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14. College of Pharmacy

M. Lynn Crismon, PharmD,

Dean

Patrick J. Davis, PhD,

Senior Associate Dean

Carlton K. Erickson, PhD,

Associate Dean

William McIntyre, PharmD,

Associate Dean

Diane B. Ginsburg, MS,

Assistant Dean

Jennifer L. Ridings
-
Myhra, BSPhr,

Assistant Dean

Richard E. Wilcox, PhD,

Assistant Dean

http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/

GENERAL I NFORMATI ON

HI STORY

For more than a century, the University’s College of Pharmacy has provided education and training for men and women
as pharmacy practitioners
, scientists, professional leaders, and responsible citizens. Eleven students constituted the first
class when a school of pharmacy was created in the fall of 1893 at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.
In 1927, the program was reorganized

as the College of Pharmacy and moved to the Austin campus. The college shared
quarters with other University programs until 1952, when the first pharmacy building was opened. Instruction now takes
place in facilities designed for the pharmacy program and
located near the center of the Austin campus, and on the
campuses of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, the University of Texas at El Paso, and the
University of Texas
-

Pan American in Edinburg.

The first undergraduate program c
onsisted of two sessions, each seven months in length. The current PharmD degree
program requires six years in preprofessional subjects, biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, and professional
experience courses. Graduate study became available in 1948 wi
th the institution of a Master of Science in Pharmacy
degree program. Today programs are also available that lead to the Doctor of Philosophy in the pharmaceutical,
administrative, and clinical sciences. More than eight thousand students have graduated fro
m the programs offered by the
college; many have achieved state, national, and international prominence in pharmacy or in related health fields.

Academic leadership for pharmaceutical education at the University has been provided by eleven prominent educat
ors,
beginning with James Kennedy of San Antonio, who was appointed as a pharmacy professor and director of the
Galveston program in 1893. He was succeeded by

R. R. D.
Cline, who for almost thirty years guided pharmaceutical
education in Texas. When the sc
hool was moved to Austin in 1927,

W. F.
Gidley was named the first dean of the college.
In 1947, Henry M. Burlage succeeded Professor Gidley as dean. He was succeeded in 1962 by

Lee F. Worrell, who served until 1966. Carl C. Albers was acting dean until J
oseph B. Sprowls was appointed dean in
1967. William J. Sheffield became acting dean upon the death of Professor Sprowls in 1971. He was succeeded in 1973
by James T. Doluisio, who served the college for twenty
-
five years. Steven Leslie served as dean from

1998 until 2007,
when M. Lynn Crismon assumed the leadership of the college.

University pharmacy students receive instruction in the basic biomedical sciences, the pharmaceutical sciences,
pharmacy administration, and pharmacy practice in state
-
of
-
the
-
art

academic and health care facilities. Pharmacy interns
expand their professional practice knowledge and skills at clinical education sites in the Austin/Temple/Waco area, El
Paso, and the Lower Rio Grande Valley, and at the University of Texas Health Scien
ce Center at San Antonio, the
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, the Texas Medical Center in Houston, and the University of
Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

ACCREDI TATI ON

The College of Pharmacy has been a member of the American A
ssociation of Colleges of Pharmacy since 1927. The
Doctor of Pharmacy degree program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE); ACPE
does not accredit master’s and PhD degrees in pharmacy.

AI MS AND CURRI CULA

The University of
fers the six
-
year program leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) as the sole entry
-
level practice
degree. This program offers a course of study in the pharmaceutical and clinical sciences designed to provide the state
and the nation with pharmacists wh
o are scientifically trained and clinically competent to deliver a full spectrum of
pharmaceutical services in all areas of practice. In meeting its teaching obligation, the college provides a curriculum and
faculty that offer students an educational exper
ience beyond training solely for the practice of pharmacy.

The profession of pharmacy is evolving rapidly from a role primarily in distribution of medication toward a patient
-
oriented,
pharmaceutical care model. Pharmaceutical care is a process through whi
ch a pharmacist interacts with the patient and
other health care professionals in the design, implementation, and monitoring of a patient
-
specific therapeutic plan that will
produce the desired therapeutic outcomes. To ensure that graduates have the necess
ary tools to practice in this complex,
patient
-
oriented environment, the pharmacy curriculum has evolved from traditional discipline
-
specific coursework to a
discipline
-
integrated approach of disease state management and a case
-
based, team approach to the
design of the patient
-
specific therapeutic plan.

The professional curriculum is designed to prepare pharmacy graduates to provide patient
-
oriented pharmaceutical
care in a contemporary setting, whether a community pharmacy, an ambulatory clinic, a hospital
, or a long
-
term care
facility, as well as to work in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, the curriculum aims to inculcate an understanding o
f
the basic sciences sufficient to prepare the student for graduate study in the pharmaceutical sciences. The
se objectives
are pursued through a balanced program of study in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, therapeutics,
pharmacy administration, social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities, as well as a structured clinical and
professional
practice experiential program. The holder of a professional degree from the University of Texas at Austin has
received an education and training as sophisticated as any available in the health professions.

The College of Pharmacy has conducted a joint Phar
mD degree program with the University of Texas Health Science
Center at San Antonio since 1974. Students who complete their internship courses at the Health Science Center are
considered part of this program and receive a degree awarded jointly by the two
institutions.

The college has cooperative programs with the University of Texas at El Paso and the University of Texas
-

Pan
American, and educational affiliations with several other academic health institutions, including Scott & White Hospital in
Temple,

the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, the University of Texas Medical Branch at
Galveston, and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; and with other University of Texas System
academic components. The col
lege also has cooperative practice arrangements with medical centers and other health
care facilities throughout the state as part of the experiential program.

The college seeks to encourage the belief that education is ongoing and lifelong and that all le
vels of professional
education must form a continuum with professional practice and patient care. To meet this objective, the college provides
postgraduate educational programs and develops innovative programs of training through continuing education for t
he
roles pharmacists may be called on to fill as a result of changes in the patterns of delivery of pharmaceutical services.

In addition to the PharmD degree, the University offers the Master of Science in Pharmacy and the Doctor of
Philosophy with a major in pharmacy. Both graduate programs offer qualified students the opportunity to complete
specialty practice residencies. The
se programs are described in the
Graduate Catalog
.

LEGAL REQUI REMENTS F
OR PROFESSI ONAL PRAC
TI CE

Upon matriculation to the first professional year in the College of Pharmacy, each student must apply to become a student
intern trainee with the Texas State B
oard of Pharmacy (http://www.tsbp.state.tx.us/). Each student must be registered as
a student intern trainee, and subsequently as a student pharmacist
-
intern, in order to acquire, through pharmacy courses,
the internship hours necessary for licensure upon
graduation as a pharmacist in Texas. Only after completion of the first
professional year (at least thirty semester hours) may the student register as a student pharmacist
-
intern with the Texas
State Board of Pharmacy and earn internship hours.

Students sh
ould be aware that the process of registration as an intern includes a criminal history and fingerprint check.
The existence of a criminal record may preclude the student from registration as an intern and from subsequent licensure
as a pharmacist in Texas
. However, the Texas State Board of Pharmacy may grant limited internship status under certain
conditions to those with prior convictions. It is possible that health care facilities in which students are placed for inter
nship
may mandate an additional back
ground check and/or drug screen. Students assigned to these facilities must comply with
all such requirements. If a student cannot be placed in internship facilities because of prior convictions that appear on any

background check, or because of a positive

drug screen, his or her graduation may not be possible or may be significantly
delayed.

After completing the first professional year (at least thirty semester hours), students registered as student pharmacist
-
interns may earn internship hours toward licen
sure not only through professional sequence pharmacy courses but also
outside the academic program through employment in certain practice settings. Internship hours gained outside the
College of Pharmacy curriculum, however, may not replace any portion of
the experiential program required for
graduation.

Graduates of the College of Pharmacy are eligible to apply to the Texas State Board of Pharmacy for licensure as
pharmacists. Licensure exams may be taken shortly after graduation. Postgraduate internship e
xperience is not currently
required for Texas licensure but may be required for licensure in other states.

Additional information about requirements for pharmacy licensure in Texas is available from the Texas State Board of
Pharmacy, William P. Hobby Build
ing, 333 Guadalupe Street. The mailing address is P

O Box 21, Austin TX 78701
-
3942.
The URL is http://www.tsbp.state.tx.us/, and the telephone number is (512) 305
-
8000.

Intern registration and pharmacist licensure requirements are subject to change by the
Texas State Board of
Pharmacy. Students and graduates must meet current requirements, even if they differ from those described above.

FACI LI TI ES

THE PHARMACY BUI LDI N
G

In addition to well
-
equipped classrooms, laboratories, and offices, the Pharmacy Building

provides a learning resource
computer center and laboratory, a television production laboratory and classrooms, and pharmaceutical technology
laboratories with facilities for product development, pilot manufacturing, sterile production and quality control
, and stability
testing. The University Health Services Pharmacy also serves as a teaching laboratory for second
-
year pharmacy
students while providing comprehensive pharmaceutical services to the student community.

PHARMACY FACI LI TI ES
I N SAN ANTONI O

The U
niversity of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio has provided facilities for the education and training of
pharmacy students, residents, and fellows since 1972. The McDermott Clinical Sciences Building on the Health Science
Center campus, which hous
es the pharmacotherapy division of the college and the Pharmacotherapy Education and
Research Center, provides a state
-
of
-
the
-
art distance education classroom, a student computer laboratory, research
laboratories, and offices for faculty and staff members.

The Division of Pharmacotherapy maintains a broad range of
affiliation agreements with institutions in San Antonio that provide extensive training opportunities in a variety of practic
e
settings. Research opportunities exist in the areas of infectious dis
ease, oncology, anticoagulation, stroke prevention, and
psychiatry.

PHARMACY FACI LI TI ES
I N EL PASO

The Cooperative Pharmacy Program with UT El

Paso provides classrooms and conference rooms equipped for high
-
quality interactive telecommunications and satell
ite reception, as well as a complex of offices for faculty and staff
members. Facilities can also accommodate intravenous admixture, patient assessment, and drug information. These
accommodations supplement the physical facilities, student computer laborat
ories, libraries, and other services available
on the University of Texas at El

Paso campus.

PHARMACY FACI LI TI ES
I N EDI NBURG

The Cooperative Pharmacy Program with UT Pan American is located within the Edinburg Regional Academic Health
Center (ERAHC), an ed
ucational and biomedical research facility. The building provides research laboratories, computer
and library facilities, staff and faculty offices, and conference rooms. The classrooms are equipped for both on
-
site and
distance education and can accommoda
te instruction for intravenous admixture and

patient assessment courses. The
library, computer facilities,

and health services on the UT Pan American campus are also available to students in the
cooperative program.

OFFI CE OF PHARMACY C
ONTI NUI NG EDUCATI ON

As part of a state university, the College of Pharmacy recognizes obligations to the profession of pharmacy on a state,
national, and international level. The college began providing continuing education to pharmacists in 1953 in cooperation
with the Unive
rsity’s Division of Extension. Today, the college is an ACPE
-
approved provider of continuing pharmaceutical
education. A primary goal of the Office of Pharmacy Continuing Education is to advance the pharmacist’s knowledge and
provide the skills necessary t
o adapt to a changing practice. Toward this end, the office offers a variety of programs,
including home
-
study courses, seminars, multiday conferences, and certificate programs addressing the most current
practice issues. Programs are conducted both on
-

an
d off
-
campus and by correspondence and distance learning.
Annually, the office provides about 350 contact hours of continuing education programming to more than sixty
-
five
hundred pharmacists across the United States.

LEARNI NG RESOURCE CE
NTER

The college’s

Learning Resource Center (LRC) offers a variety of instructional resources to students and faculty
members. The LRC provides state
-
of
-
the
-
art digital video teleconferencing transmission of courses among the Austin
campus, the Health Science Center at San
Antonio, UT El

Paso, UT Pan American, and other sites in The University of
Texas System, so that faculty members can teach students at two or more locations simultaneously. Many courses are
recorded and made available by videostreaming. The LRC also operat
es the Delgado Library, a multipurpose,
nontraditional facility with computer support, individual and small
-
group study spaces, and seminar rooms.

