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Harlaxton College

Education 3
2
0: Teaching Strategies K
-
12

Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday

1:10
-
2:00 p.m.

Fall 2007



It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative

expression and knowledge.

~A. Einstein


If you want to build a boat,

Don’t dru
m up people to collect wood

And don’t assign them tasks and work,

But rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.


~Antoine de Saint
-
Exupery


Aut mortus est aut docent litteras. [a person is either teaching or dead].

~Erasmus


Professor
: Katherine A. Rhoades, Ph.D.


Office Hours
:
Mondays and Tuesdays, 2:30
-
3:30 p.m.
,

or by appointment at a mutually
convenient time.
I enjoy getting to know students and welcome your visits.


Welcome:


You are invited to join a course that
offers abundant o
pportunities to gain theoretical
insights into
and practical
experiences with
teaching strategies that are standards
-
based and
informed by

research
-
based

“best
-
p
ractice
s.


You also are invited to participate in creating and
nourishing
our
collaborative lea
rning community

that
will enable us to engage in
a lively, active
inquiry where
intellectual risk
-
taking and
concern for each other’s learning
thrive
.
W
e each bring
different gifts to this c
ourse
,

and we gain much by fostering a classroom atmosphere that h
onors
different experiences
, skills,

and knowledge. Because of the centrality of student input in this
class, I expect you to arrive at all classes well
-
prepare
d to contribute to
and lead
discussions
by
having read, studied, and thought about the assigned
materials. I also
urge you to bring the
following to every class:
an open mind, a propensity for posing questions,
an enthusiastic
willingness to listen to others’ ideas and share your own,
a collegial spirit

that facilitates
community
-
building and fosters

learning for all classroom participants,

and an abiding sense of
humor. Please be aware that this course is rigorous with high expectations because to expect any
less limits, rather than extends, your horizons.


Course description:

This course, d
esigned f
or prospec
tive kindergarten
-
12 teachers,
will address
curricular and teaching issues from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Emphases will
include promoting understandings of the K
-
12 curriculum, and gaining knowledge and skills that
will aid in
preparing developmentally appropriate instructional strategies that extend from and are
anchored by national teaching standards

(see
INTASC Standards on the next page
)
and informed
by
evidence
-
based
best practices
.

Prerequisites: Education 100, 200, or per
mission of instructor.


2

In
terstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC)

Standards

and Education 320

(with thanks and credit to Dr. Chuck Watson, University of Evansville)


Principle
/Standard

Education 320

Principle #1: The teacher unde
rstands the central concepts,
tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she
teaches and can create learning experiences that make these
aspects of subject matter meaningful for students.

Minor component of course,
but content knowledge wi
ll be
critical to successful
completion of the course.

Principle #2: The teacher understands how children learn and
develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support
their intellectual, social and personal development.

Minor component

Principl
e #3: The teacher understands how students differ in
their approaches to learning and creates instructional
opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Minor component

Principle #4: The teacher understands and uses a variety of
instructional strat
egies to encourage students' development of
critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

Major component; instructional
strategies, models, methods,
thinking skills.

Principle #5: The teacher uses an understanding of individual
and group mo
tivation and behavior to create a learning
environment that encourages positive social interaction, active
engagement in learning, and self
-
motivation.

Major component; motivating
students with engaging,
interesting, relevant lessons
and units.

Principle
#6: The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal,
nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster
active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the
classroom.

Major component;
communicating and interacting
with diverse students.

P
rinciple #7: The teacher plans instruction based upon
knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and
curriculum goals.

Major component; instructional
planning, lessons, units,
technology.

Principle #8: The teacher understands and uses formal an
d
informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the
continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the
learner.

Major component; ongoing,
daily, lesson, and unit
assessment; summative
assessments.

Principle #9: The teacher is a reflec
tive practitioner who
continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions
on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the
learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities
to grow professionally.

Major component; analys
is of
lessons, units, developing ways
to improve and grow.

Principle #10: The teacher fosters relationships with school
colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to
support students' learning and well being.

Minor component, but
collaborat
ive leadership will be
emphasized through
working in
teams and with colleagues
.


