Download the Connecticut at Work Resource Guide

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ARTNER
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ESOURCE
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cthumanities.org/ctatwork

#ctatwork


C
ONTENTS


O
VERVIEW OF
R
ESOURCES

................................
................................
..

1

R
EGIONAL
C
OORDINATOR
C
ONTACT
I
NFORMATION

................................
..

1

A
BOUT
C
ONNECTICUT AT
W
ORK

................................
...........................

2

R
EGIONAL
P
ROGRAM
A
CTIVITY
W
INDOWS

................................
................

3

R
EGIONAL
T
IMETABLES
OF

A
PPLICATION
D
EADLINES
................................
....

4

P
ROGRAMS

................................
................................
....................

6

H
OW TO
A
PPLY

................................
................................
...........

6

H
OST
O
BLIGATIONS

................................
................................
.....

6

P
ROGRAMS FOR
A
DULTS

................................
................................

7

W
RITTEN
W
ORK
L
ITERATURE

D
ISCUSSIONS

................................
.....

7

F
ILM
W
ORK
D
ISCUSSIONS

................................
........................

10

A
UTHORS ON
W
ORK

................................
................................

12

C
OMMUNITY
C
ONVERSATIONS

................................
.....................

14

H
ARTBEAT
E
NSEMBLE

S
W
ORKIN


FOR A
L
IVIN


................................
.

15

P
ROGRAMS FOR
T
EENS

................................
................................
.

16

N
EXT
GEN

AT
W
OR
K

................................
...............................

16

G
ETTING INTO
W
ORK

................................
..............................

16

G
RANTS

................................
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......................

17

C
ONNECTICUT AT
W
ORK
G
RANTS

................................
.....................

17

C
OMMUNITY
R
EADS
G
RANTS

................................
..........................

19

P
UBLIC
P
RESENTATION

G
RANTS

................................
......................

2
0

K
EEPING IN
T
OUCH WITH
C
ONNECTICUT AT
W
ORK

................................
.....

20

A
P
PENDIX
A:

P
ROGRAM
R
EQUEST
F
ORM

................................
.................

21

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O
VERVIEW
OF
R
ESOURCE
S


This
document

contains

information on
Connecticut Humanities
resources
available
to partner organizations
engaged in the
Connecticut at Work

initiative.

Please read it carefully in order to understand what resources
are available, how to access them
,

and who to contact for more information. The initiative is organized around
regional activity
,

so it is also important to
beco
me familiar with

deadlines and timeframes.


We offer
:



Access to book
-

and film
-
based

discussions, author talks, community conversations
,

and performances
created by Connecticut Humanities
;

some free and others with a modest cost share.



Regional grants of u
p to $1,500 for
small

exhibitions and other public programs

directly related to the
Connecticut at Work

initiative.



Grants of up to $1,500 for community
-
based “one book”
initiatives around a work
-
related theme.



Grants of up to $50,000 for larger
work
-
related projects through the Connecticut Humanities Fund.


Please note
:
Your organization must be affiliated with one of seven regional collaborations in order to
use
the

resources

outline
d

in this guide
. To join
one
, contact the coordinator in the re
gion
nearest

you:


Coventry Area


Beverly York
, Independent Consultant

860
-
423
-
1878;
bevishistory@yahoo.com


Hartford Area


Ashley Sklar, Community Programs Coordinator

Greater Hartford Arts Council

860
-
525
-
8629 x252;
asklar@letsgoarts.org


Groton Area


Betty Anne Reiter, Director

Groton Public Library

860
-
441
-
6750;
breiter@groton
-
ct.gov




New Haven Area


Cindy Clair, Executive Director

Arts Council of Greater New Haven

203
-
772
-
2788;
cclair@newhavenarts.org


Stamford Area


Ryan Odinak, Executive Director

Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County

203
-
256
-
2329;
ryan@culturalalliancefc.org



Waterbury Area


Stephanie Coakley, Director of Education

Mattatuck Museum

203
-
753
-
0381 x117;
scoakley@mattatuckmuseum.org


Torrington Area


Amy Wynn, Executive Director

Northwest Connecticut Arts Council

860
-
618
-
0075;
awynn@artsnwct.org





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A
BOUT
C
ONNECTICUT

AT
W
ORK


From the fall of 2013 through the winter of 2014,

C
onne
c
ti
c
ut

H
u
m
anities

(CTH)

is

leading

a

stat
e
w
ide

initiative to engage Connecticut residents in
a
n in
-
depth
exploration of work

h
ow it has shaped our lives and
our state over time, how it impacts our lives today
,

and how it might look in a future of rapid technological

and economic change.


The

catalyst of

t
his

ef
f
o
r
t

is

The

W
ay

W
e
Wo
r
k
ed
,

a
n

e
xhi
b
i
t
ion

c
r
e
at
ed
b
y

t
he

Smi
t
h
s
oni
a
n

Institution
that
t
r
a
c
e
s the history
of
work life in America
.
The exhibition
,
hosted by

an
organization in each of
seven
communities across
the state
,

is intended to form

the
nucleus for
regional
programming collaborations
among

a wide range of
groups and institutions.
The initiative is

coor
dinated regionally by an organization familiar with
the institutions operating in its
area

of service.

C
TH provide
s

overall coordination
,

grant and program
resources
,

and

marketing and promotional support.


The goals of
Connecticut at Work

are

to
:


1.

E
ngage a broad and diverse range of Connecticut’s citizens in an exploration of the role of work in our
state’s

history, in their lives today
,

and in the continued vitality of our communities.


2.

Foster productive collaborations
among

groups and institutions, including those engaged in the
humanities, culture, art, government, business, education and community
-
buildi
ng.


3.

Encourage imaginative programming that sparks dialog, broadens public understanding of the central
importance of work in our lives
,

and addresses issues of pressing concern to our state.


