Death How do you know someone is dead? 1. - Sawtry Community ...

onwardhaggardΒιοτεχνολογία

12 Δεκ 2012 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

214 εμφανίσεις

Religion and Morality Revision




Religious attitudes to life

Key tips for the exam...




Don't panic, read through the questions before you attempt an
answer.



Make sure you look at how many marks each question is worth.



In 6 mark answers you need to refer to religion in your answer.
Never just agree or disagree with a question.



Use the religious quotes/teaching you have learned to back up the
points you make.







Remember to explain your ideas
-

why have you included the points
that you have in your answer, how are they relevant to the
point you
are trying to make?



Sanctity of Life
:
Life is given by God, precious, and should not be taken away.
Everyone is unique and special „made


by God, in the image of God. Therefore
(say religions) is IVF

playing
God


and wrong?


Value of Life:
To measure how valuable life is


is it worth the cost of medical
treatment? Is one life more important than another?


Quality of Life:
To measure a life in terms of happiness and health (not
money). Is life worth living if the quality of life is poor?




Fertility Treatment
(helping couples have a baby)

1
. IVF
= In vitro fertilisation (test
-
tube baby) (Egg & sperm fertilise in a dish
t
hen implanted. Any spare embryos are frozen for up to 10 yrs, donated to
other couples or destroyed)

2.
AIH
= Artificial Insemination by Husband

3
. AID
= Artificial Insemination by Donor (another man) (name confidential
until 18)

4.
Surrogacy
= A woman
carries a baby for someone else. Can use any egg. No
fees just expenses. Surrogate mum could keep the baby but should sign forms
to not be the legal mum at 6wks.


Genetic Engineering:
Genetic Engineering =
changes to the genetic structure
of living things



2 types:

1. Somatic cell therapy

2. Creation of saviour siblings (with possibility of designer babies in the future)


1. Somatic Cell Therapy


Adds / enhances or replaces a defective gene. Treats genetic disorders.

Cure
developed by producing a copy of the defective gene which works. First
successful in 2002. Saves lives. No one is harmed. Less expensive than other
treatments.


2. Saviour Siblings

To save a life by using IVF to select eggs which do not have a gene
tic disorder


to give birth to a child


use this child

s cord blood and transplant into the sick
sibling (brother or sister). This is a type of designer baby where you select,
however, it is not lawful to do this for social reasons (e.g. choosing what th
e
baby would look like etc.) Some say it is „playing God

. It does carry risks


worry that

designer babies


becomes big business. Is it fair on the

saviour
sibling


to be used in this way?


Embryology




Scientists can use human embryos until they are

14 days old for medical
research into fertility, contraception, miscarriages etc. This is regulated by the

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990


Cloning Cloning
= create a genetically identical copy of an organism, e.g. dolly
the sheep.
Reproductiv
e cloning (ILLEGAL)
= useful for single women who dont
want sexual relationship / infertile couples, gay couples who want to use their
own genes.
Stem Cell (therapeutic) cloning (LEGAL)
= cloning used for
researching cures for diseases. Regulated by licens
ed premises and only on
embryos under 14 days old. The nucleus is removed from an egg, a nucleus from
an adult cell is inserted into the empty egg, an electrical charge triggers it into
be
com
ing an embryo, at 6 days the stem cells are removed for research
then
the embryo is destroyed


Blood Transfusions and Transplants

Some Christians are happy to help others by donating an organ when they die
(kidney, bone marrow heart etc). Risks involved (rejection / disease).

Jehovah Witnesses do not agree. They say t
hat blood should not be consumed
(taken from the old testament in the Bible). Will accept organ transplant if all
blood drained first.


Experiments on Humans
You can test on humans but not children etc. and they
must consent! Some humans test drugs (monit
ored carefully)


some given a
placebo drug (not a real one) to make sure the results are accurate.



