Case_Study

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CCNA Case Study


This case study will utilize Packet Tracer 3.1. This network simulation software is available for
download by instructors and students in the Cisco Networking Academy program. There is no licensing
fee for using the product within the Acad
emy Program.


The case study will use some pre
-
defined configuration files that will allow you to “step” through the
tasks. Each file is numbered, so that you will be sure to use the correct one in the sequence.


There are several resources we will use dur
ing the case study. Each of these resources should be
downloaded and installed on your local PC.


The CCNA case study folder contains the following items:




Packet Tracer FAQs



Configured .pkt files for each step of the case study

(NOLA_pkt)



Subnetting Cheat

Sheet


Task 1)

Install Packet Tracer Software & Practice



Install Packet Tracer.



View the Help contents by selecting
Help

from the main menu. You may wish to refer back to
this Help file at a later time.



Click Tutorials to select and
view: “Creating Devices on Pac
ket Tracer”. This gives a quick
overview of how to add new devices to a topology.


Task 2)

Complete the partial topology



Open the first .pkt file by selecting
File…Open

from the Packet Tracer menu. Navigate to the
folder where you saved the downloaded .pkt files a
nd choose the file named “1NOLA Partial
Topo”



You will see that the topology has not been completed. Your task is to add the devices and
connections needed to complete the topology to match the printout. Remember to use both
Simple mode
ON

and Simple mode
OFF

as you create and connect these devices.



Save your file with a new name.


Task 3)

Add IP addressing to the completed topology



Open the second .pkt file named “2aNOLA Complete Topo No IPs”. You will use this file to
complete your IP addressing for each of the L
AN and WAN connections as well as you hosts.



Each device has a description of the addressing needs for that site. You can click the “i” button
for each device to view these requirements.



Addressing the LANs and WANs will require a combination of “tradition
al” and VLSM
subnetting. You have been provided with a “cheat sheet” to assist you with both tasks.



WAN connections between Central, Madison and Lincoln should use the 10.10.10.0 /24
network. Divide this address space equally between the networks.



Madison
will use the 192.168.1.0 /24 address space for the student and instructor LANs. This
address space should be VLSM subnetted to provide the following address needs:



100 student users



16 instructor users



Lincoln will use the 192.168.2.0 /24 address space for

the student and instructor LANs. This
address space should be VLSM subnetted to provide the following address needs:



70 student users



25 instructor users



Central will use the 192.168.3.0 /24 address space for the student and instructor LANs. This
address
space should be VLSM subnetted to provide the following address needs:



75 staff users



40 admin users



4 private servers



4 public servers



Save your file with a new name.



Open the file named “2bNOLA IP Scheme” to view one possible answer to the addressing nee
ds
of this network.


Task 4)

Configure Routing



Using the “2bNOLA IP Scheme” file, you will now add the necessary routing statements to
allow your routers to exchange network information.



Since we have used VLSM subnetting, we must also use a routing protocol that
communicates
subnet mask information in the routing updates. RIP version 2 can be used to support our VLSM
subnets.



With Simple mode OFF, select Central from the Topology tab. You should see the router
command line interface. From this interface, enter RIP

configuration mode and enter networks
for Central to advertise. Central should advertise the 10.10.10.0 and the 192.168.3.0 networks.



Don’t forget to enter the “version 2” command in RIP routing protocol configuration.



Configure Madison and Lincoln to adv
ertise their networks. Also enter the “version 2” command
for both of these sites!



From the Simulation tab, you can view the routing tables for each router in both Simple mode
ON and Simple mode OFF. With Simple mode OFF, you will type the “show ip route”
command. With Simple mode ON, you can click the router icon to view the contents of the
routing tables. Make sure that each router has a known route to each subnetwork.



Create a simulation to test connectivity through your network. You should be able to pi
ng from
each host to any other host within the internetwork.



Save your file with a new name.



Open the “2cNOLA Routing” file to view a completed topology including VLSM subnets,
routing statements and simulations. Run the simulations to confirm that full co
nnectivity has
been established.


Task 5)

Configure and apply ACLs



Open the file named “3NOLA Pre ACLs”. This file contains instructions for each device for the
ACLs that you will need to configure and apply.



The student users on Madison and Lincoln should be deni
ed access to the WWW and FTP
servers on the private LAN at Central.



Prior to creating the ACL, confirm that student users can access both WWW and FTP services
on the private LAN. This will require a simulation that includes both target IP and port
informat
ion.



These ACLs will be extended ACLs and should, therefore, be placed close to the source.
Configure, apply and test ACLs for both Madison and Lincoln.



Test the ACL from the Simulation mode.



Save your file with a new name.


Task 6)

Test ACLs



Open the fourth file,

named “4NOLA Post ACLs”. This file has ACLs configured. View the
ACL configuration and compare it with the ACLs you configured in your topology.



Select the Simulation tab to see the ACL tests. Step through the test to view the packet
information as it tra
verses the network.


Task 7)

Configure NAT & PAT



Open the file named “5NOLA Pre NAT”. This file has directions for the NAT and PAT
requirements at each remote site.



Madison will NAT students and instructors using the “leftover” IP addresses from the WAN
connection

to Central. (Don’t forget to configure the pool with the correct mask!)



Students will use addresses 10.10.10.10


10.10.10.60. Since this is only 50 addresses, this
pool will require overloading.



Instructors will use addresses 10.10.10.61


10.10.10.80. T
his pool is sufficient for one
-
to
-
one mappings for instructors.



Lincoln will NAT students and instructors using the “leftover” IP addresses from the WAN
connection to Central. (Don’t forget to configure the pool with the correct mask!)



Students will use ad
dresses 10.10.10.140


10.10.10.190. Since this is only 50 addresses, this
pool will require overloading.



Instructors will use addresses 10.10.10.191


10.10.10.230. This pool is sufficient for one
-
to
-
one mappings for instructors.



After your configurations

have been completed, create a Simulation to test each NAT statement.
You should see that packets from students and instructors on both Lincoln and Madison are
being NAT’d as they leave the routers.



Use the “show ip nat trans” command from the routers to v
iew the translation table. Compare the
entries for NAT and PAT.



Save your file with a new name.


Task 8)

Test NAT & PAT



Open the file named “6NOLA Post NAT”. This file has completed NAT and PAT pools for each
user group. View the configs for each router and compar
e with your NAT and PAT
configurations from the previous step.



Switch to Simulation mode to view the NAT and PAT translations. Click the packet as it moves
through the router to view the point at which the translation occurs.



Use the “show ip nat trans” co
mmand from the routers to view the translation table. Compare the
entries for NAT and PAT.


This is the case study topology. You may use this page to work out your addressing, ACLs, and NAT configurations.