioactive sources)

29.


Slips, trips and falls (trailing cables, slippery floors etc)

30.


Special Effects (pyrotechnic / smoke effects / explosions)

31.


Storage (safe storage includ
ing use of racks, shelves etc)

32.


Street Operations

33.


Stunts

34.


Transport (forklift trucks, vehicles, tractors etc)

35.


Violence (violent attack and public disorder)

36.


Weapons (guns / knives)

37.


Weather (hot, cold and wet weather, wind and lightening)

38.


Working enviro
nment
(including temporary workplaces)

39.


Working on or near water

40.


Work patterns (working hours, work organisation and stress)

41.


Workshop equipment (machinery, welding, blowtorches and PUWER)

42.


Other hazards (including physical exertion, work near water etc)




more detailed assessment may be required for hazards shown in bold



2

HAZARD EXAMPLES


1

ACCESS/EGRESS


Typical Problems




restrictions due to layout of work area.



poor layout for circulation of people.



corridors, doorways etc. obstructed e.g. by deliveries
.



other building users e.g. contractors causing obstructions etc.




Typical Precautions




areas regularly checked to be clear and free from obstructions.



facilities provided for temporary storage etc.



adequate lighting installed for normal and emergency us
e.



good
directional signs for public,

staff

and students
.



protection provided for temporary hazards (e.g. during maintenance/repair work)


2

ANIMALS



Typical Problems




performing animal.



interviewees’ pets.



wildlife subject.



dogs for people with special n
eeds.



bites, scratches, stings & zoo
-
noses. e.g. Wiel’s Disease



animal’s

allergy.



security / deterrents.


Typical Precautions




competent handlers/ keepers in charge of animals.



scientist who knows the animals



people and animals separated by the use of pens

cages, vehicles and hides.



separation of vulnerable groups, e.g. pregnant women from mammals who deliver young.


3

ASBESTOS


Scope
-

this will include all types of asbestos as either a soft fibrous material which will release fibres
easily or as an embedd
ed constituent of a harder material which may only release fibres during abrasion
or cutting.



In some building built pre 1978,

asbestos may be present in hard decorative and structural panels, in
softer insulating panels and in asbestos cement sheeting.
It may be used as a sprayed insulating or fire
resisting coating on structural steelwork and as a fire stopping material in cable ducts.



Typical problems




inhalation of asbestos dust can cause serious or fatal illness.



asbestos dust particles may not be
visible to the naked eye.



materials containing asbestos have been widely used in the past, particularly in buildings and in
vehicle
brakes

and the asbestos content cannot usually be identified without expert analysis.



the presence of asbestos is not known
or checked before building work starts.









Typical precautions


3





Ravensbourne staff & students
do not work with asbestos. Asbestos work is done by approved
contractors.



asbestos work is monitored by an approved/accredited analytical company appointed

by
Ravensbourne College
.



people whose work may bring them into contact with asbestos are trained to recognise the
possibility of its presence.



all
Ravensbourne College

buildings are surveyed to establish, as far as practicable, the location,
type and cond
ition of asbestos materials present in the building.



a specific assessment is made of the risks associated with the asbestos materials present to
determine the appropriate action, e.g
...

sealing the material in situ or removing it.



the condition of any asb
estos materials remaining in
Ravensbourne College

buildings is
monitored and the asbestos clearly marked to identify its presence.



arrangements are made for staff to report damage to materials containing asbestos or to
materials suspected to contain asbest
os.


4.


AUDIENCES



Typical Problems




May be children



May be elderly or infirm



No / little knowledge of studio / production environment



No knowledge of site layout and facilities



Typical Precautions




Children
placed under supervision



Briefing to audience about safety precautions (fire exits, toilets, etc.)



A trained First Aider present



5.

DRIVING & MOBILE PHONES



Typical Problems




Hold
ing

phone to ear whilst driving



Not ensuring

due care and attention whilst

driving



Being easily distracted



Typical Precautions




Switching phone off whilst driving



Using hands free



Pulling over and stopping before answering the phone


6.

