FdSc Computing and Internet Technology PART-TIME YEAR 2 UNIT ...

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FdSc Computing and Internet Technology FULL
-
TIME YEAR 1


UNIT DIRECTORY



Unit Title:



COMPUTER SYSTEMS

Level :

C

Credit Value:

20


ECTS
Credit Value:

10



PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


None


AIMS


The aim is to examine the components of
computers, their architecture,
functioning and integration. The learner will develop understanding of operating
systems as resource manager, user interface, and hardware abstraction. The
concepts and practices of simple point
-
to
-
point communications will b
e
introduced within the framework of laboratory tasks. Computer and laboratory
safety concerns will also be introduced and understanding of the value of data
security and countermeasures to IT professionals investigated.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At
the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

Understand data formats of simple and structured entities.


2.

Choose appropriate descriptions of the functioning and architecture of
the major components of a computer.


3.

Understand physica
l and logical structures on a disk drive.


4.

Relate the control of basic components of the computing hardware to the
operations of computer software, including operating system processes.


5.

Understand simple communications principles in simple and multi
plexed
computer links.


6.

Be able to formulate a coherent preventative maintenance programme
and have knowledge of the principles that underlie computer safety.


7.

Design and carry out simple experiments on computer systems.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHOD
S


The context of the unit is the single
-
processor, single
-
user computer,

typically
single
-
processing (not multi
-
processing) though it covers the interaction of a
single process with operating system processes and additionally forms the
introduction to basic networking


In terms of the Computing subject benchmark, the unit brin
gs together material
from Architecture, Computer Communications and Operating Systems.


Learners work through a set of experiments in computer laboratories. They are
given an experiment reporting framework, but take responsibility for the content
of the re
port and level of analysis that it shows. They learn the importance of a)
good experimental work, and b) good experimental reporting.


They study the basic components, architecture and functioning of computers,
progressing through the year to understand t
he way that each component
contributes to the overall functionality provided to computer users. The needs
and requirements of computer security and safety are emphasised and
interwoven within this study.


Indicative Styles



Learners undertake a series of la
boratory tasks that investigate the
behaviour of computer hardware and communication protocols. These tasks
are carried out on personal computers, and allow learners to apply the
conceptual knowledge and principles developed in a parallel sequence of
lect
ures.




Learners use on
-
line materials / examples and formative assessment tasks
to provide immediate feedback to the learner to indicate their level of
attainment. They also take part in interactive virtual activities that model
laboratory work on
-
line
.




Learners are confronted with trouble
-
shooting tasks that expose them to
common industry
-
related computing problems dealing with issues such as
start
-
up modes, registry entries, BIOS problems, boot problems, data and file
corruption. They use system tools
to expose more dynamic information such
as the state of hardware components and software settings during program
execution. Lectures cover the structure and organisation of computers, to
provide an abstract model against which they can view the examples t
hat
they work through.




Learners carry out exercises building and linking computers and setting up
the protocols to enable them to exchange data and configure DHCP and
DNS and default gateways. Lectures relate the concepts of communications
(which are deve
loped in the Network Systems unit), to the practical activities
in seminars.


Informal assessment plays an important part in the development of learner
ability in this unit. Each student is required to keep a laboratory notebook, and
record every experime
nt. The notebooks are inspected cyclically, a few being
marked in each laboratory session, and feedback is given on a) quality of
reporting, b) quality of thought/analysis, and c) level of understanding of the
topic. Most laboratory sessions enable the l
earner to observe, discuss and
analyse behaviour. Some focus particularly on performance.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Intended Learning Outcomes 1 through 6:

All of these

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO) are assessed through an
examination. At this level the learner is expected broadly to be able to
demonstrate understanding over a multiplicity of individual short questions which
may be based on scenarios from industrial
and commercial environments and
require them to choose correct explanations or descriptions as appropriate.


Intended Learning Outcomes 1 through 7:

Laboratory Notebooks form the in
-
course assessment. They are formally
marked twice in the year, using a
cycle from the informal assessment cyclic
process. Learners are not told which cycle will be used for the formal
assessment, to encourage them to work to a high standard throughout the year.
Ability to work practically with computer equipment is the prim
ary focus of this
assessment, but it naturally covers all of the other ILOs in terms of
understanding of experiment content.


Weighting

The weighting of in
-
course assessment, to final assessment is 50:50.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


Data representation and mathem
atical operations:

Bits, bytes, binary, octal, hexadecimal and decimal, number and character,
different word lengths. Conversions to any base. Boolean logic gates.


Computer Technology:

Processor, bus, primary and secondary memory.

BIOS, EPROM, EEPROM,
System resources (IRQ, DMA, IO addresses)
Installation and set up Operating System Fundaments (process creation &
scheduling, memory management, file systems.) System Tools (Regedit,
Scandisk, Msconfig, Wscript.exe, Hwinfo.exe, ASD.exe, ERD, Recovery
conso
le) Multimedia capability (colour book formats, RAMDAC, PCI vs AGP,
video and sound standards)

Physical and logical disk formats, space allocation techniques, NTFS, FAT16,
FAT32.

Input and output. Performance issues: buffering and caching, fragmentation
.


Communications:

Fundamentals of communications, digital and analogue, media, the notion of
protocol. Overview and introduction to OSI model. Basics of TCP/IP. Comms
utilities (Ipconfig, winipcfg, config, and ifconfig, Tracert, iptrace, and traceroute,
N
etstat/tpcon, ping) Synchronous and Asynchronous serial transmission,
modulation and de
-
modulation, AT commands, error checking and correction.
Networks (circuit and packet switched) Basics of Ethernet
-

a means of
multiplexing. Setting up networks (NIC,

IP addresses, DHCP, DNS, Default
gateway)


Computer and Laboratory Safety:

Preventative Maintenance programme. Electrostatic discharge (ESD) Power
issues UPS. Troubleshooting methodologies Security principles applied to
computers. Hardware, software and d
ata threats. Countermeasures including
technical and management solutions. Using Systems tools to ensure data safety
and integrity

INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Tanenbaum, A. (2005). Structured Computer Organisation (5
th

Edition).
Prentice
-
Hall.

Woodhull, A. & Tanenbaum, A. (2006). Operating Systems: Design and
Implementation (
3rd

Edition). Pearson Prentice
-
Hall


Tanenbaum A., Day, W & Waller, S. (2003). Computer Networks (4
nd

Edition).
Prentice
-
Hall


Comer, D. & Droms
, R. (2003). Computer Networks and Internets (4th Edition).
Prentice
-
Hall.


Dick, D. (2003) The PC Support Handbook: The Configuration and Systems
Guide (11
th

Edition). Dumbreck Publishing



WEB BASED RESOURCES

http://www.netbook.cs.purdue.edu

http://cisco.netacad.net



Unit Title:


DATABASE SYSTEMS 1

Level:



C

Credit Value:



20


ECTS Credit Value:



10



P
RE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Programming 1,

Systems 1.


AIMS


To examine and develop a working knowledge of computer
-
based file and
record structures and access methods. To develop an understanding of
relational data modelling and manipulation using relational calculus and algebra
and to develop a
framework, via data analysis and modelling, for robust
database design and implementation.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

Explain the organisation of files used by a small
-
scale, PC
-
based DBMS.


2.

Apply a data analysis process to analyse a given single
-
user, PC
-
based
application scenario.


3.

Demonstrate the use of entity
-
relationship modelling and normalisation
to design a database for a single user, PC
-
based system and illustrate
the design using a
n appropriate diagramming technique.


