PGCE Computer Guide 2013-14 - Anglia Ruskin University

peanutunderwearΛογισμικό & κατασκευή λογ/κού

7 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

49 εμφανίσεις


1


Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education


Secondary PGCE

Com
puter Science with ICT
subject guide








Department of Education




















Academic Year: 2013/14



Contents


Key Information…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2

PGCE Secondary Course Calendar
………………………………………………………………………………….3

Introduction to the course
…………………………………………………………………………………………….5

Outline Delivery………………………………………………………………………………………………………
…..7

Course Assignments……………………………………………………………………………………………………12

Learning Resources………………………….………………………………………………………………………….16



2

1. Key Information


Course title:



Secondary PGCE
Computer
Science with
ICT





Head of Department:

Dr
Debra Scarsbrook



SAW
219



0845 196 3520






debra.scarsbrook@anglia.ac.uk


Deputy Head of Department:

Alison Feist



SAW222



0845 196 3589



alison.feist@anglia.ac.uk



Course Group Leader:


Dr Philip Howlett

SAW221

0845

196 3612

philip.howlett@anglia.ac.uk



PGCE Course Leader:


Peter Cook






SAW 205






0845 196 3612









Philip.Howlett@anglia.ac.uk



Computer
Science

Subject

Tutor
:

Tarisai Chikomba

SAW 205






0845 196 3519









tarisai.chikomba
@anglia.ac.uk



Learning Technologist:

Mark Miller


SAW 208


0845 196 3553


Mark.miller@anglia.ac.uk



Administration Team:



Education Administration Office

SAW 201

educationadmin@anglia.ac.uk







0845 196 3615


Partnership Team:




Education Administration Office

SA
W 201

partnershipadmin@anglia.ac.uk







0845 196 3527

3


PGCE Secondary Course Calendar 2013
-
2014


Week
beginning

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday













09
-
Sep











16
-
Sep











23
-
Sep











30
-
Sep











07
-
Oct











14
-
Oct











21
-
Oct











28
-
Oct











04
-
Nov











11
-
Nov











18
-
Nov











25
-
Nov











02
-
Dec











09
-
Dec











16
-
Dec











23
-
Dec






BH


BH



30
-
Dec






BH





06
-
Jan











13
-
Jan











20
-
Jan











27
-
Jan











03
-
Feb











10
-
Feb











17
-
Feb











24
-
Feb











03
-
Mar











10
-
Mar











17
-
Mar











24
-
Mar










31
-
Mar










07
-
Apr











14
-
Apr










BH

21
-
Apr


BH









28
-
Apr











05
-
May

BH









12
-
May











19
-
May











26
-
May

BH









02
-
Jun










09
-
Jun











16
-
Jun




















4 day primary school placement





1 day v
isit to School B






4 day alternative placement






University workshops and assignments





School Experience






Holiday/non
-
teaching time



4



Every module has a

Module Definition Form
(MDF) which is the officially validated record of the module
.
You can access the MDF for this module in three ways:




the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)



the My.Anglia Module Catalogue at
www.anglia.ac.uk/modulecatalogue



Anglia Ruskin’s
module search engin
e facility

at

www.anglia.ac.uk/modules


All modules delivered by Anglia Ruskin University at its main campuses in the UK and at partner institutions
throughout the UK and overseas are governed by the
Academi
c Regulations
. You can view these at
www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs
. A printed extract of the
Academic Regulations
, known as the
Assessment
Regulations
, is available for every student from your Faculty

Office

(all new students will have received a
copy as part of their welcome pack).


In the unlikely event of any discrepancy between the
Academic Regulations

and any other publication,
including this module guide,
the Academic Regulations
, as the definiti
ve document, take precedence over
all other publications and will be applied in all cases.


2. Introduction to the
Course

The purpose of this handbook is to provide you with a guide to the university
-
based elements of the course.