Blood Transfusions and Transplants

Some Christians are happy to help others by donating an organ when they die
(kidney, bone marrow heart etc
). Risks involved (rejection / disease).

Jehovah Witnesses do not agree. They say that blood should not be consumed
(taken from the old testament in the Bible). Will accept organ transplant if all
blood drained first.


Experiments on Humans
You can test
on humans but not children etc. and they
must consent! Some humans test drugs (monitored carefully)


some given a
placebo drug (not a real one) to make sure the results are accurate.


Christian Views on Matters of Life All say


children are a blessing a
nd a gift
from God. The purpose of marriage is to have kids! God is love and Jesus told us
to help and love each other (Parable of the Good Samaritan).
Some say (e.g.
Church of England / Methodist Christians
): God gave us scientific knowledge
and skills th
erefore use this to help infertile couples


a loving thing to do to
„heal


(like Jesus did). Some say


fertility treatment too upsetting and low
chance of success. Some Christians are okay with cloning embryos under 14 days
old and if it is used to benef
it others. The embryo is only a potential person so
is not murder. Some say Genetic Engineering is a loving thing to do to help a
child


to reduce suffering


give the child a better quality of life. Some say no
to cloning = destroys the unique of each pe
rson and many risks (Dolly the sheep
died prematurely). Some use Sanctity of Life argument for genetic engineering
= all life i
s special, therefore, save it.


Others.



„playing God




dislike

designer babies




too much focus on looks etc. Others


use
Sanctity of Life argument to argue that God is in control of life and death


not us. Plus


a waste of money?!!!! Some do not like organ transplant as it
deforms the body that God gave


may need it in the afterlife?

Catholic Christians say


accept infe
rtility as God’s will


he has different plans
for your life. IVF is no better than adultery when you use other sperm etc.
(goes against Ten Commandments).

Life begins at conception


therefore: Spare embryos being destroyed = killing
human life = goes ag
ainst Ten Commandment „Do not kill

. All life has rights and
should be respect (Sanctity of Life argument).


Religious attitudes to death

and the elderly

Death and the Elderly Revision



understand and explain the term 'death'.



discuss

religious beliefs about what happens after death.



understand the problems faced by the elderly and discuss what younger
generations might learn from them.



discuss the options of care for the elderly and religious teachings on the
topic.



understand the law

relating to death and euthanasia.



evaluate the debate on euthanasia and whether anyone has the right to
take life.



evaluate the circumstances in which the use of a life support machine
should be discontinued.



discuss religious teachings that relate to all
owing someone to die.



describe the provision of care in the community for the elderly and the
dying.



understand and explain the ways religion can help the dying and bereaved.



give real
-
life examples to support your points.

The Sanctity of Life:
The belief
that people are created by God therefore
life is very precious. Only God can give life or take it away.



Quality of Life:
Whatever is important to have a good life e.g. freedom from
suffering, hunger etc.

Euthanasia
: Death by medical means. Sometimes
called ‘mercy killing’ or
‘assisted suicide’

Active euthanasia
: A doctor gives drugs to a patient in order to kill them.

Passive euthanasia
: The doctor withholds treatment including food and drink
until the patient dies.

Voluntary euthanasia
: The decision
to end life is taken by the patient

Involuntary euthanasia
: The doctor or relatives make the decision to end life as
the patient is unconscious or mentally unable e.g a baby

Living Wills
: People state what treatment they want if they are seriously ill and

unable to communicate.

Hospice
: A place where people go to die if they are terminally ill when all
treatment has ended. They are experts in pain control.




The Elderly

Problems faced by the elderly

1.

Poverty can be a real problem if they have to depend on

the state
pension.

2.

Illness can be more serious to the elderly


they are more likely to have
health problems associated with age.

3.

Family may live far away.

4.

They may feel worthless to society because they are no longer able to
work.

5.

Hey may be lonely espec
ially as partners and friends die.

6.

