flow project document - School of Biomedical Sciences

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Faculty of Health Sciences




313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
1

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



313
400

Biomedical Science

100


Semester One, 2011


Unit study package number:

313400

Mode of study
:

Internal

Tuition pattern summary:

1 x 2 hr lecture (weekly)


1 x 2 hr lab (weekly)

Credit value:

25

Pre
-
requisite units:

none

Co
-
requisite units:

none

Anti
-
requisite units:

none

Additional Requirements:

none


Result type:

Grade and mark

Approved incidental fees:

All fee information can be obtained through the Fees
Centre. Visit
fees.curtin.edu.au

for details.



Unit Coordinator:

Adrian Paxman


Phone: 9266 4316


Email: A.Paxman@curtin.edu.au


Room: 308.203


Consultati
on times:

TBA


Teaching Staff:

Dr Brian Brestovac




Ph:
(08) 9266 7474


Email:
B.Brestovac@curtin.edu.au



Room: 310.213


Consultation times:

TBA


Administrative contact:

School Reception


Phone:

9266 7374


Email:

h.tonkin@curtin.edu.au


Room:

308 L1 Reception Office



Learning Management System
:

FLECS
-

Blackboard (
oasis.curtin.edu.au
)



313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
2

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



Syllabus


This unit is an introduction to the theory and application of disciplines in the biomedical
sciences: microbiology, immunology, histopathology, haematology, biochemistry and
molecular genetics. Themes include the basic theory of the cellular and molecular
components that form the foundations of biomedical science, the investigation of disease and
infectious agents, occupational health considerations, the use of specialized equipment and
testing of biological samples in a professional manner. The role and fu
nction of medical and
research laboratories will also be explored.


Introduction


Welcome to Biomedical Science 100!

The area of biomedical science is an exciting and fascinating field for anyone interested in
science, medicine or laboratory work.

This
unit will introduce you to biomedical science
including the theory, the significance and the application of activities performed in diagnostic
or medical research laboratories.

You will be provided with the opportunity to develop Curtin graduate attribute
s both as an
independent learner and as part of a team with other students and the University staff
involved in Biomedical Science 100.

You will be strongly encouraged

to

“think” and “act” like
a professional Biomedical Scientist throughout this unit.

St
udents taking this unit include those studying courses in Laboratory Medicine/Medical
Science, Human Biology, Dental Therapy and Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
however the material is applicable to any Health Science or Biology degree.



Unit Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit students can:

Graduate
Attributes
addressed:

1.
Categorize and explain characteristics of microorganisms and relate their
interactions with humans and the environment.


2.
Describe and explain the basic components and function of the human
immune system, blood and selected tissues.


3.
Propose and evaluate measures for the prevention of the spread of
pathogens in laboratory and clinical settings.


4. Perform s
elected laboratory techniques competently and safely.





Faculty of Health Sciences




313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
3

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



Curtin’s Graduate Attributes


Apply discipline
knowledge


Thinking skills

(use analytical skills to
solve problems)


Information skills

(confidence to
investigate new ideas)


Communication skills


Technology skills


Learning how to
learn

(apply principles learnt
to new situations)

(confidence to tackle
unfamiliar problems)


International perspective

(value the perspectives of
others)


Cultural
understanding

(value

the perspectives of
others)


Professional skills

(work independently and
as a team) (plan

own
work)

Find out more about Curtin’s Graduate attributes at the Office of Teaching & Learning
website:
otl.curtin.edu.au


______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Learning Activities


Learning outcomes listed above will be achieved through an integrated program of lectures,
tutorials and laboratory sessions.


Lectures

will provide core content in this unit and will be complemented by Powerpoint slides
on blackboard and will also be a
vailable as iLectures to give additional access for revision or
if a session is missed.

Laboratory sessions

will comprise a series of experiments and exercises in appropriate
biomedical laboratory facilities particularly relevant to the discipline being
considered.

The
practical exercises will illustrate concepts discussed in lectures and give students an
opportunity to gain hands
-
on practical skills in important aspects of laboratory medicine.


Tutorial sessions

will discuss the results of practical
exercises and give students an
opportunity to raise questions and clarify concepts raised in lectures or laboratories.


Learning Resources

Recommended Texts



This unit does not have an essential textbook.
A

single text covering all discipline area
s
in this unit is not available at this point.


Before the purchase textbooks for this unit it is advised that students attend the unit
orientation session in StartU
p week.

During this session students

will be given an indication
of the merits of the te
xts listed below and the suitability of these texts for the requirements of
different students.


Students will need to refer to a text that provides an introduction to microbiology.

The
following three textbooks provide this information.


Faculty of Health Sciences




313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
4

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



Willey, J.M. ,

Sherwood, L.M. & Woolverton, C.J. ( 2008)
Prescott’s
Microbiology
,

8
th

Ed, McGraw Hill NY.


