Smart Grid Impacts on Solar

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21 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

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Smart Grid Impacts on Solar
Dl
D
eve
l
opmen
t
G
Michael
G
ravely
Manager
Energy Systems Research Office
CaliforniaEnergyCommission
1
California

Energy

Commission
mgravely@energy.state.ca.us
/ 916-651-0316
Overview

PublicInterestEnergyResearch(PIER)Program
Public

Interest

Energy

Research

(PIER)

Program

WhatisaSmartGrid?
What

is

a

Smart

Grid?

HowDoesSolarDeploymentImpacttheGrid
?
How

Does

Solar

Deployment

Impact

the

Grid
?

HowCanSmartGridHelp?
How

Can

Smart

Grid

Help?
2
Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program
•IOU Ratepayer-funded program launched in 1997 by AB1890

A
ddresses electricity, natural gas, and transportation sectors

$86Mannualbudget;over$400Minactiveprojects

$86M

annual

budget;

over

$400M

in

active

projects

A
leader in no/low-carbon science and technolo
gy

p
ro
g
rams
gypg
•Strong emphasis on collaborations
3
PIER Research Ongoing at all Levels
Distribution
Consumer
Transmission
Integration

A
utomating Demand
Response
•AMI
•Dynamic Rates
•Phasor Measurement
•Advanced displays
•Advanced comm &
controls
•Renewables
•Standards
•Protocols
•Reference designs
•Distribution
Automation
•AMI
•Advanced C&C
•Home Area Networks
•Plug in Hybrids
•Renewables
•MRTU interface
•Energy Storage
•Renewables
•Micro Grids
•Automation
•MRTU
•Energy Storage
•Renewables

AMI
4

AMI
WhatisaSmartGrid?
What

is

a

Smart

Grid?
5
Merging Two Infrastructures
Electrical Infrastructure
“Intelligence” Infrastructure
6
The Energy Independence and Security
Act of 2007: Extracts from Title XIII
The Smart Grid includes:
•Optimizing grid operations and resources to reflect the changing dynamics of
the physical infrastructure and economic markets
•Cybersecurity
•Using and integrating distributed resources, demand side resources, and
energyefficiencyresources
energy

efficiency

resources
•Deploying smart technologies for metering
•Communications of grid operations and status
•Distribution automation
•Integrating “smart” appliances and other consumer devices
•Deploying and integrating advanced electricity storage and peak-shaving
technologies
Tfiiftititiltlltl

T
rans
f
err
i
ng
i
n
f
orma
ti
on
t
o consumers
i
n a
ti
me
l
y manner
t
o a
ll
ow con
t
ro
l

decisions
•Developing standards for the communication and interoperability of appliances
and e
q
ui
p
ment connected to the electric
g
rid
7
qpg
•Identifying and lowering barriers to adoption of smart grid technologies,
practices, and services
Utility Grid of the Future (Smart Grid)
11
Source: 2007 Integrated Energy Policy Report
How Does Solar
Deplo
y
ment Impact
y
t
h
e

G
ri
d
?
teGd
12
Future Challenges
13
How Can Smart Grid
Help?
Help?
18
Synchrophasor Measurement –
The Heart of the Smart Grid Transmission
PEACE CANYON
PRINCE RUPERT
jfh
01/24/95
PSM
SUNDANCE
FT. PECK
KEMANO
MICA
VANCOUVER
SEATTLE
AREA
AREA
COLSTRIP
PORTLAND
AREA
HOT SPRINGS
HELLS
CANYON
JOSEPH
GRAND
COULEE
WILLISTON
LANGDON
CHIEF
PPSM
PPSM
PPSM
*
PPSM
PPSM
PPSM
PPSM
PPSM
PPSM
PPSM
D
S
M
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PSAM
GPS Satellite
BOISE
MALIN
TABLE MTN
ROUND MTN
SALT LAKE
CITY AREA
SAN FRANCISCO
AREA
MIDPOINT
NAVAJO
DENVER
AREA
HOOVER
P
H
O
E
N
I
X
BURNS
PINTO
FOUR
CORNERS
SHASTA
DELTA
MONTROSE
LANDING
MOSS
MIDWAY
PPSM
PPSM
*
PPSM
PPSM
*
PPSM
*
PPSM
*
D
S
M
DSM
DSM
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
PMU
*
PMU
*
PMU
*
PMU
PMU
PMU
*
PMU
*
PSM
PSM
PSM
WECC
JohnDay
Malin
SummerL
Slatt
McNary
Time-Stamp
Time-Stamp
Useful
Real-Time
jfh
HVDC Terminal
MEXICO
EL PASO
AREA
PALO
DEVERS
LUGO
LOS ANGELES
AREA
ALBUQUERQUE
AREA
VERDE
MOJAVE
P
H
O
E
N
I
X
AREA
CORONADO
Projected WSCC Monitors, 1995
Power System Analysis Monitor (BPA)
Power System Monitor
Phase-Angle Measurement Unit (Macrodyne)
Dynamic System Monitor (PTI/Hathaway)
Portable Power System Monitor (BPA)
*Proposed installation
PMU
DSM
PSM
PPSM
PPSM
*
PPSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
PMU
PMU
PMU
PSAM
500
525
550
575
a
ge - kV
John