The staff of the LRC provides faculty members and students with computer hardware and software consulting as
well as
advice on the use of media in the classroom. Facilities and equipment are available for video and data projection. The
college’s Web site (http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/) provides additional information and curriculum support for students
and facu
lty members.

In the Student Computer Laboratory, students have access to desktop computers with removable media and CD
drives, professional business software, and Internet client software. The electronic classrooms feature desktop computers
with projection

equipment and a full suite of software. The large distance
-
learning classroom supports notebook computer
ports. Wireless high
-
speed Internet is available throughout the Pharmacy Building.

The goal of the Learning Resource Center is to provide the highest
quality learning technology infrastructure and support
services to students and faculty members.

LI BRARI ES

The Life Science Library supports the teaching and research missions of the College of Pharmacy by providing access to
an extensive array of print an
d electronic information resources. The library maintains extensive holdings in
pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pharmacy administration, and medicinal chemistry, with supporting materials in medicine
and nutrition. Biochemistry and medicinal chemistry materia
l is complemented by the collections of the Mallet Chemistry
Library. Medical material is supplemented by additional material in nursing, pediatrics, and psychiatry at the Perry
-
Castañeda Library.

The online Clinical Information Center (Clin
-
IC), sponsored by the Life Science Library, provides electronic access to
the complete resources of a drug information center. The center gives users access to significant electronic resources
such as
MICROMEDEX
, Access Pharmacy, AHFS Drug Information, Cli
nical Pharmacology Online, Facts & Comparisons,
Lexi
-
Comp
ONLINE
, and the Cochrane Library of evidence
-
based reviews, in addition to databases such as Medline,
International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Web of Science, and SciFinder Scholar. These electronic
resources are available
for remote access through the University Libraries Web site, which offers a full range of databases, access to electronic
journals, and links to other digital information sources. Access to print information resources for students o
n rotation and
at College of Pharmacy Cooperative Program campuses is provided through the University’s D
-
Doc distance learning
library service.

All units of the University Libraries offer reference service, circulation and reserve services, and interlibra
ry loan.
Instruction in the use of information resources is provided in required pharmacy classes and by individual consultation.

HONORS AND AWARDS

UNI VERSI TY HONORS

The designation University Honors, awarded at the end of each long
-
session semester, gives

official recognition and
commendation to students whose grades for the semester indicate distinguished academic accomplishment. Both the
quality and the quantity of work done are considered. Criteria for University Honors are given in
General Information
.

GRADUATI ON WI TH UNI V
ERSI TY HONORS

Students who, upon graduation, have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement are eligible to graduate with
University Honors. Criteria for graduation with University Honors are given in
General Information
.

COLLEGE O
F PHARMACY RECOGNI TI
ON AWARDS

The Highest GPA Award

is given to the graduate(s) with the highest grade point average in required PharmD courses.

The Second Highest GPA Award

is given to the graduate(s) with the second highest grade point average in require
d
PharmD courses.

The College of Pharmacy Award for Outstanding Research

is given to a graduate who has demonstrated
outstanding ability in areas of pharmacy research.

The College of Pharmacy Award for Excellence in Patient Care

is presented to a graduate
who has demonstrated
excellence in patient care while pursuing the PharmD degree.

The College of Pharmacy Award for Dedicated Service

is presented to a graduate who has shown a commitment to
service above and beyond the norm.

The College of Pharmacy Award
for Exemplary Leadership

is presented to a graduate who has excelled in
leadership while pursuing the PharmD degree.

The College of Pharmacy Alumni Association Mortar and Pestle Award for Leadership, Service, and Patient
Care

recognizes an exceptional graduate who has demonstrated outstanding leadership, service, and patient care in the
college, the University, and the community while pursuing the PharmD degree. The award is a hand
-
carved mortar and
pestle.

College of Pharmacy

Class Officers

are elected by their classmates and serve as permanent officers of their class.

Students’ scholarly accomplishments are also recognized through election to Rho Chi, the national pharmaceutical
honor society, and through admission to the Pha
rmacy Honors Program. Students’ leadership accomplishments are
recognized through election to Phi Lambda Sigma, the national pharmacy leadership society.

FI NANCI AL ASSI STANCE

AVAI LABLE THROUGH TH
E COLLEGE OF PHARMAC
Y

Students who have completed the first y
ear of the professional curriculum may apply for scholarships and loans offered
through the College of Pharmacy. Eligibility and application information is available at
http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/students/

finaid/scholarship.html and in the Office of S
tudent Affairs, Pharmacy Building 5.112.

ENDOWED PRESI DENTI AL

SCHOLARSHI PS

To be eligible to receive an Endowed Presidential Scholarship, students must meet the college’s eligibility requirements and
must have maintained a 3.50 grade point average in requi
red pharmacy courses. Students must also show evidence of
active involvement in college, University, and other extracurricular activities. The minimum Endowed Presidential Scholarship

is $2,500.

OTHER ENDOWED SCHOLA
RSHI PS

To be eligible to receive an endow
ed scholarship, students must meet the college’s eligibility requirements. For some
awards, students must meet additional criteria. The minimum endowed scholarship is $1,500.

OTHER SCHOLARSHI PS

Pharmaceutical Foundation scholarships are funded by various p
harmacy associations, individuals, employers, and
organizations. These scholarships are awarded, as they become available, through The University of Texas
Pharmaceutical Foundation and at the direction of the Undergraduate Financial Aid Committee.

LOAN FUN
DS

The Klinck Family Loan Funds.

These loan funds were established by the Klinck family of McAllen, Texas, to benefit
students in need of financial assistance. Emergency loans for a maximum of $500 are available; they are normally
repayable within thirty
days. Long
-
term loans of up to $1,000 are also available to pharmacy students who demonstrate
financial need. The interest rate for these loans is six percent, and interest must be paid while the student is still in sch
ool.
Repayment begins three months af
ter the student’s graduation from pharmacy school. Monthly payments of at least $100
are required, and the maximum payment period is eighteen months. Students may apply for more than one loan, but
except in unusual circumstances the loans will total no mor
e than $2,000. Additional information is available in the Office
of Student Affairs, Pharmacy Building 5.112.

Other loan funds.

Other loan funds may be available to pharmacy students. Information about these loans is available
from the Office of Student Af
fairs, Pharmacy Building 5.112.

STUDENT ORGANI ZATI ON
S

American Pharmaceutical Association Academy of Students of Pharmacy.

In December, 1951, the Longhorn
Pharmaceutical Association was organized as an association jointly representing the student branches
of the American
Pharmaceutical Association and the Texas Pharmaceutical Association. Renamed in 1998, the association sponsors
service projects and social events and serves to develop professionalism in pharmacy students.

Asian Pharmacy Students Associatio
n.

The mission of the Asian Pharmacy Students Association, established at the
University in 1999, is to promote unity among pharmacy students who have common interests, values, and backgrounds,
in order to help them achieve educational, professional, and p
ersonal excellence.

Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI).

This group seeks to identify and enroll all Christian pharmacists,
wherever they practice, and to assist them in creating opportunities for fellowship. CPFI is the first internation
al
organization of evangelical Christian pharmacists established with a focus on integrating the spiritual and vocational
dimensions of the pharmacist’s role.

Kappa Epsilon.

Kappa Epsilon is a national professional fraternity established to promote careers

for women in
pharmacy, but membership is open to women and men. Xi chapter, established in 1943, sponsors service and
professional projects, including a city
-
wide Poison Prevention program in elementary schools each February, as well as
social events and
other extracurricular activities.

Mexican American Association of Pharmacy Students.

The primary goals of the Mexican American Association of
Pharmacy Students are to assist in the recruitment and retention of qualified students in the College of Pharmacy,

to
provide health care education to the community, and to maintain open communication channels between students and the
college. Membership is open to prepharmacy and professional students.

Pharmacy Council.

The Pharmacy Council is composed of officers of

the recognized student organizations in the College
of Pharmacy and elected student representatives from each of the professional pharmacy classes. The president and
financial director of the council are also members of the Senate of College Councils, and

a member of the council serves
as the college’s representative to Student Government. Acting as liaison between the student body and the Office of the
Dean, the Pharmacy Council works to ensure the equitable consideration of student concerns and problems.

The council
sponsors orientation programs for new pharmacy students, college and University
-
wide programs, and events that
promote student
-
faculty interaction.

Pharmacy Graduate Students’ Association.

This association conducts activities that promote the
general welfare of
pharmacy graduate students. Its chief purposes are to encourage and facilitate graduate student communication and
interaction; to gather and disseminate information important to pharmacy graduate students; to represent pharmacy
graduate
students to the University community; and to promote pharmaceutical education at the undergraduate level.

Phi Delta Chi.

Lambda chapter of Phi Delta Chi, established at the University in 1905, was reactivated in 1956. Phi Delta
Chi is a professional pharma
ceutical fraternity of national standing. Membership is open to qualified professional students
who are interested in promoting leadership, scholarship, and professional ethics in the field of pharmacy.

Phi Lambda Sigma.

Psi chapter of Phi Lambda Sigma, th
e national pharmacy leadership society, was established at the
University in 1989. Students selected for membership must be of high moral and ethical character, must have
demonstrated dedication, service, and leadership in the advancement of pharmacy, must

have completed at least ninety
semester hours of scholastic work, and must be in good academic standing as defined by the College of Pharmacy.

Rho Chi.

Nu chapter of Rho Chi, the national pharmaceutical honor society, was established at the University in
1930.
Charters for chapters of this organization are granted only to groups in colleges that are members in good standing of the
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility for membership in the society is based on scholarship,
character, per
sonality, and leadership. Students selected for membership must have a pharmacy grade point average of
at least 3.20, must be in the top 20 percent of their class, and must have completed the first professional year of the
pharmacy curriculum. All candidat
es must be approved by the dean of the College of Pharmacy.

UT Chapter, International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (UT
-
ISPOR).

This group’s mission is
to provide an environment in which students can share knowledge in phar
macoeconomi
cs and health outcomes research.
It brings together students of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research and members of the pharmaceutical industry,
health
-
related organizations, and academia; acts as a resource for students interested in pharmacoeconomics
and
outcomes research; and provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with the work of ISPOR and to be
represented in its affairs.

UT Chapter, National Community Pharmacists Association.

NCPA is a national professional organization representin
g the
interests of independent community pharmacists. The student chapter sponsors projects and events designed to foster the
entrepreneurial spirit among future practitioners. The national association has a loan program available to student members,
as we
ll as several competitive scholarships and research grants.

UT Chapter, National Pharmaceutical Assoc
iation.

The purpose of the SNPhA is to plan, organize, coordinate, and
execute programs geared toward the improvement of the health, educational, and soci
al environment of the minority
community.

University of Texas Student Society of Health
-
System Pharmacists.

The student chapter of the Texas Society of Health
-
System Pharmacists is an organization for students interested in institutional or health
-
system p
harmacy practice. An
affiliate of the American and Texas Societies of Health
-
System Pharmacists, the organization considers a wide range of
topics of interest to health professionals and encourages the broadest possible educational introduction to institut
ional
pharmacy and pharmaceutical care. This introduction includes presentation of programs and seminars, tours of pharmacy
practice sites, and distribution of literature. The chapter publicizes job openings in hospital pharmacies across the state.

Longhor
n Prepharmacy Association.

LPPA comprises all prepharmacy students at UT Austin. The group’s chief
objectives are to function as a small community of students within a large institution; to provide current information on the

preprofessional and professiona
l curricula; and to provide information about the pharmacy profession.

PLACEMENT SERVI CES

The College of Pharmacy, under the supervision of the assistant dean for experiential and professional affairs, conducts a
Placement Conference for graduating seniors
. The conference gives seniors an opportunity to interview for professional
practice positions with major employers of pharmacists in Texas and throughout the nation. A career workshop to prepare
students for interviews is held prior to the Placement Confe
rence as a part of Senior Conference. A college
-
wide Career
Day each spring, featuring displays by major employers, allows students in all years of the curriculum to interact with
numerous pharmacist employers.

The college also sponsors a summer internshi
p interview day for first
-
professional
-
year students. The event is
designed to help students find summer internship experiences that meet the early practice experience requirement.
Participating employers represent primarily community and hospital pharmacy

practice.