The attitude of others towards them can make them feel that they are
just a burden.


Who should care for the elderly?

1.

Living at home and getting help with basic care.

2.

Living with their relatives.

3.

Sheltered housing or
residential homes.



Christian teaching about the elderly

Christians should support the elderly because age should be respected and
because they are the vulnerable in society. Sometimes they will be happier and
better cared for in a nursing home or shelter
ed accommodation than with the
family. Teaching about ‘loving your neighbour’ and ‘honouring your father and
mother’ apply.

Muslim teaching about the elderly.

In many Muslim cultures different generations of a family are expected to live
together. Elderly
parents have the right to expect their children to look after
them because it repays the care the elderly have once given them. Looking after
the elderly provides spiritual growth. Sending elderly parents to a home is seen
as unkind and disrespectful.

Death


How do you know someone is dead?

1.
They stop breathing

2. Their heart stops

3. They are brain dead.


Life after death

There are two main religious views:

1.

Heaven and hell.

Christians, Muslims and Jews believe that when a person dies God decides (a
t
judgement day) whether they should spend eternity in heaven with him or in hell
with the devil. Roman Catholics believe in purgatory which is a place of cleansing
and preparation for some before they enter heaven.


2.

Reincarnation and rebirth

Hindus, Buddhists and Sikhs believe that we are born again and again into
different bodies on the earth. This is the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. The
type of body we are born into depends on our karma. Karma is the sum total of
the good and bad deeds

a soul has done in its life time.

More good than bad = a better body.

More bad than good =a worse one.



Euthanasia


Arguments for Euthanasia:



Death with dignity is better than a long, painful death.



People have free choice


it is their life after all.



If quality of life is very poor, a person should be free to not choose to
die?



Euthanasia can be the most compassionate thing to do


the most loving.

Arguments against Euthanasia:



Only God has the right to decide when a person’s life should end.



It is mu
rder which is forbidden in the Bible and Qur’an



Doctors will not want to kill their patients


it will affect the Doctor
-
Patient relationship

Christian teaching

Euthanasia is wrong because:



Human life is a gift from God



Christians should ‘love their neighb
our’ and offer care and protection to
the weak.



All churches are against euthanasia



The Hospice Movement means that people can die with dignity.


Muslim teaching

Euthanasia is wrong because:



Allah fixes a time span for all things


to decide when a person
should die
is ‘playing God’.



If a person is suffering it is Allah’s will


He is testing them and they will
be rewarded in heaven if they bear their suffering well.


Religious attitudes to death

and the elderly



Death and the Elderly Revision



understand

and explain the term 'death'.



discuss religious beliefs about what happens after death.



understand the problems faced by the elderly and discuss what younger
generations might learn from them.



discuss the options of care for the elderly and religious teac
hings on the
topic.



understand the law relating to death and euthanasia.



evaluate the debate on euthanasia and whether anyone has the right to
take life.



evaluate the circumstances in which the use of a life support machine
should be discontinued.



discuss
religious teachings that relate to allowing someone to die.



describe the provision of care in the community for the elderly and the
dying.



understand and explain the ways religion can help the dying and bereaved.



give real
-
life examples to support your poi
nts.

The Sanctity of Life:
The belief that people are created by God therefore
life is very precious. Only God can give life or take it away.

Quality of Life:
Whatever is important to have a good life e.g. freedom from
suffering, hunger etc.

Euthanasia
: De
ath by medical means. Sometimes called ‘mercy killing’ or
‘assisted suicide’

Active euthanasia
: A doctor gives drugs to a patient in order to kill them.

Passive euthanasia
: The doctor withholds treatment including food and drink
until the patient dies.

Voluntary euthanasia
: The decision to end life is taken by the patient

Involuntary euthanasia
: The doctor or relatives make the decision to end life as
the patient is unconscious or mentally unable e.g a baby

Living Wills
: People state what treatment they

want if they are seriously ill and
unable to communicate.