(
A detailed, microbiology text that will be
recommended for

subsequent units taken by

Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
students and Public Health students
)


Bauman, R.W. (
2007)
Microbiology with Diseases by Taxonomy,

3
rd

Ed
Benjamin Cummings NY.

(
A detailed, medical based, microbiology text that will be recommended for
subsequent units taken by
Laboratory Medicine
students
)


Engelkirk, P.G. &

Burton, G. R. W. (2007)
Burton’s Microbiology
,

8
th

Ed,

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

PA


(recommended for
Human Bi
ology (PreClinical) students,

Dental Therapy students

and as a
relatively
simple introduction to the area of microbiology
)


The following
text is recommended for an in
troduction to the remainder of the laboratory
component (other than microbiology):


Cox, P. & Wilken, D. (2011)
Palko’s Medical Laboratory Procedures
,

3
rd

Ed.
McGraw Hill NY


For general laboratory aspects of this unit and s
ubsequent years of their course students are
recommended:


Reed, R.,Holmes, D., Weyers, J. & Jones, A. (2007)
Practical Skills in
Biomolecular Sciences
,

3
rd

Ed, Pearson Benjamin Cummings UK.



Online Resources


Lecture slides on Blackboard. iLectures
.


______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Assessment

Assessment Schedule

Task

Value (%)

Date due

Unit Learning
Outcome(s) assessed

1.

Week 4, theory test

(eTest)


15

21 March

1, 3

2.

Week 6, Lab

test


20

4 April

1,3, 4

3.

Week 12, Final lab test


20

16 May

1,3 ,4

4.

Exam week, final theory exam


45

1


12 June

1,2,3,4





Faculty of Health Sciences




313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
5

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



Detailed information on assessment tasks


Assessment task
1:



Your first assessment will be in week 4 and cover the first 3 weeks of this unit. It will be run through
the “Assessment Centre” located in the Library (105:510). It will consist of Multi
-
choice questions and
be worth 15% of your final assessment.
When you

go to do the test please bring you ID card.

You will
have 40 minutes to complete the test.
This is a closed book assessment.
You must
reserve

a time
du
ring week 4 to sit the test.

Please be advised the Assessment Centre booking system gives students the

flexibility to book a test
at a time that is suitable. This does not

guarantee that your preferred time will be available. It is your

responsibility to ensure that you have completed the test within the

specified availability period.
Students are advised t
o make their bookings

early in the semester
for their week 4 eTest.

To make your bookings click on the link in the My Studies tab in OASIS.

Once you have made your
booking be sure to record the date and time in your

diary. We encourage students to be
early,
however if you arrive more than 10

minutes before your scheduled time you may be asked to wait.


Bookings can be changed or deleted up to 10 minutes before the start time.

If you do not plan to use
your bookings please delete the booking so that it

can be made available to another student. If you
arrive more than 10 minutes

after your scheduled booking you will forfeit your booking. If you do not

attend at the scheduled time your booking will be blocked. In either case

you will not be able to make
an
other booking until the block has been

removed by the Assessment Centre Team.


The Assessment Centre is open from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm (last test time 5:00

pm) Monday to Friday
.

Assessment task
2:



The second assessment will be
l
aboratory based and
done in your Lab
oratory

session 6.

It will be
microbiology
focused

and consists of performing a gram stain of bacteria, viewing the gram stain
u
sing

a microscope
that

you will set up appropriately, re
porting on that gram stain. Pla
ting out for
single colonies and
performing
an aseptic dilution test. These manipulations will be
taught

in the first
5 weeks of this unit.

This will form 20% of your final assessment.

Assessment task
3:



The third assessment is also a laboratory

ba
sed assessment and will cover the lab
oratory

work done
from week
s 7 to

12. This will cover methods based on the immunology, haematology, histopathology,
biochemistry and molecular biology components of this unit.


This test

will be a series of stations at

which you need to examine a laboratory item or exhibition and answer questions for that exhibition.
This will form 20% of your final assessment.

Assessment task
4:



The final assessment task will be the final theoretical exam done during the exam
ina
tion

period

at
the end of semester. It will cover of all work done in the semester in the unit.

It will be a 2 hour
written exam and consist of multi
-
choice and short answer questions. This will be worth 45% of your
final assessment.


______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Fair assessment through moderation

Moderation describes a quality assurance process to ensure that assessments are
appropriate to the learning outcomes, and that student work is consistently evaluated by
assessors. Minimum standards for the moderation of assessment are described in the
Ass
essment Manual, available from
policies.curtin.edu.au/policies/teachingandlearning.cfm



Faculty of Health Sciences




313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
6

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



Late penalties

Students are expected to submit each assessment on or before the due deadl
ine date.
Failure to do so will result in a 10% penalty per calendar day (eg 10% per day off the
‘total’
marks
available



an assignment worth 25 marks will lose 2.5 marks every day it is late). An
assignment more than 7 days overdue will not be marked.