Connecticut at Work

is a program of Connecticut Humanities in
partnership with:


Arts Council of Greater New Haven

Association for the Study of CT History

Connecticut Explored

Connecticut Landmarks

Connecticut League of History
Organizations

Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County

Greater Hartford Arts Council

Groton Public Library

Hartford Public Library

Historic New England

Mattatuck Museum

New Haven Free Public Library

Northwest Connecticut Arts Council

Southeastern Connecticut
Cultural Coalition

Stamford Museum & Nature Center


Smithsonian Institution

Warner Theatre


and communities across Connecticut.



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R
EGIONAL
P
ROGRAM
A
CTIVITY

W
INDOWS


In order to provide a rich programming experience for the public,
Connecticut at Work

program
ming is
concentrated

in

three
-
month activity window
s

in communities surrounding the seven communities
hosting
The
Way We Worked
.


December
,
2013

Kickoff
Conference

Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven




Nov

2013
-
Jan

2014

New Haven Region

Exhibition
H
ost: New Haven Free Public Library

Coordinator: Arts Council of Greater New Haven


Jan
-
Mar

2014


Torrington Region


Exhibition Host: Warner Theater

Coordinator: Northwest Connecticut Arts Council




Feb
-
Apr
2014

Hartford Region

Exhibition Host: Hartford Public Library

Coordinator: Greater Hartford Arts Council




Jun
-
Aug 2014

Waterbury Region

Exhibition Host and
Coordinator: Mattatuck Museum


Aug
-
Oct

2014


Coventry Region


Exhibition Host: Hale Homestead/ CT
Landmarks

Coordinator: Beverly York




Sep
-
Nov 2014

Stamford Region

Exhibition Host: Stamford Museum and Nature Center

Coordinator: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County




Oct

Dec 2014

Groton Region

Exhibition Host and Coordinator: Groton Public
Library

and
Southeastern Connecticut Cultural Coalition

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R
EGIONAL
T
IMETABLES

OF

A
PPLICATION
D
EADLINES


Application

deadlines
vary
by region
to

align with

the
programming
window for each region
.


Coventry Region


The Way We Worked Exhibit
Run

8/9/2014


9/14/2014

Target

Programming Window

8/1/2014


10/31/2014

Grant Deadline
s
: CT Humanities Fund <$10,000

10/1/2013, 1/2/2014, 4/1/2014

Grant Deadline
s
: CT Humanities Fund $10,000
+

8/1/2013, 11/1/2013, 2/3/2014, 5/1/2014

Grant Deadline
s
:
Community Reads Grants

12/
16
/2013

Grant Deadlines: CT at Work Grants

6/2/2014, 7/1/2014, 8/1/2014

Request for Programming due

5/1/2014

Groton Region


The Way We Worked Exhibit Run

11/8/2014


12/21/2014

Target Programming Window

10/1/2014


12/31/2014

Grant Deadlines: CT Humanities Fund <$10,000

10/1/2013, 1/2/2014
, 4/1/2014, 7/1/2014

Grant Deadlines: CT Humanities Fund $10,000+

8/1/2013, 11/1/2013, 2/3/2014, 5/1/2014

Grant Deadlines: Community Reads Grants

12/
16
/2013

Grant Deadlines: CT at Work
Grants

9/2/2014, 10/1/2014, 11/3/2014

Request for Programming due

8/1/2014

Hartford Region


The Way We Worked Exhibit Run

3/15/2014


4/27/2014

Target Programming Window

2/1/2014


4/30/201
4

Grant Deadlines: CT Humanities Fund <$10,000

10/1/2013,
1/2/2014

Grant Deadlines: CT Humanities Fund $10,000+

8/1/2013, 11/1/2013

Grant Deadlines: Community Reads Grants

12/
16
/2013

Grant Deadlines: CT at Work Grants

1/2/2014, 2/3/2014, 3/3/2014

Request for Programming due

12/2/2013

New Haven Region


T
he
Way We Worked Exhibit Run

12/7/2013


01/19/2014

Target Programming Window

11/01/2013


01/31/2014

Grant Deadlines: CT Humanities Fund <$10,000

10/1/2013

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Grant Deadlines: CT Humanities Fund $10,000+

8/1/2013

Grant Deadlines: Community Reads Grants

12/
16
/2013

Grant Deadlines: CT at Work Grants

10/1/2013,
11/1/2013, 12/2/2013

Request for Programming due

9/3/2013


Stamford Region


The Way We Worked Exhibit Run

9/20/2014


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6


P
ROGRAMS

Looking for
a program that is ready to go
?
Choose from

a selection of high
-
quality programs developed by
CTH staff members using tested formats and content related to the
Connecticut at Work

initiative.
We offer
book
-

and film
-
based discussions, author talks, community conversations

and more.


H
OW TO
A
PPLY


1.

F
ind the

region
nearest to your
organization (see chart below) to determine
when programs are
available to you.
Be

sure you have contacted the regional coordinator for your region before applying.

2.

Complete and submit the Program Request form (Appendix

A
) by the
d
eadline for the region you
identify with.

3.

Lead applicants must be 501
(
c
)(
3
)
, non
-
profit organizations

or municipalities
. However, partnerships
with other non
-
profits and for
-
profits

in your region are encouraged.


Region

Request Deadline

Notifica
tion

Regional Programming Window

New Haven

Sept
3
, 2013

Sept 16, 2013

November 2013

January 2014

Torrington

Nov 1, 2013

Nov 15, 2013

January

March 2014

Hartford

Dec 2, 2013

Dec 16, 2013

February

April 2014

Waterbury

April 1, 2014

April 15, 2014

June

August 2014

Coventry

May 1, 2014

May 15, 2014

August
-
October
2014

Stamford

June 2, 2014

June 16, 2014

September

November 2014

Groton

August 1, 2014

August 15, 2014

October

December 2014


H
OST

O
BLIGATIONS
:


1.

Provide appropriate venue for hosting
the
selected program
.