4.

To understand the difference between good and bad relational data
modelling.


5.

Translate a design expressed as an entity
-
relationship model into an
equivalent relational data model to answer a given set of queries.


6.

Sel
ect a number of indexes to meet the performance requirements of a
set of queries on a given entity
-
relationship model.


7.

Implement a single
-
user, PC
-
based database for a given set of relations
(including integrity constraints) to answer a given set of queri
es.


8.

Estimate the size and usage of a given database from a description of a
single user, PC
-
based scenario.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development

The context of this unit is the single
-
user, PC
-
based database
management
system.


This unit focuses material from the Database Computing subject benchmark.


In this unit learners develop an understanding of how data is stored in single
-
user computer systems. They start by studying some simple scenarios about
collect
ing and storing data in a business context. These scenarios are used to
introduce the learner to a typical database management system (DBMS) and to
help the learner explore different methods of manipulating data using a DBMS.
Once the learner understands

some of these tools, they are introduced to a
number of formal data modelling techniques and they apply them in simple, well
-
defined scenarios and discuss the difference between good and bad models.


Indicative Styles



Lectures and laboratory classes inclu
de a wide range of case studies that
illustrate how data is used in a business context. Many of these case studies
are derived from situations with which learners are familiar, for example,
small retailers and schools, and the case studies are designed to

complement similar examples used on other units of the course. Less
familiar case studies are used to help the learners widen their experience of
business situations, for example, production companies and sales
organisations.




The learners develop data

analysis and database design skills by studying
common data modelling techniques such as entity
-
relationship modelling.
They work in small groups during seminar sessions to apply these skills to
variety of well
-
defined case studies. During group discuss
ions, learners are
encouraged to use analysis and design techniques that they have learned in
other parts of the course, for example, data flow analysis. Learners are
given additional exercises that they work on during their own study times.




Learners lea
rn to use a common database management system by working
through a series of structured tasks and by additional laboratory
-
based
tutorials. The skills that they develop by completing these tasks are re
-
enforced by building databases for many of the analys
is and design case
studies that they are given.




Lectures are used to explain formal database theory, for example, data
modelling and query languages. Many of these lectures are supported by
laboratory classes that are intended to highlight the practica
l application of
database theory. For example, learners develop an appreciation of
relational algebra by using database systems that use relational algebra and
SQL. Exercises are designed to highlight important features of the
theoretical material.



Fee
dback on Progress

Informal assessment takes place at a number of points during the unit. LO6 is
assessed by a number of tests that are designed to help the learner progress
through the material. The learner’s progress through the tasks is closely
monitor
ed. LO2
-
4 are assessed in seminars using case studies and other
exercises that require the learners to solve problems individually and as part of a
group. Learners are required to present their work during the seminars. ILO 1,
5 and 7 are assessed by la
boratory exercises that require the learner to create a
database that they have designed.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Assessment: Learning Outcome 1:

This learning outcome will be assessed in a written examination.


Assessment: Learning Outcomes 2
-
4,6 and 8:

These learning outcomes are assessed in a single assessment exercise. The
exercise requires the learner to solve a data management problem that is given
to them in the form of a business scenario. The exercise typically requires the
learner to identify t
he problem contained in the scenario and to design a
database to solve the problem. As part of this exercise the learner must build a
database system that corresponds to their proposed design. These learning
outcomes are also assessed in a written examin
ation.


Assessment: Learning Outcomes 5 and 7:

These learning outcomes will be assessed in a written examination.


Assessment: Integration

LO2
-
4 and 6 are integrated in most problem scenarios. LO1, 5, 6 and 7 are
assessed by tasks that require the
learner to develop and evaluate a database.


Assessment: Weighting

The weighting of in
-
course assessment to final assessment is 50:50.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


Data and Information:

Data and information. Data in a business context. Processing vs storing data
.
Information systems. Uses of data. Data ownership. The role of data within the
organisation.


Data and Storage:


Data storage methods and concepts (e.g. bits, bytes, fields, records, files,
databases)


Files and File Access:

Using indexing and hashing in physical database design. Critique of physical
layout of database structures. Database size and usage estimation.


Data Modelling:

The difference between physical, logical and conceptual database design.

The
relational data model (relational algebra and calculus). Data modelling
techniques including entity
-
relationship modelling, functional analysis,
normalisation. Using data flow diagrams and other analysis techniques as aids
to database design.


Data
base Querying and Manipulation:


Using database management systems to construct databases and to implement
data models. Querying database systems using visual querying tools and SQL.


Data Processing:


Using and implementing different data processing tech
niques. Using main
memory and disc memory in data processing.


Data Exchange:

Data markup languages (e.g. XML), data transformation (e.g. XSL).



INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Curtis, G., (2004) Business Information Systems: Analysi
s, Design and Practice
(5
th

Edition), Financial Times Prentice Hall .


Elmasri, R. & Navathe, S. (1999) Fundamentals of Database Design, McGraw
Hill.


Elmasri, R. & Navathe, S. (2006) Fundamentals of Database Systems (5
th

Edition). Pearson Addison Wesley


Kroenke, D. (2005) Database Processing : Fundamentals, Design and
Implementation (10
th

Edition), Pearson Prentice Hall.


Ramakrishnan, R. & Gehrke, J. (2006) Database Management Systems (3
rd

Edition), McGraw Hill.


WEB BASED RESOURCES

Database,
http://www.intelligententerprise.com/dbframe.shtml.

Datamation,
http://datamation.earthweb.com/
.

DBMS Online,
http://www.dbmsmag.com/artin403.html
.



Unit Title:



PROGRAMMING 1


Level:



C

Credit Value:



20


ECTS Credit Value:



10




PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Systems 1.


AIMS


To develop an understanding of fundamental programming
concepts and to
examine the process of program design, implementation and testing.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

Explain the programming concepts of sequence, iteration and selection
and demons
trate them in a single programming language.


2.

Design an algorithm to solve a given problem using sequence, iteration
and selection.


3.

Implement a given algorithm by selecting appropriate variables, data
types and programming constructs.


4.

Demonstrate a detai
led understanding of the syntax of a single
programming language.


5.

Test and debug a given program by developing and implementing a
suitable test strategy and selecting an appropriate set of test data.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive

and Operational Development

The context of this unit is fundamental programming constructs demonstrated
through procedural programming and structured design.


In terms of the Computing subject benchmark,

this unit focuses on material from
Programming Fundamentals.


In this unit learners develop an understanding of fundamental programming
constructs (sequence, iteration and selection) and algorithm design. The main
approach adopted in laboratories is prac
tical exercises that give the student a lot
of practice programming. Practical sessions are structured to provide the
correct level of support for all students.


Indicative Styles



This unit utili
s
es two seminars per week.




Learners learn to use a simple p
rogramming environment and to edit and
compile source code. They learn to recognise the relationship between the
organisation of programs and the organisation of the computer, for example,
setting up the environment and compiling and executing programs




L
earners work on programming problems during laboratory classes. Their
first programs illustrate simple programming problems that emphasise
individual programming constructs but they quickly progress to larger
problems.




Learners work in small groups to so
lve programming exercises and they
present their algorithm designs during seminars.


Feedback on Progress

During practical classes learners are given continuous feedback on exercises
that they complete. They work on many of the exercises in their own time

and
the results of these exercises are discussed during laboratory sessions.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Assessment: Learning Outcome 1
-
5:

All the learning outcomes are assessed by the students completing a portfolio of
work during the unit. The problems in the

portfolio get more difficult as the unit
progresses. They are given regular feedback on the contents of the portfolio.
The learning outcomes will also be assessed in a written examination.


