Computing and Information Science

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Computing and
Information Science


Associate Degree Program

March 9, 2011

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COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Background
……………………………………………………………………………
….

……2

Statement of Need…………………………………………………………………
…….

……2

Program Mission………
……………………………………………………………………....

3

Program Description
…………………………………………………………………………..

3

Program Graduate Competencies…………………………………………………………..

3

Curriculum……………………………………………………………………………………...

4

Program Delivery Struct
ure…………………………………………………………………..

4

Program
Budget…
………………………………………………………………………….…

4

Conclusion………
……………………………………………………………………………..

4

Appendices
………
……………………………………………………………………………

.
5



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Background

At its April 12, 2010 meeting, members of the Computer Information Systems Advisory
Committee at the Wilmington Campus agreed that the
landscape of job opportunities in
the field is

changing

(Appendix I and J)
.

They recommended that

a

more
in
-
depth
compute
r science program
be added to the existing program with the goal of preparing
students for transfer to four
-
year programs.
The advisory board recommendations were
researched and
initiated the beginning of
the program development process
. The

process le
d t
o the development of
a new associate degree

program
proposal with

the
focus on preparing
students for transfer to

computer and information science bachelor
degree

program
s
.


The new
Computing and Information Science Program will provide transfer
opportunities to three related bachelor’s degrees at the University of Delaware: a
Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, and
a Bachelor of Science in

Information Systems. At Delaware State University, it will
provide transfer opportunities to two related bachelor’s degrees: A Bachelor of Science
in Computer Science and a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology. The
associate degree
curriculum wil
l provide the high
-
level preparation in mathematics and
physics needed for upper
-
level coursework at these universities. It is also expected to
provide future transfer opportunities to Wilmington University.


Statement of Need

Acco
rding to
Delaware

2018:

Occupation

and Industry Projections,
published by
the
Delaware Department of Labor in October 2010,
the degree requirement for Computer
Software Engineers at bachelor’s entry level indicated excellent job availability. The
wage category for Computer Soft
ware Engineers


Applications is high (2008 annual
average: $90,230) with excellent job availability and an average annual growth rate of
1.9% (27 due to growth and 11 due to replacements) through 2018. The wage category
for Computer Software Engineer


Sy
stems Software is also high (2008 annual
average: $100,547) with excellent job availability and an average annual growth rate of
1.5% (13 due to growth and 7 due to replacements) through 2018.

Lastly, the report
projected
that the wage category for
bachelo
r degree prepared
Computer and
Information Systems Managers is high (2008 annual average: $129,459) with good job
availability and an average annual growth rate of .7% (10 due to growth and 22 due to
replacements) through 2018.
(http://www.delawareworks.co
m/oolmi/Information).


The Bachelor of Arts degree in Computer Science at the University of Delaware is
designed for students who desire a liberal arts program. They may be pursuing more
than one major or they may be planning to pursue a graduate degree
in a professional
area like business, law, or medicine

(http://www.cis.udel.edu/print/book/export/html/74)
.
The Bachelor of Science degrees in Computer Science at both the University of
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Delaware and Delaware State University prepare students to
solve real
-
world,
computing
-
based problems in a variety of disciplines through a
focus on software
applications and computer theory

(
http://www.cis.udel.edu/print/book/export/html/74

and
http://www.des
u.edu/print/1152)
.




The Bachelor of Science degree in Information Systems at the University of Delaware is
a combination of two concentrations
.

The business concentration focuses on
management and marketing, and the information systems concentration focu
ses on
solving business problems using computing technology

(
http://www.cis.udel.edu
/
print/book/export/html/
67)
. At Delaware State University, the Bachelor of Science
degree in Information Technology focuses on
tech
nology design and management

http://www.desu.edu/print/1153).


The
s
e

pathway
s

will provide our students with opportunities that existing degrees do
not. If they choose not to transfer, the AAS degree will prepare students to be computer
support specialists.