COMMUNICATIONS


Typical Problems




Communication failure



Communication not in range



Battery fai
lure



Communications equipment is defective


Typical Precautions




Test communications prior to operation
al

use



Spare batteries


7.

COMPRESSED GAS/CRYOGENICS



4

Scope
-

will include cylinders containing oxygen and acetylene, liquefied petroleum gases (propane
and
butane), inert gases (argon and carbon monoxide).

Uses in Ravensbourne

may include welding and heating equ
ipment in workshops and studios
.



Typical problems





fire/explosion risks arising from leaks or cylinders being involved in a fire.



toxic/asphyxi
ation risks from leaks.



large, heavy cylinders are difficult to handle manually.



cylinders with small diameters are likely to fall over unless secured.



cryogenic gases may cause burns to the skin.



Typical precautions




cylinders are stored in secure place
s or cages ventilated to the open air.



“No Smoking” areas are established and clearly marked where flammable gases are stored or
used.



cylinders are kept upright and secured against falling over.



oxygen is stored separately from flammable gases and combust
ible materials.



arrangements are made with the supplier for inspection and maintenance of cylinders.



personal protective equipment, for example gloves, overalls and face shield, are provided for
persons handling or using cryogenic gases.


8.

CONFINED SPACE
S




Typical problems




people entering confined spaces are overcome by fumes or gases already present.



people are overcome by fumes or gases which accumulate in the space after the person has
entered.



people are affected by a lack of oxygen in the atmosphe
re of the space.



entry and exit from the confined space may be difficult



Typical precautions




potential confined spaces in buildings/premises are identified where the atmosphere may be
dangerous or it may be difficult for a person
to get out.



arrangements are made to keep unauthorised people out of confined spaces.



before any work is done in a confined space a risk assessment is made specifically for that work
and a written permit prepared which details all the necessary safeguards
including atmospheric
monitoring if appropriate.



no person works alone in a confined space; a second person is present immediately outside the
confined space to raise the alarm in case of emergency.



suitable emergency arrangements are in place before work
starts.



people who work in a confined space are assessed to be competent to carry out the work in that
particular environment. No
-
one is compelled to work in a confined space against their wish.



specially protected electrical equipment may be needed in a c
onfined space to prevent fire or
explosion.


9.

CONSTRUCTION

(Set building can be interpreted as a
construction

site and may fall under the
terms of Construction, Design, Management Regs (CDM))




Typical problems




people not involved in the construction o
r building work may not recognise dangers arising from
the work



it is not always possible to avoid staff or visitors having to pass through parts of premises in which
construction or building work is being carried out.





Typical precautions


5




entrances t
o a construction site have a notice displayed indicating the work being carried out, the
names of the companies present and the people responsible for the site.



where it is practicable a contractor is given sole right of access to a site; safety on the sit
e is then
his responsibility and persons must obtain the contractor’s permission to visit the site.



where it is necessary for rights of access to a site to be shared, one party is nominated to take
overall responsibility for site safety.



where it is necess
ary for a contractor to have exclusive use of access routes within an occupied
building, then alternative access routes for the building occupants are agreed with the manager of
the premises and properly signposted.



construction or building work will not s
tart until a health and safety plan for the work has been
prepared to comply with the Construction Design and Management (CDM) Regulations.



when the CDM Regulations do not apply to the work, a method statement will be obtained from
the contractor before th
e work starts which to identify the risks involved in the work and the way in
which it is to be done.



people who may be affected by the work will be informed about the health and safety plan or
method statement and the contractor will be given information
about work activities, and the
associated risk assessments, which may affect the safety of his people


10.
COSTUMES & MAKE


UP



Typical problems




Allergic reaction to make


up



Costumes may be restrictive (weight, tight fitting, moveme
nt, etc.)



Long time periods dressed in costume



Typical precautions




Make requires CoSHH Assessment

(refer to point 18)



Sample test make


up before full application



Suitable rest periods for actors in restrictive costumes


11.