Assessment: Weighting

The weighting of in
-
course assessment to
final assessment is 50:50.



INDICATIVE CONTENT


Programming Constructs:

Sequence, iteration, selection; variables, data types, procedures, functions,
parameter passing.


Programming Language:


Syntax, semantics, coding standards, documenting code.


Algorithm Design:

Problem decomposition, top
-
down design, structured programming, problem
representation (eg pseudo
-
code, flowcharts), abstraction, assessing algorithm
designs, good design practices.


File and Data Structures:

File input/output, file proce
ssing, sorting. Arrays, linked lists, queues, stacks.


Testing and Debugging:

Importance of testing, approaches to testing, test design, generating test data,
debugging.


Programming Tools:

Compilation, compilers, libraries, programming environments.



IN
DICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Bailey, D. A. (2000) Java Elements: Principles of P
rogramming in Java, McGraw
Hill


Bailey, D. A. (2002) Java Structures: Data Structures in Java for the Principled
Programmer (2
nd

Edition) McGraw Hill


Flanagan, D. (2005) Java in a Nutshell (5
th

Edition) O’Reilly.


Lewis J.& Loftus W., (2006) Java Software Solutions
-

Foundations of Program
Design (5
th

Edition), Addison
-
Wesley.


McConnell, S. C. (2004) Code Complete (2
nd

Edition) Microsoft


King M. J.,
& Pardoe, J. P. (1995) Program Design using JSP. MacMillan



WEB BASED RESOURCES

http://java.sun.com

http://www.netbeans.org

http://www.bluej.o
rg





Unit Title:



SYSTEMS 1

Level:



C

Credit Value:



20


ECTS Credit Value:



10




PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


None


AIMS


To develop understanding of the operations of business systems including the
communication, storage and processing
of data and information and to
develop capability to develop solutions to simple business information
problems. This involves a) the concepts and practice of modelling business
systems using informal and formal techniques, and b) the integration of
capabil
ities needed for the process of system provision such as human
computer interface and computer systems architecture design.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

Understand basic business processes an
d generate ideas for
improvement with particular reference to information.


2.

Understand how data can be manipulated and presented to assist a
business person.


3.

Understand the use of measurement to monitor business process.


4.

Use formal modelling concepts in
logical analysis of (a) simple business
process(es) with an understanding of the importance of recognised good
practice and quality standards.


5.

Design and develop a record
-
based system to assist a business
process, taking into account the needs of the business to collect, store
and manipulate data with due regard to relevant legislation such as the
Data Protection Act.


6.

Appreciate the cycle of sy
stem development activity and the roles and
responsibilities of the different people involved including the principle
duties set out in the rules of professional bodies.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development

The context of the unit is the activities of a single business function, and its
interactions with other parts of the business.


In terms of the Computing subject benchmark, the unit brings together material
from Computer Based Systems, Information Systems

and Systems Analysis
and Design.


During the first term learners work through a series of discussions and modelling
exercises progressing from well
-
defined business tasks constrained to one
business department with simple information requirements, to bus
iness
scenarios with more complex interactions between departments and processing
needs. The nature of business data and information flows needed to support
business processes are explored through the use of example prototype systems
on a personal compute
r used in stand alone mode. Different styles of graphical
representations are explored as vehicles for understanding, design and
communication.


They study the basic activities of the computer systems development cycle,
progressing through the second ter
m to understand the way that each phase
contributes to the process of providing a successfully functioning computer
system to computer users. They examine the role of systems developers in
identifying and extracting business requirements for information p
rocessing from
the business computer users.


Indicative Styles



This unit utilises two lectures per week. One covers the business process
basics and logistics. The other lecture concentrates on systems, drawing on
the process knowledge stream.




Learners u
se different types of graphical representation to understand,
record, design and communicate business information processing and
business process improvements.




They examine a series of computer based information systems running on
personal computers, wh
ich allows them to apply the conceptual knowledge
and principles developed in a parallel sequence of lectures.




Learners participate in discussions which examine the information
requirements to support business processes, the facilities which computer
-
bas
ed systems can provide to provide and present the information.




They experience development of a system, using very simple tools, focusing
on the identification of process improvement and the use of information and
systems to provide the improvement
. Decis
ions about the system’s design
take into account the needs of the business to collect, store and
manipulate data with due regard to relevant legislation such as the Data
Protection Act.


Feedback on Progress:

Feedback plays an important part in the
development of learner ability in this
unit. Each student is expected to keep a file of the exercises and discussions
and to make these available in class when requested. Feedback is provided
on a) the quality of the document, b) quality of thought/analys
is, c) ability to
model business processes and d) level of understanding of the topic.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Assessment: Intended Learning Outcomes 1 through 4:

Students participate in class discussions of business studies, where they have,
for example, to
identify a process improvement. They take the study away and
prepare notes outlining their proposals and justification. In the following week, a
few of them present their ideas to the class. Students do not know which of
them will be asked to present, a
nd they are randomly selected over repeating
cycles. All cycles are marked. The marks from two cycles are made formal.
Students are not told which cycles are which. As the year progresses,
presentations will adopt a more formal style, and use a wider v
ariety of visual
aids.


Assessment: Intended Learning Outcomes 2 through 4 and 6:

These will be assessed through examination. The examination will be partly
based on a case study.


Assessment: Intended Learning Outcome 5:

Student will carry this out as a
formative group assignment. The extended time
of the assignment vehicle provides scope for their design and development
thinking. Students will work as a team, keeping an individual log and
participating in an element which is peer assessed.


Assessmen
t: Weighting

The weighting of in
-
course assessment, to final assessment is 50:50. In the in
-
course assessment the weighting of presentations to assignment will be 50:50.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


Business Process:

Logistics of businesses: what business process
es are, information as the trigger
to all process and the monitor of process, dependency of management on
measurement. The importance of detail. Common processes: trading, stock
control, planning and management, resource planning and management.
Managem
ent approaches: reductionism, just
-
in
-
time. Quality management: each
business as a system, failure of goal
-
setting approaches, improvement via
radical change and continuous improvement.


System software:

Screen/form and report generating software tools.


Managing with Data:

Presentation of data to provide operational and management information.
Creating reports and screens from sorted and selected data. What makes a
good report/screen, how they assist business people, how they support/enable
process impr
ovements, and facilitate the process improvement process itself.
Defining measurements for different businesses, or sub
-
components of
businesses. Indicators, simple and calculated, use of index numbers and ratios.



Analytical Models:

Soft systems thinki
ng and tools. System block diagrams, and process flow
-
charts. Data flow modelling. Using models to identify process improvements
and information requirements. Systems people, business people, and the
mutual learning process of system provision. Using
models to facilitate/support
learning.


Systems:

Different kinds of system: record
-
keeping systems through data processing
systems. Typical business contexts, and appropriate systems. Systems
architectures: batch, interactive, internet
-
based, mobile, rea
l
-
time.


Systems Requirements and Design:

Systems architecture: overall structure, relationships among major components
and their interactions, such as humans, hardware and software. Layering and
partitioning. Relevant legislation, regulations and standard
s and the need to
comply with such requirements when designing and building computer
-
based
systems.