A limited number of competitive summer internships both in and outside of Texas are available by application only.
Information is available in the Office of Student Affairs, Pharmacy Building 5.112; from individual faculty members; and on
the co
llege’s Web site at http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/

general/experiential/student/summer.html.

As a complement to the assistance available from the college, the Sanger Learning and Career Center provides
comprehensive career services to all students. The ce
nter offers professional assistance to students in choosing or
changing their majors or careers, seeking an internship, and planning for a job search or graduate study.

The University makes no promise to secure employment for each graduate.

GRADUATE DEGREE
S

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Science in Pharmacy and the Doctor of Philosophy are offered through the
Graduate School and described in the

Graduate Catalog.

The graduate student may specialize in medicinal chemistry,
pharmacology and toxico
logy, pharmaceutics, pharmacotherapy, or pharmacy administration. Faculty members in each
area work closely with students and engage in research in such fields as drug synthesis, pharmacokinetics, drug
mechanisms and toxicity, and clinical research.

ADMI SSI ON AND REGI ST
RATI ON

ADMI SSI ON TO THE UNI
VERSI TY

Admission and readmission of undergraduate students to the University is the responsibility of the director of admissions.
Information about admission to the University is given in

General Information.

ADMI SSI ON TO THE PRO
FESSI ONAL CURRI CULUM

No student may begin the professional curriculum until he or she (1) has been admitted to the University by the director of
admissions according to the normal undergraduate procedures and (2) has been admitted to t
he professional curriculum
in pharmacy by the dean, following recommendation by the Admissions Committee of the College of Pharmacy, according
to the procedures on this and the following page. All students must meet the admission requirements given in the
catalog
in effect at the time of application. Admission to the University in no way implies or guarantees admission to the
professional curriculum. If the number of eligible applicants to the professional curriculum exceeds the number that
available facili
ties can accommodate, final selection is made by the college Admissions Committee and the dean.

Students should note that the two admission processes are separate and independent and that deadlines for
submission of all application materials for admission
to the University may differ from those for submission of all
application materials for admission to the professional curriculum.

Students who are enrolled in a pharmacy program at another institution and wish to transfer to the University should
follow th
e normal application process. Upon admission to the University and the professional curriculum, the student may
request advanced standing in the pharmacy curriculum. Placement is contingent on availability of space and on transcript
evaluation to determine

University equivalencies for the student’s course work.

As a condition of admission to the college, each student must sign a statement that he or she agrees to accept
assignment to any one of the college’s internship regions throughout the state. Cooperat
ive arrangements for pharmacy
education exist with academic units and health care institutions in the following internship regions: Austin/Temple/Waco,
Dallas/Fort Worth, El

Paso, Galveston/Houston, the Rio Grande Valley, and San Antonio. Internship region
s may be
added or deleted at any time based on the availability of resources. Elective regions, which provide limited internship
experiences for a specified period of time (less than four months), may also be available.

Students assigned to San Antonio and

Cooperative Pharmacy Program students from UT El

Paso and UT Pan
American in Edinburg must spend the last two years of the professional program in those regions. Students assigned to the
other regions spend only the final year of the program (the fourth p
rofessional internship year) in their assigned region.

Students are assigned to internship regions through a computer
-
generated random lottery number system that takes
students’ ranked preferences into account. Since most students relocate to internship re
gions outside the Austin area,
region assignment occurs during the latter part of the second professional year to allow students adequate time to make
personal and financial arrangements. There are no exceptions to the region assignment process. If a stude
nt fails to
agree to accept assignment to any region, he or she will not be admitted to the college.

The Cooperative Pharmacy Program is available to highly qualified high school seniors entering the University of Texas
at El

Paso or the University of

Tex
as
-

Pan American. The program offers these students a competitive advantage for admission to the University of
Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy once they complete the requirements of the program at the Cooperative Pharmacy
Program campus. Additional in
formation is available from UT El

Paso at (915) 747
-
8535 or
http://academics.utep.edu/pharmacy/, and from UT Pan American at (956) 318
-
5255 or
http://portal.utpa.edu/utpa_main/daa_home/hshs_home/pharmacy_home/.

ADMI SSI ON TO THE FI R
ST

PROFESSI ONAL YEAR

Adm
ission to the professional curriculum is competitive.

BASI C ADMI SSI ON CRI T
ERI A


1.

Scholarship, as indicated by grade point average and Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores. In evaluating
the applicant’s academic record, the Admissions Committee p
ays particular attention to the courses required for
admission.




Ideally, the applicant will have a grade point average of at least 2.80 in prerequisite coursework. Typically, more than
90 percent of successful applicants have grade point averages greate
r than 3.00, and more than 50 percent of
successful applicants have grade point averages greater than 3.60. The applicant will also have a PCAT composite
score in at least the 70th percentile, a score in at least the 70th percentile in each area, and writi
ng scores of at least
3.00. Typically, more than 75 percent of successful applicants have a composite score in the 70th percentile or better,
and more than 50 percent of successful applicants have a composite score in the 85th percentile or better.


2.

Ess
ays on the subjects “Why Pharmacy?” and “Why UT?”


3.

Letters of recommendation from people who know the applicant well professionally, especially employers.


4.

A résumé that provides details about the applicant’s professional, organizational, volunteer,
and service experience.

ADDI TI ONAL PERSONAL
FACTORS


1.

Pharmacy and other related work experience


2.

Organizational, service, and volunteer activities that demonstrate community involvement and leadership potential


3.

Teaching, tutoring, and mentoring e
xperience


4.

Research experience


5.

Honors and awards


6.

Interview. Applicants are screened for interviews based on academic record, direct work experience in the profession,
special life circumstances, and any other compelling factors. If the applicant

is invited for an interview, then other
factors are considered; these include but are not limited to the following:


a.

Knowledge of and motivation for pharmacy as a career


b.

Lifelong learning strategies


c.

Critical thinking skills


7.

Special life cir
cumstances; these include but are not limited to the following: single parent, socioeconomic status of
family, first generation attending college, overcoming adversity, resident of an underserved area of the state or an
area of Texas with a health professi
ons shortage, race and ethnicity, and cultural background.

Because the University is a public institution, strong preference is given to applicants who are legal residents of Texas
and to applicants from states without colleges of pharmacy. Applicants are
strongly encouraged to examine the admission
statistics published by the college on its admissions Web site, http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/admissions/ad_stats.html.


Application deadlines.

The deadline to apply for admission to the University is given at
the ApplyTexas Web site,
http://www.applytexas.org/; the deadline to submit the supplemental PharmD application is published by the College of
Pharmacy at http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/admissions/pharmd.html. Students are admitted for the fall semester on
ly.

ADMI SSI ON REQUI REMEN
TS


1.

The applicant should have completed at least sixty
-
six semester hours in total, and must have completed the following
forty
-
five hours in prerequisite courses prior to enrolling in the professional pharmacy curriculum:


a.

Ni
ne hours of biology, including cellular and molecular biology, structure and function of organisms, and genetics


b.

Eight hours of general chemistry with laboratory


c.

Three hours of freshman
-
level rhetoric and writing


d.

Three hours of sophomore
-
level
survey of American, British, or world literature


e.

Three hours of calculus (including both differential and integral calculus)


f.

Three hours of statistics


g.

Eight hours of organic chemistry with laboratory


h.

Four hours of microbiology with laborato
ry


i.

Four hours of physics with laboratory



The remaining twenty
-
one hours should be the core curriculum coursework listed on page 649.


2.

The applicant must remove all deficiencies in high school units by the means prescribed in
General Information

be
fore
seeking admission to the professional curriculum.

ADMI SSI ON PROCEDURES


1.

Application for admission to the professional curriculum should be made by submitting online application materials.


2

All University application materials must be submitted by

the deadline given at the ApplyTexas Web site,
http://www.applytexas.org/. All
PharmD supplemental application materials must be submitted by the deadline
published by the College of Pharmacy at http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/admissions/pharmd.html. Stud
ents are
admitted for the fall semester only.


3.

The following must be submitted to the University’s Office of Admissions:


a.

The completed online application for admission to the professional curriculum.


b.

The nonrefundable PharmD supplemental
application processing fee.


c.

The completed “Why Pharmacy?” and “Why UT?” essays and a résumé.


d.

Two letters of recommendation from people who know the applicant well professionally, such as work or service
supervisors.


e.

A high school transcript, if

the applicant’s foreign language requirement was completed in high school. Official
transcripts must be sent to the University’s Office of Admissions.


f.

Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores. Scores more than three years old are not accepted. T
he PCAT
scores must include writing sample scores.


g.

Scores on the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test), if and only if
the student is required by state law to take this test.


4.

Applicants must submit score
reports for any credit earned by examination. These reports should be sent directly to
DIIA

Student Testing Services at the University.


5.

The applicant may be asked to appear for a personal interview.


6.

The applicant is considered on the basis of over
all academic performance, with emphasis on grades in the required
PharmD prerequisite courses. In accordance with University policy, courses in which the applicant earned a grade of
D+, D, D
-
,
or

F
at another institution

are not transferable; they may not
be used to fulfill any degree requirements.
However, courses in which the student earned a grade of
D+
,
D
, or
D
-

are considered when the student’s admissibility
to the professional curriculum is determined.


7.

Applicants who have been offered admission to

the University and to the PharmD program will be asked to pay a
nonrefundable enrollment deposit. If the student does enroll in the program that fall, the deposit will be applied to the
semester’s tuition bill.


8.

An applicant who has been admitted to th
e University and to the professional curriculum but fails to enroll in either, and
who wishes to enter the professional curriculum in a subsequent fall semester, must reapply both to the University and
to the College of Pharmacy and must meet all requireme
nts in force at the time of reapplication.


9.

An applicant who has been admitted to and enrolls in the professional curriculum but subsequently withdraws, and
who wishes to reenter in a subsequent fall semester, must apply for readmission to the professio
nal curriculum and
must meet all requirements in force at the time of reapplication. A student who has been out of the University for a
semester or more must also apply for readmission to the University.

TECHNI CAL STANDARDS

“Technical standards” are the ob
servational, communication, sensory/motor, and intellectual skills, the behavioral and
social attributes, and the ethical values required for the completion of the professional curriculum and for the practice of
pharmacy. These standards are described on t
he college’s Web site at http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/. Each applicant
should review the technical standards. Any applicant who believes he or she may have difficulty meeting them should
contact the college’s director of admission to discuss possible acc
ommodations.

REGI STRATI ON

General Information

gives information about registration, adding and dropping courses, transfer from one division of the
University to another, and auditing a course. The

Course Schedule,

published before registration each semeste
r and
summer session, includes registration instructions, advising locations, and the times, places, and instructors of classes.
The

Course Schedule

and
General Information

are published on the registrar’s Web site, http://registrar.utexas.edu/. The
printe
d
General Information

is sold at campus
-
area bookstores.

PROFESSI ONAL LI ABI LI
TY I NSURANCE

Professional liability insurance is required of all students each year of the professional pharmacy curriculum. Coverage in
the amount of two million dollars for each

claim and four million dollars in the aggregate per year is provided through the
insurance policy. The approximate annual premium is $17.00, payable by the student. The policy covers the period
September 1 through August 31.

MEDI CAL CLEARANCE RE
QUI REMENTS

In addition to the University’s immunization requirements, students must show proof of immunity to tetanus, diphtheria,
hepatitis B, and varicella and must complete a PPD (Mantoux) skin test before entering the first professional year. In
compliance with
the Texas Administrative Code, section 97.64, the following are required:

t

Tetanus/diphtheria: One dose of vaccine within the past ten years.

t

Hepatitis B: At least two doses of the three
-
dose series. The third dose must be received before the student
co
mpletes the first professional semester. Students may also show serologic confirmation of immunity to the hepatitis
B virus via appropriate documentation.

t

Varicella: One dose, for students who received this vaccine prior to thirteen years of age, or two
doses, for students
who were not vaccinated before their thirteenth birthday. A history of varicella illness (chicken pox), validated by
serologic confirmation of immunity, is acceptable in lieu of vaccination.

Although not required by the state code, the
following is required by the College of Pharmacy:

t

PPD: A skin test for tuberculosis (PPD) is required within the three months preceding enrollment in the professional
sequence, and prior to each subsequent year of the professional sequence.

Immunization
requirements are subject to change. Every effort is made to notify students promptly of any changes. An
current list of vaccination requirements can be found online at
http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/general/experiential/student/immunization.html.