Hospice
: A place where people go to die if they are terminally ill when all
treatment has ended. They are experts in pain control.


The Elderly

Problems faced by the elderly

7.

Poverty can be a real
problem if they have to depend on the state
pension.

8.

Illness can be more serious to the elderly


they are more likely to have
health problems associated with age.

9.

Family may live far away.

10.

They may feel worthless to society because they are no longer able

to
work.

11.

Hey may be lonely especially as partners and friends die.

12.

The attitude of others towards them can make them feel that they are
just a burden.


Who should care for the elderly?

Living at home and getting help with basic care.

Living with their
relatives.


Sheltered housing or residential homes.



Christian teaching about the elderly

Christians should support the elderly because age should be respected and
because they are the vulnerable in society. Sometimes they will be happier and
better care
d for in a nursing home or sheltered accommodation than with the
family. Teaching about ‘loving your neighbour’ and ‘honouring your father and
mother’ apply.

Muslim teaching about the elderly.

In many Muslim cultures different generations of a family are e
xpected to live
together. Elderly parents have the right to expect their children to look after
them because it repays the care the elderly have once given them. Looking after
the elderly provides spiritual growth. Sending elderly parents to a home is seen

as unkind and disrespectful.

Death

How do you know someone is dead?

1.
They stop breathing

2. Their heart stops

3. Internal organs stop

4
. They are brain dead.


Life after death

There are two main religious views:

3.

Heaven and hell.


Christians, Muslims and Jews believe that when a person dies God decides (at
judgement day) whether they should spend eternity in heaven with him or in hell
with the devil. Roman Catholics believe in purgatory which is a place of cleansing
and preparation
for some before they enter heaven.


4.

Reincarnation and rebirth


Hindus, Buddhists and Sikhs believe that we are born again and again into
different bodies on the earth. This is the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. The
type of body we are born into depen
ds on our karma. Karma is the sum total of
the good and bad deeds a soul has done in its life time.

More good than bad = a better body.

More bad than good =a worse one.



Euthanasia


Arguments for Euthanasia:



Death with dignity is better than a long, pai
nful death.



People have free choice


it is their life after all.



If quality of life is very poor, a person should be free to not choose to
die?



Euthanasia can be the most compassionate thing to do


the most loving.

Arguments against Euthanasia:



Only God
has the right to decide when a person’s life should end.



It is murder which is forbidden in the Bible and Qur’an



Doctors will not want to kill their patients


it will affect the Doctor
-
Patient relationship

Christian teaching

Euthanasia is wrong because:



H
uman life is a gift from God



Christians should ‘love their neighbour’ and offer care and protection to
the weak.



All churches are against euthanasia



The Hospice Movement means that people can die with dignity.


Muslim teaching

Euthanasia is wrong because:



Allah fixes a time span for all things


to decide when a person should die
is ‘playing God’.



If a person is suffering it is Allah’s will


He is testing them and they will
be rewarded in heaven if they bear their suffering well.


Drug abuse







understand the difference between prescription drugs, legal drugs and
illegal drugs.



discuss religious beliefs about the body and mind.



understand the law relating to different types of drug and the
classification of illegal drugs.



understand

the legal classification of different drugs and discuss issues
related to their use.



evaluate why people might smoke tobacco, drink alcohol or take illegal
drugs.



evaluate the raising of taxes on social drugs and the use of those taxes



discuss religious t
eaching relating to alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs.



evaluate why some people might take illegal drugs and the effects on
their own and others' lives.



evaluate the possible solutions to drug abuse.



discuss religious teaching relating to helping addicts.



discuss the topics from a different points of view, particularly religious
ones.