You should read this close
ly as it provides you with essential information that you will need for successful
completion of the course. You will however need to read this book in conjunction with the School
Experience Handbook which gives you detailed information about your school p
lacements. When taken
together, these two guides will support your professional learning and development throughout this year.
Although we respond to individual needs as much as we possibly can, these course guides provide a
common starting point for your
continuing professional development throughout this training year.


Computer Science with ICT


Computer Science (CS) in UK schools has been on a roller
-
coaster journey. In the 1990s and early 2000s
computer science and programming slowly vanished from UK
schools, swallowed by the subject
“Information and Communication Technology” (ICT), which focused on the use of technology and software
rather than its creation and the underlying principles of computation. There was less awareness of the
difference betwee
n using a computer and programming a computer, both among the general public and
also among education policy
-
makers.

In the past five years, however, computer science has begun a dramatic resurgence that sees it poised to
become mandatory for pupils in En
gland from age 5 upwards. This turn
-
around has come through a
mixture of pressure from industry and lobbying by interest groups, with the government now apparently
convinced of the wider value of computer science education for all pupils. The argument that

has been
presented is that computing develops useful transferable skills (often referred to as “computational
thinking”) as well as valuable principles for a modern, digital world and thus is of benefit to all students.

Partnership with schools

The
CS/IC
T

PGCE programme is delivered through partnerships between Anglia Ruskin and a wide range of
secondary schools in the local region. You are embarking on a challenging year in which you will learn the
craft of effective classroom practice and develop an in
-
depth appreciation of teaching
CS/ICT

as a national
curriculum subject.



5

The partnership approach to teacher training allows us to draw on a range of expertise and contexts to
support you during this year. You will experience teaching in
CS/ICT
/Computer S
cience

departments in two
schools in the region, and
Tarisai Chikomba

will lead most of the workshops as part of the University
-
based
part of the course. Some university tutors will also visit you in the school placement as part of our
assessment and moder
ation procedures. The experience that individuals in the group gather over the year
in these schools becomes an increasingly valuable source of knowledge and expertise on which we draw as
the course progresses. The Theories, Themes and Issues sessions, whi
ch will mostly run on Friday mornings
in Semester 1, will be taught by members of the secondary PGCE teaching team and experienced visiting
speakers.


The
university
-
based

element of the course, outlined in this handbook, will support you to prepare for an
d
reflect on your practical teaching in schools. It will also help you develop a deeper appreciation of your
subject and the contribution that
CS/ICT

makes to young people’s education. Training as
an

CS/ICT

teacher
provides you with the opportunity to crea
te a learning community, which will inspire and support pupils on
their journey of discovery through
CS/ICT
.


You and the PGCE


Although the content you need to cover in 36 weeks may seem a little daunting, the course is not crammed
with lectures and not
e taking. The Knowledge and Pedagogy and Curriculum and Pedagogy modules are
taught through a variety of teaching methods that require your participation. Trainee presentations, group
work, directed activities outside workshops, site visits, role play, foc
used reflection and sharing experiences
are all essential elements of a successful course and will demonstrate the principles of effective teaching
and learning.


As you progress through the programme you should learn to provide effective learning experie
nces and
progressively reflect more critically on the use of
CS/ICT

in school. You will consider the ways in which the
National Curriculum, your school’s strategies and your methods of delivery portray the nature of
CS/ICT

to
pupils.
Qualified Teacher Stat
us (QTS) will be awarded on the successful completion of all aspects of the
course
.

We appreciate that some of you may well be living a considerable distance from home and that teaching,
especially as a trainee, can be very different to what you may have
experienced previously. As a
consequence of this, we place a great deal of emphasis on pastoral care and support. The subject tutor will
be your first point of contact if you have any problems or difficulties, and he or she will also write your
confidentia
l university reference when you apply for your first teaching post. Additionally, Anglia Ruskin
University has an effective Student Services department that provides a wide range of support and
guidance to trainees. You are actively encouraged to make full

use of these facilities. Claire Tyler is the
Faculty’s Student adviser and she can be found on the second floor of the Sawyers Building in Room
SAW218. She can be contacted on extension 3555 or via email at
claire.tyler@anglia.ac.uk
.