REGI STRATI ON AS A ST
UDENT PHARMACI ST
-
I NTERN

Upon matriculation to the first professional year, each student must register as a student intern
-
trainee with the Texas
State Board of Pharmacy. This is accomplished through completion of the Application for Stu
dent Pharmacist
-
Intern
Registration. Each student must be registered first as an intern
-
trainee and subsequently as a student pharmacist
-
intern in
order to complete the academic requirements for the degree.

Additional information regarding intern registrat
ion and pharmacist licensure is given in the section “Legal
Requirements for Professional Practice” on pages 634

635. This regulation is subject to change by the Texas State
Board of Pharmacy. Every attempt is made to inform students of changes as they occ
ur.

STUDENT HEALTH I NSUR
ANCE

Students must procure health insurance to cover treatment for injuries or illness. This is especially important for the
experiential components of the curriculum, spanning all four professional years, when students have frequen
t contact with
patients in a number of different health care facilities.

The Student Health Insurance Plan, operated under the auspices of University Health Services, offers optional low
-
cost
insurance for students who are not covered by other programs. In
formation about this plan is available through University
Health Services.

ACADEMI C POLI CI ES AN
D PROCEDURES

ACADEMI C STANDARDS I
N THE COLLEGE

University regulations on scholastic probation and dismissal are given in
General Information.

In addition, the fo
llowing
academic standards are in effect in the College of Pharmacy.

ACADEMI C PROGRESS


1.

The student must repeat a required pharmacy course in which he or she earns a grade of
F.

The student who earns a
grade of
D+, D,
or

D
-

in a required pharmacy course

becomes subject to the policies on academic probation and
dismissal described below.


2.

The student must earn a grade of at least
C
-

in each elective pharmacy course. If the student fails to earn a grade of
at least
C
-

in an elective pharmacy course, he
or she may repeat the course or may take another elective course in its
place, but only courses in which the student has earned a grade of at least
C
-

may be counted toward the
professional elective requirement.


3.

The student must earn an average of at l
east two grade points (2.00) a semester hour on all courses undertaken at
the University, whether passed or failed. The student must also earn an average of at least two grade points (2.00) a
semester hour on all required pharmacy courses undertaken, wheth
er passed or failed.


4.

The student may not repeat for credit a course in which he or she has earned a grade of
C
-

or

better, except under circumstances approved by the dean.


5.

With the exception of laboratory problems courses, all pharmacy electives mu
st be taken on the letter
-
grade basis.
The student must also take the professional electives on the letter
-
grade basis.

ACADEMI C PROBATI ON A
ND DI SMI SSAL

A student is placed on academic probation in the College of Pharmacy if he or she receives a grade of
D
+, D, D
-
,

or

F

in
any required pharmacy course. If the grade received is an
F,

the student must repeat the course and may not progress to
courses for which it is a prerequisite until he or she has earned a grade of at least
C
-

in the failed course. If the
initial
grade received is a
D+, D,
or

D
-
,

the student may progress to courses for which the course is a prerequisite. The student
may choose to repeat a course in which he or she received a
D+, D,
or

D
-
,

if the course does not conflict with other
courses t
he student would normally take in the same semester; however, this choice affects the student’s release from
academic probation as described in the following section.

If the student receives more than two incompletes in required pharmacy courses, regardles
s of the grades ultimately
awarded, he or she is subject to review by the Academic Performance Committee; the committee may choose to place the
student on academic probation.

A student is subject to dismissal from the college if he or she receives more tha
n one
D+, D, D
-
,

or
F
in required
pharmacy courses in one semester. The student is also subject to dismissal if he or she receives a second
D+, D, D
-
,

or
F

while on academic probation or conditional academic probation.

Students on academic probation are
expected to focus on academic improvement and thus are not allowed to hold
student offices or to receive college stipends for travel to professional meetings or other college
-
sponsored events.

RELEASE FROM ACADEMI
C PROBATI ON

After receiving a grade of
F.

T
he student must repeat the course and earn a grade of at least
C
-
.

If the failed course is a
prerequisite for another course, the student must repeat the course and earn a grade of at least
C
-

before taking the
course for which the failed course is a prere
quisite. In the semester or summer session in which he or she repeats the
course, the student must complete a full academic load, including at least five hours in required pharmacy courses and/or
other courses recommended by the academic adviser. A full ac
ademic load is defined for this purpose as twelve hours in
a long
-
session semester and six hours in the summer. The new grade replaces the grade of
F

when the student’s
pharmacy grade point average is calculated. If the new grade is
C
-

or better, the stude
nt is released from academic
probation if and only if he or she has earned no further grades of
D+, D, D
-
,

or
F

while on academic probation or
conditional academic probation. If the student does not earn a grade of at least
C
-

upon repeating the course, he

or she is
subject to academic dismissal.

After receiving a grade of
D+, D,
or
D
-
.

The student chooses whether or not to repeat the course, if the course does not
conflict with other courses the student would normally take in the same semester. He or she m
ay progress to courses for
which the course in question is a prerequisite. If the student chooses to repeat the course, he or she must earn a grade of
at least

C
-
.

If the new grade is a
C
-

or better, the student is released from academic probation only if
he or she has earned
no further grades of
D+, D, D
-
,

or
F

while on academic probation or conditional academic probation. If the student does
not earn a grade of at least
C
-

upon repeating the course, he or she is subject to academic dismissal. The new grad
e
replaces the grade of
D+, D, or D
-

when the student’s pharmacy grade point average is calculated.

If the student chooses not to repeat the course, he or she remains on academic probation (or conditional academic
probation, described below) through completion of the internship courses in the final semester. To take the internship
courses, the student mu
st have a grade point average of at least 2.00 in required pharmacy courses. If the student earns the
symbol
CR
in each internship course,

he or she is released from probation and graduates in good academic standing with
the college.

CONDI TI ONAL ACADEMI C

P
ROBATI ON

If a student on academic probation receives no grade lower than
C
-

in required pharmacy courses during the following
semester or summer session in which he or she takes a full academic load, the student may be placed on conditional
academic probat
ion. This status allows the student to hold student office and to receive college stipends for travel to
professional meetings or other college
-
sponsored events. The student remains on conditional academic probation until
graduation and is subject to dismi
ssal if he or she receives a second grade of
D+, D, D
-
,
or
F.

CALCULATI ON OF GRADE

POI NT AVERAGES


1.

The student’s University grade point average includes all courses taken at the University for which a grade or symbol
other than
Q, W, X,

or
CR

is recorded. If the student has repeated a course, including those courses for which he or
she earned a grade of
D+, D, D
-
,

or
F,

all grades earned are included in the University grade point average.


2.

The student’s College of Pharmacy grade point avera
ge includes all required professional courses taken at the
University for which a grade or symbol other than
Q, W, X,

or

CR

is recorded. When a student repeats a required
pharmacy course, the second grade in the repeated course replaces the previous grade
when the student’s College of
Pharmacy grade point average is calculated.

THE ACADEMI C PERFORM
ANCE COMMI TTEE

The College of Pharmacy Academic Performance Committee monitors the academic progress of students in the
professional program. The committee makes
recommendations to the dean regarding students’ academic progress and
academic probation and dismissal. The committee also makes recommendations to assist students who may be in
academic difficulty. Any student in academic difficulty may be asked to appear

before the committee for guidance. The
committee hears all student appeals regarding academic progress and academic probation and dismissal. The committee
aids the Admissions Committee in the evaluation of students who wish to return to the college after
having been
dismissed.

COURSE LOAD AND SEQU
ENCE OF WORK


1.

To progress to the final
-
year internship courses, the student must have successfully completed all basic education
requirements and all required and elective pharmacy courses except those in the i
nternship year.


2.

Because internship courses are offered on the pass/fail basis only, students should have attained both the University
and the College of Pharmacy grade point average of at least 2.00 required for graduation before they begin the
interns
hip semester(s).


3.

If a conflict arises between University requirements and a student’s employment, the student must resolve the conflict
in favor of the University requirements.


4.

A student who is not on academic probation must take at least twelve se
mester hours during any long
-
session
semester.


5.

A student on academic probation must take at least twelve semester hours during any long
-
session semester or at
least six semester hours during the summer session in order to clear academic probation.


6.

Students may not take courses for degree credit at another institution without prior approval from the dean of the
College of Pharmacy.


7.

All students seeking to reenter the College of Pharmacy after having been placed on academic dismissal must make
for
mal application through the Admissions Committee. The application is processed through the Admissions Committee
with recommendations from the Academic Performance Committee and the approval of the dean.

EARLY PRACTI CE EXPER
I ENCE

All students must participa
te in an early practice experience, which consists of at least two hundred hours in either a
community pharmacy or a hospital pharmacy practice setting. Since the student must be registered with the Texas State
Board of Pharmacy as a student pharmacist
-
int
ern before gaining these hours, and since that registration requires that
students have completed the first year of the professional sequence, students may not begin accruing these hours until
after the first professional year. The early practice experienc
e must be completed before the student begins the fourth
professional year.

Additional information is provided to students during the first professional year.

STANDARDS OF ETHI CAL

CONDUCT

Pharmacy practitioners enjoy a special trust and authority based on
the profession’s commitment to a code of ethical
behavior in its management of client affairs. The inculcation of a sense of responsible professional behavior is a critical
component of professional education, and high standards of ethical conduct are expe
cted of pharmacy students.

Toward that end, the faculty and students of the College of Pharmacy have pledged their support to the Policy
Statement on Ethical Conduct and Scholastic Integrity and the Code of Ethics that implements this Policy Statement.
Upo
n entering the College of Pharmacy, and each academic year thereafter, students are asked to recite and sign the
following pledge:

“As a student of the University of Texas College of Pharmacy, I have reviewed and hereby pledge my full support to the
Honor
Code. I pledge to be honest myself, and in order that the spirit and integrity of the Honor Code may endure, I
pledge that I will make known to the appropriate authorities cases of dishonesty which I observe in the College of
Pharmacy.”

In addition, the fo
llowing oath, which students will be asked to sign, is included at the end of all class examinations:
“I
have neither participated in nor witnessed any

acts of academic dishonesty pertaining to this

assignment.” At the discretion of the instructor, the oa
th may also be included for other assignments such as quizzes,
written reports, or papers.

The entire text of the Policy Statement on Ethical Conduct and Scholastic Integrity and the Honor Code are available at
http://www.utexas.edu/

pharmacy/students/hand
book98/3code.html.

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including failure of
the course involved and dismissal from the college and/or the University. Since dishonesty harms the individual, f
ellow
students, and the integrity of the University and the College of Pharmacy, policies on scholastic dishonesty are strictly
enforced.

ATTENDANCE I N CLASSE
S AND LABORATORI ES

Students in the College of Pharmacy are expected to attend all meetings of the courses for which they are registered.
Students who fail to attend class regularly are inviting scholastic difficulty. In some courses, instructors have special
attendance requi
rements that should be made known to the students during the first week of classes and stated in the
syllabus. With the approval of the dean, a student may be dropped from a course with a grade of
F

for repeated
unexcused absences.

ACADEMI C ADVI SI NG

Academ
ic and career advising are ongoing activities of the Office of Student Affairs, Pharmacy Building 5.112. Because
advising is not restricted to the time just before registration, all students are strongly encouraged to seek advice whenever

they need it abou
t degree requirements, the availability of course offerings each semester, and taking courses in proper
sequence.

Advising for University prepharmacy students is provided by assigned academic advisers in their colleges and by
Health Professions Advising in

the College of Natural Sciences. University students interested in the profession of
pharmacy should contact that office early in their college careers. Prepharmacy students from outside the University
should seek advice from the Office of Student Affairs

of the College of Pharmacy.

CAREER COUNSELI NG I N

THE COLLEGE

OF PHARMACY

The college provides career counseling to students in the professional sequence of courses. Throughout the year, career
counselors are available in the Office of Student Affairs to a
ssist students in examining the career options available to
them upon graduation.

In addition, a systematic exploration of professional career options is conducted as part of the professional
development convocation series of courses
.

Guest lecturers inclu
de successful pharmacists representing a variety of
pharmacy practice models, other health care and regulatory settings, and careers in professional organizations,
education, research, and the pharmaceutical industry.