Course o
verview

and philosophy
:

In this course you will begin to learn some of the skills and
strategies that exemplary teachers use to help all children, regardless of backg
round, ability, or
circumstances, learn and achieve. You will learn about different ways to help manage a complex,

diverse classroom environment and
you will learn about the many different ways excellent
teachers transform complex content and concepts into

understandable and interesting lessons and
instructional units. You will learn the importance of planning, the value of assessment, and how
reflection on teaching helps teachers grow and learn and improve.


3


The overarching question that drives this course

is “What does it mean to be a good teacher?” We
will grapple with this question throughout the semester by first formulating essential questions to
guide our inquiry
into theory
and practice
,

and
subsequently
engaging
actively and thoughtfully
with
a wide

range of
resources
,

activities
--
including field
-
based observations

in area schools
--

and assignments

that will
lead us to answers to the
essential
questions we have posed. Examples
of essential questions include:




How do I describe my identity as a teach
er?



How do students learn?



Who are my students and how do I assure that all students who are under my care are
successful learners?



How do I create a classroom atmosphere that fosters learning

for all students
?



What do students need to know and be able t
o do?



What values are important to guide effective teaching and learning?



What practices are most effective in facilitating learning?



How
can
I know and demonstrate that students have learned?



What is worth learning and who decides the relative value
of different kinds of
knowledge and skills?


The classroom community we create in EDUC 320 will be reflective of and accountable to our
shared understanding of what it means to learn in an atmosphere that respects and builds on prior
knowledge and values
a
nd
shared decision
-
making. Students are essential leaders and active
creators, caretakers, and critical assessors of our classroom community.


Required texts:


William Ayers (2001).
To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher
. New York: Teachers College Press.

(den
oted as
TEACH

in topical outline)


Harvey Daniels and Marilyn Bizar (2005).
Teaching the Best Practice Way: Methods that Matter,
K
-
12
. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Publishers.

(denoted as
BEST

in topical outline)


Please also note the bibliography of online
resources at the end of the syllabus!


Supplementary text (available in the library)
:
Arends, R.I. (2007).
Learning to Teach
. Boston:
McGraw
-
Hill.

(denoted as
LEARNING

in topical outline)


School visits and course fee:


Pending my success in arranging
K
-
12

school visits in the Grantham area
, we
may take several
field trips to schools on selected Wednesday afternoons. If so, we may need to adjust the tentative
topical outline accordingly. A
course fee of approximately 6
-
7
£

will cover transportation
expenses.


Learning activities
,

course requirements
, evaluation
,

and grading:


Y
ou will
complete a
number of written assignments, field
-
based observations, in
-
class exercises;
creat
e

and refl
ect on lesson plans and units;
demonstrat
e

lessons

and units;

work

with colleagues;

design
assessments
;

and
use a variety of technologies as tools to support teaching and learning.
You
also
will create a portfolio entry based on
William Ayers’
To Teach
:
Th
e Journey of a

4

Teacher

and take a mid
-
term exam and a final exam.


Detailed instructions for all assignments with grading criteria and/or rubrics will be
distributed separately.


Attendance and participation

in class are
require
d, and you will also be expe
cted to demonstrate
pr
ofessional dispositions and attitudes throughout the semester.
We will discuss the conceptual
frameworks and related dispositions from each of your home universities and develop a plan for
consolidating the dispositions that will be a
ssessed during this course
.
Also please note that
during the course, it is unlikely that we will have time in class to cover every topic presented in
the textbook or in the assigned readings; however, students remain responsible for reading the
assigned ma
terials and may be tested on these materials.


Please note that to facilitate our discussions, you will bring a "Question/Analysis/or
Critical Commentary Card" [
QUACC

meaning
QU
-
qu
estion,
A
-
a
nalyze, and
CC
-
c
ritical
c
ommentary] to each class as indicated on

the topical outline. On a 5 x 8” card or
its equivalent, pose a
thoughtful
question, an analytical "thinking point," or a critical
comment based on your careful reading of the assigned material. This is your opportunity
to think critically about your read
ing and to synthesize your thoughts. Please
use word
processing or
strive for legibility if you write your comments, because you will be
sharing your cards with your fellow students and me. Approaching this simple
assignment thoughtfully and enthusiastical
ly will add immeasurably to the quality and
focus of our discussions and gives me a chance to provide you with ongoing feedback.