Resources

University based
CS/ICT

sessions will normally be delivered in the
CS/ICT

room

on the
second
floor of
Sawyers Building in room SAW
2
09. This area may be used whenever there is no teaching taking place
, but is
locked
so you will need to obtain a key from reception
. The
computers in the
CS/ICT

suite are

equipped
with
most software

that you are likely to find in your placement secondary schools.



6

3
. Outline Delivery

Week

Week

Beginning

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thurs
day

Friday

1

9 Sep




9
-
4

Welcome and
Introductions



9
-
4

Knowledge
and Pedagogy

9
-
4

Knowledge
and Pedagogy

9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1.30
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

2

16 Sep





Study Day 1

(Tutorials)

Study Day 2

(Tutorials)

9
-
4

Knowledge
and P
edagogy

9
-
4

Knowledge
and Pedagogy

9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

3

23 Sep














9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

4

30 Sep











9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge a
nd
Pedagogy

5

7 Oct











9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

6

14 Oct


















9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

7

21 Oct






9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Ped
agogy

8

28 Oct

Half Term


Tutorials







Tutorials


Planning and
preparation
day


Planning and
preparation
day


Planning and preparation
day

Mentor

session:



Discuss points on induction check
list



Discuss KS2/3 transition



Di
scuss trainee observations

Mentor session:



Review observations of behaviour management
techniques.



Review a lesson plan to discuss differentiation and
extension (observe a lesson).



Trainees to research EAL and SEN policy
and
provision in school / department.

Primary school visit (4 days) to observe key stage 2
teaching, before starting
KS
3 practice.

Mentor session:



Review observations of behaviour management
techniques.



Discu
ss the school’s approach to Assessment for
Learning.



Trainee to meet with professional tutor for viva.




Mentor session:



Discuss departmental policy on SEN and working
with LSAs.



Discuss trainee’s observations of differentiation in
practice.


7

9

4 Nov











9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

10

11 Nov










9
-
12

The
ories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

11

18 Nov











9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

12

25 Nov











9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

13

2 Dec






9
-
12

Theories, Th
emes and
Issues


1
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy

14

9 Dec


Tutorials


Tutorials








9
-
4

Knowledge
and Pedagogy



9
-
4

Knowledge and
Pedagogy


15

16 Dec














16

23 Dec












Mentor session:



Discuss departmental assessment and marking
policy.



Discuss departmental approach to Assessment for
Learning.

Mentor session:



Discuss the school’s policy regarding literacy



Discuss the school’s policy statem
ent on
values/ethos
/safeguarding, etc.

Mentor session:



Devel
op an overview of the KS4 curriculum and
where appropriate, the KS5 curriculum



Review the contribution the department makes to
pupils’ personal development.

Mentor session:



Complete summative report together and agree
targets.

School B Visit

Take SE
report

Mentor session:



Complete summative report together and agre
e
targets (if not already done)



Review PDP and sign off any

evidence against the
St
andards.


8

17

30 Dec








Knowledge and
Pedagogy

Submission Deadline


Ini
tial School Experience
Submission Deadline


18

6 Jan






9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Curriculum and
Pedagogy

19


13 Jan






9
-
4

Theories, Themes and
Issues





20

20 Jan





9
-
12

Theories, Themes and
Issues


1
-
4

Curriculum and
Pedagogy

21

27 Jan













22



3 Feb















23

10 Feb













24

17 Feb

9
-
4

Diversity Day

Tutorials

Tutorials

Planning and
preparation
day


Planning and preparation
day







Mentor

session:



Discuss
targets arising from summative report and
tutorials



Di
scuss departmental policies

Mentor

session:



Di
scuss trainee’s observations



Review a lesson plan to discuss differentiation and
extensi
on



Trainees to research EAL and SEN policy and
provision of school/department

Mentor

session:



Review observations of behaviour management
techniques



Discuss the school’s approach to Assessment

Mentor

session:



Review a lesson plan to discuss formative ass
essment



Discuss departmental assessment and marking policy

Mentor

session:



Review a lesson plan to discuss inclusion



Discuss the school’s policy statement on values/ethos/safeguarding, etc.