2.

Assist with
program promotion and
audience recruitment
.

3.

Assist with selecting local speakers from within your region
when appropriate

(
Community
Conversations

and
Getting into Work
).

4.

Host a

minim
um of 1
5

attendees per session.

5.

Complete a program evaluatio
n form once the program is over.

6.

P
rograms

for

A
dults




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P
ROGRAMS FOR
A
DULTS



W
RITTEN
W
ORK

Choose from twelve pieces of literature that range from fiction and non
-
fiction
books

to
work
-
related
articles from
Connecticut Explored

magazine. Connecticut Humanities provides multiple
copies of reading materials and a scholar
who

facilitate
s

a deeper look into the themes, characters
and story

lines
, while creating an atmosphere for engaging conversation. Each program consists of
two, one
-
hour sessions about one piece of literature. Program participants are encouraged to read
the text in advance.

Cost share for
each

program
: $100

A
VAILABLE
T
ITLES
:


A Violet Season
(2012)

Kathy Leonard Czepiel

The violet industry is booming in 1898, and a Hudson Valley farm owned by the Fletcher
family is turning a generous profit for its two oldest brothers. But Ida Fletcher, married to the
black sheep youngest brot
her, has taken up wet nursing to help pay the bills, and her
daughter, Alice, has left school to work.

This
is the story of an unforgettable mother
-
daughter

journey in a time when women were just waking to their own power and independence.

The Amazing
Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000)

Michael Chabon

A young escape artist and budding magician named Joe Kavalier arrives on the doorstep of
his cousin, Sammy Clay. While the long shadow of Hitler falls across Europe, America is
happily in thrall to the Go
lden Age of comic books
.

Climbing from the streets of Brooklyn to
the top of the Empire State Building, Joe and Sammy carve out lives, and careers, as vivid as
cyan and magenta ink.




Cannery Row (1945)

John Steinbeck

Cannery Row

follows the adventures of Mack and the boys, a group of unemployed yet
resourceful men who inhabit a converted fish
-
meal shack on the edge of a vacant lot down
on the Row.

Cannery Row

creates an
evocative portrait of life as it is lived by those who
unabashedly put the highest value on the intangibles

human warmth, camaraderie, and
love.


Connecticut

Explored (Winter 2013 Issue)

Through compelling stories and intriguing images,
Connecticut Explored

investigates the
state's cultural heritage with the
aim of revealing connections between our past, present, and
future.


The
Winter

2013 issue of
Connecticut Explored

is dedicated to Connecticut at Work.



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Empire Falls (2002)

Richard Russo

Miles Roby has been slinging burgers at the Empire Grill for 20
years, a job that cost him his
college education and much of his self
-
respect. What keeps him there? In

Empire Falls
,

Richard Russo delves deep into the blue
-
collar heart of America in a work that overflows with
hilarity, heartache and grace.




The Help
(2009)

Kathryn Stockett

Three women join together to write a tell
-
all book about work as a black maid in the South
that could forever alter their destinies and the life of a small town.

A moving novel filled with
poignancy, humor, and hope,

The Help

is a story about the
social boundaries

we
abide

by,
and the ones we don’t.



The Jungle (1906)

Upton Sinclair

This 1906 bestseller reveals intolerable labor practices and unsanitary working conditions in
the Chicago stockyards as it tells the brutally gri
m story of a Slavic family that emigrates to
America full of optimism but soon descends into numbing poverty, moral degradation, and
despair.


The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1955)

Sloan Wilson

Tom and Betsy Rath are

a young couple with everything going for them. They have every
reason to be happy, but for some reason they are not. Like so many men of the day, Tom
finds himself caught up in the corporat
e rat race

what he encounters there propels him on a
voyage of sel
f
-
discovery that will turn his world inside out.




The Mind at Work (2004)

Mike Rose

As did the national bestseller
Nickel and Dimed
, Mike Rose’s revelatory book demolishes the
long
-
held notion that people who work with their hands make up a less
intelligent class.

Through research, interviews and personal history,
Rose, an educator who is himself the son
of a waitress, explores the intellectual repertory of everyday workers and the terrible social
cost of undervaluing the work they do.






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Revolutionary Road (1961)

Richard Yates

This is the story of Frank and April Wheeler, a bright, beautiful, and talented couple who have
lived on the assumption that greatness is only just around the corner.

They dream of leaving
suburbia, where Frank’s job

in Manhattan is “the dullest…you could possibly imagine” and
April, a failed aspiring actress, reflects the
stereo
typical 1950s housewife.



Then We Came to the End (2007)

Joshua Ferris

No one knows us quite the same way as the men and women who sit beside us in
department meetings and crowd the office refrigerator with their labeled yogurts.
The ad
agency Joshua Ferris brilliantly depicts in his debut novel is family at its strangest and

best,
coping with a business downturn in the time
-
honored way: through gossip, pranks, and
increasingly frequent coffee breaks.




The Tortilla Curtain (1995)

T.C. Boyle

Topanga Canyon is home to two couples on a collision course
:

one a pair of wealthy
suburbanites

(
he a sensitive nature writer, she an obsessive realtor)
;

and

the other
undocumented

immigrants from Mexico

clinging to their vision of the American Dream
.
These
four individuals and their opposing worlds gradually
intersect in what becomes a tragicomedy
of error and misunderstanding.



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F
ILM
W
ORK


Choose from six documentaries that go behind the scenes of the world at work. Connecticut Humanities
provides a scholar to facilitate a conversation following the screening
, for an in
-
depth look at the documentary
and its connection to work in our lives. Documentaries range from 50 to 88 minutes in length. Each screening
is followed by a 30
-
minute scholar
-
led discussion.