DERELICT BUILDINGS



Typical problems




Asbestos (refer to point 3)



Unsound structure



Vandalism



May be used as haven for drug and alcohol usage



Typical precautions




Carry out a survey of structure



Gain p
ermission from owners



May consider security


12.

DISPLAY SCREEN EQUIPMENT (DSE) / WORKSTATIONS





Note


a more detailed assessment form may be required




Typical problems




the workstation or machine design is unsuitable for the user.



the installation of

workstations does not comply with the DSE Regulations.



workstation equipment is not suitable for the task.



workstation equipment is not properly adjusted to suit the user.



inappropriate introduction of new technology/equipment in existing environment.



tec
hnology and software is unsuitable for the task.



lack of user information, instruction and training.



the work area is overcrowded.


6



the working environment is too noisy and/or too hot.



Typical precautions




workstations and equipment are designed to suit t
he user and the task.



workstations can be adjusted to suit individual users.



all users are trained in the safe use of the workstation.



all workstations are assessed for risks to health and safety and, where appropriate, for
compliance with the DSE Regulati
ons.



“users” of DSE have been identified.



eyesight screening is offered to DSE users.



health surveillance offered



arrangements exist for on
-
going review and re
-
assessment of workstations.


13.

ELECTRICITY





Typical problems




poorly designed, i
nstalled and maintained equipment.



inappropriate use or deliberate miss
-
use of equipment.



use of unauthorised equipment.



panel covers missing or insecure.



electrical supply systems overloaded.



damaged cables or fittings.



electrical equipment not inspected
or tested.



survey or check not made for buried services (cable underground or in a wall)



electrical supplies not isolated before being worked on.



inadequate training of people doing work on electrical systems or equipment.



damaged insulation on electrical
cables.



taped joints in electrical cables.



cracked or damaged casings on tools and equipment.



equipment not inspected, examined or tested.



250V equipment used in construction or building work.



eye protection not worn by users of metal/stone cutting power t
ools.




Typical precautions




installation, maintenance and repair work is carried out only by
competent,

authorised persons.



Permit
-
to
-
Work system in place and used where appropriate.



visible parts of the fixed installation and fittings are regularly insp
ected (for cracked socket
outlets/switches, burn marks, unprotected cabling)



up to date inspection and test records are kept.



sufficient socket outlets provided to prevent trailing cables and overloading.



decommissioning/isolating of equipment prior to mai
ntenance or change of use of an area.



fault reporting procedure
is in

place and used.



tools and equipment are inspected by the user before they are used.



portable electrical equipment is examined and tested at suitable intervals by a competent person
(e.g.
, 6 monthly intervals for handheld equipment).



the date of the next examination due is marked on the equipment.



portable electrical equipment used for construction or building work is cordless or powered from
an

110V transformer centre tapped to earth.



por
table electrical equipment used in damp confined spaces is cordless or powered from a supply
of less than 30V.



residual current devices are provided for use with handheld tools and equipment.



suitable personal protective equipment is provided, especially e
ye protectors.






14.

FIRE RISKS



7



Typical Problems




inadequate provision and maintenance of fire fighting equipment



incorrect specification of fire fighting equipment



people not trained in the use of fire fighting equipment



poorly defined and practise
d emergency procedures



fire wardens not appointed or suitably trained




Typical precautions




suitable fire fighting equipment is readily available



fire points are labelled to define the type and correct uses of the equipment placed there.



staff are sui
tably trained and practised in emergency evacuation procedures.



fire alarms, emergency lighting, means of escape and evacuation procedures are regularly tested
and records kept
.



15

FLAMMABLE MATERIALS



Typical problems




poorly stored flammable and combu
stible materials.



improperly fitted or maintained gas equipment.



Typical precautions




flammable and combustible items are kept in segregated storage.



flammable liquids are stored in fire resisting cupboards or containers.



gas equipment is fitted and main
tained only by a competent gas fitter who is CORGI registered.


1
6.

FOOD HYGIENE




Typical problems




food is contaminated because preparation surfaces are not clean.



contamination arises because of handling by unclean hands.



unaffected food can be contami
nated during storage by affected food.



inadequate chill or freeze temperatures during storage.



inadequate cooking temperatures or times to kill natural bacteria.