Mentor

session:



Trainee to meet with professional tutor for viva


9

25

24 Feb












26


3 Mar













27

10 Mar












28

17 Mar












29

24 Mar












30

31 Mar













31


7 Apr




Tutorials (QSE)


Tutorials (QSE)









32

14 Apr












Mentor

session:



Review trainee’s subject knowledge audit (linked to Curriculum & Pedagogy
assignment)

Mentor

session:



Review tr
ainee’s behaviour management strategies

Mentor

session:



Review trainee’s formative assessment strategies

Mentor

session:



Review trainee’s inclusion strategies

Mentor

session:



Discuss targets arising from university tutorials



Review PDP and sign off any evidence against the Standards


10

33

21 April

Bank Holiday

Curriculum
and Pedagogy

9
-
4

Curriculum
and Pedagogy

9
-
4

Curriculum
and Pedagog
y

9
-
4

Curriculum and
Pedagogy

9
-
4

Theories, Themes and
Issues Submission
Deadline (online)


34

28 April












35


5 May

Bank Holiday











36

12 May






QSE Day

9
-
4


Curriculum and
Pedagogy Submission
Deadline

37

19 May











38

26 Ma
y

Bank Holiday











39


2 Jun






Qualifying School
Experience Day

9
-
4





40

9 Jun













Alternative Placement


Mentor

session:



Complet
e summative report together and agree
targets (if not already done)



Review PDP and sign off any evidence against the
Standards


Mentor

session:

Complete summative report together and agree targets


11

41

16 June

PDP Tutorials






PDP tutorials

NQT Day

9
-
4






NB. Qualifying School Experience Submission Deadline is 27
th

June.



4. Course Assignmen
ts


Semester One

Semester Two

MOD001552

Theories, Themes and Issues

(Level 7

-

30 credits)

MOD001498

Knowledge and Pedagogy

(Level 7

-

15 credits)

MOD001499

Curriculum and Pedagogy

(Level 7

-

15 credits)

MOD001489

Initial School Experience

(Level 6

-

30

credits)

MOD001488

Qualifying School Experience

(Level 6

-

30 credits)

Initial School Experience (
MOD001489)

Submission Date:
Friday 3
rd

January 2014


(for the reflective commentary)



Assessment Information



There are three components to the assessment

for this module:

-

Summative Report

-

Viva

-

Reflective Commentary



This module includes an assessment of your teaching practice. This will be completed by your
placement school (the Summative Report).

All aspects of assignments are assessed on a pass/fail b
asis.



Assessment No.

Assessment
Method

Learning
Outcomes

Weighting
(%)

Fine Graded or
Pass/Fail

010

Coursework

1,3,4

0

Pass/Fail

Details:

Reflective Commentary. 2000 words:

011

Coursework

1
-
4

0

Pass/Fail

Details:

Summative report.

012

Viva

1 and 5

0

Pass/Fail

Length/Duration:

Professional Dialogue with in
-
school professional tutor.


12



Learning Outcomes



1

Interpret national teaching and learning strategies/curricula within a theoretical framework, to
maximise learning opportunities for all children

and young people.


2

Identify and apply relevant subject knowledge to design appropriate teaching, learning and
assessment experiences for all children and young people.


3

Demonstrate an awareness of current educational frameworks and their implications for
subject specialist teachers.


4

With guidance, plan, deliver and evaluate differentiated teaching and learning activities to
progress the learning of all children and young people


5

Observe classroom practice, be responsive to feedback and relate practice to
theory.





Summative report

This will be written by your Subject Mentor towards the end of the School Experience.



Viva

The Professional Dialogue Form is a record of a formal discussion that takes place between the
Professional Tutor and you and is a me
chanism for checking progress in induction during the Initial
school Experience. It creates an opportunity for the Professional Tutor to meet and formally discuss
your plans and progress. It also provides an early opportunity to identify any areas of conce
rn, from
either party. It must be submitted to Anglia Ruskin by the date indicated on the School Experience
calendar.