At its February
2011

meeting, the Advisory Committee

re
-
affirmed
the need
to add more depth to the current curriculum in order to meet new emerging
employment opportunities, such as Web
-
programming and service
-
side programming.
They, again, verified the need to offer a program with higher level math and computer
science courses
in order
to promote transfe
r
to
bachelor degree

programs
(Appendix J)
.


Program Mission

The mission of the Computing and Information Science program is to provide students
with the foundational computing, analytical, communication, collaborative, and
ma
thematics skills at the associate degree level for transfer to a baccalaureate
institution to earn a degree in preparation for a career in computer
-
related fields.


Program Description

Employment demand for graduates with high level computing and
information
technology skills is projected to continue to increase over the next decade. The
Computing and Information Science program provides students with the skills
necessary to design computing and information technology solutions so that they are
pr
epared to be successful upon transfer to a bachelor’s degree program. Students who
wish to continue their education may do so through conne
cted degree programs with
local
universities
,

including the University of Delaware and
Delaware State

University.


P
rogram Graduate Competencies

The graduate will be able to:

1.

Capture users’ requirements in the form of technical specifications, diagrams,
flow charts, storyboards, etc. for use by IT personnel and restate IT documents in
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a form meaningful to non
-
technic
al personnel.

2
.

Install, configure and secure operating systems and application software within a
given organizational environment.

3
.

Given specifications, design and implement simple to moderately complex
programs.

4.

Create and apply algorithms and d
ata structures to meet end user needs.

5
.

Work effectively as part of a team charged with solving a complex technical
problem.

6.

Utilize current standards to design, implement, and evaluate an appropriate and
secure computer
-
based system.


Curriculum

The Computing and Information Science curriculum meets all of the College’s
curriculum guideline requirements

(Appendix H).

It consists of two existing Computer
Information Systems (CIS) courses and adds four new Computer Science courses,
which are in acc
ordance with the 2009 American Computing Machinery (ACM)
Computing Curricula Guidelines for Associate
-
Degree Transfer Curriculum in Computer
Science. T
he program
requires upper
-
level math and science courses, including
calculus and physics
-
based calculus.
See Appendix A for the course sequence sheet
and Appendix B for the course descriptions.
At its February meeting,
t
he advisory
committee
approved the program curriculum.


Program Delivery Structure

This new program will be delivered through the Computer
Information Systems
Department at the Wilmington Campus beginning in fall 2011.

The students will be
made aware of the multiple transfer options. The Connected Degree Suggested Course
Sequence Sheets are located in Appendices C through G.


Program Budget

A new faculty member will be needed at the Wilmington campus to support the offering
of the new Computer Science courses.
An available faculty position will be used to meet
this need.


Conclusion

The
Computer

Information
Systems/Computer N
etwork Engineering Technology

Advisory Committee, the Deans of Instruction, the Assistant Vice President for
Curriculum and Instruction, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs fully support
and request approval for the
Computing and Information Scienc
e

Associate Degree
Program.


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APPENDICES


Appendix A
:

Course Sequence Sheet

Appendix B:

Course Descriptions

Appendix
C
:

UD Connected Degree


BA Computer Science

Appendix
D
:

UD Connected Degree


BS Computer Science

Appendix
E
:

UD Connected Degree


BS Information Science

Appendix
F
:

DSU Connected Degree


BS Computer Science

Appendix
G


DSU Connected Degree


BS Information Technology

Appendix H

CAPP
-

Curriculum Advising and Program Planning

Appendix I:

Advisory
Committee Membership

Appendix J

Adv
isory Committee Meeting Minutes



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Appendix B
-

Course Descriptions


CSC 114


Computer Science I

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of programming. Topics include data
types, control structures, functions, arrays, files, and the mechanics of

running, testing,
debugging and documenting. The concepts of data abstraction and recursion are
introduced. Students are required to create simple programs, explain them and
demonstrate they meet requirements.



CSC 164


Computer Science
II

This is the
second in a series of courses. As such it builds on the concepts of the
previous course while emphasizing the use of classes and objects. Topics include
object
-
oriented programming concepts, abstraction, algorithms, techniques, and
libraries. Students ar
e required to write programs using multiple files and modules,
class hierarchies, inheritance, polymorphism and that are fault tolerant.