HONORS

University
-
wide honors are desc
ribed in
General Information
.

In addition, the College of Pharmacy encourages academic
excellence through Rho Chi, the national pharmaceutical honor society, described on page 639, and through the
Pharmacy Honors Program.

PHARMACY HONORS PROG
RAM

Criteria f
or admission.

Students who plan to seek special honors in pharmacy should apply to the chair of the Honors
Program Committee after they have completed the fall semester of the first professional year; they must apply before they
begin the second profession
al year. Students interested in the Pharmacy Honors Program are strongly encouraged to
enroll in Pharmacy 051R,
Research Opportunities in the Pharmaceutical Sciences,

in the spring semester of their first
professional year. The criteria for admission to th
e program are (1) admission to the professional curriculum; (2) a grade
point average of at least 3.00 in all required professional coursework completed at the time of application to the program;
and (3) approval of the Honors Program Committee.

Requiremen
ts for graduation.

Requirements for the completion of the honors program are (1) a grade point average of at
least 3.00 in all required professional courses; (2) a grade point average of at least 3.00 in all professional courses,
including required profess
ional elective coursework; (3) completion of Pharmacy 167H at least twice; (4) completion of at
least one honors elective; (5) completion of Pharmacy 278H and 479H; and (6) completion of the regular curriculum for
the degree.

The statement “Research Honors

in Pharmacy” appears on the transcript of each graduate certified to have completed
the honors program.

GRADUATI ON

All students must fulfill the general requirements for graduation given in chapter 1. In addition, students seeking the
Doctor of Pharmacy m
ust complete in residence the courses prescribed for the third and fourth professional years.

DEGREES

The University offers the PharmD as the sole entry
-
level pharmacy practice degree. As described in “Aims and Curricula,”
page 634, this program emphasizes

an integrated and problem
-
based approach to disease management as the core of
the didactic and laboratory program of study.

The capstone of the PharmD program is a series of seven six
-
week rotations known as the advanced pharmacy
practice experiences (APP
E). Each APPE course requires between forty and fifty on
-
site, practitioner
-
faculty

supervised
hours of internship experience a week for six weeks.

The college expects but cannot guarantee that experiential sites will include Austin/Temple/Waco, Dallas/For
t Worth
(the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and other area health care facilities), El

Paso (the University of
Texas at El

Paso and area health care facilities), Galveston/Houston (the University of Texas Medical Branch at
Galveston, the U
niversity of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and other area health care facilities), the Rio Grande
Valley (the University of Texas
-

Pan American and health care facilities primarily in Harlingen and McAllen), and San
Antonio (the University of Texas
Health Science Center and other area health care facilities). Students in the UT El

Paso
and UT Pan American cooperative programs and students assigned to San Antonio spend two years in these regions,
while students assigned to other regions spend only the

final year in the APPE region.

College of Pharmacy students who complete their experiential courses at the University of Texas Health Science
Center at San Antonio are considered part of a joint PharmD degree program and receive a degree awarded jointly b
y the
two institutions. The joint nature of this program is reflected on the student’s diploma. Students who complete the UT
El

Paso or UT Pan American cooperative program receive a diploma reflecting the cooperative nature of their programs of
study.

In c
ompleting the Doctor of Pharmacy degree, students also fulfill the internship requirements of the Texas State Board
of Pharmacy. The final year of APPE courses and several other practice
-
based experiential courses, beginning in the
second professional year
, make up the experiential program. The professional experience courses are currently approved
by the Texas State Board of Pharmacy to meet its standards for completion of the professional internship licensure
requirement. The board reassesses all programs

annually.

THE MI NOR

While a minor is not required as part of the PharmD degree program, the student may choose to complete additional
coursework in a field outside of the College of Pharmacy. The minor consists of at least twelve semester hours of
coursew
ork in a single field of study or in closely related fields, including at least nine hours of upper
-
division work. The
upper
-
division coursework must be completed in residence; coursework the student takes on a cooperative program
campus in the third profe
ssional year may be counted. A course to be counted toward the minor may not be taken on the
pass/fail basis, unless it is offered only on that basis. A course may not be counted both toward the minor and toward the
213 hours of work required for the Pharm
D degree.

Students are encouraged to use health
-
care

related courses to make up the minor; lists of such courses in a variety of
fields are available in the Student Affairs Office. While the College of Pharmacy allows students to minor in any field in
whic
h the University offers a major, prerequisites and other enrollment restrictions may prevent the student from minoring
in some fields. Before planning to take specific courses, the student should consult a pharmacy adviser and the
department that offers th
e courses.

Written verification that a student completed the minor is available from the dean’s office.

APPLI CABI LI TY OF CER
TAI N COURSES

PHYSI CAL ACTI VI TY CO
URSES

Physical activity (PED) courses are offered by the Department of Kinesiology and Health
Education. They may not be
counted toward a degree in the College of Pharmacy. However, they are counted among courses for which the student is
enrolled, and the grades are included in the University grade point average.

ROTC COURSES

Courses in air force s
cience, military science, and naval science may be substituted for a total of nine semester hours of
nonpharmacy electives and for Government 312L by students who complete the sixteen to twenty semester hours of
required air force science, military science
, or naval science coursework and accept a commission in one of the services.
These courses may not be counted toward the professional elective requirement.

CORRESPONDENCE AND E
XTENSI ON COURSES

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneo
usly by correspondence or extension from the University or
elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree unless it is specifically approved in
advance by the dean. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for

any degree may be completed by
correspondence, and no pharmacy courses taken by correspondence or extension may be counted toward a pharmacy
degree.

PRESCRI BED WORK

Students who enter the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program must complete a minimum of 213 se
mester hours of
coursework in the areas described below

the core curriculum, additional basic education requirements, professional
electives, and preprofessional and professional coursework.

CORE CURRI CULUM

Each student must complete the University’s core
curriculum, described in chapter 2. Because of the intensity and structure
of the professional pharmacy curriculum, and because admission to the professional curriculum is highly competitive, the
College of Pharmacy strongly recommends that students comple
te as many of the core courses as possible before they
enter the college

The following core requirements are met by the preprofessional and professional coursework described below: English
composition, mathematics, science and technology (parts I and II),
and humanities. Students must complete additional
coursework to meet the core requirements listed below; the courses in each core area are listed in chapter 2.

COURSES

SEM HRS

First
-
year signature course

For students who enter the professional
curriculum
in fall 2010 or fall 2011, an approved
course in the College of Natural Sciences will
meet this requirement; students who enter the
professional curriculum in fall 2012 must meet this
requirement as directed by the School of
Undergraduate Studies.

3

American and Texas government

6

American history

6

Social and behavioral sciences

3

Visual and performing arts

3

TOTAL
21


Transfer students who complete the core curriculum at another public Texas institution of higher education and are then
admitted

to the PharmD program are considered “core complete” by the University. Core curriculum requirements are
waived for students admitted to the PharmD program who have previously earned a bachelor’s degree.

ADDITIONAL BASI C EDU
CATION REQUIREMENTS

All student
s must also earn the following skills and experiences flags: writing, quantitative reasoning, cultural diversity in
the United States, ethics and leadership, and independent inquiry. More information about skills and experiences flags is
given in chapter 2
; courses that carry these flags are identified in the
Course Schedule
.

Students who enter the professional curriculum in fall 2012 or later must also earn a global cultures flag as directed by
the School of Undergraduate Studies. The global cultures flag
is not required of students who enter the professional
curriculum in fall 2010 or fall 2011.

Flag requirements are waived for students admitted to the professional curriculum who have already earned a
bachelor’s degree.

All students must complete the
foreign language requirement described in chapter 2 before they enter the professional
curriculum.

PROFESSI ONAL ELECTIV
ES

The student must complete at least two professional elective courses, for a total of at least six semester hours. The
student must tak
e the courses used to fulfill the professional electives requirement after admission to the professional
curriculum.

PREPROFESSI ONAL AND
PROFESSI ONAL COURSEW
ORK

The following courses are required. The course sequence given here shows the usual order in whi
ch courses are taken to
fulfill prerequisite requirements and illustrates the feasibility of completing requirements for the degree within six calend
ar
years. Students who depart significantly from this sequence may need more time to complete their coursew
ork, because
most courses are taught only once a year and because in a given semester the scheduled meeting time of a
preprofessional or professional course may conflict with the times of core courses or professional electives.

COURSES

SEM HRS

FI RST PREPR
OFESSI ONAL YEAR

FALL

BIO 311C,
Introductory Biology I

3

CH 301,
Principles of Chemistry I

3

M 408C,
Differential and Integral Calculus

4

RHE 306,
Rhetoric and Writing

3

UGS 302 or 303,
First
-
Year Signature Course
1

3

TOTAL
,

PREPROFESSIONAL COUR
SES

16


SPRING

BIO 311D,
Introductory Biology II

3

CH 302,
Principles of Chemistry II

3

CH 204,
Introduction to Chemical Practice

2

M 316,
Elementary Statistical Methods

3

Social and behavioral sciences core course

3

American history

3

TOTAL
,

PREPROFESSIONAL COUR
SES

17


SECOND PREPROFESSI ON
AL YEAR

FALL

BIO 325,
Genetics

3

CH 301M,
Organic Chemistry I

3

E 316K,
Masterworks of Literature

3

PHY 302K,
General Physics

Technical Course:
Mechanics, Heat, and Sound

3

PHY 102M,
Laboratory for
Physics 302K

1

American and Texas government

3

TOTAL
,

PREPROFESSIONAL COUR
SES

16


SPRING

CH 210C,
Organic Chemistry Laboratory

2

CH 310N,
Organic Chemistry II

3

BIO 326M,
Introductory Medical Microbiology and
Immunology

3

BIO 126L,
General
Microbiology Laboratory

1

American and Texas government

3

American history

3

Visual and performing arts core course

3

TOTAL
,

PREPROFESSIONAL COUR
SES

18

FI RST PROFESSI ONAL Y
EAR

FALL

PHR 341C,
Pharmaceutical Biochemistry I

3

PHR 342C,
Physical and
Chemical Principles of
Drugs

3

PHR 242DA,
Introduction to Pharmacy Practice

1

PHR 142P,
Physical and Chemical Principles of
Drugs Laboratory

1

PHR 343C,
Function and Anatomy of Human
Systems I

3

PHR 143M,
Medical Chemistry Principles

1

PHR 143P,
Basic

Pharmaceutical Sciences
Laboratory

1

PHR 252C,
Biopharmaceutics

2

PHR 142H,
Professional Development
1

COURSES

SEM HRS

Convocation I

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

16


SPRING

PHR 242DB,
Introduction to Pharmacy Practice

1

PHR 244C,
Pharmacy Administration

2

PHR 144P,
Pharmacy Administration Laboratory

1

PHR 251C,
Pharmaceutical Biochemistry II

2

PHR 253C,
Function and Anatomy of Human
Systems II

2

PHR 253D,
Principles of General Pathology

2

PHR 153M,
Pharmacology Principles

1

PHR 356C,
Pharmaceutics

3

PHR 156P,
Pharmaceutics Laboratory

1

PHR 152H,
Professional Development
Convocation II

1

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

16


SECOND PROFESSI ONAL
YEAR

FALL

PHR 262D,
Nonprescription Pharmacotherapeutics
I

2

PHR 163C,
Drug Information and Evidence
-
Based
Practice

1

PHR 163P,
Drug Information and Evidence
-
Based
Practice Laboratory

1

PHR 364D,
Pharmacy and the Health Care System

3

PHR 665E,
Pharmacotherapeutics I

6

PHR 266P,
Pharmacy Professional
Communications

2

PHR 392S,
Patient Assessment Skills
Laboratory

3

PHR 161H,
Professional Development
Convocation III

1

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

19


SPRING

PHR 171P,
Integrated Basic and Applied
Pharmacokinetics Laboratory

1

PHR 371S,
Integrated Basic and Applied
Pharmacokinetics

3

PHR 172E,
Nonprescription Pharmacotherapeutics
II

1

PHR 172P,
Nonprescription Pharmacotherapeutics
II Laboratory

1

PHR 675E,
Pharmacotherapeutics II

6

PHR 175P,
Pharmacotherapeutics II Laboratory

1

PHR 176E,
Interprofessional Ethics

1

PHR 176P,
Experiential
Pharmacy Practice and
Patient Counseling

1

PHR 177G,
Introduction to Clinical Skills

1

PHR 177P,
Introduction to Clinical Skills
Laboratory

1

PHR 172H,
Professional Development
Convocation IV

1

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

18


SUMMER

PHR 377H,
Institutional Clinical Skills

3

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

3

COURSES

SEM HRS


THI RD PROFESSI ONAL Y
EAR

FALL

PHR 183F,
Basic Intravenous Admixtures

1

PHR 183G,
Basic Intravenous Admixtures
Laboratory

1

PHR 185P,
Pharmacotherapeutics III Laboratory

1

PHR 287H,
Clinical Skills: Community Care

2

PHR 695F,
Pharmacotherapeutics III

6

PHR 395G,
Pharmacotherapeutics IV

3

PHR 182H,
Professional Development
Convocation V

1

Professional elective(s)