Grading Grid:





Classroom participation and leadership as evidenced through assessment of
dispositions

and knowledge and skill
s as demonstrated in QUACCs and other
classroom activities and assignments

2
5
%
of your final grade




A journal/notebook chronicling and reflecting on your experiences in the course,
including reading and lecture/discussion notes
,

is required
. The format you

use for this
requirement is your decision, but I urge you to create a document that will be useful to
you now and in the future. I will review your journal/notebook periodically, so please
bring it to
each
class. Journal/notebooks will be graded
satisfact
ory

or
unsatisfactory
.
An unsatisfactory grade will result in a lower final grade.




Portfolio project based on TEACH

15
%

of your final grade




I
n
-
class e
xam
, Thursday, October 25

15%

of your final grade




Lesson/unit plan, including presentation

30%

of your
final grade




Final exam

15%

of your final grade




Please note that in fairness to myself and all students, I do not accept late work.




5

Final grades will be calculated according to the following scheme:


93
-
100 A


80
-
82.9 B
-


67
-
69.9 D+

90
-
92.9


A
-


77
-
79
.9 C+


63
-
66.9 D

87
-
89.9


B+


73
-
76.9 C


60
-
62.9 D
-

83
-
86.9 B


70
-
72.9 C
-


0
-
59.9 F

A
ttendance Policy, student sickness and absence:


"In courses which meet three times a week students are allowed a maximum of three unexcused
absences during the course o
f the semester which incur no grade penalty. In courses which meet
twice a week, two such absences are permitted, and in courses which meet once a week, a single
absence is allowed. Additional unexcused absences will attract a grade penalty, namely the
low
ering of the student's final grade for each absence in excess of the permitted quota."

"In the case of a student who is, without good reason, more than ten minutes late arriving for
class, the faculty member may deem the offender inexcusably absent for tha
t class period."


In exceptional circumstances, students may be granted an excused, or justified, absence. Such
absences, however, must receive the prior approval of the principal or dean of students, who will
confirm the absence in writing to the faculty
members concerned. More commonly, students may
also receive an excused absence if, in the opinion of the College nurse, they are too ill or
otherwise incapacitated to attend class. In such cases, faculty will receive a signed certificate
from the nurse wit
hin 24 hours of the missed class.


Honor Code:
The Harlaxton honor code states:
I will neither give nor receive unauthorized aid
nor will I tolerate an environment that condones the use of unauthorized aid.

All students are
expected to honor and abide by t
his code.
This means that you may not intentionally use
unauthorized notes or other materials, or copy or ask others for information during exams. It also
means that you may not intentionally use someone else’s ideas or writing as your own
(plagiarism), in
tentionally falsify or lie about a particular piece of information (fabrication), or
help others commit any of the above (facilitation).


Tentative
Topical outline and assignments
:


Week one

Building our community
/

The Challenge of Teaching and “Seeing”
o
ur
Student
s



Monday, August 27


Welcome and introductions

Course overview and expectations

Creating ground rules for our community


In
-
class film clip
Dead Poet’s Society


6

Tuesday, August 28


Before class read
TEACH
, Chapters 1 and 2


Complete the require
d learning activities
described on the reading guide and be prepared to
discuss ideas presented and questions raised based on your reading.


Discussion on what makes a quality reflection


Thursday, August 30


Before class read
TEACH
, Chap
t
ers 3 and 4


Comp
lete the required learning activities described on the reading guide and be prepared to
discuss ideas presented and questions raised based on your reading.


In
-
class film,
Good Morning, Miss Toliver


Week two

Creating Learning Environment
s
,
Liberating the
Curriculum
, and
Exploring the Mystery
, Complexities, and Challenges
of Teaching


Monday, September 3


Before class read

TEACH
, Chapters 5&6


Complete the required learning activities described on the reading guide and be prepared to
discuss ideas presented

and questions raised based on your reading.