Reflective Commentary

You will provide a reflective account of two lessons that you have taught. The commentary will
focus on how you ha
ve planned, delivered and evaluated those lessons in relation to maximising
learning opportunities for all the children in the class. The account will evaluate the learning and
teaching in relation to contemporary national initiatives and should be set in

a theoretical
framework




Knowledge and Pedagogy (MOD001498
)

Submission Date:
Friday 3
rd

January 201
4



Assessment Information

Equivalent to 4000 words



This module will enable you to organise, synthesise and disaggregate your subject knowledge to
provi
de access, progress and assessment for the benefit of the children and young people with
whom you will work. You also have an opportunity to develop a philosophy for teaching your
subject discretely and in a cross
-
curricular context.



Assessment is in the

form of a directed patchwork text, with the patches being linked by a critical
reflection, which allows you to engage with a variety of aspects of teaching your subject.
Throughout the module there will be opportunities for informal peer assessment and f
ormative
assessment through patchwork groups. These will be groups of trainees (all with the same subject
specialism) who will exchange drafts of their work for comments and feedback.



Learning Outcomes



1.

Critically evaluate the contribution of subject k
nowledge to the development of a
philosophy of subject pedagogy within contemporary curriculum issues;


13

2.

Justify a critically informed philosophy of subject pedagogy;

3.

Apply and critically evaluate the deployment of subject knowledge in cross
-
curricula
conte
xts;

4.

Apply and critically evaluate the deployment of subject knowledge for meeting the needs of
children and young people.



Task

There are four patches, and the critical reflection. Each patch focuses on different aspects of school
and teaching, and how t
hese relate to your own subject specialism. It should be noted that the
element of criticality required by the learning outcomes should be expressed in each part of the
assignments: the patches and the reflection. The focus of each patch will be as follow
s:



Inclusion:

this could be a story/narrative/diary written from the perspective of a child’s
whose learning needs are not being met at school. You should draw on your own
observations of lessons, and discussions with relevant staff.



Cross
-
Curricular Skil
ls:
you will produce an account or an artefact showing the use of either
Literacy, Numeracy or
CS/ICT

in the teaching of your subject. If your subject is English,
Mathematic or
CS/ICT
, then you should choose from one of the two remaining subjects.



Subject
specific topic:

this could be either a discussion of a general issue related to your
subject, or the production of a subject
-
specific resource.



The philosophy of your subject:

this is an opportunity for you to express your own ideas,
based on your experien
ce so far, .of why your subject is important in the school curriculum.



The four patches are linked by a
Reflective commentary

on your experience of producing the
patches, and your development as a subject specialist. The commentary is also an opportunity

for
you to say how you think your patches have addressed the learning outcomes.


Theories, Themes and Issues (MOD001552)

Submission Date:
Friday 25
th

April 2014


Learning Outcomes

1.

Provide a critical justification for teaching, learning and curriculum desi
gn to maximise
learning opportunities for children;

2.

Analyse and demonstrate critical engagement with current educational issues at home and
abroad including classroom management, assessment and inclusion strategies;

3.

Provide a critical analysis of framework
s for classroom management and justify strategies
for provision in the appropriate phase of education;

4.

Evaluate critically the principles of monitoring and assessment and apply them effectively
within the learning and teaching content

5.


Evaluate critically
a range of strategies for inclusion in the classroom and in the wider life of
the school to improve their practice.


In order to pass this module you are required to submit a written assignment of 6000 words
(maximum) in which you develop a critical analys
is and comparison of
two case studies
from
different key stages based on your two school placements. (Each detailed case study of a class /
pupil group is likely to use 2000 / 2500 words with the balance of words being used for the critical
comparison and

critical commentary on your development in using critical case studies)


The case studies should engage with a variety of elements that affect teaching and learning but
must consider: behaviour management, assessment and inclusion. A confident and critic
al
discussion of these broader issues will be rewarded including an acknowledgement of how an
aspect of your case study is dealt with internationally.