CSC 214


Computer Science III

This is the third in a series of courses providing students with a foundation in comput
er
science. Students will develop advanced programming skills using a language that
supports an object
-
oriented approach and emphasizing data structures, algorithmic
analysis, software engineering principles, software and information assurance and
professi
onalism
.


CSC 264


Applied Computing Capstone

This course
provides practice in the design and programming of real
-
life applications
utilizing skills and knowledge obtained from previous Computer Information System

and
Computing and Information Science

courses
.



CIS 130


Computer Organization

The computer is introduced as a hierarchy of levels.

Topics include digital logic, micro
-
programming, memory, I/O, computer arithmetic, instruction sets, CPU structure, control
unit operation, parallel organizat
ion, and Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC).
Assembly programming is included.


CIS 211


Data Structures

Basic concepts of data structures such as abstraction, arrays, graphs, linked lists,
multiple stacks, queues, recursion, searching, sorting,
stacks, tables, and trees are
considered as well as systematic techniques for the construction and efficient
implementation of same. The course uses C language and requires extensive
programming.






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Appendix I

-

Advisory Committee
Members

Name & Address

Telephone

E
-
Mail

Allen Alexander, Ed.D. Chairperson,
CIS & CNE

Director, IT Learning Center

Delaware Tech

333 Shipley Street

Wilmington, DE 19801

573
-
5453 (w)

alex@dtcc.edu


Tony Chou

Architect
IV

J. P. Morgan Chase Bank, N.A.

301 North Walnut Street

Floor 15

Wilmington, DE 19801

529
-
8510 (h)

monkibum77@aol.com

tonychoud@aol.com


Richard Hartland

AstraZeneca



1800 Concord Pike

Wilmington, DE 19803

886
-
4094 (w)

994
-
2634 (h)


sixball@comcast.net

Mark Hufe

Chair

CNS and WIS Programs

College of Technology

Wilmington University

356
-
6869

mark.j.hufe@wilmu.edu

Yvette King


Distributed Applications

Project Leader

AIG Marketing

3 Beaver Valley Road

Wilmington, DE 19803

302
-
731
-
1677 (h
)

302
-
252
-
4799 (w
)

yvette.king@aig.com

Rich Liero

Director, Managed Computing

Services

Computer Sciences Corp.

645 Paper Mill Road


Newark, DE 19711

302
-
391
-
2719 (w)

rliero@csc.com


Sherman Miller

2006 North Van Buren Street,

Wilmington, DE 19802


302
-
421
-
9064 (h)

302
-
377
-
7877 (cell)


shermanmil@aol.com

srmiller@srmiller.com


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Linda W. Morris

DuPont

Global I.T. Program Manager
Corporate I.T. Group

Barley Mill Plaza

Bldg. 16, Room 1122

Wilmington, DE 19805

992
-
3932 (w)

762
-
7249 (h)


Linda.w.mor
ris@usa.dup
ont.com


Joe J. Olinchak


6 Brookridge Lane

Newark, DE 19711

239
-
3273 (h)

joeolinchak@comcast.n
et

Cheer
-
Sun Yang

O
ffice: 25 University Ave,

Computer Science Dept

West Chester University,


West Chester, PA 19383



cyang@wcupa.edu


Marwan
Rasamny

Chairperson & Associate Professor

Dept. of Computer & Information
Sciences

Delaware State University

Dover, Delaware 19901

302
-
857
-
6640 (Dept.)
302
-
857
-
7896 (Office)
302
-
857
-
6552 (Fax)

rasamny@desu.edu

www.cis.desu.edu

(URL)