Cost share for
each
program: $200

A
VAILABLE
T
ITLES
:



Bill Cunningham New York

Zeitgeist Films

2010/84 min

Bill Cunningham New York

is a delicate, funny and often poignant portrait of a dedicated artist
and cultural anthropologist whose only wealth is his own humanity and unassuming grace.
Cunningham is a Schwinn
-
riding
New

York Times

photographer who has obsessively and
inventively c
hronicled fashion trends and high
-
society charity soirées for decades.
Documenting uptown fixtures, downtown eccentrics
,

and everyone in between, Cunningham’s
enormous body of work is an expression of time, place and individual flair.


Connecticut Towns:

Iron & Ivory

in Connecticut

Visions of Iron
, 2008

Legacies of White Gold
, 2005

Total Time: 65 min

This discussion includes two films about Connecticut’s industrial history.
Visions of Iron

tells
the story of iron
production

in the Salisbury Iron
D
istrict. It is narrated by historian Ed Kirby
and produced by the Sharon Historical Society.
Legacies of White Gold

explores Ivoryton’s
unique history in the ivory trade, and its complex relationship with a continent across the
world, Africa.


For Man
Must Work

Icarus Films

2002/52 min

For Man Must Work

raises crucial questions and suggests rethinking the future. In the global
economy, human resources are being replaced by technology. We are moving from a mass
labor force to an elite corps concentrate
d in the knowledge sector. Will this revolution mean
the end of work as we know it? Filmed in the United States, Canada, France and Mexico, the
film shows how living and working conditions are deteriorating for many people. We also hear
from experts such a
s
Jeremy Rifkin
, American economist and author of
The End of Work.



Heist

Bullfrog Films

2012/76 min

Heist

is a groundbreaking documentary about the roots of the American economic
crisis, and the continuing assault o
n

working and middle class people in the United
States.
Heist

examines

the crumbling structure of the U.S. economy
, government
regulations on businesses, job outsourcing, and policies
implemented by both the
Republican
Party
and

the

Democratic
Party
.






CT

AT
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ORK
|

R
ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
11


Shift Change

Bullfrog Films

2013/69 min

Shift Change
investigates employee
-
owned businesses that p
rovide secure, dignified jobs.
Locations of o
rganizations featured include Boston, San Francisco,
Cleveland
, and

Spain
.




Work and Time

Bullfrog Films

2000/50 min

What is work? Why is it important? What

has

changed about work in our globalized,
corporatized world? Why are we

either overworked, under
-
worked or out of work? Why don't
we have enough time for the things we say are most important in our lives? What are we
'saving time' for anyway? This program examines work and time as intertwined problems in
our fast
-
forward live
s and why it

is

becom
ing

increasingly
difficult

to find balance.

CT

AT
W
ORK
|

R
ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
12


A
BOUT
O
UR

F
ILM AND
L
ITERATURE
D
ISCUSSION
L
EADERS


Connecticut Humanities programs are designed to offer participants quality experiences to promote
meaningful thinking and to support lifelon
g learning. We have cultivated a group of diverse practitioners,
teachers, experts, and storytellers to guide conversation
s

around
Connecticut at Work

topics
through books,
articles, films, and performances. Our discussion leaders challenge adults and yout
h to think about themselves
and the world around them in new and insightful ways.


A
UTHORS ON
W
ORK


From children’s books to first
-
hand stories from foreign lands, the world of work has been explored in a
variety of ways through the written word. Choose fr
om a list of authors who have used fiction and non
-
fiction
to share the story of the past, present and future of work. Programs are 90 minutes. Connecticut Humanities
will work with you to select a date and time
,

based on each author’s schedule.


Cost shar
e for
each
program: 50% of author fee (fee varies by author)

A
VAILABLE
A
UTHORS
:



Kathy Leonard Czepiel

A Violet Season

Kathy Leonard Czepiel is the recipient of a 2012 creative
-
writing fellowship from the
National Endowment for the Arts. Her short fiction has appeared in
Cimarron Review
,
Indiana Review
,
CALYX
,
Confrontation
,
Brain Child
, and elsewhere. She teaches
writing at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut.
A Violet Season

i
s her first novel.

The violet industry is booming in 1898, and a Hudson Valley farm owned by the
Fletcher family is turning a generous profit for its two oldest brothers. But Ida
Fletcher, married to the black sheep youngest brother, has taken up wet nursi
ng
to help pay the bills, and her daughter, Alice, has left school to work. As they risk
losing their share of the farm, the two women make increasingly great sacrifices for their family’s
survival

sacrifices that will set them against one another in a lif
elong struggle for honesty and
forgiveness.


Denis Horgan

The Bangkok World

Denis Horgan decided early

on

to look
at

the world through the eyes of a journalist.
Starting as a copyboy at the Boston Globe, he worked in a variety of capacities

reporter, editor, columnist

for the Bangkok World, the Washington Star and the
Hartford Courant.


In The Bangkok World, Denis tells

the story of his fascinating days as an Army officer
during the war in Southeast Asia
,

and as editor of the English
-
language newspaper of
that name in Thailand.


Ed Johnetta Miller

The Short North

A fiber artist, quilter, teacher, curator and lecturer, s
he is acknowledged to be one of
the most creative and colorful improvisational quiltmakers in the U.S. Widely exhibited
in the U.S. and internationally, her quilts can be found in many important museum
,
corporate and private collections including
:

The Nati
onal Gallery of the Smithsonian
Institution in Washington, D.C.; Nelson Mandela's National Museum in Cape
T
own,
South Africa;
the
Wadsworth Athenaeum Museum of Art in Hartford,
Connecticut
.; and
the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum in Golden,
Colorado
.



The Sh
ort North

is a children’s book about the life of Ed Johnetta’s grandfather, who
was a Pullman porter on the Southern Railroad, and all of the adventures he shared
with her when she was a small child.

CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
13





John Cilio

Women’s Work in WWII

John is a skilled
aviation historian focused on mid
-
twentieth
-
century general
aviation, military aircraft and the people
who

made them possible. He has
written over 200 articles and contributed to several books covering
everything from steam
-
driven automobiles to a secret B
-
24 mission to bomb
Tokyo. As a member of Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental
Aircraft Association
,

and the Danbury, Connecticut, WWII Lost Squadron
Veterans organization, his stories are recognized for their excellence in
accuracy and aut
henticity.


Women's Work in WWII

tells the history of millions of women working in
thousands of roles with minimal training and no experience
,

but fully
confident that they were equal to filling the roles of
the
men they replaced. It
tells the chronologica
l story about the zigzag social and political
developments that enabled women to gain equal employment in thousands of
jobs
,

coupled with the parallel story of WWII.



CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
14


C
OMMUNITY
C
ONVERSATIONS


These moderated conversations bring together featured speakers and the community to discuss work issues
related to women's leadership, impact of local agriculture, and the contributions of immigrant workers in
Connecticut
. Connecticut Humanities provides a

conversation moderator and work
s

with
host organizations

to
identify two to three featured guests from
the

local
community
for a guided

conversation that results in a call
to action.


Cost share for each program: none


A
VAILABLE
C
ONVERSATIONS
:



Growing

Local Roots

How does local agriculture impact the cultural, economic and educational landscape of
our community? Farms and farmers provide food for our communities and contribute to
the local economy. This enlightened conversation explores the work being
done on local
farms
,

and the relationship between the community and local farmers. Speakers are
chosen from within your region to provide an in
-
depth look at agriculture as it relates to
your region’s history, its current status
,

and the future.


Working

in a New Land

Historically, Connecticut has offered opportunities for immigrant workers on farms, in
brass and textile mills
,

and in firearms factories. Today, the promise of a better life in
America represents opportunities and many challenges, but immig
rant workers
continue to shape the way we work in
Connecticut
. This provocative conversation looks
back on contributions made by new Americans and tackles issues that surround their
work today.


Women
and

Leadership

How can we create more leadership
opportunities for women on the job and in their
communities? This illuminating conversation with local experts discusses issues such
as representation of women in government, business and non
-
profit

organizations;

challenges and opportuni
ties for women in
the workplace;
factors that influence
leadership prospects
;

and increasing opportunities for women to lead.



CT

AT
W
ORK
|

R
ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
15


H
ARTBEAT
E
NSEMBLE

S
W
ORKIN


FOR A
L
IVIN



This performance piece
by Hartbeat Ensemble
,

commissioned especially for
Connecticut at Work
,

features
a collection of
short plays (
10

to 15 minutes
each) that explore the human side of work life in Connecticut today. The
plays are performed in groups of three
,

followed by a “talk back” session
to

engage audience members in dialog about their own w
ork life.


Each short play focuses on the work experiences of a character drawn from
first
-
hand accounts and interviews:




An employment case worker must cope with the stresses of her own heavy workload
,

as well as the
problems of a diverse group of out
-
o
f
-
work clients, from a pregnant pharmacy technician unable to
work 10
-
hour shifts to a helicopter mom whose young out
-
of
-
work son has no education and a son of
his own to provide for. (Spanish/English)




A mother and daughter from Peru work for the same jan
itorial company but rarely see one another. As
custodians at a local college, the two perform “invisible work” in opposite shifts so that they can also
care for the third member of their family, a 2
-
year old

toddler
. (Spanish/English)


The
performance

is

s
ometimes humorous and sometimes disturbing
,

but
always

celebrate
s

the human side of
Workin’ for a Livin’.


HartBeat Ensemble creates theater based on stories drawn from contemporary life in Connecticut. Through
Mainstage Plays, education programs and commi
ssioned work, HartBeat develops theater that is accessible
beyond the barriers of class, race, geography and gender. In 2009 HartBeat was recognized by the Theater
Communications Group as part of the New Generations Program for its ability to cultivate new

audiences for
theater. HartBeat regularly appears in the
Hartford Advocate’s

“Best of”

edition as one of the top three
professional theaters in the area.


The host venue must seat at least 75 and be willing to work closely with Connecticut Humanities
to
recruit a
diverse audience.

Admission fees, if charged, must be
modest and used to defray the cost of the performance.



CT

AT
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ORK
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R
ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
16


P
ROGRAMS

FOR
T
EENS


N
EXT
GEN

AT
W
ORK


How do young people figure out what to do after high school? What career
opportunities are open to them in Connecticut? Are the jobs of their dreams readily
available right after college graduation? Answering these questions is more
important than ever, as

the next generation prepares to enter today’s competitive
and rapidly changing workforce.


NextGEN at Work

brings young people face
-
to
-
face with professionals in their
community for story sharing and a question
-
and
-
answer session to help them learn more
about
work
experiences and the journeys

that brought community leaders to the profession they have today. Connecticut
Humanities and host organizations work together to organize a panel of diverse speakers to represent the
interests of teens and young adul
ts, and
to
highlight the
p
rofessional achievements of their community

leaders
.


G
ETTING INTO
W
ORK


What’s work without a little fun?
Connecticut

Humanities and
Sea Tea Improv bring both wit and wisdom to work! These
specially designed programs target middle and high school
students and other young adult groups. Improv brings the
world of work alive! Whether it’s an exploration of jobs, careers
and

professions through audience
-
driven skits or hands
-
on
workshops that help improve confidence and hone skills, Sea
Tea promises it will be fun
f
or all!


We offer two formats:
Performances for larger groups
,

and
hands
-
on workshops for smaller groups.