Typical precautions




fly
-
proof screens are fitted on external windows.



walls and floors of c
atering areas have a smooth impervious surface.



preparation surfaces are smooth and impervious.



narrow gaps between surfaces and walls/equipment have been avoided to allow thorough
cleaning.



the pot and crockery wash is separate from food preparation area
s.



pots and crockery stored in clean dry cupboards.



separate hand wash basin and food preparation or wash
-
up basin are provided.



separate refrigerators for raw and cooked meats are provided.



thermometers are provided for regular checking of refrigerator te
mperatures.



checks are made that microwave ovens cook or heat food evenly.









17.

HAND TOOLS



8


Typical problems




handles in poor condition can cause hand injuries.



mushroomed heads on steel chisels can cause fragments to be ejected.



blunt cutting edge
s can require excessive forces to be used.



improper use of knives, e.g., cutting towards the body.



hand tools which are poorly modified or used for purposes not designed for.


Typical precautions




good quality tools are provided and maintained.



users are a
dequately trained and competent.



special purpose tools are provided where necessary, e.g., parcel knives for opening packages.



sharp knives are fitted with shielding or retracting blades where possible.


1
8

HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES (CoSHH) / WASTE DISPOSAL



N
ote


a more detailed assessment form may be required



Typical problems




hazardous substances might be used as a raw material, be produced during a process, arise as a
by product or be used a cleaning agent.



substances can cause a chemical hazard, e.g., e
xposure to toxic dust, fumes or gases.



substances can also cause a biological hazard, e.g., infections such as tetanus, hepatitis and
legionnaire’s disease.



product safety data sheets are not acceptable as a risk assessment although they may provide
useful

information.


Typical precautions




a risk assessment (a COSHH assessment) is made of all work activities which might involve
exposure to a hazardous substance. It is regularly reviewed.



less harmful substance is used or a safer alternative process using t
he same substance.



the process is isolated or enclosed to limit the effect it can have.



local exhaust ventilation (LEV) is provided to collect contaminants at or close to source.



good general ventilation is provided for substances with low toxicity.



good h
ousekeeping is encouraged to reduce accidental contact by spills.



exposure time is kept to a minimum.



information and training are provided about the hazards involved and the use of control
measures.



personal protective equipment is provided
(only

if other

controls cannot reduce the risk of injury/ill
health sufficiently).



suitable welfare facilities, (showers / accommodation for protective clothing) are provided.



health surveillance is arranged when necessary.



there is separate collection, removal and disp
osal of waste substances which are hazardous.


19

HEIGHTS



Typical Problems




ladders slipping on smooth flooring (e.g., lino).



damaged rungs or rungs slippery with grease/mud.



metal ladders used for electrical work.



over
-
reaching from a ladder



ladder
not being footed by another person, or tied/lashed at the top



an unsuitable ladder is used, (e.g., too short).



tools and/or materials are dropped by persons using them at a height.



failure of temporary fastenings, ropes or cables securing equipment.



materi
als are dislodged from high workplaces, e.g., by strong wind.



persons injured by objects dropped by person working on ladder.



general access scaffolds not properly constructed, e.g., footings not stable, inadequate ties to

9

buildings, insufficient bracing.



guard rails and toe boards missing.



scaffold boards and access ladders not secured.



scaffold not inspected.



bracing and stabilisers missing from towers.



wheels not locked on moveable towers.