2

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

17


SPRING

PHR 284E,
Pharmacy Law

2

PHR 394F,
Pharmacoeconomics

3

PHR 295R,
Advanced Evidence
-
Based Practice

2

PHR 396D,
Pharmacotherapeutics of Special
Populations

3

PHR 194P,
Advanced Pharmacotherapy
Laboratory

1

PHR 192H,
Professional Development
Convocation VI

1

Professional
elective(s)

4

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

16


FOURTH PROFESSI ONAL
YEAR
2

SUMMER

PHR 693C,
Acute Care Pharmacy Practice I

6

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

6


FALL

PHR 693E,
Elective in Pharmacy Practice I

6

PHR 693N,
Advanced Health
-
System Pharmacy
Practice

6

PHR 693P,
Advanced Community Pharmacy
Practice

6

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

18


SPRING

PHR 693S,
Selective in Pharmacy Practice I

6

PHR 694C,
Acute Care Pharmacy Practice II

6

PHR 694E,
Elective in Pharmacy Practice II

6

TOTAL
,

PROFESSIONAL COURSES

18


COURSES

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2010

2011 and 2011

2012; however, not all
courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the
Course Schedule

to determine which
courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The
Course Schedule

may also reflect
changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

PHARMACY: PHR

PREPROFESSI ONAL COUR
SE

310
K.

Drugs in Our Society.

Survey of drug development, distribution, and safety, including therapeutic categories of drugs, their actions and
abuse potential, and the sociological aspects of drug use. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Pharmacy 310
K and 350K may
not both be counted. Not open to students in the professional pharmacy curriculum and may not be counted toward the professio
nal
elective requirement in pharmacy.

PROFESSI ONAL COURSES

320M.

Pharmaceutical Marketing.

Concepts of marketing as
they apply to the pharmaceutical industry, pharmaceutical products, and the
health care environment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 244C and 144P.

321K.

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

Current concepts and pri
nciples fundamental to the study of the structure of matter and of its
relationship to pharmaceutically significant properties. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted towa
rd the
professional elective requirement. Prerequisite: Chem
istry 310M or the equivalent.

322H.

Research Design and Methodology.

Concepts and procedures involved in designing and carrying out a research project. Three lecture
hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program or c
onsent of instructor.

322P.

New Concepts, Topics, and Issues in Pharmacy Practice.

New concerns, topics, and issues in pharmacy practice. Three lecture hours a
week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 364D.

326C.

Community P
harmacy Management.

Advanced concepts in community pharmacy management for the student who plans to become a
pharmacy owner or manager. Topics include operational, personnel, and financial management; marketing; layout and design; and

the
delivery of pharm
aceutical care in a community pharmacy setting. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy
244C.

326M.

Applied Pharmacy Management.

Organizational structure of the hospital pharmacy; principles of financial systems and personnel
ma
nagement. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 244C and 144P.

329C.

Pharmacy Association Management.

An introduction to the principles involved in managing pharmacy associations. Students gain
practical experience in a commun
ity pharmacy. Nine hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Pharmacy 329C and 389C may not
both be counted. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 244C and 144P and consent of instructor.

629D.

Pharmacy Association Management Residency.

Experience working in a pharmacy

association, including active involvement in some
managerial aspect of the association. Eighteen hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Pharmacy 629D and 689D may not bot
h be
counted. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 364D and consent of instructor.

338.

Introd
uction to Pharmacology.

Survey of basic concepts and principles in pharmacology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.
Required for all preprofessional students in the School of Nursing and athletic training students in the Department of Kinesi
ology

and
Health Education. May not be counted toward the professional elective requirement in pharmacy. Prerequisite: Credit or regist
ration for
Biology 365S, 446L (or 416K), or Kinesiology 324K.

139H.

Pharmacy Administration for Honors Students.

Each student
conducts an in
-
depth examination of a selected issue in pharmacy
administration. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph
armacy
Honors Program and Pharmacy 244C and 144P.

340D.

Structure
-
Activity Relationships and Mechanisms of Action.

Study of structure
-
activity relationships as the basis for investigation of
mechanisms of drug
-
receptor interactions. Model compounds are selected from enkephalins, morphine
-
like analgesics, cholinergics, an
d
adrenergics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Pharmacy 340D and 380D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admis
sion
to the Pharmacy Honors Program, Pharmacy 675E and 175P with a grade of at least

B
-

in each, or consent of instructor.

341C.

Pharmaceutical Biochemistry I.

Basic principles of intermediary metabolism, with emphasis on defects in pathways that result in disease
and on identification of molecular targets for therapeutic control. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered

on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

342C.

Physical and Chemical Principles of Drugs.

Fundamental, introductory principles of pharmaceutics, including thermodynamics, kinetics,
and other basic chemical principles related to drugs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis
only. Prerequisite: Admission to

the professional pharmacy curriculum, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 142P.

242D.

Introduction to Pharmacy Practice.

Introduction to the profession of pharmacy, including the principle of service. Includes fieldwork in a
local eldercare facility.
Two lecture hours a week for two semesters; and twelve additional hours of fieldwork to be arranged over two
semesters. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Pharmacy 242D and 249 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 242DA,
admission to the profess
ional pharmacy curriculum; for 242DB, Pharmacy 242DA.

142H.

Professional Development Convocation I.

Professional development issues and assessments for PharmD students in the first
professional year. Includes students’ professional and program
-
specific res
ponsibilities, such as program evaluations, portfolios, and
administrative requirements; practice opportunities in pharmacy; and expected areas and levels of professional growth as the
student
advances through the curriculum. One lecture hour a week for on
e semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

142P.

Physical and Chemical Principles of Drugs Laboratory.

Problem
-
based learning exercises to reinforce the material presented in
Pharmac
y 342C. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 342C.

343C.

Function and Anatomy o
f Human Systems I.

Basic principles of human physiology and anatomy in relation to drug action. Includes
cellular and subcellular physiology, membrane transport, electrophysiology, synaptic transmission, and autonomic, neurologica
l, and
cardiovascular phys
iology and anatomy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

143M.

Medicinal Chemistry Principles.

Introduction to medicinal chemistry principles.
Topics include drug metabolism and the transition from
organic to medicinal chemistry. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum, and credit or registra
tion for Pharmacy 143P.

143P.

Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences Laboratory.

Laboratory exercises to support the basic pharmaceutical sciences courses. One hour of
prelaboratory lecture and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
g
rade basis only. Prerequisite:
Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 143M.

244C.

Pharmacy Administration.

Concepts and principles of management, and social and behavioral aspects of pharmacy practice. Tw
o
lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy
curriculum.

144P.

Pharmacy Administration Laboratory.

Issues in pharmacy practice. Students discuss case studies, participate in group presentations,
and work in small groups to enhance their communication and teamwork skills. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester.
Offered
on the letter
-
grade basis o
nly. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum and credit or registration for Pharmacy
244C.

345L.

Clinical Pharmacokinetics.

Application of pharmacokinetic principles to the determination of proper dosing regimens. Three lecture
hour
s a week for one semester.

149H.

Pharmaceutics for Honors Students.

Expanded study of the way principles covered in the pharmaceutical curriculum affect drug design,
formulation, dosing, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. Three laboratory hours a week
for one semester. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program and Pharmacy 252C (or 352C), 356C, and 156P.

350K.

Drugs in Our Society.

Survey of drug development, drug actions and abuse potential, and sociological asp
ects of drug use. Three
lecture hours a week for one semester. Pharmacy 310K and 350K may not both be counted. Not open to students in the profession
al
pharmacy curriculum and may not be counted toward the professional elective requirement in pharmacy. Pre
requisite: Upper
-
division
standing.

251C.

Pharmaceutical Biochemistry II.

The biosynthesis and function of macromolecules (nucleic acids, lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates);
sites of drug action, immunology, and applications of biotechnology and molecula
r biology to the pharmaceutical sciences. Two lecture
hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 341C.

051R.

Research Opportunities in the Pharmaceutical Sciences.

An introduction to research in all divisi
ons of the College of Pharmacy.
Includes ethical issues in research, career paths in research, and topics such as choosing a research mentor or project. One
lecture
hour a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Admission
to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

252C.

Biopharmaceutics.

Complements the basic pharmaceutics principles covered in Pharmacy 342C. Subjects include core concepts in
biopharmaceutics of drugs. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the

letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Admission
to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

152H.

Professional Development Convocation II.

Professional development issues and assessments for PharmD students in the first
professional year. Student fulfillmen
t of professional and program
-
specific responsibilities (program evaluations, portfolios, administrative
requirements), practice opportunities in pharmacy, and addressing the expected areas and levels of professional growth as the

student
advances through
the curriculum. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 142H.

253C.

Function and Anatomy of Human Systems II.

Continuation of Pharmacy 343C, with emphasis on blood pressure regulation, renal
function, digestion, respiration, endocrinology, and reproduction. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the
letter
-
grade
basis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 343C.

253D.

Principles of General Pathology.

An overview of most aspects of general

pathology, including abnormal cell function, disturbances of
flow, nutritional pathology, hematology, genetics, inflammation and repair, immunology, and infectious diseases. Taught via t
elevision
and on
-
site lectures, supplemented by specimen demonstratio
ns in cooperation with faculty members of the University of Texas Health
Science Center at San Antonio. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 343C and credit or registration for Pharmacy 2
53C.

153M.

Pharmacology Principles.

Introduction to pharmacology principles. Topics include pharmacology at the cellular and subcellular/receptor
levels. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Admiss
ion to the professional
pharmacy curriculum.

356C.

Pharmaceutics.

General introduction to dosage forms; the technology and pharmaceutical rationale fundamental to their development.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade b
asis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 342C, 142P, and 252C,
and credit or registration for Pharmacy 156P.

156P.

Pharmaceutics Laboratory.

Laboratory course supporting the subjects discussed in Pharmacy 356C. One hour of prelaboratory lecture
and three laborato
ry hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 356C.

356R.

Advanced Pharmaceutical Compounding.

Continuation of related subjects in pharmaceutical dosage forms covered in Pharmacy 356C
and 156P, with emphasis on the com
pounding of drugs into stable delivery systems for oral and topical applications. Two lecture hours
and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 356C and 156P.

358.

Geriatric Pharmacy Practice.

Social, demographic, ethical, and

therapeutic issues concerning pharmaceutical products and care of the
elderly. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 665E.

160J, 260J, 360J.

Basic Study in Pharmaceutical Research for Nonmajors.

Original investigation in any
area of the pharmaceutical sciences.
For each semester hour of credit earned, three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequi
site:
Consent of instructor and the dean.

160K, 260K, 360K.

Basic Study in Pharmaceutical Rese
arch.

Basic exploration in any area of the pharmaceutical sciences. For each
semester hour of credit earned, three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. No more than thre
e
semester hours may be counted toward the professiona
l pharmacy elective requirement. Prerequisite: Admission to the PharmD
program and consent of instructor and the dean.

261C.

Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Representative practices in four domains of complementary and alternative
m
edicine (CAM): mind
-
body medicine, biologically based practices, manipulative and body
-
based practices, and energy medicine.
Emphasizes whole medical systems built on complete systems of theory and practice (such as homeopathy, traditional Chinese
medicine
, and ayurvedic medicine) that cut across several domains. Students may enroll concurrently in Pharmacy 161D for an
experiential component to the study of fundamental CAM concepts. Two lecture hours a week for a semester. Offered on the lett
er
-
grade
basis
only. May not be counted toward the professional elective requirement. Prerequisite: Upper
-
division standing in a health
-
related
major or consent of instructor.