Tuesday, September 4


Before class read
TEACH,

Chapters 7&8


Complete the required learning activities described on the reading guide and be prepared to
discuss ideas presented and questions raised based on yo
ur reading.


Thursday, September 6


Discussion and in
-
class work on the
TEACH

Portfolio Project

Planning our future coursework and schedule of activities


Week three

Introduction to Best Practices Research and Outcomes


Monday, September 10


Before class r
ead
BEST
, Prologue and selected readings in Chapter 1, “How to Teach”


7

Tuesday, September 11


Before class read
BEST
, selected readings in Chapter 2, “Reading as Thinking”

*QUACC


Thursday, September 13


TEACH

Portfolio Project is due at the beginning of c
lass

“Good Teacher/Bad Teacher” discussion


Week four

More Methods that Matter
/Student
-
Centered Models of Interactive
Teaching


Monday, September 17


Discussion/presentation of portfolio projects and learning outcomes


Tuesday, September 18


Before class r
ead
BEST,

selected readings in Chapter 3, “Representing
-
to
-
Learn”


Thursday, September 20


Before class read
BEST
, selected readings in Chapter 4, “Small group activities”


Friday, September 21


Before class read
BEST
, selected readings in Chapter 5, “Clas
sroom Workshop”

*QUACC


Week five

Assuring Authenticity in Learning


Monday, September 24


Pause and reflection/evaluation of where we have been and where we are going


Tuesday, September 25


Before class read
BEST
, selected readings in Chapter 6, “Authent
ic Experiences”

*QUACC


No class on Thursday

trip to Ireland!


Week six

Exploring Leadership Aspe
cts of Teaching/Planning and Or
ganization


Monday, October 1


Selected readings from
LEARNING




8

Tuesday, October 2


Selected readings from
LEARNING


Thursday,
October 4


Selected readings from
LEARNING


*QUACC


Week seven

Exploring Leadership Aspects of Teaching/Classroom Management


Monday, October 8


Selected readings from
LEARNING


Tuesday, October 9


Selected readings from
LEARNING



Thursday, October 11


Se
lected readings from
LEARNING

*QUACC


Week eight

Exploring Leadership Aspects of Teaching/Assessment and Evaluation


Monday, October 15


Read
BEST
, selected readings from Chapter 7


Tuesday, October 16


Selected readings from
LEARNING


Thursday, October 18


Selected readings from
LEARNING

*QUACC


Week nine

School leadership and collaboration/Thoughts on collaborative
leadership


Monday, October 22


Selected readings from
LEARNING


Tuesday, October 23


Selected readings from
LEARNING


9

Thursday, October 25


In
-
class
exam



Week ten

Creating Lesson Plans and
Integrative Units


Monday, October 29


Read BEST, Chapter 8, Integrative Units


Tuesday, October 30


Selected readings in
LEARNING


Thursday, November 1


Selected readings in
LEARNING

*QUACC


Week eleven

Con
structing Lesson Plans and Integrative Units


Monday, November 5


Work on units/plans in class


Tuesday, November 6


Work on units/plans in class



No class on Thursday

trip to Paris



Week twelve

Constructing Lesson Plans/Units


Monday, November 12


Work
on units/plans in class


Tuesday, November 13


Work on units/plans in class


Thursday, November 15


Work on units/plans in class





10

Friday, November 16


Work on units/plans in class


Week thirteen
-
Presenting Lesson Plans/Units


Monday, November 19


All le
sson plans/units are due at the beginning of class


Student presentations in class


Tuesday, November 20


Student presentations in class


Thursday, November 22


Student presentations in class


Week fourteen

Reviewing and Reflecting


Monday, November 26


S
elf and community assessment


Tuesday, November 27


Review for final exam


Thursday, November 29


Course evaluation and celebration



Final exams December 1
-
4








Bibliography of Education Websites ( K
-
12)


Lesson Planning & Curriculum


Blue Web’N

Blue
Web'n is an online library of outstanding Internet sites categorized by
subject, grade level, and format (tools, references, lessons, hotlists, resources,
tutorials, activities, projects).