Typical Precautions




where possible stable work platforms are us
ed, (e.g., tower scaffolds etc.) instead of ladder.



workplaces are redesigned to obviate the need for ladder/steps.



ladders are used which suit the purpose, (e.g., correct type/class).



a ladder register is kept and ladders are regularly inspected and maint
ained.



stabilisers are used where practicable, or securing ties or a second person to foot ladders.



non conducting ladders are used in electrical work.



safety bonds are provided to support overhead rigged equipment in case the main fitting fails.



work is p
rohibited on overhead studio gantries while persons are working below.



toe boards and scaffold nets are provided at tower and scaffold edges.



all materials kept on towers and scaffolds are tied down or netted.



lanyard is used to secure hand
-
tools used over

the edge of a working platform or cage.



barriers provided to prevent persons passing underneath temporary overhead work.



all scaffolding is erected by trained and competent persons.



general access scaffolds are inspected by a competent person after erecti
on and a certificate is
obtained before handover.



general access scaffolds are re
-
inspected weekly when they are in use or after violent weather or
any changes to the scaffold structure.



wheels are locked or braked before a tower is used.



ladders or height

extenders are not used on the platform of a tower.



towers are not moved while a person or heavy equipment is on it.



a safe means of access (e.g., ladder) is provided on the narrowest side of the tower and inside
the tower structure.



the working platform i
s fitted with suitable guard rails and toe boards.


20.
LASERS / STROBOSCOPIC EFFECTS



Typical p
roblems




Directed as eyes



Epilepsy



Wrong class of laser used



Typical precautions




Only used by SFX sp
ecialist’s



Stroboscopic effects set at manufactures recommended Hz cycle



Check laser type


21.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT



Typical Problems




mobile cranes might overturn if not properly set up with stabilisers.



lifting machinery failing through mechanical fault/d
amage or overloading.



dangerous parts of machinery e.g., closing traps, especially with scissor lifts.



trapping risks between the lifting machinery and overhead structures.



overhead electrical lines/cables close to lifting machinery.




Typical Precautions




lifting equipment is maintained in a safe condition.



lifting equipment is examined, tested and certificated in accordance with statutory requirements.


10



up to date records are kept.



the Safe Working Load (SWL) is clearly marked on all equipment.



lifting eq
uipment is always visually inspected prior to use



correct equipment is used for the task.



the SWL is not exceeded.



lifting equipment is only used, inspected and maintained by a competent person(s).



hydraulic hoists are supplied by a pre
-
vetted contractor



c
ontractors supply a Risk Assessment which applies to the task in hand



health surveillance is offered


22.
LOCATION CATERING




Should only be conducted by suitable contractor with relevant food hygiene certificates,
insurance and has experien
ce this type work


23.

LONE WORKING



Typical problems




safety standards in some overseas countries may be lower



the whereabouts of the lone worker may not be known.



Typical Precautions




risk assessments consider first aid training and equipment and the

need for routine check
-
ins.



risk assessments consider the risks of lone working and the competence of the individual to
deal with them.



there is a clear check
-
in procedure and a plan of action if the worker(s) fails to check in.



the assignment must be sui
table for a lone worker.



lone workers are not deployed in situations where violence is foreseeable.



a responsible person knows where the lone worker is.



lone workers are allowed to withdraw from an activity for safety reasons.



24

MANUAL HANDLING


Note


a more detailed assessment form may be required



Typical problems




injuries to intervertebral discs in the back.



ligament and tendon injuries.



injuries to muscles or nerves.



hernias.



fractures, cuts and abrasions.



Typical precautions




all manual handlin
g work which carries a risk that is not insignificant is identified.



manual handling the load is avoided or the operation is automated or mechanised. Where this is
not possible, a full manual handling assessment is carried out.








25

NOISE EXPOSURE



N
ote


a more detailed assessment form may be required



11



Typical Problems





fixed plant & installations.



machines and portable work equipment.



venues with loud ambient noise, e.g. football grounds.



live music events.



weapons, pyrotechnics.



technical testin
g of sound equipment.



checking broadcast quality sound.



programme production (headphones, talk
-
back, free
-
field sound mixing).



background and incidental noise.




Typical Precautions




N
oise guidance is regularly reviewed.



noise assessment is made of work a
ctivities



attenuated speakers and noise limiting headphones are provided.



limited talk
-
back



suitable ear protection (ear defenders, ear plugs) is provided.



exposure time is limited.



health surveillance is offered



audiometry is carried out.