Human Computer interface:


Standards & legal requirements, dialogues, direct manipulation and style
guides. Input
-
output design, business process and
human factors issues.
Introduction to approaches to usability requirements analysis: structured,
ethnographic, scenario
-
based. Usability for different classes of users: novice,
expert, people with disabilities.


Systems Development Cycle

The different ac
tivities in the systems development cycle: the activities learned
in this unit in context.
Appreciate the cycle of system development activity
phases, tasks, documentation, deliverables, and the roles and responsibilities
of the different people involved i
ncluding the principle duties set out in the
rules of professional bodies such as the BCS Code of Practice and BCS Code
of Conduct.


Systems development themes:

Activities and issues that need to be taken into account across the
development cycle such as

documentation & standards, feasibility, user
participation, communication, client
-
consultant relationship, documentation
and standards, quality management, project management, risk analysis,
configuration management.


INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Bennett, S. & McRobb, S. (2005) Object Oriented Systems Analysis and
Design using UML. McGraw Hill ISBN: 0077110005


Valacich, J. S. & George, J. F. (
2005)

Essentials of Systems Analysis &
Design

(3
rd

Edition).


Prentice Hall. ISBN: 0131854623 (Linked to website


see below).


Kendall, K. E. & Kendall, J. E. (
2004)
Systems Analysis and Design (6
th

Edition),


Prentice Hall ISBN: 013127323x (Linked to website


see below).


Whitten, J.
L. & Bentley, L. D. (2005) Systems Analysis and Design Methods (7
th

Edition). McGraw
-
Hill


Post, G. V. & Anderson, D. L. (2005) Management Information Systems: solving
business problems with information technology (4
th

Edition). McGraw Hill.


Waters, C.

D. J. (2001) Operations Management: Producing Goods and
Services (2
nd

Edition). Financial Times Prentice Hall.


Ayres, R. (2001) The Essence of Professional Issues in Computing with
Communication Skills. Prentice
-
Hall.


Spinello, R. A. (2002) Case Studi
es in Information and Computer Ethics and
Policy (2
nd

Edition). Prentice
-
Hall.


Journal of Applied Systems Analysis.
-

Lancaster : University of Lancaster.
-

0308
-
9541


Maxey, J., Rowlands, D. George, M. L. & Upton, M., (2005) The Lean Six
Sigma


Pocket

Toolbook: A Quick Reference Guide to 70 Tools for Improving Quality
and Speed.

McGraw Hill. ISBN: 0071441190


Womack, J. P. & Jones, D. T. (2005) Lean Solutions: How Companies and
Customers Can Create Value and Wealth Together. Free Press. ISBN:
074327778
3


WEB BASED RESOURCES


The following websites will be used as supplementary material and activities:


http://cw.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/valacich/

http://www.prenhall.com/kendall/

http://www.leanstrategies.com/basicblocks.htm

British Computer Society for Codes of Conduct Codes of Practice etc:

http://www.bcs.org.uk/index.html

Association for Computing Machinery for ACM Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct etc:

http://www.acm.org/constitution/code.html




Unit Title:



WEB DEVELOPMENT


Level:



C

Credit Value:



20


ECTS Credit Value:



10




PRE
-
REQUISITE & CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Programming


AIMS


To develop a critical view of information presented on the World Wide Web.
To introduce and promote confidence in the use of commercial web
design
programs and evaluate the use of graphics and multimedia and evolving web
technologies


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

A
ppreciate the complexity of the Web


2.

D
emonstrate an understanding of
the principles of good web site and
web page design


3.

D
esign and construct effective web sites using graphics, multimedia and
sound


4.

E
valuate available scripting languages


5.

U
nderstand the opportunities afforded by new web technologies


LEARNING AND TEACHING

METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development

This unit presents the principles of good web design in the context of evolving
web standards and the practical application of these principles through
appropriate software tools. The unit
focuses mainly on client
-
side
technologies.


Indicative Styles

The unit will be presented to students using lectures and seminar sessions
using worked examples and case studies. Students will examine and evaluate
existing web material and create their own.



Feedback on progress

In addition to feedback for completed assignments, feedback will be provided
on formative tasks and case studies.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Learning Outcomes 1, 2 and 3

The material covered in these Learning Outcomes will be assessed by

the
completion of an individual web based assignment.

Learning Outcomes 4 and 5

The material covered in these Learning Outcomes will be assessed by an
individual 1500 word report.

Weighting

The weighting of assessments will be 50:50.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


An Overview of the World Wide Web

Internet, history of the World Wide Web, HTTP, HTML, Web Servers and Web
Browsers (Clients)

URLs and web
-
applications. Browser plug
-
ins, Applets. Semantic Web and
Web 2.0 concepts.


HTML

HTML standards, Document structure,

Text, Hyperlinks, Images.

Tables, Frames, Forms and simple CGI Server
-
side scripts,

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), separating document style from structure.

Web design, usability, accessibility and legal issues

HTML editing and validation tools

Uploading web content (FTP and WebDav), File (MIME) types


Web Graphics

Colour, the Web Palette.


graphic file formats GIF, JPEG, PNG, Animated graphics

creating and editing graphic files

placing and aligning imagery

mapping an image



Multimedia and
Sound on the Web

audio file formats and compression

video file formats and compression

including sound and video on web pages

Flash, Shockwave, Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), Synchronised
Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL)


Client
-
Side Scripting

JavaS
cript, JScript and ECMAScript

VBScript and Active X

Java Applets

adding executable content

adding web functionality to Visual Basic Applications


XML & XHTML

Document Type Definition (DTD). Well
-
formed XML. XHTML

Examples of XML such as: SMIL, SVG, Mathematical Markup Language
(MathML) Wireless Markup Language (WML) Chemical Markup Language
(CML) Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP).



INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Niederst, J. (2006) Web Des
ign in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference (3
rd

Edition). O’Reilly


McFarland, D. (2004) Dreamweaver 8: the Missing Manual. O’Reilly


Page, K. A. (2003) Macromedia Dreamweaver MX2004: Training from the
Source( 3
rd

Edition). Macromedia


Williamson, H., &

Epstein, B. (2002) Dreamweaver in a Nutshell: A Desktop
Quick Reference. O’Reilly


Neilson, J. (1998) Designing Web usability: The Practice of Simplicity. New
Riders Publishing


Lie, H. W. & Bos, B (2005) Cascading Style Sheets: Designing for the Web
(3
rd

Edition) Addison
-
Wesley


WEB BASED RESOURCES

World Wide Web Consortium
http://www.w3c.org

Adobe (Macromedia)
http://www.adobe.com

Internet Explorer
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie

Mozilla & FireFox
http://www.mozilla.org

Opera
http://www.opera.com

The Web Developer’s Resour
ce
http://www.webmonkey.com

Matt’s Script Archive
http://www.scriptarchive.com

VisiBone
http://www.visibone.com

Web Accessibility Initiative
http://www.w3.org/WAI/


Unit Title:



INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES


Level:



C

Credit Value:



20


ECTS Credit Value:



10




PRE
-
REQUISITE & CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Web Development


AIMS


To
develop the students’ knowledge of a number of current Web industry
techniques. Further, to explore and investigate the use of web technologies
and their applications


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to
:


1.

Demonstrate an understanding of a number of recent Web technologies

2.

Appreciate the power of Web technologies and development tools

3.

Competently use Web technologies

4.

Integrate applications with the Web.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Knowledge and understanding are acquired through a mixture of formal
lectures and seminars, computer networked practical areas, laboratory
experiments, student
-
led seminars, work
-
related exercises and other directed
independent learning activities augmente
d by the utilisation of available
software tools and virtual learning environment (VLE) so students have the
opportunity to consolidate work by self
-
tuition.