Pass requirements

Students should note that a mark of 50% or more in BOTH the theoretical AND practical
component of the unit is required in order to secure a pass. Failure in any one area may
result in an overall failure in this unit regardless of the to
tal marks accrued. That is, a pass in
the practical component but failure in the theory (or vice versa) may lead to a fail grade for
the unit, even though the student’s total mark may exceed 50%.


Referencing style

Students should use the
APA (American
Psychological Association)

referencing style when
preparing assignments. More information can be found on this style from the Library web site:
library.curt
in.edu.au/research_and_information_skills/referencing

______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plagiarism

Plagiarism occurs when work or property of another person is presented as one's own,
with
out appropriate acknowledgement or referencing. Plagiarism is a serious offence. For
more information refer to
academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au

Plagiarism Monitoring

Work submitted may

be subjected to a plagiarism detection process, which may incl
ude the
use of systems such as ‘Turnitin’.

For further information, see
academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/tur
nitin.cfm


Additional

information

Enrolment:

It is your responsibility to ensure that your enrolment is correct
-

you can check your
enrolment through the eStudent option on OASIS
,
where you can also print an Enrolment
Advice.

Supplementary/Deferred Exams:

Supplementary and deferred examinations granted by
the Faculty of Health Sciences

will be
held

in the second or third week after the exam period
.

Notification to students will be made
after the
Faculty of Health Sciences

Board of Examiners meeting via the Official
Communications Channel (OCC) in OASIS. It is the student’s responsibility to check their
OASIS account for official Curtin correspondence on a weekly basis. If your results show that
you have been awarded a supp
lementary or deferred exam you should immediately check
your OASIS email for details.


Faculty of Health Sciences




313400

Biomedical Science 100

2/11/10

This unit is managed by the Faculty of Health Sciences

Page
7

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B



Student Rights and Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation

and

policies and
procedures relating to
his or her

r
ights and

responsibilities as a student.

These include:



the Student Charter



the Universit
y’s Guiding Ethical Principles



the University’s policy and statements on pla
giarism and academic integrity



copyright p
rinciples and responsibilities



the University’s p
olicies on appropriate use of s
oftware and computer facilities


Information on all these things is available through the University’s “Student Rights and
Responsibilities” website at:

students.curtin.edu
.au/rights
.


Recent
unit
changes

We welcome feedback as one way to keep improving this unit. Students are encouraged to
give unit feedback through
e
VALUate
, Curtin’s online student feedback system (see
http://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/index.cfm
).





http://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm











Program calendar

“O” week


21 February


Orientation: Unit Outline


No Practical



Semester 1
e
VALUate


is open for student feedback in weeks
11
-
16




Publication Date:

18 March 2013


Page
8

of
8

CRICOS Provider Code

WA 00301J, NSW 02637B





1


28 February

Introduction to
the Biomedical Sciences: role of the laboratory in
diagnostic pathology.

Basic requirements for Laboratory Safety.


No Practical


2


7

March

Concepts of microbiology: types of microorganisms, their role in
health and infectious disease. Fundamentals of bacteriology.


Practical 1



3


14 March

An introduction to mycology, virology and parasitology.


Practical 2



4


21 March

Control of microorganisms:
the
role of disinfection, sterilisation
and antimicrobial chemotherapy
. Asepsis and safe handling of
microbes.

Week 4 Theory Test

(covering
material from weeks 1 to 3)
:

i
n
the
Assessment Centre at the time you have booked


Pract
ical 3




5


28 March

Applied bioscience: mi
crobiology of foods. Microbes
and the
environment. Microbial biotechnology



Practical 4



6


4 April

Hos
t

microbe interactions. Host defences: non
-
specific
defences.


Foundations of immunology:
the immune

system
and
specif
i
c host defence
s



Practical Assessment




7


11 April

The blood and it’s components
-

an introduction to laboratory
haematology.


Practical 6



8


18 April

Foundations of Histopathology
-

the study of human tissues,
laboratory
processing and section preparation. Basic histology.



Practical 7


9



25 April

Week Free


No Practical



10


2 May



Bio
-
molecules


review of the basic structure and function.


Practica
l 8



11


9 May

Fundamentals of molecular biology and molecular
genetics.
Laboratory molecular diagnostic methods.

Practical
9


12



16 May


Instrumentation


introduction to the use of laboratory
instruments and their quality assessment.



Practical Assessment



13


23 May

Review session



14


30 May

Study Week


15
-

16


Examinations