161D.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Enrichment.

Experiential course designed to famili
arize students with the fundamental
concepts in complementary and alternative medicine that are presented in Pharmacy 261C. One lecture hour a week for a semeste
r.
Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. May not be counted toward the professional elective
requirement. Prerequisite: Upper
-
division
standing in a health
-
related major, concurrent enrollment in Pharmacy 261C, and consent of instructor.

161H.

Professional Development Convocation III.

Professional development issues and assessments for PharmD stud
ents in the second
professional year. Student fulfillment of professional and program
-
specific responsibilities (program evaluations, portfolios, administrative
requirements), practice opportunities in pharmacy, and addressing the expected areas and levels

of professional growth as the student
advances through the curriculum. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 152H.

161J, 261J, 361J.

Basic Studies in the Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Basic exp
loration in any area of the pharmaceutical and clinical sciences.
For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics

vary.
Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Admi
ssion to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

262D.

Nonprescription Pharmacotherapeutics I.

Study of nonprescription drugs, with emphasis on the pharmacist’s consultant role in product
selection. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the l
etter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for
Pharmacy 665E.

362L.

Clinical Toxicology.

A course in toxicology that focuses on common poisons and their management; designed for pharmacy students
planning to enter general practice. Three
lecture hours a week for one semester. Pharmacy 362L and 362M may not both be counted.
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 252C (or 352C).

163C.

Drug Information and Evidence
-
Based Practice.

Knowledge and skills needed to retrieve and interpret drug information. Interp
retation of
biomedical literature and an introduction to concepts of evidence
-
based practice. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on
the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in the College of Pharma
cy, and credit or registration
for Pharmacy 665E and 163P.

263K.

Veterinary Pharmacy.

Treatment of selected disease states of domestic and exotic animals; veterinary appliances and products,
including proprietary pharmaceuticals and biologicals, with their

therapeutic indications and uses. Two lecture hours a week for one
semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

163P.

Drug Information and Evidence
-
Based Practice Laboratory.

Practical application of the concepts presented in

Pharmacy 163C. Includes
assignments, projects, and oral presentations. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in the College of Pharmacy, and credit o
r registration for Pharmacy 665E and
163C.

364D.

Pharmacy and the Health Care System.

The health care system in the United States; principles of managed care; application of pricing
policies; and an overview of pharmacy services. Three lecture hours a week

for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 244C and 144P.

665E.

Pharmacotherapeutics I.

An integrated approach (pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics) to the
etiology and treatment of ad
renergic
-
based diseases; cholinergic
-
based diseases; inflammatory diseases; hypertension; acute and
chronic renal disease; and cardiovascular disease, including hyperlipidemia, circulatory problems, thromboembolic disease, my
ocardial
ischemia, myocardial i
nfarction, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmias. Six lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the
letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

165P.

Pharmacotherapeutics I Labora
tory.

Problem
-
based laboratory course that integrates the pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry,
pharmacology, and therapeutic aspects of various diseases in order to prepare students to make sound therapeutic decisions. S
ubjects
introduced in Pharmacy 665E
. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 665E.

166H.

Pharmacotherapeutic Case Studies for Honors Students.

Students participate in ongoing pharmacy practice, clinical, pharmacy
association, and research activities. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisit
e:
Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program, and Pharmacy 665
E or consent of instructor.

266P.

Pharmacy Professional Communications.

Professional communication skills in interacting with patients and other health care
professionals. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, with additional

hours to be arranged. Offered on
the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 242D (or 249).

167H.

Exploratory Research in Pharmacy.

The student participates in ongoing in
-
depth research activities in pharmaceutics, medicinal
chemistry, toxicology,

pharmacology, pharmacy administration, pharmacy practice, or pharmacotherapy. At least seven research hours a
week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 051R and admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program,
or
consent of the de
an.

168H.

Medicinal Chemistry for Honors Students.

Expanded study of principles covered in the medicinal chemistry curriculum that concern
synthetic, semisynthetic, and naturally occurring therapeutic agents. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester.

May be repeated
for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 665E or consent o
f
instructor.

270C.

Communication Skills for Health Professionals.

Designed for pharmacy, premedical, predental, a
nd nursing students. Oral
communication skills used by health professionals. Emphasis on developing personal and professional confidence through improv
ing
oral communication skills. Small and large group presentations. Two lecture hours a week for one seme
ster.

270D.

Nutritional Aspects of Clinical Pharmacy.

Explores the interrelationships of nutrition, disease, and drug therapy, including aspects of
both normal and clinical nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, and the metabolic consequences or diseases ass
ociated with malnutrition.
Patient case studies examine both the effects of drug therapy on nutrition and the effects of nutrition on drug therapy. Dise
ase states
covered include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hepatic and renal failure, and anemia. Two
lecture hours a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

271C.

Drug Interactions.

Mechanisms, types, examples, and significance of drug interactions in pharmacy practice. Two lecture hours a

week
for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 665E, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 266P (or credit for 366P) or consent o
f
instructor.

171P.

Integrated Basic and Applied Pharmacokinetics Laboratory.

Problem
-
based and case
-
based application of pha
rmacokinetic principles to
specific drugs and patient situations. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the le
tter
-
grade
basis only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 371S.

371S.

Integrated Basic an
d Applied Pharmacokinetics.

Introduction to pharmacokinetic principles; and the application of principles to specific
drugs and patient situations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy
665E, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 171P, 675E, and 175P.

172E.

Nonprescription Pharmacotherapeutics II.

Study of nonprescription drugs, with emphasis on the pharmacist’s consultant role in product
selection. One lecture hour a week for one
semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for
Pharmacy 172P and 675E.

172H.

Professional Development Convocation IV.

Professional development issues and assessments for PharmD students in the second
professional

year. Student fulfillment of professional and program
-
specific responsibilities (program evaluations, portfolios, administrative
requirements), practice opportunities in pharmacy, and addressing the expected areas and levels of professional growth as the

student
advances through the curriculum. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 161H.

372K.

Hospital Pharmacy.

Basic principles, standards, and procedures involved in providing professional
pharmaceutical services in hospitals.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the professional pharmacy curriculum.

172P.

Nonprescription Pharmacotherapeutics II Laboratory.

Laboratory practice related to the pharmacist’s co
nsultant role in over
-
the
-
counter
product selection; includes fieldwork in a community pharmacy. One lecture hour and three laboratory or fieldwork hours a wee
k for one
semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration
for Pharmacy 172E and 675E.

173H.

Pharmacology and Toxicology for Honors Students.

Expanded study of principles covered in the pharmacology curriculum that concern
mechanisms of action and toxicity of pharmacologic agents on body systems. Three laboratory
hours a week for one semester. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 665E or
consent
of instructor.

675E.

Pharmacotherapeutics II.

An integrated approach (pathophysiology
, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics) to the
pathogenesis and treatment of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections; immunizations against bacterial and viral diseases; an
d allergies,
asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Six l
ecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in the College of Pharmacy, and credit or registration for 175P.

175P.

Pharmacotherapeutics II Laboratory.

Problem
-
based l
aboratory that integrates the pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology,
and therapeutic aspects of various diseases in order to prepare students to make sound therapeutic decisions. Subjects introd
uced in
Pharmacy 665E and 675E. Three laboratory
hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Completion of the first professional year in the College of Pharmacy, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 675E.

176E.

Interprofessional Ethics.

Explores ethical issues

in pharmacy practice and health care, with a focus on the perspectives of professionals
in the fields of nursing, law, social work, and medicine. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 244C

and 144P.

176P.

Experiential Pharmacy Practice and Patient Counseling.

Medication use and dispensing in a practice environment. Counseling skills and
techniques for a better understanding of disease states and positive medication outcomes. Three laborator
y hours a week for one
semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 665E and 266P (or credit for

366P).

177G.

Introduction to Clinical Skills.

Designed to develop the practical skills necessary in a pharm
acy setting, with a focus on patient histories,
how to read and interpret patient charts, and adult immunizations; includes training and certification in CPR from American R
ed Cross
facilitators. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the let
ter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 665E and 266P (or
366P), and credit or registration for Pharmacy 675E and 175P.

377H.

Institutional Clinical Skills.

Hands
-
on experience in an institutional practice care facility; examines pharmacy services, ho
spital
management, staff interaction, and the flow of information from laboratory to bedside. Forty hours a week for two weeks. Offe
red on the
pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

177K,
277K, 377K.

Advanced Study in Pharmaceutical Research.

For each semester hour of credit earned, three laboratory hours a week for
one semester. May be repeated for credit. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the professional pharmacy
el
ective requirement. Prerequisite: Second
-
professional
-
year standing and consent of instructor and the dean.

177P.

Introduction to Clinical Skills Laboratory.

Practical application of pharmacy clinical skills; subjects introduced in Pharmacy 177G. One
lectu
re hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Credit or
registration for Pharmacy 177G.

278H.

Pharmacy Honors Proposal and Tutorial Course.

Honors seminar; development of laboratory resear
ch proposal for approval by the
Honors Program Committee. One lecture hour and three hours of independent research a week for one semester. Prerequisite:
Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program.

479H.

Pharmacy Honors Thesis and Tutorial Course.

Honors sem
inar; laboratory research project conducted under the supervision of one or
more faculty members. One lecture hour and nine laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 278H.

280H.

Landmark Studies in Cardiovascular Disease.

Evidence
-
ba
sed clinical studies in support of drug therapy recommendations in the
treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Second
-
professional
-
year standing in
pharmacy.

280U.

Case Studies in Emerging Infections.

Case studies in the analysis and therapeutic control of recurring, cycling, and newly emerging
infectious diseases. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in th
e College of
Pharmacy.

280W.

Psychia
tric Pharmacy Practice and Drug Treatment of Mental Disorders.

Advanced study in the pathophysiology of selected
psychiatric disease states and the clinical presentation, phenomenology, diagnosis, and treatment of these disease states. Tw
o lecture
hours a
week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 695F or consent of instructor.

381E.

Advanced Hospital Pharmacy.

An in
-
depth analysis of the operation and administration of the institutional pharmacy and its relationship
to the tot
al functioning of the hospital. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

281H.

Interprofessional Health Care for HIV Patient Management.

Interprofessional teamwork, health literacy, treatment guidelines, patient
safety,

and medication reconciliation in the care of patients with the human immunodeficiency virus. Conducted at an HIV clinic in Te
xas.
Students complete six hours of required Web
-
based instruction before beginning the clinical component. Thirty
-
four hours of f
ieldwork in
one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the College of
Pharmacy.

281U.

Case Studies in Diabetes Management.

Designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge to
serve as primary care providers
in the area of diabetes management. Use of a case approach to discuss the management of patients with diabetes mellitus. Spec
ific
treatment modalities and management issues for the child, adolescent, adult, and elderly diabe
tic patient. Two lecture hours a week for
one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 395G and consent of instructor.

182H.

Professional Development Convocation V.

Professional development issues and assessments for PharmD students in t
he third
professional year. Student fulfillment of professional and program
-
specific responsibilities (program evaluations, portfolios, administrative
requirements), practice opportunities in pharmacy, and addressing the expected areas and levels of profes
sional growth as the student
advances through the curriculum. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 172H.

282Q.

Pediatric Pharmacotherapy.

Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of selected pe
diatric diseases. Designed to expose students to
pediatric pharmacy as a potential area of focus, and to prepare them for a potential residency or practice in providing pharm
aceutical
care in a pediatric setting. Two lecture hours a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Completion of the first professional year in the
College of Pharmacy.

382U.

Medicinal Herbs and Phytomedicine.

The emerging role of medicinal natural products in pharmacy; the role of the pharmacist in the
therapeutic use of herbs as controll
ed products and for self
-
medication. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite:
Credit or registration for Pharmacy 185P, 695F, and 395G.

183F.

Basic Intravenous Admixtures.

Basic principles of injectable and other sterile dosage forms; met
hods of preparation and evaluation that
meet current pharmacy practice standards. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Pharmacy 356C, 156P, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 183G.

183G.

Basic

Intravenous Admixtures Laboratory.