Day
Malin
Summer

L
Slatt
McNary
Gilt#2
A
she reactor
Information
PMUs (Phasor
Measurement
Data
425
450
475
306090120150180210240
Time - second
s
Volt
a
G
r
i
zz
l
y reac
t
or
#2
Grizzly reactor #3
Time
S
y
nchronous
Control
Center
CtfEPRI
Measurement

Units)
y
Data
C
our
t
esy o
f

EPRI
Ultimately, Smart Grid required for maximum renewables deployment.
New Technologies to AccommodateUnique
Renewable Generator Behaviors…
•Energy Storage & Intelligent
Agent
…through a smarter
Agent
•Solar and Wind Forecasting
Tools

Synchrophasor
Tehachapi Wind Generation -April 2005
and more flexible grid.
Synchrophasor

Measurement
•Power Flow Control (spatial)
•Demand Res
p
onse
Intermittenc
y
p
•Distributed Generation
•Generator and Load
Modeling
y
•Statistical and Probabilistic
Forecasting Tools
•Advanced Intelligent
PttiSt
P
ro
t
ec
ti
on
S
ys
t
ems
New Technologies for Increased
Transmission Capacity…
… by optimizing the grid for greater power flow.
North-South COI
•Dynamic Thermal Ratings
•Real-Time System
Operations
(synchrophasors &
applications)
•Power Flow Control (spatial)
ESt

E
nergy
St
orage
•Advanced Transmission
Line Conductors

HighVoltageDirectCurrent

High

Voltage

Direct

Current

•Distributed Generation
•Statistical & Probabilistic
Analysis&PlanningTools
California –
Desert
Southwest
Analysis

&

Planning

Tools
•Advanced Intelligent
Protection Systems
Energy Storage Technologies Applying
Smart Grid Technologies
PIER Energy Storage Research
Flywheel Technology
25
PIER Energy Storage Research
ZBB Technology
26
PIER Energy Storage Research
NaS Technology
Fuses
2.2 m
1.7 m
Sand
Fuses
0.67 m
Main
Pole
Vacuum Vessel
Battery Module
NAS Battery 8MW / 57.6MWh
Cells
Heater
27
28
Demand Response Automation by Sector
Communicating 
Thermostat
Demand Response 
Automation Client
Demand Response 
Automation Client
Internet
Internet
Automation of Demand Response
Auto-DR 2007 Results
20062007*
PG&E AutoDR Test Day –All AutoDR
Participants –8/30/07
45000
(k
W)
Total Participants13 CPP
37 CPP
53 DBP
62 CBP
152 Total
30000
35000
40000
e
Building Power
(k
8-30-07 Loads
AutoDR
saves
Capacity
Total Base load8 MW80 MW
15000
20000
25000
12:00
3:006:009:00
12:00
Noon
3:006:009:00
12:00
Whol
e
3-10 Baseline
3-10 MABaseline
OAT Baseline
AutoDR
saves Energy
Total Peak Load
Reduced
1 MW25 MW
Average Peak
13%
34%
Noon
30
Load Reduction
13

%
34%
* Includes large industrial loads.
AutoDR Customer CPP Performance
C/I Customers on CPP
With and Without AutoDR
30%
40%
Average CCP
Peak Load Reduction
8% w/AutoDR
1%w/oAutoDR
0%
10%
20%
30%
e
rage Shed
-
1%

w/o

AutoDR
-20%
-10%
0%
n
d
ey
st
n
d
st
nd
n
d
n
d
Av
e
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t
ail-I
n
l
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n
d
Retail-Vall
ey
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-
Coa
st
Offic
e-
Inl
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B
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otech
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o
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P
u
bl
i
c-I
nl
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nd
Indus
-
Inl
a
n
d
School
-
Inla
n
d
A
uto CPP
Non-Auto CPP
DR as Spinning Reserve or
Ancillary Service
32
Follow-up Questions
MichaelGravely
Michael

Gravely
California Energy Commission
mgravely@energystatecaus
mgravely@energy
.
state
.
ca
.
us
916-651-0316
34