26

OFFICE EQUIP
MENT



Typical problems




un
-
maintained equipment



untrained people make unauthorised adjustments or repairs



doors or covers which can be opened to give access to the machine for maintenance are not
secured or interlocked



inadequate guarding or protection of

mechanical/electrical hazards in the machine



loose clothing/long hair near moving equipment (
e.g.

shredders)


Typical precautions




equipment regularly serviced by a competent technician



service contract which provides for urgent repairs to be carried out
quickly



staff trained to operate the equipment properly



fault reporting procedure in place



access doors and covers kept locked (or are interlocked)



additional guards or protection provided for dangerous or live parts inside machine



conveniently accessible
and clearly marked switch to isolate equipment from electrical supply



equipment does not generate excessive noise or heat in an office environment



screens provided around equipment to reduce ambient noise levels



waste paper regularly removed from photocopi
er and fax machine areas


2
7

PRESSURE SYSTEMS




Typical problems
-




poor equipment and/or system design.



poor maintenance of equipment.



unsafe systems of work.



operator error, poor training or supervision.



incorrect or poor quality installation.



inadequate

repairs or improper modifications.



Typical precautions




safe and suitable equipment is provided.



the operating conditions are known, e.g. what fluid or gas is being contained, stored or

12

processed.



the process conditions are known, such as the pressures

and temperatures.



the safe operating limits of the system are known (and any equipment directly linked to or
affected by it).



there is a set of operating instructions for all of the equipment and for the control of the whole
system (including emergencies)
.



appropriate employees have access to these instructions and are properly trained in the operation
and use of the equipment or system.



suitable protective devices are fitted and are kept in good working order at all times.



checks are made to ensure the pr
otective devices function properly and they are adjusted to the
correct settings



warning devices are fitted, which are noticeable either by sight or sound.



the system and equipment are properly maintained taking account of its age, the environment
and its
use.



when protective devices have to be isolated for maintenance, alternative arrangements are made
to ensure safety levels are not exceeded without detection.



there is a safe system of work to ensure that maintenance work is carried out properly and under

suitable supervision.



appropriate training is given to for everybody operating, installing, maintaining, repairing,
inspecting and testing pressure equipment.



all persons carrying out the work are competent.



the equipment examined and a written scheme of
examination has been prepared by a
competent person.


2
8

RADIATION


Typical problems




radiation sources not identified or marked.



adequate shielding or distance fencing is not provided to prevent exposure.



people who may be affected are not fully informed
about the risks.




Typical precautions




any source of harmful non
-
ionising radiation, e.g., tape erasers, radio transmitter dishes/aerials is
clearly identified and marked.



warnings are given where people with implants or pacemakers are at special risk.



e
xposure to non
-
ionising radiation from aerials, dishes or equipment is assessed and action
taken if the relevant NRPB investigation level is likely to be exceeded.



exposure from antenna installations belonging to other companies, e.g., mobile phone operato
rs,
is considered. Non
-
ionising radiation monitors are available.



work involving ionising radiation sources are under the control of a competent person and a
radiation protection adviser must be appointed to monitor the work.



health surveillance is offered



exposure to harmful levels of ionising and non
-
ionising radiation is prevented by shielding and/or
safe distance fencing.


29

SLIPS, TRIPS & FALLS



Typical Problems




wet or slippery or surfaces.



damaged or uneven surfaces.



tripping hazards such as cables
, furniture and objects in access routes.



obstructions, holes or excavations arising from contract activities.



slips & falls on stairways.



excessive haste, collision with others or wearing unsuitable footwear.



camera work.



audience or public



Typical Prec
autions



13



suitable floor surfaces to suit the purpose are provided, e.g. non
-
slip.



gangways and layouts are suitable.



floor coverings and surfaces are kept in good condition and suitably clean.



appropriate footwear is worn, especially for conditions at sit
e locations.



walkways are marked out where possible.



cables are properly managed and clear floors & corridors are maintained in buildings.



at site locations, cables are flown overhead or protected by ramps or mats.



barriers, fences, signs and lights are i
nstalled where necessary to protect obstructions or holes
arising during contract maintenance work.



assistance is provided when camera operators have to walk backwards.



additional stewarding is arranged for audiences plus additional lighting, exit signage
etc.


