Mobile Device Use

pantgrievousΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

30 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

72 εμφανίσεις

Mobile Device Use
and Standardized
Test Scores

By: Cameron Johnson

EDIT 6900

Spring 2013

Introduction



Numerous studies have been conducted that
determine:


that mobile learning is
a growing trend in schools and in the
workplace


how best to teach using mobile learning (Allen, 2011)




The Problem


Not much research exists in regards to mobile device
learning and its effects on standardized test
scores.

Why does it
Matter
?



Every year more and more schools across
America are adopting mobile devices.
According
to
Kukulska
-
Hulme

(2013), there are
approximately 1.5 million
iPads

in US schools and
rising, which accounts for millions of tax
-
payer
dollars.



This
research may:


provide insight into how student use of mobile devices
for academic purposes will effect standardized test
scores


positively impact standardized test scores (End Of
Course Tests, SAT, ACT, etc.) in a high school setting



This study proposes to investigate the link
between the academic use of mobile devices
and the effects on standardized test scores by
exploring the following question:


Do students who use mobile devices for
school
-
related tasks score higher on
standardized tests?

Purpose of
this Study

Before
it Starts



It is important to understand:


How Technology
E
nhances Learning


Advantages
of Mobile Devices in Education


Limitations of Mobile Devices in Education


How Technology

Enhances
Learning

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT:

Interactive simulations and illustrations can
improve student engagement (Shuler, 2009)

COLLABORATION:

Ability to work collaboratively on projects
with others who may not be physically close
(
Quillen
, 2010)

LEARNING
vs

TEAHCING:

Instead of teaching, students can be given
projects that require them to learn the
necessary material themselves

GLOBAL REACH:

Zero cost of communicating with other
people around the globe

PACING:

Permits students to pace and order their
learning

TIME & PLACE:

Extends the place and time of learning
(Allen, 2011)




Advantages
of Mobile
Devices in
Education



According
to McClanahan, Williams,
Kennedy & Tate (2012)
mobile devices

integrate
the aural modality with the visual and
tactile/kinesthetic more readily and
effectively (than paper).”


Mobile devices in education allow:


mobility


spontaneity


efficiency (
Pocatilu
,
Visoiu
,
Doinea

&
Osch
, 2012)


Allows access to get
real
-
time
results
that
teachers


can use to
individualize instruction (Wong, 2012).

Limitations of Mobile


Devices
in Education



According to Kiger,
Herro

&
Prunty

(2012), “Successful
implementation of mobile learning is dependent on
administrative and school commitment and adequately trained
teachers in matters of pedagogy, instructional technology
integration, classroom management/facilitation, and mobile
device operation.”



To fully use mobile devices either a Wi
-
Fi network must be
accessible or a monthly fee must be paid to access a cellphone
network.



Mobile devices are expensive and are not as durable as non
-
electronic devices (textbooks, worksheets,
etc
).

Recap at a Glance


This study proposes to study the link between mobile device
use for academic purposes and standardized test scores. The
reason why mobile devices are not used in every high school
across the country is because little current research exists
about mobile devices and standardized test scores. To do this,
the study will
address the following research
question:


Do students who use mobile devices for school
-
related
tasks score higher on standardized tests?


Research
Method



Use of the quantitative research method.



Procedure:


An entire incoming 10
th

grade class at one high school
will be given mobile devices and instructed to use these
mobile devices (laptops, tablets, & smart phones) for
academic purposes. Students will then take the PSAT at
the end of the year and their scores will be compared to
their 9
th

grade PSAT scores. The difference between
their 9
th

& 10
th

grade scores will be compared to the
national average of change.

Research
Method cont.

Participant consent

Compile students’
9
th

grade PSAT
scores

Instruct students to
use mobile devices
for academic
purposes for all 10
th

grade courses

Distribute devices

Administer PSAT

Compare each
student’s current
PSAT scores to
previous year’s
scores

Compare change of
score to national
average change
from 9th to 10
th

grade

References


Allen, R. (2011). Can mobile devices transform education?
Education Update,
53
(
2),
2

7.


Andrews, R. (2011). Does e
-
learning require a new theory of
learning? Some initial thoughts.

Journal For Educational Research
Online
,

3
(1), 104.


Kiger, D.,
Herro
, D., &
Prunty
, D. (2012). Examining the Influence
of a Mobile Learning Intervention on Third Grade Math
Achievement.

Journal of Research on Technology in
Education
,

45
(1), 61
-
82
.


Kukulska
-
Hulme
,
A. (2013). Limelight on Mobile
Learning.

Harvard International Review
,

34
(4), 12
-
16
.


McClanahan, B., Williams, K., Kennedy, E., & Tate, S. (2012). A
breakthrough for Josh: How use of an
iPad

facilitated reading
improvement.

TechTrends
,
56
(3), 20
-
28
.


Pocatilu
, P.,
Visoiu
, A.,
Doinea
, M., & van
Osch
, W. (2012). Mobile
Learning and Mobile Technologies in Academia: A Case
S
tudy.
Economic
Computation & Economic Cybernetics Studies &
Research
,

46
(3), 79
-
98.


Quillen
, I. (2010). Left to their owned devices.
Digital Directions, 4
(Fall), 30

35
.


Shuler
, C. (2009).
Pockets of potential: Using mobile technologies to
promote children’s learning.
New York: The Joan
Ganz

Cooney
Center at Sesame Workshop
.


Wong, W. (2012). Tools of the Trade: How Mobile Learning Devices
Are Changing the Face of Higher Education.

Community College
Journal
,

82
(5), 54
-
61.


References cont.