Perfo
rmances
: Sea Tea Improv spins your weirdest and wildest thoughts into the kinds of scenes and songs
you’ve seen on
Whose Line
I
s
I
t Anyway!, Wild n’ Out,
and
Drew Carey’s Improv
-
A
-
Ganza.
Every Sea Tea
Improv show is invented entirely on the spot, so no two

are the same! Input from the audience is turned into
a one
-
act

play
,

bringing scenes from work and the workplace humorously to life. 45 minutes; (for groups of
15+)


Workshops
: Have instructors, will travel! Participation workshops are a great way to buil
d self
-
confidence,
practice clear diction and encourage
teens

to think and speak “on
their

feet.” Sea Tea Improv shares the art,
skill and fun of improvisation, highlighting how to incorporate these techniques into
participants’

life plan
s
. 2
hours; (for g
roups
of
less than 15)


Sea Tea Improv

officially burst onto the comedy scene on April Fool’s

Day, 2009. The troupe of ten players,
professionally trained by Hartford Stage Company, Improv Boston, and the Upright Citizens Brigade in New
York, dazzles Hartford and beyond on a regular basis with their witty interpretations of audience suggestions.
S
ea Tea performs short improvised games and long improvised plays at public and private functions, teaches
classes to students of all ages, and trains professionals in the art of communication.

They have performed all
over Connecticut and New England. For m
ore information, please visit

www.seateaimprov.com
.



Cost share for each

program: $125

CT

AT
W
ORK
|

R
ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
17


G
RANTS


Connecticut Humanities offers three granting programs to support
Connecticut at Work

activities
:



Connect
icut

at Work

g
rants of up to $1,500 for exhibitions, tours, facilitated discussions and similar
programs that explore themes related to work



Community Reads

g
rants of up to $1,500 for “one book” initiatives tied to a

call
-
to
-
action activity



Connecticut Humanit
ies Fund

grants of up to $50,000 for larger projects addressing work themes


Please note that

guidelines, application materials and deadlines
vary by

granting program.

F
UNDING
P
RIORITIES

In addition to specific priorities for each granting program,
Connecticut Humanities’

general funding priorities
focus on
projects that:




Include significant humanities scholarship and content



Reach broad audiences



Address social issues through humanities disciplines



Foster collaboration among organizations



Encourag
e heritage tourism

W
HO
C
AN
A
PPLY

Grants and programs are available to
organization
s that
:



Have been

incorporated in the state of Connecticut for at least one year as a 501(c)(3) non
-
profit
organization that is governed by a board of directors that meets re
gularly to set policy OR

are

a city or
municipality in the state of Connecticut.



Provide significant programs and/or services to the public on a regular basis, including open hours

and
special events, or
that
function as a professional service organization

that supports humanities
program providers.



Are

in compliance
with

all reporting obligations from previous
Connecticut Humanities

grants.

The following are
not

eligible for funding:



For
-
profit organizations

(although they may partner with a non
-
profit)



In
dividuals



Agencies of the State of Connecticut, including state universities, state parks and
state
historic sites



Organizations not in compliance with
the
terms and conditions of previous grants.


CT

AT
W
ORK
G
RANTS


See it...talk about it…experience it! These modest competitive grants allow
organization
s

to
create

work
-
themed programs
tailored
to
their

community

s needs and interests.

H
OW
I
T
W
ORKS



Funding of up to $1,500 is by competitive grant application
,

with deadlines based on the programming
activity window established for each programming region.

Coventry Region:


6/2/2014, 7/1/2014, 8/1/2014

Groton Region:


9/2/2014, 10/1/2014, 11/3/2014

Hartford Region
:


1/2/2014, 2/3/2014, 3/3/2014

New Haven Reg
ion
:


10/1/2013, 11/1/2013, 12/2/2013

Stamford Region
:


8/1/2014, 9/2/2014, 10/1/2014

Torrington Region
:


12/2/2013, 1/2/2014, 2/3/2014

Waterbury Region
:


5/1/2014, 6/2/2014, 7/1/2014




Applicants compete for funding only within their region and only wi
th other Connecticut at Work
projects.



G
rants must be matched dollar for dollar, but matching funds can be in

the form of
in
-
kind
contributions, organization cash
,

or donations and grants from other sources.



Only one grant per organization per region.


CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
G
UIDE
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P
AGE
18


E
LIGIBLE
P
ROJECTS

E
XHIBITIONS AND
T
OURS


These projects explore

work
-
related themes

through interpretive exhibitions, documentary work
,

or local
tours. Project formats include:



M
useum
-
style
interpretive
exhibit
s



Online interpretive exhibitions

(
both crowd
-
sourced and curated content
)



Walking or driving tours

Eligible expenses

include:



Purchase of materials and rental of equipment needed to produce the exhibit



Expenses for
v
ideo

recordings
, audio recordings or photography
in support of interpretive
programmi
ng



Printed programs, brochures or other educational material associated with
the

exhibit



Transportation between sites

(
for multi
-
venue programming
)



Direct
promotion and advertising

expenses

C
OMMUNITY
D
ISCUSSIONS

These programs

are meant to get people
talking

the audience first experiences a work
-
related
text
,
film,
performance
, panel presentation or lecture

and then

explore
s

work
-
related themes and issues through
guided
conversation
.
Be sure to
review

our programming offerings to see if one
meets your

needs before
applying for funding for a similar program. We cannot offer grants for programs similar to those
we offer directly until all are booked in your region.

Eligible expenses include
:



Speaker and performer

fees



Film screening fees



Speaker/performer travel expenses



Equipment rental for use in public performance/presentation

Outside v
enue rental



Printed programs, brochures or other educational material for distribution at event



Direct
promotion and advertising

expenses

H
OW TO APPLY
:


Download guidelines and application materials
from
cthumanities.org/grants/
connecticut
-
at
-
work
-
grants
.

You
must be affiliated with a regional collaboration before submitting an application. Please see page
1

for regional
coordinator contact information.



CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
19


C
OMMUNITY
R
EADS
G
RANTS


Community Reads

grants support “
o
ne
b
ook” initiatives in communities througho
ut the state

that

use

the
power of the written word to engage

participants
and

motivate
them
to
make a
difference in
their

communit
y
.