http://ww
w.kn.pacbell.com/wired/bluewebn/


11


DiscoverySchool.com Lesson Plan Library

Discovery Education’s site featuring
hundreds of original lesson plans, all written
by teachers for teachers. The video, print and CD
-
ROM educational products
supported by the less
on plans on DiscoverySchool.com are created, marketed and
distributed by Discovery Channel School.


http://school.discovery.com/lessonplans


EDSITEment

A project of the National Endowment for the Hum
anities to help educators exploit
the resources of the World Wide Web. The site contains an extensive section
called,
Lesson Plans
, which is annotated with goals and skills to help teachers
fully integrate Web resources and classroom activities.

http://edsitement.neh.gov/


Education World®:
Lesson Plans

A

place
for

teachers
to
gather and share ideas.
Includes
including lesson plans,
practical information for educators, information on how to integrate technology in

the classroom, and articles written by education experts
.

http://www.education
-
world.com/a_lesson/


The Educator's Reference Desk: Lesson Plans

This collection contains more than 2000 unique lesso
n plans which were written
and submitted by teachers from all over the United States and the world.

http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/


EduHound

A

specialized educational directory with built
-
in r
esource links offered free to educators, students
and parents.

http://www.eduhound.com/


ERIC: Education Resources Information Center

P
rovides free access to more than 1.2 million bibliographic records of journal
articles and other education
-
related materials and, if available, includes links to
full text. ERIC is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of
Education Sciences (IES).

http://www.eric.ed.gov/


F
REE: Federal Resources for Educational Excellence

Teaching and learning resources from federal agencies.

http://www.free.ed.gov/


GEM: Gateway to 21
st

Century Skills

A Consortium effort to provide educators with q
uick and easy access to thousands
of educational resources found on various federal, state, university, non
-
profit and
commercial Internet sites.

http://thegateway.org/


12


Ide@s

Provides Wisconsin educators with teache
r
-
reviewed, standards
-
aligned lessons,
interactive tools, video and other resources for use in curriculum development and
classroom instruction.

http://ideas.wisconsin.edu/


K
-
12 Station

F
eatures over 20,000 web
-
based resources for K
-
12 students, teachers and
families. Just click on a grade level and topic to view dozens of tutorials, games,
movies, simulations, primary source documents, and more!

http://www.k12station.c
om/


Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators

Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators is a categorized list of sites useful for
enhancing curriculum and professional growth. It is updated often to include the
best sites for teaching and learning.

http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/


LearningPage.com

Provides

a
large

collection of professionally produced instructional materials you
can download and print. Lesson plans, books, worksheets, and much more
can be
found here.

Free registration required.

http://www.learningpage.com/index.html


LessonPlanZ.com

A searchable directory of free online lesson plans and lesson plan resources for all
grades and
subjects.

http://www.lessonplanz.com/



McREL: Mid
-
continent for Education and Learning

Lesson Plans

Links to selected lesson plans and other resources that are helpful for curriculum
planning, including activit
ies developed a
t McREL for specific benchmarks.
Each subject area is organized by topic.

http://www.mcrel.org/lesson
-
plans/


PBS Teachers


Resources for the Classroom

This Web site correlates classroom
activities to 46 sets of national and state
curriculum standards.

http://www.pbs.org/teachers/


Scholastic.com


Lesson Plans

10,000+ lesson plans and ideas for teachers, including a searchable database with
pr
intables and booklists.

http://teacher.scholastic.com/lessonplans/



13

Teachnology.com

F
ind your way to well over 27,234 lesson plans.

http://www.teach
-
nology.com/teachers/lesson_plans/


Websites and Resources for Teachers

Dr. Vicki F. Sharp and Dr. Richard M. Sharp are Professors of Elementary
Education at California State University, Northridge. They have collected sites
and resourc
es from the Internet for teachers to use in their classrooms. There is
also a special category for children called "Just for Kids". These sites are
entertaining, useful, informative, and fun. They range from lesson plans, creative
classroom projects, inter
active activities, visits to museums, and trips around the
U.S.A. and other countries.

http://www.sitesforteachers.com/resources_sharp/



Standards


Academic Benchmarks

Provides
access to th
e current state curriculum standards
.