Problem solving skills are further developed using a range of appropriate ‘real’
and ‘theoretica
l’ case studies together with problem
-
based and task
-
based
learning scenarios




System Week / Final assessment

Following the examinations in the summer term, students typically engage in a
one week exercise, carried out in teams, known as the System Week. They
build a system to solve a business problem, which is an integrative piece of
work, involving aspects of t
he different units of the course. There are no
lectures, or seminars. Staff supervise the week. The exercise is deliberately
challenging, drawing upon a small number of issues that arise at Level I, and
stimulating their interest in the year ahead. The

result is an individual Systems
Week mark derived from a Group mark moderated to reflect individual
contribution.


Where the Systems Week is not practicable, e.g. for part
-
time students, a similar
integrative assignment is undertaken towards the end of te
rm over a longer time
frame.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


The Lecture
-
Seminar Series results in a portfolio of work. It comprises a number
of equally weighted items:




ILOs 1
-
3, are assessed
by the completion of a group web based
assignment

and team reports.



ILO 4
is assessed by system week (or equivalent final assessment)


Weighting

The unit is 100% assessed on course
-
work.


The three elements of assessment are weighted as follows

Practical: 50%

Group Report: 25%

Final Assignment/Systems Week Mark: 25%


INDICATIV
E CONTENT


Web Graphics & Animation

Flash, Shockwave, Scaleable Vector Graphics, SVG, Authoring/Editing Tools,
Pendraw


Multimedia

Audio file formats and compression

Video File formats and compression

Synchronised Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL)

Aut
horing/Editing Tools, Integrating multimedia in web pages


The Semantic Web, XML

XML, Well
-
formed and Valid XML, XSL XSLT XSL
-
FO, XPath, XQuery, XLink,
XPointer, Document

Type Definition DTD, XML DOM, XForms, RDF, RSS, GIS

Specialist markup

languages VRML, X3D, MathML, Wireless Markup
Language WML.


Editing and Manipulating XML data.

Office tools, XML editors/parsers, Macros, specialist tools.


Web Services Platform

SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol)

UDDI (Universal Description, Discover
y and Integration)

WSDL (Web Services Description Language)


Vocational
-
context. Web building


Web W3C, Web Browsers, Quality of Service, Semantic Web, Web Careers,
Web Hosting, Web Certification


INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Erl,

T. (2005) Service
-
Oriented Architecture: Concepts, Technology, and
Design.



Erl, T. (2005) Service
-
oriented Architecture: A Field Guide to Integrating XML
and Web Services.


Harold, E. R. & Means, W.S (2004) XML in a Nutshell (3
rd

Edition) O’Reilly.


Ni
ederst, J. (2006) Web Design in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference (3
rd

Edition). O’Reilly.


Curbera, F.
et al
. (2005) Web Services Platform Architecture: SOAP, WSDL,
WS
-
Policy, WS
-
Addressing, WS
-
Bpel, WS
-
Reliable Messaging and More


WEB BASED RESOURCES


World Wide Web Consortium
http://www.w3c.org

W3 schools
http://www.w3schools.com

The Web Developer’s Resource
http://www.webmonkey.com

Ma
tt’s Script Archive
http://www.scriptarchive.com

VisiBone
http://www.visibone.com

O’Reilly XML.com
http://www.xml.com

FdSc

Computing and Internet Technology FULL
-
TIME YEAR
2


UNIT DIRECTORY


Unit Title:


WORK BASED PROJECT


Level
;



I


Credit Value:



20



ECTS
Credit Value:



10




PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


This unit is the final integrative unit and thus
provides students with the
opportunity to draw upon and combine the skills and knowledge developed in
other units of the course, as appropriate, in order to provide a solution to the
business problem undertaken as their project
.

It consequently enables
stu
dents to enhance their employability and demonstrate this to prospective
employers as evidenced by the outcomes of their project


AIMS


1.

To provide a learning experience that enables students to integrate,
apply and evaluate skills and knowledge from all
parts of the course and
work in a ‘real
-
world’ environment.


2.


To provide the experience of defining and analysing real business
problems through direct links with local industry.


3.

To provide the experience of solving real business problems through
project management in an industry context and to encourage self
motivation through liaison with a local company employees
.



4.

To provide a systematic approach, from problem identification t
o the
proposals of appropriate courses of action for a specific area to meet
the needs of a local industrial project.


5.

To develop the student's technical, documentation and presentation
skills.



INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of this unit the stud
ent will be is expected to:


1.

Apply knowledge and skills from different parts of the course in an
integrative manner in the solution of a real business problem.


2.

Use acquired consultancy skills, liaison skills and problem solving skills
to achieve an approp
riate understanding of a real business problem in
the context of local industry and to present one or a range of possible
solutions.

3.

Create and maintain appropriate project documentation.


4.

Make a Project presentation.


5.

Perform a quality assurance review of

a project.


TEACHING AND LEARNIN
G


The overarching aim of the course is to prepare the students to begin a
career in the field of commercial or business computing. It provides the
opportunity to develop skills in several key areas, both business and
tech
nical. If these skills are to be effectively deployed the student must be
given the opportunity to practice their use in an integrative manner to solve
business problems. The students are given an opportunity to practice these
skills in a safe environment
as a culmination of their level C work in the
Systems Week.


This unit provides the vehicle by which students are encouraged and enabled
to further develop their skills in a real life environment. Specifically it


1.

Enables the student to apply skills
taught during the course to a real
-
life
problem


2.

Gives the student the opportunity to integrate these skills to develop a
solution for their clients problem to an agreed brief


3.

Is carried out in a real
-
life, live, environment which provides the valuable
wo
rk experience which is a vital element of the course.


The project thus provides work
-
experience in a manner which can be
carefully monitored and in which the student can be encouraged to reflect on
their management and conduct of the project undertaken.


CONTROL OF PROJECTS


Staff closely monitor

the project
-
teams and their progress throughout the
year, with an individual project supervisor responsible for monitoring each
team's progress. The project manager is responsible for overall control and
co
-
ordination of all projects. The project manager
will ensure that students
are aware of the format, standards and deadlines for the project. They also
act as a moderator in ensuring even standards of assessment.


In order to assure the quality of the project work undertaken each team is
required to prod
uce, in addition to the documents required at the end of the
project,


1.

the terms of reference for the project, which must be signed by a
representative of the host organisation, the project supervisor and the
group members


2.

an interim report


3.

a log of all

the activities and meetings undertaken by the project team


Further, each project group is required to complete a control sheet for their
project supervisor indicating the tasks undertaken since the last meeting with
the supervisor and the tasks to be un
dertaken before the next meeting. The
supervisor must sign this control sheet.


ASSESSMENT



Each project team is required to produce:


1.

An interim report (including terms of reference) or staged viva (ILOs
1&2)

30%


2.

Final report, log of all meetings and communications and
a
n oral
presentation (ILO’s 1,3,4)

70%




The oral presentation consists of a formal talk/discussion given by the whole
team in the presence of the project manager, project supervisor.
Representativ
es from the local industry/host company will also be invited to
the presentation. All members of the audience are encouraged to address
questions to individual members of the project team.


The project team members will be assessed under the following head
ings:


1.

Technical Merit


2.

Management of the project


3.

Individual development of the student


4.

Documentation standard


5.

Standard of oral presentation


6.