Drug
:
A substance which alters the way the body works and may change how we
feel. They can be depressants (slows us down), stimulants (speeds us up) or
hallucinogens (makes u
s see things)

Uses of drugs

Social or recreational drug taking:


Drugs for non
-
medical purposes as part of leisure time or to relax. E.g.
caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, all the illegal drugs

Performance enhancing drugs:


Taken to improve performance on sport
e.g. steroids

Legal Drugs


Caffeine


An addictive drug which makes a person feel more energetic. Can cause
restlessness and nervousness.

Tobacco


Causes 80% of lung cancer deaths. Costs the NHS £400 million a year.
Harmful to children including the unborn.

Alcohol


90% of adults drink in the UK. Can cause damage to the liver and brain.
Costs the NHS £150 million a year. Alcohol Anonymous help people to
recover from alcoholism.



Religious views of legal drugs

Christian


Smoking is not encouraged. Alcohol is OK

in moderation. Jesus drank
alcohol in moderation. We must look after our bodies because: “Don’t you
know that you yourselves are God’s temple and that God’s spirit lives in
you?”

Muslim


Smoking is not encouraged. Alcohol is forbidden in the Qur’an. Muslims
must not take anything that would cause them to lose control of body or
mind.


Illegal Drugs

Class A


The most damaging. Possession
-
7 years. Dealing


life. E.g. heroin, crack

Class B


Possession


5 years. Dealing


14 years. E.g. amphetamines

Class C


Possession


2 years. Dealing


5 years.


Why do people take illegal drugs?

o

Pressure from friends or family.

o

Part of the youth culture

o

To feel good and to escape from the real world and
forget their problems

o

They are addicted


once they start it is impossible to stop.

What can be done about addiction?

o

Increase education in schools

o

More places for drug addicts to go

o

Sentences on users or drug dealers could be increased.

o

Drugs could be mad
e legal, taxed and the tax used to help the addicted.


Arguments for legalizing drugs



It will stop the criminals making a huge profit.



Drugs will be less appealing because they are legal



Some illegal drugs are no more harmful than legal drugs



Arguments
against legalizing drugs



Many would start with soft drugs and then move to hard drugs



Many soft drugs are particularly harmful to the unborn child.



The government has a duty to protect society



More people would become addicted and the cost to the NHS would

increase.



Deaths from drug abuse would increase.



Crime and punishment




explain religious belief about law and order.



explain the concepts of right and wrong, conscience, duty and responsibility.



describe and evaluate causes of crime.



understand

the different causes of crime.



explain the aims of punishment.



evaluate whether or not the different forms of punishment achieve the aims
of punishment, including consideration of young offenders, imprisonment,
parole and early release and the death penal
ty.



evaluate alternatives to prison and issues concerning prison reform.



discuss topics from different points of view, including religious ones.




Crime: Action against a person / property or state which breaks the law.
Sin: Doing wrong against God, e.g. ad
ultery but it is not illegal. Custodial

Sentence: Prison of some kind


CAUSES OF CRIME:

1. Environmental reasons?

1. Drug users

2.
Unemployed

3.
Non
-
educated

4.
Previously been in care

5.
Under 21 years old



2. Social Reasons?
Either to take part in crime or to have the lifestyle

that a life of crime can bring (money / status etc)



3. Psychological Reasons?
Mental health problems / addictive personalities
/ naturally greedy and selfish.





PUNISHMENT



Punishment is aimed to fit the crime (it also depends on if the crime was
planned or not)

1.

Prison
(custodial) / detention centre or young offender

s institutions.
2.
Community Rehabilitation Order
: Probation Officers „advise, assist
and befriend



3.
C
ommunity Punishment Order
/ Community Service: Unpaid community
work

4.
Fines
: Money



5.
Suspended Sentences
: Off the hook unless they do it again!





AGE OF RESPONSIBILITY:


Under 10 years old Cannot be charged


Age 14 Send to a detention centre


Ag
e 16 Young Offenders institution


Age 18 Prison


The Aims of Punishment

To protect society e.g. driving ban for dangerous driving

Retribution. To have revenge; such as giving a long prison sentence

The principle from the Bible ‘An Eye for an Eye and a Tooth for a Tooth’

Vindication
.