http://www.academicbenchmarks.com/search


ARTSEDGE: Standards for Arts Education

The standards outline what every K
-
12 student should know and be able to do in
the arts. The standards were developed by the Consortium of National Arts
Education Associations, through a grant administered by The National
Association for Music Education

http://art
sedge.kennedy
-
center.org/teach/standards.cfm


Center for Civic Education National Standards

http://www.civiced.org/index.php?page=stds


Developing Educational Standards

This site features an anno
tated list of Internet sites containing K
-
12 educational
standards and curriculum frameworks. Standards and frameworks may be
searched by subject or by state. Links to education related governmental resources
and to professional

links are also available.

http://www.edstandards.org/Standards.html


Education World®: U.S. Education Standards

http://www.education
-
world.com/standards/nati
onal/

Compiles links to s
everal national and education organizations
that have created

educational standards or guidelines
. Also a good source for lesson plans.


McREL: Mid
-
continent for Education and Learning, Content Knowledge
Standards and Benchmark D
atabase

A compendium of content standards and benchmarks for K
-
12 education in both

14

searchable and browsable formats.

http://www.mcrel.org/standards
-
benchmarks/


The MiddleWeb Guide to Standards
-
B
ased Middle School Reform

A collection of stories, research articles, databases, and useful websites for
schools committed to higher standards.

http://www.middleweb.com/SBRGuide.html


National Associa
tion for Music Education Standards

http://www.menc.org/publication/books/prek12st.html


National Center for History in the Schools Standards

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs/standards.html


National Council for Geographic Education Standards

http://www.ncge.org/publications/tutorial/standards/


National Counc
il of Teachers of English

http://www.ncte.org/


National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards

http://standards.nctm.org/


National Council for the Social Studi
es Standards

The Curriculum Standards for Social Studies were developed by a Task Force of
the National Council for the Social Studies and approved by the NCSS Board of
Directors in April 1994.

http:/
/www.socialstudies.org/standards/


National Educational Technology Standards Project

The National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) Project is an ongoing
initiative of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
.

http://cnets.iste.org/


National Science Education Standards

http://books.nap.edu/html/nses/html/


National Standards for Physical Education

http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/publications
-
nationalstandards.html


Wisconsin Model Academic Standards

http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/standards/



Assessment



15


Asse
ssment and Rubric Information Links


Part of Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educator, a long list of links to assessment and
rubrics.

http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/assess.html



As
sociation for Supervision and Curriculum Development


An international education association focusing on curriculum issues.

http://www.ascd.org/portal/site/ascd/index.jsp/



Education Commiss
ion of the States

A
n interstate compact created in 1965 to improve public education by facilitating
the exchange of information, ideas and experiences among state policymakers and
education leaders.

ECS creates unique opportunities to build partnerships,
share
information and promote the development of policy based on available research
and strategies.

http://www.ecs.org/


National Center for Education Statistics

L
ocated within the U.S. Department of Education and the
Institute of Education
Sciences,

NCES

is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data
related to education.

http://nces.ed.gov/


National Education Association

T
he nation's largest professional employee
organization, the NEA is committed to
advancing the cause of public education.

http://www.nea.org/index.html


The Nation’s Report Card

Part of the National Center for
Education Statistics,
the
National Assessm
ent of
Educational Progress

is a continuing national assessment of American students'
performance in selected subject areas.

http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/sitemap.asp


No Child Left B
ehind

President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act on January 8, 2002.
http://www.ed.gov/nclb/landing.jhtml


SchoolMatters

A service of Standard’s and Poors, School Matters offers tools for analys
is of the
nation’s education data. Users of SchoolMatters gain access to a broad set of
information about schools and school districts including student performance and
achieveme
nt.

http://www.schoolmatters.com
/



16

UNESCO
-

Education for All
-

EFA 2000 Assessment

Assessment of basic education in 180 countries. The reports for each country
contain some of this information: funding, issues and goals, statistics on
enrollment, literacy, educational levels of teacher
s, academic and vocational
education,
and more.

http://www.unesco.org/education/efa/efa_2000_assess/index.shtml