14

You should also demonstrate your ability, as a postgraduate student, for critical analysis and
reflect
ion supported by relevant literature. You should also develop and demonstrate the following
research skills: project planning, time management, knowledge retrieval, knowledge management,
analytical skills, interpretation skills, evaluative thinking, proble
m solving in different contexts,
critically reflective writing, reviewing the literature critically, structuring and presenting complex
ideas and arguments, and managing discussion.


For this module
you are required to submit your final assignment via Turn
itin GradeMark.
An
explanation of how to use Turnitin Grademark is in Appendix 11.1. On the class page is the start
date, the due date and time (
5pm GMT
) for your assignment and the date that your results will be
available. The Originality Report is autom
atically generated by Turnitin.

If you are not successful in
your first attempt and are required to resubmit, any subsequent submissions are also to be
electronically submitted via Turnitin GradeMark and a new assignment class will be set up for you to
use
.


Curriculum and Pedagogy (MOD001499
)

Submission Date
:
Friday 16
th

May 2014


This module provides the opportunity to evaluate subject knowledge and teaching skills, and then
develop an identified area. This is done through research, discussion, practical

experience and
teaching, and careful reflection. The specific area for development is identified from subject
knowledge audits and is further discussed with the university tutor and school based mentor.

Learning Outcomes

1.

Critically evaluate the applicati
on of subject knowledge and the implementation of an
informed philosophy of subject pedagogy in the learning environment.


2.

Demonstrate a critical understanding of the need for secure subject knowledge for the
provision of successful learning experiences


3.

R
eflect critically on the practical issues associated with their developing role as subject
specialists.


4.

Demonstrate a critical appreciation of the role of the subject in developing core skills and
enhancing the learning skills of all learners


You will ha
ve undertaken a subject knowledge audit at the beginning of the course, and arising from
this and in consultation with the subject leader, you will choose an area of study in your subject that
requires development.

You will undertake private research and
other study to enhance your own
knowledge and skills in this chosen area.
You will then produce a subject
-
relevant artefact such as a
reflective learning journal, presentation, animation or interactive resource. This will track your
progress in addressing
an area identified as requiring development and in delivering lessons
incorporating that area.


You will use this to inform a scheme of work that you will plan, develop, resource and potentially
teach in your final placement. You will then produce a detail
ed evaluation of the process and
products, which will form the basis of this assignment.


After carrying out the work you should hand
in

a

report that includes the following elements:




The key areas you established and a clear rationale for your focus, i
n terms of personal
knowledge and the requirements of the curriculum



An account of the strategies you used and evidence (e.g. lesson observations, materials you
have developed, etc. ) to show how you have engaged with the material. (NOTE: the

15

submission of

downloaded materials from the internet is not sufficient evidence of
engagement)



An outline of the enquiry you have taken, including key findings, references to key
publications and academic debates in your chosen area



A discussion of how the work you hav
e done could be used in the classroom. This could be
integrated with the main text, or be partly linked to curriculum materials in an appendix. (A
full scheme of work is not required)



Reference to relevant professional materials and literature in the tea
ching of the topic you
have studied



Reflections of how mentors and colleagues have helped you to develop your subject
knowledge during the school experiences



A reflection on the extent to which you have answered the key questions and an outline of
any issu
es you have identified for further investigation.


It

is expected that the scheme of work and evidence of your own subject knowledge development
will be present in the Appendix.

Qualifying School Experience (MOD001488
)

Submission Date:
Friday
27
th

June 201
4



Assessment Information

This is the Qualifying School Experience for secondary student teachers. It is designed to develop
your confidence and competence to lead learning and meet the professional standards to achieve
QTS. You will also be prepared for
their induction year as Newly Qualified Teachers. To gain the
maximum benefit from this experience you are expected to engage professionally in all aspects of
school life, and to plan, teach and assess whole classes for a sustained period appropriate to yo
ur
specialist interest area.



There are three elements to the assessment.



The first item of assessment is a
critical reflection

on your professional development. This should
be 1000 words or equivalent.