Punish to keep the Law respected



PRISON




DOES PRISON WORK?
No. Over 58% sent to prison again within 2 years.
Why is prison not working?



1. Prisons are overcrowded
(over 65000 people in prison)



2. Prisoners learn criminal behaviour from each other.



3. Many prisons are old and tatty = stress = violence.



4. Imprisonment breaks up families = no backup for the convict




5. If in prison a long time, they cannot cope with

the outside world.



Alternatives to Prison





1. Probation: Offenders under the supervision of a probation officer.
Meet / discuss



2. Community service: unpaid work which benefits the community



3. Fines: Money



4. Electronic tagging and curfews: Tags to keep offenders in and out of
trouble!



5. ASBOs: Keep people away from troubled areas.




CAPITAL PUNISHMENT


The

Death Penalty We stopped using capital punishment in 1965, but
other countries, e.g. USA still do.


Arguments in Favour of Capital Punishment





1. It will
DETER
or stop other people from murdering. (NB. The number
of murders in England has gone up a lot since 1965)



2. It
PROTECTS
society. It will keep the murdered from killing again.
(NB. Many murders
who have been to prison for murder, come out and
then killed again)



3. It saves
money
! (Much cheaper than prison!)



4. Some criminals prefer the death sentence to life imprisonment!



5. It is
VINDICATION


i.e. it is correct for breaking the Law.



6. It i
s
RETRIBUTION


i.e. it is just and fair for the victims who have
been murdered.


Arguments against Capital Punishment




1. What if it gets it
WRONG
! Mistakes can be made and the wrong person
killed. (It has happened)




2. It is
HARSH


it punishes the
murderer

s family as well.




3. It

s
CRUEL!
(not appropriate in our modern society)





4. It encourages
TERRORISM
as some terrorists use this to show how
they would „die


for their cause (and the
refore become a MARTYR
(hero).


Religious views





All agree that you should obey the law and often sin leads to crime.
Punishment should fit the crime.



Catholics
believe that capital punishment is JUST for „cases of extreme
gravity


like murder, especially if it is to protect society, as the Bible
says „
Whoever sheds the blood of a man, by man shall his blood be shed;
for God made man in his own image.


Also

Show no pity: life for life, eye
for an eye, a tooth for a tooth



Church of England / Methodist
Christians:
Many disagree with capital punishment.
Jesus taught
FORGIVENESS
and not to seek revenge. Also, it says in the bible that it
is a sin to kill. Life is sacred and only God should take it away. It is God
who judges. Humans must forgive and help the person to change. The
Church of England (Anglican
s) announced in 1983 that it was against
capital punishment because it didn

t succeed as a deterrent.
Quakers
:
Against Capital Punishment as there is a bit of God in everyone


human
life is sacred.



e.g. Bible teaching
: The Woman caught in Adultery



A Jew
ish woman was found guilty of having an affair (adultery) and the
law at that time stated that she should be stoned to death. Jesus was
asked whether that was right or not. He answered that yes she should be
punished, but only by someone who was free from
sin themselves. Since
only God was considered perfect, no one dared throw a stone. Jesus then
told the woman to say sorry and agree not to do it again. Christians use
this as an example of how Jesus would want us to deal with offenders, to
give them a seco
nd chance.



In conclusion
: Love the sinner Hate the sin (the crime) Give them a
second chance (so they could change) As a result, many Christians would
support the work of an organisation called
NACRO
(The National
Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders) which seeks to
reform the prison system and help offenders settle back into the
community after prison. have thought about more than one point of view.