30.

SPECIAL EFFECTS



Typical problems




Fire / explosion (refer to points 14 & 15)



Lack of experience or knowledge



Lack of safety precautions (method statements, exclusion areas, etc)



Lack of planning



Ty
pical precautions




Only to be arranged and organised by specialist



Specialist engaged early



Safety rules, exclusions rigorously observed



Good communications (refer to point 6)


31.

STORAGE



Typical problems




shelves and racks are damaged/overloaded



load capa
city of storage racking not known



no safe access to high racks or shelves



material stored in unsafe places in work area,
e.g.

gangways



Typical precautions




sufficient safe storage provided for work materials and equipment not immediately required at
the
workplace



items not stored on top of tall cupboards



storage shelves and racking properly installed, secured at the base and braced where
necessary



storage rack bays are all marked with load carrying capacity



corner legs of storage racks protected by steel
posts where they are liable to damage from
vehicles,
e.g.

forklift trucks



heavy items moved by forklift truck and stored at ground level



heavy items handled manually stored at waist level



no electrical or gas fittings above storage racks where forklift tru
cks operate



mobile stepladders provided for access to high level racks and shelves



separate pedestrian routes clearly marked in storage areas where forklift trucks operate





32.

STREET OPERATIONS


Typical problems




General public (not wishing to be filmed, l
arge numbers)



Obstructing the highway


14



Obstructing points of access & egress



Working too close to pavement edge



Traffic / vehicles



Street furniture



No filming permit



Threat of violence



Typical precautions




Ensure filming permit fro
m local authority



Work with in the kerb line



Barrier off working area



Signage (Filming in progress)



Permission from property owners


33.

STUNTS




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collis
ions with people, structures and equipment



instability and overturning



approaching vehicles (particularly electric vehicles) are difficult to hear.



non
-
segregation of vehicles and pedestrians



no warnings of reversing vehicles



speeding



overloaded vehicles



i
nexperienced and/or unauthorised drivers



hazards from power supplies e.g., batteries, LPG, petrol/diesel fuel



vehicles not adequately maintained



drivers not experienced in the use of specialist vehicles.



vehicles not maintained in good condition.



drivers w
orking long hours in addition to driving duties.



Typical precautions




traffic routes have a speed limit no greater than 10 mph.



vehicles operated only by trained and authorised drivers.



fork truck drivers are medically fit to drive. (medical examinations

are considered).



separate doors, entrances and routes provided for vehicles and pedestrians.



mirrors installed at blind spots.



warning signs and devices fitted to vehicles (e.g., reversing lights/bleepers).



vehicles regularly maintained and examined.



exha
ust emissions in buildings are extracted, (e.g., by ventilation).



vehicles & drivers comply with relevant Road Traffic legislation.



vehicles are in good condition and suitable for their intended use.



work on vehicles is only carried out by competent perso
ns



drivers are suitably licensed/qualified and experienced for the type of vehicle to be driven (e.g.
Landrovers, Quad Bikes, Golf Buggies, Diggers etc.).



only trained and experienced drivers tow trailers.



suppliers of specialised vehicles are assessed (th
is may require referral to a trade association).



employees required to drive as part of their job receive training in defensive driving.



the overall distance, the journey time, the time of day or night and likely weather conditions are
considered when allo
cating driving tasks.



35

VIOLENCE




Typical problems


15




violence towards

staff

/ students



attack/robbery




Typical precautions




risks of violence have been assessed and measures taken to reduce the risks and the effects
of an attack



workplace well lit i
nside and around the outside of the building



possible cover for attackers outside the building has been removed



transport provided for staff who work alone



physical security at cash tills



minimum amounts of cash kept in tills



high value goods placed out of

reach



staff been trained to recognise and deal with violence and potential for violence



clear emergency procedures informing staff what to do and where to go in the event of an
incident



non
-
production staff instructed to withdraw from any area where publi
c disorder or civil
disturbance breaks out


36.

