Smart Grid Vasavi College - CEAGE

nosejasonΗλεκτρονική - Συσκευές

21 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 4 μήνες)

72 εμφανίσεις

4/3/12
1
Smart Grid as an Enabler of
Intermittent Sources of Electricity
   
Vasavi College of Engg
03 April, 2012
Hyderabad, India


Invited Talk by Prof. Saifur Rahman


This  is  the  Electric  Power  Grid  
2
Source: www.sxc.hu
4/3/12
2
3
Changing  Landscape  for  the  Electric  Utility  
Load  Dura)on  Curve    
Dominion  Virginia  Power  (2010)  
Peak load of
19,140 MW
Probability that peak
loads exceed
16,000 MW is only
5% of the time
3,140 MW or
16.5% of peak load
4/3/12
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Peak  load  and  its  duration  
 


In  the  US  20%  of  the  load  happens  5%  of  the  
)me    


In  Australia  15%  of  the  load  happens  2.5  days  in  
a  year  or  less  than  1%  of  the  )me  


In  Egypt  15%  of  the  load  happens  1%  of  the  )me  
 
 
 
Potential  Savings  from    
Peak  Load  Reduction  
 
US  has  an  installed  genera)on  capacity  of  
1,000,000  megawaKs  
 
20%  or  200,000  megawaKs  of  genera)on  capacity  
and  associated  transmission  and  distribu)on  
assets  are  worth  over  300  billion  dollars  
4/3/12
4
Impact  of  Peak  Load  
Hourly  Loads  as  Frac)on  of  Peak,  
Sorted  from  Highest  to  Lowest  
>25%  of  distribu)on  and  >10%  of  genera)on  assets  are  needed  
less  than  5%  of  the  )me  ($100s  of  billions  of  investments)  
Source: US Dept of Energy

8
 
 
4/3/12
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Smart  Grid  Defini)on  


According  to  United  States  Department  of  Energy
`
s  modern  
grid  ini)a)ve,  an  intelligent  or  a  smart  grid  integrates  
advanced  
sensing  technologies
,  
control  methods  
and  
integrated  
communica)ons  
into  the  current  electricity  grid.  
9
 
Information  flow  in  a  Smart  Grid  
A  smart  grid  will  provide  a  pathway  where  
informa)on  about  the  state  of  the  grid  and  
its  components  can  be  exchanged  quickly  
over  large  distances.  It  will  thus  facilitate  
effec)ve  integra)on  of  new  sustainable  
energy  sources,  such  as  wind,  solar,  off-­‐
shore  electricity,  etc.    
4/3/12
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What  Makes  it  Smart?  




Intelligence  
Two-­‐way  communica)on  
Real-­‐)me  monitoring  &  control  
 
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Difference  Between  a  Normal  Grid      
And  a  Smart  Grid  
Normal  Phone  
Smart  Phone  
4/3/12
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Power Plant
Transmission
Distribution
Home
Business
End-use
Appliances
Starting  and  End  Points  of  a  Smart  Grid  
From  Generator  to  Refrigerator  
Components  of  the  Smart  Grid  
Source: Michael Montoya, SCE, Smart Grid Strategy & Development

SCADA, PMUs,
FACTs, Advanced
Conductors


Substation Automation
Advanced Metering,
Demand Response and
Distributed Resources
Distribution Automation

Microgrid

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4/3/12
8


Merging  Power  Flow  with  
Informa)on  Flow:  
 
 Integrated  Communica)ons  

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Electric  Power  &    
Communica)on  Infrastructures  
Central Generating

Station

Step-Up

Transformer

Distribution

Substation

Receiving

Station

Distribution

Substation

Distribution

Substation

Commercial

Industrial

Commercial

Gas

Turbine

Recip

Engine

Cogeneration

Recip

Engine

Fuel

cell

Micro-

turbine

Flywheel

Residential

Photo

voltaics

Batteries

Residential Data
Concentrator
Control Center
Data network Users
2. Information Infrastructure
1.Power Infrastructure
Source: EPRI
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4/3/12
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The  network  must  be  absolutely  reliable  


Endpoints  must  be  much  lower  cost  


Device  hardware  can
`
t  be  upgraded  oben  


Can
`
t  just  ignore  very  rural  customers  


Need  security  all  the  )me,  not  just  
some)mes  


Applica)ons  are  s)ll  being  defined  
Physical
- Application
- Network
The  Smart  Grid  is  different  
than  the  Internet
 
 
What  can  the  Smart  Grid  do  for  us?  
 


Smart  meter  is  just  the  
beginning  of  a  smart  
grid  


Two-­‐way  
communica)on  allows  
customer  par)cipa)on  
4/3/12
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Key: red=electricity, green=gas, blue=water, triangle=trial or pilot, circle=project
Smart  Metering  Projects  Map,  United  States  
Key: red=electricity, green=gas, blue=water, triangle=trial or pilot, circle=project
Smart  Metering  Projects  Map,  Europe  to  Australia  
4/3/12
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2
1
AMR
Customer
Outage
Detection
Automated
Meter Reads
Theft ID
Remote
TFTN
Remote Meter
Programming
AMR Capability+
Load
Control
Price Signals
sent to Customer
New Rate Design
AMI
Smart Grid
AMI Capability+
Remote detection – sensors
everywhere

Central and distributed analysis


Correction of disturbances
on the grid

Optimizes grid assets

Distribution Automation

Leverage data to understand
system performance better

l
Self Healing
z


Enable use of renewable resources

Enable electrification of transportation



Hourly
Remote
Meter
Reads
Customer
Voltage
Measurement
Source: EnerNex





It helps to manage the peak load

It helps to integrate intermittent
sources of generation into the
electric power grid.

Short term load control for a large number of end-
use devices makes it possible to get quick load
relief to match fluctuations in generation.


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Why  is  the  Smart  Grid  Important?

4/3/12
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Hourly  wind  power  varia)on  (MW)    in  Texas,  
USA  (01  and  02  Jan  2008)  
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01 Jan 2008
02 Jan 2008
Installed Capacity 4,541 MW
Hourly  wind  power  varia)on  (MW)    in  Texas,  
USA  (03  and  04  Jan  2008)  
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03 Jan 2008
04 Jan 2008
Installed Capacity 4,541 MW
0.0  
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4/3/12
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Plajorm  for  Smart  Grid  R&D  
 
The  electric  power  industry  provides  the  plajorm  
and  the  context  
Telecommunica)on,  IT  and    computer  industries  
provide  the  technology  and  sobware  to  
interface  with  the  electric  power  network  
The  electric  power  industry  will  require  new  
genera)on  of  engineers  who  are  versa)le  in  
several  disciplines  
 
 
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Who  else  is  ac)ve  in  smart  grid?  
 
The  non-­‐tradi)onal  players  
4/3/12
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CISCO’s  Smart  Grid  
http://www.cisco.com/web/strategy/energy/external_utilities.html
GE’s  Plug  into  the  Smart  Grid  
http://ge.ecomagination.com/smartgrid/
4/3/12
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IBM’s  Smarter  Planet  
http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/
Siemens’  Smart  Grid  
http://www.energy.siemens.com/hq/en/energy-topics/smart-grid/
4/3/12
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Building  Blocks  of  the  Smart  Grid  
© Saifur Rahman


www.Sgiclearinghouse.org
4/3/12
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How  is  the  Smart  Grid  Engineered  
Source: EPRI
Thank  you  
   
Prof.  Saifur  Rahman  
www.saifurrahman.org