User satisfaction


PROJECT SELECTION


Over past years the programme has attracted very many live projects from
local industry. The organisations range in size from small businesses
employing under ten people to large multinational companies employing
many thousands of people. The organisations

are drawn from both the public
and private sectors and include both service and manufacturing industries.
The projects are carefully selected to require some 100
-
120 hours of the
group's time.


Projects are chosen by the students from the range of 'live'
projects on offer
at that time from local companies and with the guidance of the project
manager. The projects may be in a specific area of Business Information
Technology or be inter
-
disciplinary.



At the start of Level I students are grouped into

project teams (typically 1
-
4
students, depending on the nature of the project) and each team is then
responsible for the successful completion of their chosen project.


One particular area of difference between projects relates to the required
end
-
produc
t. Depending on the complexity of the problem, students are
usually required to produce a working system.


Unit Title:



NETWORK DESIGN

Level :

I

Credit Value:

20


ECTS
Credit Value:

10




PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Computer Systems,
Programming 1


AIMS


The aim is to examine the goals and design of computer communications
networks and the models developed to aid the understanding of these networks.
The concepts and practices of computer networks will be introduced to provide a
framew
ork for consideration of communication, traffic and security aspects and
the technologies available. To examine the opportunities and problems opened
up by such technologies.



INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to

be able to:


1.

Understand the functions of the principal components of computer
networks.


2.

Understand the concepts of protocol and layering, and apply them to
networks.


3.

Design and carry out performance and behaviour experiments on
computer networks.


4.

Compare and contrast alternative solutions of structured cabling.


5.

Understand class
-
based network addressing and subnetworks.


6.

Understand the principles of encryption as applied to computer
networks.


7.

Design a computer network that links to the Internet.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Lectures are used to present subject topics and perspectives. Learners work
through a series of experiments in computer laboratories. They are given a
practical framework guidance and take responsibility for the content of
their
reports and level of analysis. Laboratory experiments are used for learners to
work through experiments and exercises on networking equipment to reinforce
their theoretical understanding. Learners use formative assessment tasks to
provide immediat
e feedback to the learner.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


ILOs 1 through 6

All of these Intended Learning Outcomes are assessed through an examination.
At this level, the learner is expected broadly to be able to demonstrate an
understanding over a multiplicity of

individual short questions which may be
based on scenarios from industrial or commercial environments and require
them to choose correct explanations or descriptions.


ILOs 1 through 6 are assessed through in
-
course, individual reports in
laboratory note
books.


ILO 7 is assessed through an in
-
course assignment.


Weighting

The weighting of in
-
course assessment, to final assessment is 50:50. Within the
coursework, the weighting of design assignment to laboratory notebooks is
40:10.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


This unit utilizes two lectures per week.


Network technology:

Ethernet technology and performance, other LAN technologies. Monitoring
Network traffic. How operating systems use LAN connections. Networked file
systems: NFS, SAMBA.


Internetworking:

Basic protocols, IP, TCP and UDP. Architecture of IP, its functioning and
characteristics. Packet structure, congestion control, associated protocols such
as ARP, BOOTP, DHCP. Architecture of TCP, its functioning and
characteristics. Connections, slidi
ng window, error
-
checking. Flow control,
congestion control. TCP as a software multiplexer. UDP, its purposes and
architecture and characteristics. Classful networks, subnetworks, IP addressing
and their purposes.


Higher Level Protocols:

HTTP and FTP.

Server architectures, browser architectures.


Security:

Principles of security. Threats, attacks, counter
-
measures. Models for security.
Encryption, symmetric and asymmetric, modulus arithmetic and public key
systems. Digital signatures and certifi
cates. Secure Sockets Layer and
Transaction Layer Security.


Management:

Tools for monitoring and managing networks, security risks and responsibilities
of IT managers.


INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Cisco Networking Academy

Program First
-
Year Companion Guide (2002)


Tanenbaum, A. S. (2005) Computer Networks.
Prentice
-
Hall International


Spurgeon, C. E. (2000) Ethernet The Definitive Guide. O’Reilly


Comer, D. (2003) Computer Networks and Internets (4
th

Edition). Prentice
-
H
all.


Comer, D. (2005) Internetworking with TCP/IP, Vol 1, 4
th

Ed. Prentice
-
Hall.


Stern, H. (2001) Managing NFS and NIS (2
nd

Edition). O'Reilly.


Rescorla, E. (2001) SSL and TLS. Addison
-
Wesley.


Spinello, R.A., (2002) Case

Studies in Information and Computer Ethics and
Policy (2
nd

Edition). Prentice
-
Hall.


WEB BASED RESOURCES

http://www.netbook.cs.purdue.edu

http://www.bcs.org
.uk/index.html

http://www.anixter.com

http://www.ieee.org


Unit Title:



PROGRAMMING 2

Level :

I

Credit Value:

20


ECTS
Credit Value:

10



PRE
-
REQUISITE AND CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Programming1, Systems1, Systems 2


AIMS


The aim of this unit is to build on Level C Programming1 and examine Object
Oriented concepts covering design, programming and testing. More complex
applications will be developed exploring database connectivity, GUI and web
interfaces. The unit will als
o consider a number of programming languages
and asses their benefits in differing contexts.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the syntax of a single object
o
riented programming language


2.

Demonstrate an awareness of other programming languages


3.

Design an algorithm for a given problem scenario, including connecting
to a database and interface design


4.

Design an object model for a given algorithm


5.

Implement a
programme corresponding to a given implementation object
model


6.

Develop and apply a relevant testing strategy to a given programme.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development

The context of this unit is Object Orien
ted programming constructs
demonstrated through use of an object oriented programming language and
object design.


This unit builds upon the basic programming constructs introduced in
Programming1, and refocuses the constructs into an Object Oriented
parad
igm. Learners will, using increasingly complex scenarios, design, build
and test programs. Learners will be encouraged to become more self
supporting in this process, using on
-
line documentation as an independent
resource to explore the practice of Objec
t Oriented coding.


Indicative Style



This unit utilised two seminars per week.




Both the lectures and seminars will present increasingly complex problems
and explore the possible resolutions through design and coding.




Learners will explore the concept of

‘design as a vehicle for
communication’ by developing an algorithm and passing it to others to
code.




Learners will build and comment programmes which will be used by the
whole seminar group, so reinforcing the lecture topics of re
-
usability and
code docu
mentation.


Each learner will be expected to complete a number of seminar tasks each
week, learners will be able to monitor their own progress against successful
completion of these tasks. A number of these tasks will be submitted as a
formal assessment.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Intended Learning Outcome 1:

In order to assess the level of understanding of Object Oriented coding
concepts and the extent to which students can apply these concepts a
number of seminar tasks will be requested for formal assessment. The
emphasis here being on practice which can be

more easily quantified in a
coding assessment as opposed to an exam.


Intended Learning Outcome 3, 4, 5 and 6

Learners will be given a scenario for which they have to design and build an
application and then test the resulting solution. The emphasis is o
n the
process of Object Oriented design and its relationship to the building process.


Intended Learning Outcome 2 through 6:

The conceptual elements of the majority of the learning outcomes can be
assessed through written work and will be assessed in an

exam. Whilst
fragments of code can be requested to illustrate a concept, it is unlikely that
learning outcome 1 would be covered in such an assessment.