Our ide
a of community is a broad one

a school, a town, a region

but

applicants
are

encourage
d

to stretch
beyond their traditional sense of community
to embrace a diverse group of participants. This year
Community
Reads
is coordinated with
our

year
-
long exploration of
Connecticut at Work
.


H
OW
I
T
W
ORKS




Funding
is

by competitive grant application,

with awards up to $1,500 for activities taking place
between February 2014 and December 2014.
Applications
are
due
by
December
16
, 2013.




A book mu
st be the focus of the proposal,

with the book’s main theme being “work.” Various
perspectives of work may be explored

(
i.e.
,

immigration, local economy and women
)
.



Projects
must

incorporate

collaboration among organizations and community partners.



Projects must go beyond
simply

reading

by engaging participants in informed discussion
.

Eligible expenses include:




Speaker and p
erformer fees



Film screening fees



Purchase of books



Discussion leader honoraria



Speaker/performer travel expenses



Equipment rental for use in public
performance/presentation



Outside v
enue rental



Printed programs, brochures or other educational material for distribution at event



Direct promotion and advertising expenses


How to apply:


Download guidelines and application materials at

cthumanities.org/grants/community
-
reads
-
grants
.




CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
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P
AGE
20


C
ONNECTICUT
H
UMANITIES
F
UND
P
UBLIC
P
RESENTATION
G
RANTS


Organizations
with

projects that are larger in scale than those supported by
Connecticut at Work

grants are
invited to submit proposals to the
Connecticut Humanities Fund
.


H
OW
I
T
W
ORKS




Funding of up to $50,000 is by compe
titive grant application. Deadlines
are not

tied to the regional
program activity windows

and

vary by the amount of the request:


Amount

Deadline is first business day of

Award n
otification
mid
-

<$10,000

January, April, July, October

February, May, August, November

$10,000+

February, May, August, November

April, July,
October
, January




Although
Connecticut at Work

is a priority for this grant line, a
pplications

compete with a statewide
pool of proposals beyond the
Connecticut at Work

initiative.



These grants require a 1:1 funding match that can be achieved through a combination of applicant
funds, external funds
,

a
nd in
-
kind contributions.



Please see the application guidelines for more information on eligibility, matching and other
requirements.


H
OW TO
A
PPLY


Download guidelines and application materials at

cthumanities.org/grants/connecticut
-
humanities
-
fund/public
-
programs




K
EEP IN TOUCH WITH
C
ONNECTICUT AT
W
ORK


Web

site
:
http://cthumanities.org/ctatwork

Facebook:
like
Connecticut Humanities

(www.facebook.com/CTHprograms)

Twitter: follow us
@cthumanities

(www.twitter.com/cthumanities)

e
-
letter: subscribe at
cthumanities.org/eletter
CT

AT
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ORK
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P
AGE
21


A
PPENDIX
A:

P
ROGRAM
R
EQUEST
F
ORM


P
ROGRAM
H
OSTING
R
EQUEST



Instructions:

1.

See the Partner Resource Guide for program descriptions and information on eligibility.

2.

Complete all requested information.

3.

Select as many programs you are comfortable managing within the programming window for your region.

4.

CTH awards programs based on t
he strength of your request, availability and venue/geographic diversity.
We will notify you of the status of your request within two weeks of the application deadline.

5.

Mail, e
-
mail, fax or hand deliver one completed copy by 4 pm on the deadline for your
region:


Connecticut Humanities

ATTN: CT at Work Programs

37 Broad Street

Middletown, CT 06457

programs@cthumanities.org

860.685.2260 (v)

860.685.7569 (f)



Regional deadlines:


Region

Request
Deadline

Notification

Regional Programming
Window

New Haven

Sept 3, 2013

Sept 16, 2013

November, 2013

January, 2014

Torrington

Nov 1, 2013

Nov 15, 2013

January

March 2014

Hartford

Dec 2, 2013

Dec 16, 2013

February

April , 2014

Waterbury

April 1, 2014

April 15,
2014

June

August 2014

Coventry

May 1, 2014

May 15, 2014

August
-
October
2014

Stamford

June 2, 2014

June 16, 2014

September

November, 2014

Groton

August 1, 2014

August 15, 2014

October

December, 2014



CT

AT
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ESOURCE
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P
AGE
22


O
RGANIZATION
P
ROFILE AND
C
ONTACT
I
NFORMATION



Y
OUR

N
AME
:







T
ITLE
:








P
HONE
:







E
MAIL
:








O
RGANIZATION
N
AME
:









M
AILING
A
DDRESS
:








C
ITY
:







S
TATE
:

CT

ZIP+4:









L
EGAL
A
DDRESS
:








(I
f different from above)



C
ITY
:







S
TATE
:

CT

ZIP+4:











B
UDGET
S
IZE


<
$250K

S
TAFFING

FULL
-
TIME










$250K

<$850K


PART
-
TIME










$850K

<$2.5M


VOLUNTEER










$2.5M+


TOTAL

0



L
EGISLATIVE
D
ISTRICTS
:


CT

S
ENATE







CT

H
OUSE







US

C
ONGRESSIONAL

D
ISTRICT








PROGRAMMING PROFILE


AUDIENCE



EVENTS

ESTIMATED



P
ROGRAM
T
YPE

PER YEAR

ATTENDANCE

RACE
/
ETHNICITY







%

A
FRICAN
A
MERICAN


B
OOK
C
LUBS



















%

A
SIAN


C
OMMUNITY
E
VENTS



















%

C
AUCASIAN


C
ONFERENCES



















%

L
ATIN
/H
ISPANIC


E
XHIBITIONS



















%

O
THER


F
ESTIVALS













0

T
OTAL


L
ECTURES















N
OT
A
VAILABLE


M
USEUM
T
OURS
















M
USICAL
P
ERFORMANCES













A
GE
G
ROU
PS







%

C
HILDREN
(<12)


P
ANEL
D
ISCUSSIONS




















%

Y
OUTH
(12
-
18)