Basic laboratory principles in the preparation and evaluation of injectable and other sterile
dosage forms. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Pre
requisite: Pharmacy 356C, 156P, and credit or registration for Pharmacy 183F.

283H.

Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics.

Advanced study of organ systems; pharmacotherapy and clinical pharmacokinetics. Two lecture
hours a week for one semester. May be counted as
a pharmacy honors elective. Prerequisite: Admission to the PharmD program.

283U.

Multidisciplinary Pain Management.

Problem
-
based instruction to help health professions students acquire knowledge and skills in the
care of patients with acute and chronic pa
in. Taught by faculty members in medicine, pharmacy, and nursing. Two lecture hours a week
for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

384D.

Antimicrobics: Mechanism of Action and Clinical Use.

Mechanisms
of antimicrobial activity and the development of bacterial resistance,
and their relationship to clinical therapy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Pharmacy 384D and 484H may not both
be
counted. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 675E and 175P.

284E.

Phar
macy Law.

State and federal pharmacy laws. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

484H.

Antimicrobics: Mechanism of Action and
Clinical Use for Honors Students.

Bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal mechanisms of antimicrobial
agents, bacterial mechanisms of resistance, and the critical evaluation of drug therapy in various clinical settings. Designe
d to give
students additional insigh
t into the development of antimicrobial agents and the interactions of these agents with each other, the
pathogen, and the patient. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with at least fifteen additional hours to be arranged
. Pharmacy
384D and 484H m
ay not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admission to the Pharmacy Honors Program and Pharmacy 675E and 175P.

385E.

Pharmacotherapeutics IIIA.

An integrated approach (pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics) to the
etiology and tr
eatment of sleep disorders; epilepsy; depression; psychosis; Alzheimer’s disease; bipolar disease; dementia; attention
deficit disorder, narcolepsy, and appetite suppression; movement disorder; anxiety disorders; and eating disorders. Three lec
ture hours
a

week for one semester. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 341C, 251C, 252C (or 352C), 253C, 356C, and 156P; and concurrent enrollment in
Pharmacy 285F and 185P.

285F.

Pharmacotherapeutics IIIB.

An integrated approach (pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacolog
y, and therapeutics) to the
etiology and treatment of drug abuse and addiction; preoperative surgical procedures and anesthesia, and pain management
medications such as opiates and nonsteroidal anti
-
inflammatory drugs. Two lecture hours a week for one seme
ster. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 341C, 251C, 252C (or 352C), 253C, 356C, and 156P; and concurrent enrollment in Pharmacy 385E and 185P.

185P.

Pharmacotherapeutics III Laboratory.

Problem
-
based laboratory that integrates the pathology, medicinal chemistry, phar
macology, and
therapeutic aspects of various diseases in order to prepare students to make sound therapeutic decisions. Subjects introduced

in
Pharmacy 665E, 675E, 695F, and 395G. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade
basis only.
Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the College of Pharmacy and credit or registration for Pharmacy 6
95F and
395G.

285Q.

Fluid and Electrolyte Therapy.

Clinical management of disorders of fluid, electrolytes, and acid
-
ba
se balance in patients with normal and
abnormal homeostatic mechanisms; includes basic concepts of parenteral nutrition support. Two lecture hours a week for one se
mester.
Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 185P, 695F, and 395G.

285V.

Mexica
n Drugs and Products.

Analysis of Mexican pharmacy practice, drugs, and products; implications for the pharmacist in the United
States. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 185P, 695F, and 395G.

286C.

Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease.

Further development of topics covered in Pharmacy 665E; discussion of such additional topics as
assessment of cardiac function and nonmedical management of cardiovascular diseases. Two lecture hours a week for one seme
ster.
Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 185P, 695F, and 395G.

386D.

Nonprescription Pharmacotherapy.

Study of nonprescription drugs, with emphasis on the pharmacist’s consultant role in product
selection. Three lecture hours a week for one
semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Pharmacy 675E (or 375E, 275F, and
375G) and 175P.

386G.

Spanish for the Pharmacy Professional.

Intermediate communication skills in Spanish. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.
Prerequisite: Compl
etion of the second professional year in the College of Pharmacy, and one year of college
-
level Spanish or consent
of instructor.

187D.

Case Studies in Cardiovascular Disease.

Review of case studies of patients with cardiovascular diseases, with emphasis o
n
development of appropriate treatment and monitoring plans. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion

of the
second professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

287H.

Clinical Skills: Community Care.

Clinical work in a community
-
based pharmacy practice setting. Students receive medication therapy
management training, participate in the development of patient care plans, and write an essay about the clinical experience.
Five hours
of fieldwork a week for one semester. Offered on th
e pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the
College of Pharmacy.

187J, 287J, 387J.

Advanced Problems in Pharmacy Education.

Laboratory course examining professional education issues and techniques
for students ex
ploring an academic career. At least three, six, or nine laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite:
Completion of all first
-
year professional coursework and consent of the dean.

289.

Community Service
-
Learning Project.

Students participate in
community service
-
learning projects with a focus on border health and
related issues. Projects will be developed in consultation with the student’s faculty mentor and the selected community site
(including
organized community service entities), and require

critical reflection on health education

related concepts. Includes an academic
service
-
learning component. For the first semester, ten hours of orientation, and one hour of fieldwork a week; for the second semest
er,
at least two hours of fieldwork a week.

Prerequisite: For 289A, third
-
professional
-
year standing in pharmacy; for 289B, Pharmacy 289A.

390T.

Pharmacy International Exchange.

Work in an exchange program with international colleges and schools of pharmacy as partners.
Examination of similarities
and differences between pharmacy education, professional practice, and/or research in the hosting country
and in the United States. Forty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of the first professiona
l year in the
College of
Pharmacy and consent of instructor.

292G.

Introduction to Botanicals and Nutraceuticals.

An introduction to the framework of biologically based complementary and alternative
medicine practices. Examines the most commonly used botanicals and nutritional sup
plements; includes popular uses, clinical
indications, pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, side effects, contraindications, and common dosage guidelines. Em
phasis
on how to access and interpret continuously emerging evidence in this field and ho
w to use this information to guide and monitor patients
within the context of a pharmacy practice. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration fo
r Pharmacy
185P, 695F, 395G.

192H.

Professional Development Convocation VI.

Professional development issues and assessments for PharmD students in the third
professional year. Student fulfillment of professional and program
-
specific responsibilities (program evaluations, portfolios, administrative
requirements), practice opportun
ities in pharmacy, and addressing the expected areas and levels of professional growth as the student
advances through the curriculum. One lecture hour a week for a semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 182H.

392S.

Patien
t Assessment Skills Laboratory.

Introduction to patient assessment techniques and to the skills needed to provide pharmaceutical
care. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisit
e:
Admission to the PharmD program, and completion of the pharmacotherapeutics sequence or consent of instructor and the dean.

693C.

Acute Care Pharmacy Practice I.

Analysis of pharmacotherapy, evaluation of drug use, and synthesis of rational drug regimens in the
context of acute patient care. Forty laboratory hours a week for at least six weeks, with additional hours to be arranged. Of
fered on the
pass/fail basis on
ly. Prerequisite: Completion of all didactic and laboratory coursework prior to the fourth professional year in the College
of Pharmacy.

693E.

Elective in Pharmacy Practice I.

Experience in pharmacy practice, research, or administration. Forty laboratory h
ours a week for at least
six weeks, with additional hours to be arranged. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all didacti
c and
laboratory coursework prior to the fourth professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

693N.

Advanced Health
-
System Pharmacy Practice.

Analysis of pharmacotherapy, evaluation of drug use, and synthesis of rational drug
regimens in the context of institutional patient care. Forty laboratory hours a week for at least six weeks, with additional
hours

to be
arranged. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all didactic and laboratory coursework prior to th
e fourth
professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

693P.

Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice.

Analysis of pharmacothera
py, evaluation of drug use, and synthesis of rational drug
regimens in the context of community
-
based patient care. Forty laboratory hours a week for at least six weeks, with additional hours to
be arranged. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisit
e: Completion of all didactic and laboratory coursework prior to the fourth
professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

693S.

Selective in Pharmacy Practice I.

Analysis of pharmacotherapy, evaluation of drug use, and synthesis of rational drug regimens i
n a
selected pharmacy practice environment. Forty laboratory hours a week for at least six weeks, with additional hours to be arr
anged.
Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all didactic and laboratory coursework prior to the fou
rth professional year
in the College of Pharmacy.

694C.

Acute Care Pharmacy Practice II.

Analysis of pharmacotherapy, evaluation of drug use, and synthesis of rational drug regimens in the
context of acute patient care. Forty laboratory hours a week for at

least six weeks, with additional hours to be arranged. Offered on the
pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all didactic and laboratory coursework prior to the fourth professional yea
r in the College
of Pharmacy.

694E.

Elective in Pharmacy Pra
ctice II.

Experience in pharmacy practice, research, or administration. Forty laboratory hours a week for at least
six weeks, with additional hours to be arranged. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all didacti
c and
laboratory

coursework prior to the fourth professional year in the College of Pharmacy.

394F.

Pharmacoeconomics.

Terms, concepts, procedures, methods, problems, and strengths associated with pharmacoeconomics. Three
lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on
the letter
-
grade basis only. Pharmacy 393T and 394F may not both be counted.
Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the College of Pharmacy or consent of instructor.

194P.

Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics Laboratory.

Using classroom simul
ations, provides students with opportunities to practice their skills in
interacting with patients and other healthcare professionals and communicating information regarding contemporary therapeutic

regimens. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a w
eek for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite:
Pharmacy 185P, 695F, and 395G.

394R.

Drug Literature Evaluation and Biostatistics.

Application of statistical principles and evaluation of drug literature, with an emphasis on
clin
ical trials. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to the
PharmD program, and completion of the pharmacotherapeutics sequence or consent of instructor and the dean.

694S.

Selective in P
harmacy Practice II.

Analysis of pharmacotherapy, evaluation of drug use, and synthesis of rational drug regimens in
selected pharmacy practice environments. Forty laboratory hours a week for at least six weeks, with additional hours to be ar
ranged.
Offere
d on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all didactic and laboratory coursework prior to the fourth profess
ional year
in the College of Pharmacy.

695E.

Elective in Pharmacy Practice III.

Experience in pharmacy practice, research, or admin
istration. Forty laboratory hours a week for at
least six weeks, with additional hours to be arranged. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of all d
idactic and
laboratory coursework prior to the fourth professional year in the Coll
ege of Pharmacy.

695F.

Pharmacotherapeutics III.

An integrated approach (pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics) to the
etiology and treatment of neurological, psychiatric, and developmental disorders. Also includes therapeuti
cs of pain management,
anesthesia, chemical dependence, and oncology. Six lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only.
Prerequisite: Completion of the second professional year in the College of Pharmacy and credit or regis
tration for Pharmacy 185P and
395G.

395G.

Pharmacotherapeutics IV.

An integrated approach (pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics) to the
etiology and treatment of hormonal disorders and gastrointestinal disorders. Three lectu
re hours a week for one semester. Offered on
the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of second professional year in the College of Pharmacy and credit or registration
for
Pharmacy 185P and 695F.

295R.

Advanced Evidence
-
Based Practice.

Researc
h methodology and biostatistical concepts as they relate to the interpretation and critical
evaluation of biomedical literature. Designed to build upon the material covered in Pharmacy 163C. Two lecture hours a week f
or one
semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 665E, 675E, 175P, 185P, 695F, and 395G; or consent of
instructor.

396D.

Pharmacotherapeutics of Special Populations.

Topics include geriatrics, pediatrics, pharmacogenomics, transplant patients, and
indigent care. T
hree lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 185P, 695F,
and 395G.

396F.

Pharmacogenomics.

Designed to provide the student with a sound knowledge and comprehension of contemporary therapeutic
re
gimens. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in
Pharmacy 296P; admission to the PharmD program and completion of the pharmacotherapy sequence; or consent of instructor.

296
P.

Advanced Pharmacotherapy Laboratory.

Designed to provide the student with an opportunity to communicate knowledge and
comprehension of contemporary therapeutic regimens. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offe
red on
the

letter
-
grade basis only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Pharmacy 396F; admission to the PharmD program and completion of
the pharmacotherapy sequence; or consent of instructor.