Weighting

The weighting of the in
-
course assessment to final assessment is 50:50.
Within the coursew
ork, the weighting of the scenario assessment to the
seminar task assessment is 30:20.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


Object Oriented Concepts

Classes, objects and object interaction, Encapsulation, Inheritance,
Polymorphism


Code design

OO techniques such as class
diagrams, pseudo code, refact
oring,
ownership
and copying of code, maintainability and documentation


Testing strategies

Developing test plans, executing test plans, producing test data sets, different
testing strategies


Error Handling

Dealing with except
ions, communicating errors to users


Database connectivity

Database connection protocols (e.g. ODBC, JDBC), executing queries,
handling results, performance issues


HCI

Element of good interface design, usability principles


Information Systems and Web
development

Interface design, event handling, web interaction protocols, remote objects,
client and server side programming, data processing

INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Horstmann, C. & Cornell, G. (2004) Core Java 2 Vol 1: Fundame
ntals (7
th

Edition), Sun Microsystems


Horstmann, C. & Cornell, G. (2005) Core Java 2 Vol 11: Advanced Features,
Sun Microsystems


Lewis, J. & Loftus, W. (2006)
-

Java Software Solutions: Foundations of
Program Design, 5th Edition
, Addison
-
Wesley.


Fowler, M. (2000) Refactoring. Addison Wesley


Fowler, M. (2004) UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Standard Object
Modeling Language. Addison Wesley


Forester, T and Morrison, P (1995) Computer Ethics: Cautionary Tails and
Ethical Dilemmas in Computing
(2
nd

Edition) MIT Press, Cambridge, MA


Barnes, D.J. and Kölling, M. (2006) Objects First with Java: A Practical
Introduction using BlueJ (3
rd

Edition) Prentice Hall.


WEB BASED RESOURCES

http://java.sun.com/

http://java.sun.com/j2se/javadoc/

http://www.extremeprogramming.org/

http://www.bluej.org

http://greenfoot.org





Unit Title:



SYSTEMS 2

Level :

I

Credit Value:

20


ECTS
Credit Value:

10




PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Systems 1


AIMS


To provide a framework and apply techniques for the object oriented analysis
and

design of systems for business process improvement. Additionally to
explore the problems associated with traditional systems development and
examine other approaches and frameworks. This involves a) examining
different development environments including
CASE tools and prototyping,
and b)
development of different computer system architectures, which provide
business improvements for operational and management information.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit, the student will be able to:


1.

U
nderstand and evaluate the various concepts and techniques of Object
Oriented Analysis (OOA) and Object Oriented design (OOD).


2.

Apply Object Oriented Analysis and Design techniques to a given
business information context.


3.

Utilise both an object oriented C
ASE tool and prototyping in the systems
development process.


4.

Select a methodology to suit a given environment and process.


5.

Criticise a given systems development process in terms of its
management and methods.


6.

Design computer system architectures and hum
an computer interfaces,
which provide business improvements for scenarios with complex
interactions between departments and integrated processing needs
.


7.

Discern similarities between sub
-
systems and application components
utilising ideas of standard framew
orks, components, design patterns.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development

The context of the unit is the activities of a small to medium business enterprise,
and its interactions with other businesses.


In terms of the Computing subject benchmark, the unit brings together material
from (i) Computer Based Systems, (ii) Information Systems and (iii) Systems
Analysis and Design.


During the first term learners are presented with the concepts and modelling
te
chniques of object oriented analysis and design. They apply the modelling
techniques to analyse
and

communicate business tasks which require
interaction between business departments and /or external agents. The nature
of business data and information flo
ws needed to support business processes
are examined through the use of example prototype systems on a personal
computer network. Different styles of object oriented graphical representations
are explored as integrated vehicles for understanding, design a
nd
communication.


They study the detailed activities of the computer systems development cycle,
building on the simple model presented in the first year unit Systems 1, to
develop an understanding of the structure, processes, and techniques of
several di
fferent development methods. They examine the process of
identifying and assessing the suitability of different systems development
methods in a

given project environment.


Indicative Styles



This unit utilises two seminars per week.




Learners use differ
ent types of object oriented graphical representations to
understand, record, design and communicate business information
processing and business process improvements.




They examine a series of computer based information systems running on
personal compu
ters, which allows them to apply the conceptual knowledge
and principles developed in the lectures.




Learners participate in discussions which examine the information
requirements to support business processes and the design of computer
-
based systems to p
rovide and present the information across departments
and between the business and external agents.




They experience development of the design of a system, using a subset of
object oriented techniques, focusing on the identification of process
improvement
and the use of information and systems to provide the
improvement.




Learners take part in discussions which examine and compare the work
breakdown structure, processes and techniques of a selection of systems
development methodologies to manage the develop
ment of computer
-
based
systems. They explore the benefits, drawbacks and suitability of systems
development methodologies within particular project contexts.




Feedback on Progress:

Feedback plays an important part in the development of learner ability in

this
unit. Each student is expected to keep a file of the exercises and discussions
and to make these available in class when requested. Feedback is provided
on a) the quality of the document, b) quality of thought/analysis, c) ability to
model business
processes using object
-
oriented concepts and techniques,
and d) level of understanding of the topic.


ASSESSMENT METHODS


Assessment: Intended Learning Outcome 2, 5 and 6:

Students participate in class exercises and discussions of business design
activities, where they have, for example, to model existing business activities,
system requirements and identify process improvements. In the following week,
a few of them present their ideas to the class. Students do not know which of
them will be aske
d to present, and they are randomly selected over repeating
cycles. All cycles are marked. The marks from two cycles are made formal.
Students are not told which cycles are which. The presentations adopt a formal
style, and use a variety of visual aids.


Assessment: Intended Learning Outcomes 1 through 7:

These will be assessed through examination. The examination will be partly
based on a case study.


Assessment: Intended Learning Outcome 1 through 3:

Student will carry this out as a formative group as
signment. The extended time
of the assignment vehicle provides scope for their design and development
thinking. Students will work as a team, keeping an individual log and
participating in an element which is peer assessed.


Assessment: Weighting

The w
eighting of in
-
course assessment, to final assessment is 50:50. The
weighting of presentations to assignment will be 20:30.


INDICATIVE CONTENT


Object oriented concepts and techniques:

Object oriented concepts such as

classes, inheritance, encapsulation

and
polymorphism, issues on reuse.

Object oriented modelling techniques such as a selection of those from the
Un
ified Modelling Language (UML)
e.g. Class diagrams, Use Case Diagrams,
Object interaction diagrams, Collaboration Diagrams, State Transition di
agrams
etc.


CASE software:

Drawing, data dictionary and reporting facilities for object oriented techniques
and methods.


Managing with Data:

Presentation of data to provide operational and management information in an
inter
-
departmental/inter
-
business context. Creating reports and screens from
sorted and selected data. Defining measurements for different businesses, or
sub
-
components of businesses.


Systems Requirements and Design:

Systems architecture,
human computer

interface and input
-
output design for
complex interactions and integrated processing needs.

The need to comply
with relevant legislation, regulations and standards requirements when
designing and building computer
-
based systems.


Development Methods:

The different activities in a selection of systems development methods:
structure, philosophy, objectives, scope, techniques and their interaction within
the different phases or iterations. The needs for professional good practice at
every phase and in eac
h role.


Modelling the systems/software development process: overview of modelling
techniques from methodologies such as Object
-
Oriented Analysis
and

Design
e.g. Unified Process with UML, structured systems methodologies e.g.
SSADM, Soft Systems Methodolo
gies e.g. SSM; prototyping approaches such
as the Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM).