Rich and Poor



How can you get rich?
(hard

work, good job (fat cat salary), gambling, inherit,
wealthy family, own a business)

What causes poverty? (
debt, gambling, lazy, illness, drugs, poor education)

Who can help the poor?
Charities (e.g. Salvation Army


food / shelter /
advice)



What do Christians Think?
Jesus:
It

s not wrong to be rich but if it is all that
you live for, it isn

t right. You should think of others


share your wealth. Don

t

store up for yourselves

treasures on earth


but store up

treasures in heaven


which will last longer. Put your trust in Jesus / God not in money ~ God will take
care of you.

You can

t serve both God and money



The love of money is the
root of all evil



It is easier for a cam
el to go through the eye of a needle than
for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God


= money can blind you from what is
really important. You must be prepared to give it all up. Therefore, some
Christians justify their wealth as they may give a lot to hel
p others, e.g. Bob
Geldof uses his time and money to help people in Africa. Some Christians hate
the lottery (encourages greed and can lead to gambling addiction). Some think it
is okay because the money goes to charity as

well.
Other quotes:
If a man has
2
coats he should share it with someone who has none. The LOVE of money is the
root of all evil.




World poverty




understand why there are inequalities that lead to extreme poverty.



understand some of the causes and effects of poverty in LEDCs.



give

examples of religious teachings relating to world poverty.



understand why believers should care for the poor and how they should
respond to the teachings.



understand and explain the concepts of justice, stewardship and
compassion, and apply them to the is
sue of world poverty.



evaluate the impact of global interdependence, world trade and Fairtrade.



discuss the work of voluntary service and religious organisations working
with the poor in LEDCs.



give

an example of a major natural disaster that caused widesp
read
poverty in an LEDC and evaluate the effectiveness of the aid response.



explain the differences between emergency and long
-
term aid and discuss
the advantages and disadvantages of each.



understand the need for sustainable development



discuss the topics

from a different points of view, particularly religious
ones.



The world in which we live in is one of great inequality, often caused by man.
People get caught in a poverty cycle (no food = get ill = can

t work = no money =
no food).


Causes of World Poverty:
LEDCs = Less economically developed countries (e.g.
Africa)


struggle due to world debt EDCs = Economically developed countries
(e.g. UK) do not always trade fairly with LEDCs. Disease Natural Disasters
Climate change (droughts et
c) Corrupt Governments War What do Christians
think?
Christians believe that God created the world and put man in charge. It
is therefore, up to us to take care of it
(stewardship).





Jesus taught that people should not be concerned with worldly wealth,

but with
Christian virtues such as love, compassion and forgiveness if they ever wished to
get to heaven. This is shown by the quote from the Bible, which says "it would
be easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than it would be for a
rich

man to enter the Kingdom of God." Jesus encouraged believers to put „faith
into action


and

love your neighbour


as shown by the parable of the Good
Samaritan and by his own example (he associated with many outcasts and poor
people). Because of this sent
iment, many Christian organisations are involved in
providing aid to the poor countries of the world, e.g. CAFOD (Catholic) and
Christian Aid (open to any Christian).
Justice


Bringing about what is right,
fair, according to the Law.
Stewardship


being r
esponsible and looking after
something for someone else, e.g. the world for God.
Compassion


suffering with
those who suffer. If there were more compassion in the world, more people
would
FEEL
the suffering and therefore do something about it.



What do
Christians do about poverty? Pray Give money to charity (e.g.
Christian
Aid


help with
Emergency Aid
(short term help


food / shelter) and
Long
Term Aid
(schools / hospitals / seeds etc) Work for a charity (volunteer f
or a
year) Campaign (write to MP
s) F
und raise Buy Fair trade (give farmers a fair
wage and premiums to community e.g. medical / schooling.)
What do Muslims
think?


Muslims believe that poverty is caused by selfishness and greed, therefore,
people must help work for justice for the poor, as
all humans are made by God
and are equal. The Islamic faith is based upon the Five Pillars, which lay down
requirements for Muslims. One of these pillars is Zakat, which requires Muslims
to give 10
% of their