A 300K Si Nanowire Transistor Closely-Coupled With a Standard High-Index Silicon n-MOSFET

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2 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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A 300K Si Nanowire Transistor Closely
-
Coupled

With a Standard High
-
Index Silicon n
-
MOSFET

PLENARY LECTURE: 25
th

Anniv. of Mexican Congress of Amer. Vac. Soc., Sept. 27, 2004

(Presented in English in Zacatecas, MX for the International and Mexican attende
es)


D. L. Kendall
1,2**
, J. de la Hidalga
1**
, A. Torres
1
, R. R. Rodríguez
1
, M. Castro
1
,


Elizabeth Mez
a Prieto
1*
, W. Calleja
1
, M. Landa
1
, C. Zúñig
a
1
, R. Murphy
1
,

N. Carlos
1
, I. Juárez
1
, and M. Kendall
1,2


1
Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica, y
Electronica (INAOE),

Puebla, Mexico
www.inaoep.mx

2
StarMega Corp, Albuquerque, NM 87123, USA,
www.starmega.com

*Present address: Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua
, Mexico

**Contact
jhidalga@inaoep.mx

or
dkendall@starmega.com

for correspondence


ABSTRACT

This is the first report on the highly unusual characteristics of a t
ransistor called
SPIKEMOS that has 15 extremely regularly spaced current spikes on 0.155V intervals in the
output curve of Isd with Vg=2V when the current flows from source to drain parallel to the
<110> direction on a high index (5 5 12) Si chip. The nar
row spikes rise sharply above the
normal MOSFET current
as we show in the companion abstract

for the Friday session. Physical
modeling suggests that the slightly raised atomic ridges at the (5 5 12) Si/SiO
2

interface act as
multiple parallel Si nanowire
transistors (SNWTs) of ≈ 1.65 nm width on a 5.4 nm pitch. These
“embedded quasi
-
Si
-
nanotubes” are in parallel with the inversion layer of an n
-
MOSFET with
W/L = 10 μm/10 μm. The very close coupling of about 1 nm between the nanowire transistor and
the no
rmal MOSFET results in unique tunneling interactions at
room temperature
, RT. These
include the development of an effective
one dimensional “artificial atom


that has apparently
not been previously observed on a standard Si
-
MOSFET at any temperature. The

transfer curves
for the coupled transistors have four
quantized bumps

between Vg = 1.74 and 2.02V, a
quantization that has also not been seen before at RT. This allows the multiple bumps of the
transfer curves to predict the spike positions and magnitude
s of the output curves, and vice versa.
We informally call these closely
-
coupled devices “
Siamese Transistors
”.

The major focus is on devices fabricated using a poly
-
Si CMOS process in our standard
Si fab with standard optical lithography. We fabricated
the devices and ICs on (5 5 12)Si because
it has one of the very few atomically flat surfaces that can be obtained on a clean Si wafer. More
importantly, it has
naturally occurring nm
-
width atomic ridges

running for long distances across
the surface, as i
n A. A. Baski et al.,
“The structure of silicon surfaces from (001) to (111)”
, Surf.
Sci.
392
, 69
-
85 (1997). The (5 5 12) also has a very large surface unit cell of 5.4 nm, so the ridge
spacing of 5.4 nm is determined by the Si crystal structure and no ab
normal lithography of any
type is required for the IC fabrication process. The packaged devices were mounted in a cryostat
at 300K and at several temperatures down to 77K, and the n
-
MOS and pMOS devices were tested
on a Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer H
P 4156A. We propose physical models for our Si
nMOS device that may ultimately apply to high index surfaces of any semiconductor.

Finally, we discuss several potential applications for this unusual device. One possibility
is multi
-
base logic (up to base
-
16) in the space of a single MOSFET. Others are cheap ultra
precise voltage
-
standards to at least 4 significant figures and UHF generation at multiple precise
frequencies, as well as high electron mobility devices. Other applications for high index Si wi
ll
be discussed from the cited patents and publications at
www.starmega.com

. These include high
temperature superconductors, high specificity multiply
-
ganged security sensors, and DNA and
other molecule handling
methods.