Daniel Chester

Associate Chair

Department of Computer and
Informational Sciences

University of Delaware

831
-
1955

chester@cis.udel.edu



Delaware Technical & Community College

Frances H. Leach

Assistant Campus Director

Stanton/Wilmington Campus

333 Shipley Street

Wilmington, DE 19801

573
-
5480

leach@dtcc.edu

Kathy Janvier

Acting Dean of Instruction

333 Shipley
Street

Wilmington DE 19801



571
-
5376

janvier@dtcc.edu



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Bob Bradley

Assistant Dean of Instruction

Stanton Campus

SB135

400 Stanton
-
Christiana Road

Newark, DE 19713

292
-
3838


bradley@dtcc.edu

Kathy Friel


Assistant Dean of Instruction

Wilmington Campus

333 Shipley Street

Wilmington DE 19801

573
-
5497

friel@dtcc.edu

Mary Marchegiano


Chair, Electronics/CNE

Stanton Campus

SE226

400
Stanton
-
Christiana Road

Newark, DE 19713

453
-
3795

marym@dtcc.edu

Lee Hsu
, Faculty Member

573
-
5458

llh@dtcc.edu

Tommy Lu
, Faculty Member

573
-
5475

lu@dtcc.edu

Lynn Mancini
, Faculty Member

573
-
5466

mancini@dtcc.edu

Chi Ching Sikina, Faculty Member

573
-
5455

sikina@dtcc.edu

Sunyata
, Faculty Member

434
-
5588

sunyata@dtcc.edu













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Appendix J


Advisory Committee Minutes


Meeting Minutes

Computer Information Systems/Computer Network Engineering Advisory Committee

April 12, 2010


Members Present:
Allen Alexander

(
DTCC),
Dan Chester (UD) Kathy Friel (DTCC),
Richard Hartland

(
AstraZeneca
), Fran Leach (DTCC), Tommy Lu (DTCC), Sherman
Miller, Linda Morris (DuPont Global I.T.),
Cheer
-
Sun Yang

(West Chester University),
Marwan Rasamny

(DSU), Sunyata (DTCC)


Discussion Po
ints

Curriculum



Curriculum
is
modeled on ACM and IEEE



ACM and IEEE curriculum models
were
recently revised



Articulation with nearby colleges and universities desirable

Course content



Revised course
syllabi

discussed



Revised curriculum sequence sheets disc
ussed

Concerns



Outsou
rcing and “offshoring“ of entry
-
level programming positions raised



Educational requirements of e
ntry
-
level programming positions rising as a result



Viability of a two
-
year degree questioned


Opportunities



Landscape of job opportunities will always be changing. While some jobs are
disappearing, others are emerging. Web
-
programming and service
-
side
programming are examples.



Need to add more depth to curriculum to meet these emerging needs.

Consensus



Courses s
hould be modeled on ACM and IEEE model curriculum
,

but current course
syllabi and curriculum sequence sheets need refinement
.



A transfer option should be offered

to provide graduates with better opportunities for
employment.



A capstone course should be ad
ded.



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Meeting Minutes

Computer Information Systems/Computer Network Engineering Advisory Committee

February 24, 2010


Members Present:
Allen Alexander

(
DTCC),
Kathy Friel (DTCC),
Richard Hartland

(
AstraZeneca
), Mark Hufe

(WU), Kathy Janvier (DTCC), Fran Leach (DTCC), Tommy
Lu (DTCC), Linda Morris (DuPont Global I.T.),
Marwan Rasamny

(DSU), Chi Ching
Sikina (DTCC), Sunyata (DTCC)


Presentation: Progress on Articulation



Summary of proposed courses and curriculum
for connec
ted degrees



Needed updates to exi
s
ting curriculum



New course descriptions



Summary of current Wilmington Campus CIS/CNE programs



Connected degree pathways at UD, WU, and DSU



Employment opportunities


Discussion Points



Committee re
-
affirmed n
eed to add more
depth to the current curriculum

in order to
meet new em
erging employment opportunities
.




Committee also re
-
affirmed need to add a capstone course.



Committee emphasized need to offer a program with higher level math and
computer science courses in order to promote transfer to bachelor degree programs.


C
onsensus



Committee commended DTCC for its creation of connected degrees that provide a
variety of
transfer pathways to students.



Allen thanked the committee for its ongoing help and support.