The second item is the assessment of your
teaching practice. This will be completed by your
placement school (the
Summative Report
) in association with your course tutor.



The third item is the
PDP

which is the main mechanism for recording progress and also records your
meeting the Teacher’s S
tandards required to be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).



Learning Outcomes

1.

Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the teacher's role and responsibilities, in
the classroom, the school and the community.

2.

Reflect on feedback to initi
ate developments in professional practice to meet national
standards for Initial Teacher training

3.

Demonstrate independent management of the inclusive classroom as expressed in national
standards for Initial Teacher training

4.

Observe classroom practice and s
ynthesise practice and theory to enhance own practice.




16


5
. Learning Resources

Library


The list below is a small selection from an extensive teacher education literature, most of which are
available in the university library in Queen’s Building. Althoug
h most of these are located on the
third floor, you will need to check the catalogue for the exact location, as they are catalogued under
a range of categories. Please note that it is not a requirement to read all of these texts; this range is
provided so
that there are sufficient books for everybody to gain access to them. Remember that
you can access the library database via the web by visiting
http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/
.


Teaching Computer Science in schools
is new and many teacher training books relate solely to ICT.
However there are several good books listed below which address both the subject knowledge and
pedagogical issues involved in teaching Computer Science.


Journals




British Journal of Educational
Technology (available online from 1997; in print from 1972)



Computer Education (Print only from 1977)



Journal of Computer Assisted Learning (available online from 1997; in print from 1985)



Journal of Educational Media (available online from 1999; in print
from 1984)



Technology, Pedagogy and Education (Formerly Journal of Information Technology in
Teacher Education) (available online from 1999; in print from 1996)



Journal of Computer Science Education


Online resource




ACM Digital Library for all journal art
icles relating to Computer Science Education



General references about or about teaching CS/ICT:



Anderson, K. (2011).
Getting the buggers excited about CS/ICT
. London: Continuum.


Dale, N. and Lewis, J. 2012.
Computer Science Illuminated

(5th ed.). Jon
es and Bartlett Publishers,
Inc., , USA.


Dewdney, K.. 1993.
New Turing Omnibus
. W. H. Freeman & Co., New York, NY, USA.


Kubica, Jeremy, 2011.
Computational Fairy Tales


Martinez, S.L. and Stager, G. 2013.
Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineer
ing the
Classroom


Papert, S. (1993)
Mindstorms: Children, Computers and Powerful Ideas

(Second Edition), Harvester
Wheatsheaf


Simmons, C. and Hawkins, C. (2009)
Teaching ICT
, London, Sage




17

Useful books for specific subject knowledge skills


Adobe Clas
sroom in a Book series

-

includes Flash, Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Fireworks


Bond, K. and Langfield, S. (2008).
AS Computing
. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.


Bond, K. and Langfield, S. (2009).
A2 Computing
. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.


Miller, B.W. and Ranum,
D.L (2006).
Problem Solving with Algorithms and Data Structures Using
Python


Richardson, W. (2009)
Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and other powerful web tools for classrooms,
California, Corwin Press.


Vocking, B. et al, 2011 (eds), Algorithms

unplugged
, Springer
, 2011


Also look at as many GCSE Computing textbooks as you can.



E
-
books on learning Python (free downloadable PDFs).


A Byte of Python

(http://swaroopch.com/notes/python/)

Program Arcade Games and Learn Computer Science

Professor Craven alternates chapters on the
“basics” with material on using Pygame to create graphical games.
http://programarcadegames.com/

Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python

Al Sweigart’s written a couple of great books that
will help you to learn to write games. This one takes you from very basic text based games in
Python, through to the begi
nnings of a Pygame game.
http://inventwithPython.com


Think Python
(originally published as “How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with
Pytho
n”), by Allen Downey.
http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/

Snake Wrangling for Kids
-

http://briggs.net.nz/snake
-
wrangling
-
fo
r
-
kids.html

. For age 8 upwards


Useful Websites


http://community.computingatschool.org.uk

National Association for the teaching of Computer
Science in school. Forum, events and resources.