P
OETRY
/S
POKEN
W
ORD




















%

A
DULT


S
CHOOL
T
OURS




















%

S
ENIOR
(65+)


S
ITE
T
OURS














0

T
OTAL


S
YMPOSIA















N
OT
A
VAILABLE


T
HEATRICAL
P
ERFORMANCES
















O
THER
















T
OTAL FOR
A
LL
P
ROGRAMS

0

0







CT

AT
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ESOURCE
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P
AGE
23





M
ISSION
S
TATEMENT
(
MAXIMUM
500

CHARACTERS
,

INCLUDING SPACES
)











O
RGANIZATION
H
ISTORY
(
MAXIMUM
2,500

CHARACTERS
,

INCLUDING SPACES
)











CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
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UIDE
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P
AGE
24


T
ARGET
R
EGIONAL
P
ROGRAMMING
W
INDOW
(the timing of your programming should
coincide with the region closest to you)



Coventry (Aug. 2014
-
Oct. 2014)


Stamford (Sept. 2014
-
Nov. 2014)


Groton (Oct. 2014
-
Dec. 2014)


Torrington (Jan.2014
-
March 2014)


Hartford (Feb. 2014
-
April 2014)



Waterbury (June 2014
-
Aug. 2014)


New Haven (Nov. 2013
-
Jan. 2014)



CT

AT
W
ORK
|

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ESOURCE
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UIDE
|

P
AGE
25



H
AVE YOU MADE CONTACT

WITH YOUR
REGION

S
CT

AT
W
ORK
R
EGIONAL
C
OORDINATOR
?



Yes


No




Unsure who to contact


Note:
see the Partner Resource Guide for a list of regional coordinators.


CT

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ESOURCE
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P
AGE
26


A
UTHORS ON
W
ORK



Denis Horgan



John Cilio



Ed Johnetta Miller



Kathy Leonard Czepiel



P
ROGRAM
V
ENUE AND
C
APACITY

(maximum 500 characters, including spaces)
:












H
OW DOES THIS PROGRAM

MATCH THE MISSION AN
D PRIORITIES OF YOUR

ORGANIZATION
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)
















W
HO IS YOUR TARGET AU
DIENCE
?

H
OW WILL YOU LET THEM

KNOW ABOUT THE PROGR
AM
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)








CT

AT
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ORK
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ESOURCE
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UIDE
|

P
AGE
27


C
OMMUNITY
C
ONVERSATION



Growing Local Roots



Working in a New Land



Women & Leadership




P
ROGRAM
V
ENUE AND
C
APACITY

(maximum 500 characters, including spaces)
:














H
OW DOES THIS PROGRAM

MATCH THE MISSION AN
D PRIORITIES OF YOUR

ORGANIZATION
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)















W
HO IS YOUR TARGET AU
DIENCE
?

H
OW WILL YOU LET THEM

KNOW ABOUT THE PROGR
AM
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)

















CT

AT
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ORK
|

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ESOURCE
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UIDE
|

P
AGE
28


F
ILM
W
ORK


Bill Cunningham New York


Heist


Connecticut Towns: Iron and Ivory in
Connecticut



Shift Change


For Man Must Work



Work an
d Time


P
ROGRAM
V
ENUE AND
C
APACITY

(maximum 500 characters, including spaces)
:














H
OW DOES THIS PROGRAM

MATCH THE MISSION AN
D PRIORITIES OF YOUR

ORGANIZATION
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)













W
HO IS YOUR TARGET AU
DIENCE
?

H
OW WILL YOU LET THEM

KNOW ABOUT THE PROGR
AM
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)





















CT

AT
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ORK
|

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ESOURCE
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UIDE
|

P
AGE
29



H
ARTBEAT
E
NSEMBLE

S
W
ORKIN


FOR A
L
IVIN




P
ROGRAM
V
ENUE AND
C
APACITY

(maximum 500 characters, including spaces)
:













H
OW DOES THIS PROGRAM

MATCH THE MISSION AN
D PRIORITIES OF YOUR

ORGANIZATION
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)














W
HO IS YOUR TARGET AU
DIENCE
?

H
OW WILL YOU LET THEM

KNOW ABOUT THE PROGR
AM
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)










CT

AT
W
ORK
|

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ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
30


Y
OUTH
P
ROGRAMS



NextGEN at Work



Getting into Work Performance



Getting into Work Workshop



P
ROGRAM
V
ENUE AND
C
APACITY

(maximum 500 characters, including spaces)
:














H
OW DOES THIS PROGRAM

MATCH THE MISSION AN
D PRIORITIES OF YOUR

ORGANIZATION
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)















W
HO IS YOUR TARGET AU
DIENCE
?

H
OW WILL YOU LET THEM

KNOW ABOUT THE PROGR
AM
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)











CT

AT
W
ORK
|

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ESOURCE
G
UIDE
|

P
AGE
31


W
RITTEN
W
ORK


A Violet Season
, Kathy Leonard Czepiel


The Jungle
, Upton Sinclair


The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay
,
Michael Chabon



The Mind at Work
, Mike Rose


Cannery Row
, John Steinbeck


Then We Came to the End
, Joshua Ferris


Connecticut Explored
, Winter 2013


Revolutionary Road
, Richard Yates


Empire Falls
, Richard Russo


The Tortilla Curtain
, T.C. Boyl


The Help
, Kathryn Stockett


The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit
, Sloan
Wilson


P
ROGRAM
V
ENUE AND
C
APACITY

(maximum 500 characters, including spaces)
:














H
OW DOES THIS PROGRAM

MATCH THE MISSION AN
D PRIORITIES OF YOUR

ORGANIZATION
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)















W
HO IS YOUR TARGET AU
DIENCE
?

H
OW WILL YOU LET THEM

KNOW ABOUT THE PROGR
AM
?

(maximum 500
characters, including spaces)