Introduction to the evaluation & selection of development methodologies using
approaches such as feature and contingency analysis. Need for professional
standards

& conduct in undertaking studies and providing recommendations.


Project Management
-

the dependency of project planning on methodology
work breakdown and structure.


Overview of Design patterns, components and frameworks: similarities
between subsystems
, re
-
use of business/application components at different
levels.


INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED

-

MAIN TEXTS


Bennett S., & McRobb S. (2005). Object Oriented Systems Analysis and
Design using UML (3
rd

Edition). McGraw Hill.

ISBN: 0077110005.


Bell, S. & Wood
-
Harper, A. (1998). Rapid Information Systems Development:
a non
-
specialist’s guide to Analysis and design in an imperfect world. McGraw
Hill.


Post, G. V. & Anderson, D.L. (2005) Management Information Systems: solving
business problems with information technology (4
th

Edition). McGraw Hill.


Spinello, R. A. (2002). Case Studies in Information and Computer Ethics and
Policy. (2
nd

Edition) Prentice
-
Hall.


Schwaber, K. (2004). Agile Project Management with SCRUM. Micro
soft Press.
ISBN: 073561993X


ADDITIONAL TEXTS


Priestley, M. (2003) Practical Object

Oriented Design with UML (2
nd

Edition).
McGraw Hill.


Quatrani T., (2002) Visual Modelling with Rational ROSE 2002 and UML.(3
rd

Edition) Addison Wesley.


Pilone, D.
& Pitman, N. (2005) UML 2.0 in a Nutshell. O’Reilly.



Kruchten, P. ( 2003) The Rational Unified Process: an introduction. (3
rd

Edition) Addison Wesley


Stapleton, J. (2002)
DSDM, Business Focused Development (2
nd

Edition)
Addison Wesley


Bainbridge, I.

(1999) Software Licensing (2
nd

Edtion) CLT Professional


Bainbridge, I. (2004) Introduction to Computer Law (5
th

Edition). Longman


Schneier, B. (2004) Secrets and Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World.
Wiley


Spinello
, R. A. (1997) Case Studies in Information and Computer Ethics.
Prentice
-
Hall. Already listed in this section. See Above


Journal of Applied Systems Analysis.
-

Lancaster: University of Lancaster.
-

0308
-
9541



WEB BASED RESOURCES


The following indicat
ive websites will be used as supplementary material and
activities:



1. The Rational site:


http://www.rational.com

http://www.rational.com/leadership/index.jsp

http://www.rational.com/products/whitepapers/334.jsp


2. Rational Edge magazine (from Rational):


http://www.therationaledge.com/


3. Systems Developer magazine:


http://www.sdmagazine.com/articles/


4. DSDM organisation:


http://www.dsdm.org/



5. SSADM international user group:


http://www.cscs.wmin.ac.uk/~ssadm/main.html


6. British Computer Society for Codes of Conduct Codes of

Practice etc:

http://www.bcs.org.uk/index.html


7. Association for Computing Machinery for ACM Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct etc:

http://www.acm.org/constitution/code.html



http://www.agile.org


http://www.agilemanagement.net




Unit Title:



INTERNET APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT

Level :

I

Credit Value:

20


ECTS
Credit
Value:

10




PRE
-
REQUISITE and CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Web Development, Database Systems 1 and Programming 1


AIMS


To develop a critical understanding of a range web
-
server technologies
together with practical experience of their installation and
configuration. Use
of server
-
side processing and scripting languages to code dynamic internet
applications and interact with web
-
based database systems.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of this unit the learner is expected to be able to:


1.

Select, in
stall, and configure a range of appropriate web
-
server
technologies for hosting internet applications.


2.

Demonstrate an ability to use server
-
side processing for coding dynamic
web
-
applications and interacting with database servers.


3.

Compare server
-
side pro
cessing abilities used in ILO 2 above.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development

This unit extends the learners experience gained in the E
-
Commerce unit to
evaluating and using to a range of proprietary and open
-
so
urce server
-
side
technologies for developing Internet Applications.


Indicative Styles

This unit will be presented through lectures and workshops using exemplar
materials and case studies. It will use a mixture of individual and group work.


Feedback on
progress

In addition to formal feedback for completed assignments, feedback will be
provided for formative tasks and case studies. Group work will involve both
formal and informal peer feedback and evaluation. Informal feedback from
lecturers will be provi
ded during assignment work involving the development
of an e
-
commerce system.




ASSESSMENT


Learning Outcome 1

This is assessed by a group practical and evaluation report.


Learning Outcome 2

This is assessed by an individual practical.


Learning Outcome
3

This is assessed by an individual 1500 word report.


Weighting

The weighting of assessments is equal.



INDICATIVE CONTENT


Webserver technologies

History and comparison of webserver technology, Microsoft IIS and Apache
as most widely used webservers. Cr
oss
-
platform and cross
-
technology
interoperability


Microsoft IIS

Windows, ISAPI,

ASP with scripting languages, focusing on VBScript and JavaScript.

interaction with databases (Access, SQL Server) via ODBC, ADO OLE/DB


Apache

UNIX/Linux and Windows, CGI

Java, PHP and Perl for server
-
side scripting.

interaction with databases (Oracle, MySQL, PostgreSQL) via SQL and ODBC

LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL PHP) and WAMP((Windows, Apache, MySQL
PHP) platforms


ZOPE

The ZOPE web application framework: Web server, Web
-
based interface,
object database, relational database integration, scripting language support.

Zope objects, dynamic content (DTML), building applications, users &
security, searching and categorising content, relational database connectivity.


INDICATIVE
KEY LEARNING RESOURCES


LITERATURE BASED


Guelich, S. Gundavaram, S. & Birznieks, G. (2000) CGI programming with
Perl. O’Reilly & Associates


DuBois, P. (2005) MySQL (3rd Edition) Developer’s Library


Pelletier, M & Latteier, A (2001) The Zope Book. New R
iders






WEB RESOURCES


http://www.microsoft.com


http://www.apache.org


http://www.perl.com


http://www.php.net


http://www.mysql.org


http://www.nusphere.com



http://www.zope.org


http://java.su
n.com





Unit Title:



HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

Level :

I

Credit Value:

20


ECTS
Credit Value:

10




PRE
-
REQUISITE & CO
-
REQUISITE UNITS


Work
-
based Project


AIMS


To inform the learner of the major issues in HCI and provide a critical
understanding of the psychological knowledge of relevance to HCI. The tools
and techniques available to analyse, design and evaluate user
-
centred web
-
based systems will be considered.


INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the end of the unit the learner is expec
ted to be able to:


1.

A
pply underlying concepts of HCI into the stages of systems
development.


2.

Apply concepts of HCI to the design and implementation of useable and
accessible Graphical User Interfaces, including web
-
based interfaces.


3.

Communicate
an understanding of how recent developments in HCI
technology are impacting evolving interface design.


4.

Communicate an understanding of the contribution of psychology to HCI.


LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS


Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational
Development

This unit deals with aspects of the Human Computer Interface using a variety
of research based and practical deign approaches.


Indicative Styles

In this unit the material will be presented in a mixture of lectures and
seminars. These will use exemplar and case
-
study material. Students will
follow a list of directed topics and will be required to conduct supporting
research and preparation. Where ap
propriate, these will be related to topics
and scenarios developed in other Computing and Internet Technology units,
particularly Programming 2, Internet Application Development and the Project.


Feedback on progress

In addition to formal feedback on compl
eted assignments, feedback is
provided for formative problems and case studies.