Computer Science for Fun

-

this site contains lots of reading material and activities that relate to
Computer Science (
http://cs4fn.org


CS Inside

-

workshops with materials for teaching CS in an engaging way (
http://csi.dcs.gla.ac.uk/
)

CS Unplugged
-

materials to teach CS

away from the computer (http://csunplugged.org)

Scratch website

-

Scratch is a commonly used program in schools for developing simple Computer
games whilst also learning programming (http:
//
http://scratch.mit.edu/
)


18

http://pythonSchool.net

Website for teaching teachers wanting to learn Python to teach up to A
-
Level.


http://
www.e
-
gfl.org



Essex Grid for Learning

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/CS/ICT/

BBC Bitesize for subject knowledge
development:

http://www.teach
-
ict.com/index.html

Teacher reso
urces for CS/ICT


http://reviseCS/ICT.co.uk/

Revision website for CS/ICT


http://www.gcsecomputing.org.uk/

OCR GCSE Computing website


www.behaviour4learning.ac.uk/

positive behaviour management website


www.multiverse.ac.uk

Website for diversity, inclusion and achievement


www.teacherxpress.com


A portal for online resources



General references about education:


Aldrich, R., ed., 2002.
A Century of Education.

London: Routledge Falmer


Bentley
-
Davies, C. (2010).
How to be an Amazing Teacher
. Bethel: Crown House Publishing.


Black, P. and Wiliam, D., 1998.
Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom
Assessment.

King's College London, School of Educ
ation


Brooks, V., Abbott, I. and Bills, L., eds, 2004.
Preparing to Teach in Secondary Schools: A Student
Teacher's Guide to Professional Issues in Secondary Education.

2
nd

ed. Buckingham: Open
University Press.


Bryan, H., Carpenter, C. and Hoult, S. (20
10). Learning and Teaching at M
-
Level: A guide for student
teachers. Sage Publications.


Capel, S., Leask, M. and Turner, T., eds, 2009.
Learning to teach in the Secondary School. A
companion to school experience
. 5
th

ed. London: Routledge.


Cowley, S., 2
010.
Getting the Buggers to Behave (4
th

edition).

London: Continuum


Dillon, Justin Maguire, Meg

2011. Becoming A Teacher : Issues in Secondary Teaching (4th Edition)
McGraw
-
Hill


Hramiak, A. & Hudston, T.(2011).
Understanding Learning and Teaching in Sec
ondary Schools.

Longman. * KEY TEXT


Jones, K., 2003.
Education in Britain: 1944 to the present
. London: Polity


Joyce, B., Calhoun, E. and Hopkins, D., 2002.
Models of Learning
-

Tools for Teaching.

Buckingham:
Open University Press


19


Matheson, D. and Gro
svenor, I., eds.
An Introduction to the Study of Education
. London: David
Fulton


McNamara, E., 1999.
Positive Pupil Management and Motivation.

London: David Fulton


Mayes, A., 1997.
Becoming a Teacher.

Buckingham: Open University Press


Riding, R. and Ray
ner, S., 1998.
Cognitive Styles and learning Strategies.

London: David Fulton

Smith, J. and Gilbert, I. (2010).
The Lazy Teacher’s Handbook: How your students learn more when
you teach less
. Bethel: Crown House Publishing.

Wilson, E., 2009.
School
-
Based Re
search: A guide for education students
. London: Sage.


Wragg, E., 1997.
Assessment and Learning in the Secondary School.

London: Routledge

Wright, T (2008)
How to be a Brilliant Trainee Teacher,

London, RoutledgeFalmer.






Additional reading may also be

recommended in the weekly sessions
.


Link to the University Library catalogue and Digital Library
http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/


Link to Harvard Referencing guide
http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm



Faculty Liaison Librarian
:


Carol McMaster

(
carol.mcmaster@anglia.ac.uk
) extn 46
43



Objectives can relate to the learning processes too e.g. ‘Develop awareness of others’ perspectives’
through paired work.