Towards Reliable Data Delivery for Highly

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3 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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Towards Reliable Data Delivery for Highly

Dynamic Mobile Ad Hoc Networks



Abstract:


This paper addresses the problem of delivering data packets
for highly dynamic mobile ad hoc networks in a reliable and
timely manner. Most existing ad hoc routing protoc
ols are
susceptible to node mobility, especially for large
-
scale networks.
Driven by this issue, we propose an efficient Position based
Opportunistic Routing protocol (POR) which takes advantage of
the stateless

property of geographic routing and the broad
cast
nature of wireless medium. When a data packet is sent out, some
of the neighbor nodes that have overheard the transmission will
serve as forwarding candidates, and take turn to forward the
packet if it is not relayed by the specific best forwarder wit
hin a
certain period of time. By utilizing such in
-
the
-
air backup,
communication is maintained without

being interrupted. The
additional latency incurred by local route recovery is greatly
reduced and the duplicate relaying caused by packet reroute is
also

decreased. In case of communication hole, a Virtual
Destination based Void Handling (VDVH) scheme is further
proposed to work together with POR. Both theoretical analysis
and simulation results show that POR achieves excellent
performance even under high
node mobility with acceptable
overhead and the new void handling scheme also works well.



Modules:

1)
Topology Creation:
In this module, nodes are added to Topology.

2)Node Details: In this module we have to give the node name
and distance.

3)File Transferr
ing:

This module makes possible to transfer the
file from Source Node to particular destination node.

4)Packet Forward Details:This module give the all the details of
the transferred file like source and destination and file details.


REQUIREMENT ANALYSIS:



FEASIBILITY STUDY:


The next step in analysis is to verify the feasibility of the
proposed system. “All projects are feasible given unlimited
resources and infinite time“. But in reality both resources and
time are scarce. Project should confirm to time

bounce and
should be optimal in there consumption of resources. This place
a constant is approval of any project.

Feasibility has applied to Digital Tune pertains to the following
areas:



Technical feasibility



Operational feasibility



Economical feasibility


TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY:


To determine whether the proposed system is technically
feasible, we should take into consideration the technical issues
involved behind the system.


OPERATIONAL FEASIBILITY:

To determine the operational feasibility of the system
we
should take into consideration the awareness level of the users.
This system is operational feasible since the users are familiar
with the technologies and hence there is no need to gear up the
personnel to use system. Also the system is very friendly a
nd to
use.



ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY


To decide whether a project is economically feasible, we have to
consider various factors as:



Cost benefit analysis



Long
-
term returns



Maintenance costs



Reliability Study:


In the existing system

ad hoc routin
g protocols are
susceptible
(influence)

to node mobility, especially for large
-
scale networks. One of the main reasons is due to the pre
-
determination of an end
-
to
-
end route before data transmission.


Owing to the constantly and even fast changing network
t
opology, it is very difficult to maintain a deterministic route.
The discovery and recovery procedures are also time and energy
consuming. Once the path breaks, data packets will get lost or be
delayed for a long time until the reconstruction of the route,

causing transmission interruption.


Efficiency Study:



A novel Position based OpportunisticRouting protocol
(POR) is proposed, in which several forwarding candidates
cache the packet that has been received using MAC interception.



If the best for
warder does not forward the packet in certain time
slots, suboptimal candidates will take turn to forward the packet
according to a locally formed order. In this way, as long as one
of the candidates succeeds in receiving and forwarding the
packet, the dat
a transmission will not be interrupted. Potential
multi
-
paths are exploited on

the
-

fly on a per
-
packet basis,
leading to POR’s excellent robustness.


SOFTWARE REQUIREMENT SPECIFICATION

What is SRS?

Software Requirement Specification (SRS) is the starting
point of the software developing activity. As system grew more
complex it became evident that the goal of the entire system
cannot be easily comprehended. Hence the need for the
requirement phase arose. The software project is initiated by the
client nee
ds. The SRS is the means of translating the ideas of
the minds of clients (the input) into a formal document (the
output of the requirement phase.)

The SRS phase consists of two basic activities:

1)

Problem/Requirement Analysis:

The process is order and more

nebulous of the two,
deals with understand the problem, the goal and constraints.

2)

Requirement Specification:

Here, the focus is on specifying what has been found giving
analysis such as representation, specification languages and tools,
and checking the s
pecifications are addressed during this activity.

The Requirement phase terminates with the production of the
validate SRS document. Producing the SRS document is the
basic goal of this phase.





ROLE OF SRS

The purpose of the Software Requirement Specif
ication is
to reduce the communication gap between the clients and the
developers. Software Requirement Specification is the medium
though which the client and user needs are accurately specified.
It forms the basis of software development. A good SRS s
hould
satisfy all the parties involved in the system.

SCOPE

This document is the only one that describes the
requirements of the system. It is meant for the use by the
developers, and will also be the basis for validating the final
delivered system. Any c
hanges made to the requirements in the
future will have to go through a formal change approval process.
The developer is responsible for asking for clarifications, where
necessary, and will not make any alterations without the
permission of the client.


Ha
rdware and software Requirements:

Software Requirements


Microsoft Windows XP Professional

JDK 6.0

Java Swing
s and awt.

Database:
MYSQL

Hardware Requirements

Pentium 4 processor

1 GB RAM

80 GB Hard Disk Space


UML Diagrams:

Usecase diagram:

node name
node information
distance


Class Diagra
m:




Sequence Diagram:

node details
main
source
browse file
destination
enter node details
select source node
select file to browse
select destination


Collaboration Diagram:

main
node
details
source
browse
file
destinati
on
1: enter node details
2: select source node
3: select file to browse
4: select destination



References:

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-
C. Hu, and J.
Jetcheva, “A

performance comparison of multi
-
hop wireless ad hoc network

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MobiCom ’98
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97.


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position
-
based routing in mobile ad hoc networks,”
Network,

IEEE
, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 30

39, Nov/Dec 2001.


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techniques

for geographic routing i
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67, Quarter
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245, July
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Aug. 2004.


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-
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routing

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144.


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SIGCOMM ’07
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in
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438.


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in multi
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3040, July

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