WEAPONS




Replica weapons, weapons that fire blank or live rou
nds, may only be used under the


provision and supervision of a professional armourer, holding a Section 5 Fire Arms Licence.




Weapons with shar
p edges should be used under the supervision of a stunt arranger.


37.

WEATHER





Typical problems




cold hands loose ability to grip or hold tightly



wet or icy surfaces greatly increase the risk of slipping




Typical precautions




suitable protective clot
hing provided for staff who work outdoors



means of warming hands provided when nature of work prevents wearing gloves



work ceases when poor weather makes any place unsafe,
e.g.

fog, heavy rain, hail, snow or
high winds



no work done at heights (
e.g.

roof wo
rk, mast work, high level access equipment) if actual or
forecast weather conditions are likely to cause a hazard














3
8

WORKING ENVIRONMENT


Note


a more detailed assessment form may be required




Typical problems




inadequate lighting.



overcrow
ding.


16



poor cable management



lack of ventilation.



unprotected glazing



poor housekeeping and inadequate cleaning.



use of unsuitable temporary workplaces.


Typical precautions




a reasonable temperature is maintained in buildings or specialist vehicles (e.g.,
minimum of 16


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there is sufficient lighting by natural light where practicable.



emergency lighting is provided where necessary.



workplac
es, furniture and fittings are kept clean and free from waste materials.



there is adequate workspace for all persons.



trailing cables are avoided by the use of cable managed desks or ducting.



ventilation is provided by a sufficient quantity of fresh or pur
ified air.



translucent or transparent glazing is marked where necessary to make it apparent.



an assessment has been made of the need for safety materials (e.g., toughened glass) or
barriers/screens to prevent contact with dangerous glass panels.



workplaces

are kept in a clean and tidy condition.



temporary workplaces are checked prior to occupation to be suitable for the proposed work
activity.



information is obtained from owners/occupiers about risks which could arise from the use of
temporary sites.



safet
y check lists are used to identify suitable precautions (e.g., fire safety in unoccupied
buildings, location safety checklist, outside studio/stage checklist)


39.

WORKING ON OR NEAR WATER


Typical problems




Drowning



Running aground / adrift



Low temperatures



U
nderwater hazards (undertones, rubbish, soft ground)


Typical precautions




safeguards are provided against the risk of drowning when work is carried out near water, (e.g.
safety boat, life jackets, buoyancy aids).



to reduce the risk of water borne infectio
n, protective clothing is provided for work near water and
people with opens cuts are not allowed access to the water.


40.

WORK PATTERNS, WORK ORGANISATION & STRESS



Typical problems




inadequate management of shift
-
work.



long shift
-
work hours and frequen
t changes to shift patterns or working hours.



frequent urgent work requirements.



poor job design, poorly defined roles and ambiguity in job descriptions.



miss
-
match between job requirements and post holder.



poor workload management and resourcing, (e.g., o
verload/underload).



no user control over work systems (e.g., computer software)



high speed working



badly managed and ineffective communication and social isolation.


Typical precautions




acceptable working patterns and hours are established and changed onl
y infrequently.



jobs are designed to provide a variety of work.


17



the scope of jobs has been broadened to provide more responsibility and control of the work
process



health surveillance is offered



the jobs are matched to the people and clear job descriptions

are prepared.



adequate resources are available for the workload.



social contact is included in the job, especially in work with display screen equipment.


41
.

WORKSHOP EQUIPMENT





Typical problems




inadequate guarding allows contact with dangerous
parts, e.g. rotating parts, cutting blades, traps
between closing tools.



improper access into machinery cabinets by unauthorised staff, e.g., fault finding.



ejection of materials from machinery.



controls that are poorly identified and positioned.



harmful s
ubstances and dusts emitted during machining.



Typical precautions




suitable guarding is provided and maintained.



machine is used by only trained competent people.



shields, guards and protective equipment are provided where necessary.



machine controls cle
arly identified and conveniently positioned.



good general ventilation and local exhaust ventilation provided.


43.


OTHER HAZARDS




Physical exertion



Aircraft



Fight sequence



Inexperience performer



Speed



Fatigue