Katie L. Vale, Ed.D.

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14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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Katie L. Vale,
Ed.D
.

Director of Academic Technology

Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Harvard University IT

Agenda


Information about Academic Technology Services


Overview of pedagogical methods and examples of
educational software based on those methods


Profiles of some of our larger initiatives


Group exercise


Q&A

My group


Academic Technology


Part of HUIT


Primarily responsible for Faculty of Arts and Sciences
(College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences,
Engineering and Applied Sciences, Continuing
Education)


FAS is approximately 50% of “Harvard University”

My group


Academic Technology


Thirteen staff


Four faculty liaisons/instructional designers


Five technical staff/learning spaces manager


One (busy) product manager/student experience
coordinator


Two unit managers


One director (me)



Our sister group,
iCommons
, provides our LMS

What we do


Consulting and support (course websites to custom
courseware)


Development of tools for teaching and learning
(collaboration, visualization, etc.)


Learning space design


Support for faculty and student innovation


Examples of pedagogical models…

…and Harvard technology projects using them


That is, how pedagogy and learning theory shapes what
we do in Academic Technology Services

Direct Instruction


Lecturing plus practice problems and homework


Useful for maximizing student learning time


Shown particularly useful for teaching math and
reading


Less useful for teaching abstract thinking, creativity,
complex problem solving


Direct Instruction


Technologies useful for this method:


Practice opportunities (drill and practice applications)


Time on task opportunities (recorded lectures)


Active learning techniques (
PRS
, clickers, peer review)


Learning
Catalytics

Personal Response Systems

Cooperative Learning


Foster teamwork, increase student motivation,
generate synergy


Steps:


Present a puzzling situation


Explore individual reactions


Create plan of attack


Assist individual students with their piece


Regroup to share data and analyze progress


Cooperative/Collaborative Learning


Technologies useful for this method:


Collaboration software


Wikis


Shared whiteboards


Shared datasets

Annotations

Collaborative Annotation Suite

(open source)

Mastery Learning


Prescribed study completed at student’s own pace


Objectives and milestones clearly set, with testing at
defined intervals and feedback for advancement or
remediation


Mastery Learning


Technologies useful for this method:


Programmed instruction


Drill and practice

Flashcards and
iBooks

Role Play


Learners assume the role of another person and
approach a situation in the manner of that person



Used to gain insight into attitudes and values and
explore feelings that may arise from unfamiliar
circumstances


Role Play


Technologies useful for this method:



Discussion boards


Social media


Virtual reality


Instant messaging


Online
case studies


Inductive Thinking


Consists of these steps:


Concept formation (defining, categorizing)


Data interpretation (relationships, inferences)


Development and application of principles (predicting
consequences, hypotheses)



E.g. How does per capita income affect longevity in
different countries?


Inductive Thinking


Technologies useful for this method:


Databases


Data analysis tools (GIS, spreadsheets)


Interactive simulations


Mashups

Exploratory Learning


Students explore an information
-
rich setting via own
choices


Develop concept maps to make sense of the
environment


Proper framing is needed for successful exploratory
learning exercises


Exploratory Learning


Technologies useful for this method:


Virtual reality


Knowledgebases


Simulations


Game engines


Location
-
aware devices


Harvard Mobile

Constructivism


Learning by doing (John Dewey,
Papert
)


Stresses active engagement with objects


Project
-

or activity
-
based learning (engineering and
design)


Learning by teaching to others


Constructivism


Technologies useful for this method:


Peer tutoring and collaborative peer review


Electronic portfolios and design notebooks


Simulation and modeling


Multimedia, podcasts and presentation software

Creative assignments

Inquiry Learning


“Scientific Method” with active experimentation



Confront a problem


Gather data and isolate variables


Make hypothesis


Develop explanation


Inquiry Learning


Technologies useful for this method:


Simulation and modeling software (
Giza
)


High Performance Computing


Databases (
WorldWide

Telescope
)


Research software (
Matlab
,
Pymol
,
Geneious
)


That’s the what…


Here’s the how: Organizations, Initiatives, and
Programs


General Education Curriculum


Harvard’s new undergraduate curriculum


Strives to link students’ experiences here with their
lives after college


Prepare them for civic engagement


Expose them to thinking from all parts of the
University


Allow for new models of teaching and learning, and
pedagogical experimentation

Implementing “Gen Ed”


The Instructional Support and Services Team


Comprised of representatives from IT, Library,
Museums, Writing Program, Undergraduate Education
Office and Bok (Teaching and Learning) Center.


Members collaborate to help faculty design new courses
from scratch or modify existing courses to make them
compatible with the Gen Ed philosophy.


Also graduate seminars that design the follow
-
on
undergraduate course (Graduate Seminars in General
Education)

How we work with Gen Ed


Consulting for faculty


brainstorming, demos,
discussions about pedagogical goals, custom
courseware or adapted software


Course trailers
(available via the General Education
website)


Creative assignments


student work using digital
media

Example: Middle Ages course






Museums: located examples from the collection for
site visits…


Libraries: located manuscripts and music, prepared
research guides, visits to library collections…


ATG: digitized materials, created interactive materials,
course trailer…


Making the Middle Ages, Professor
Daniel
Smail

Example: Sociology GSGE


Initial meeting with Teaching and Learning rep; faculty
chose who in ISST to contact next


Faculty consulted with ISST and has us present to the class
as follows:


ATG about data visualization tools such as
Gapminder
, Many
Eyes, OECD Explorer


Libraries on locating data sources, how undergrads find
information


Bok Center on syllabus design and leading discussion sections


Writing Project on how to respond to student writing and
how to write for the social sciences

Example: CS50


Provide data feeds for student projects


Brainstorming about pedagogy and objectives


Guest lecturing to introduce students to computer
science careers


https://www.cs50.net


Game Changers
profile

To learn more about Gen Ed:


http://www.generaleducation.fas.harvard.edu/


Course trailers


PITF


Presidential Instructional Technology Fellowships


Made possible from a grant from Harvard’s President
and Provost


Mission: to provide opportunities for student
PITFs

to
intern with faculty to help create instructional
materials


Outcomes: faculty receive digital teaching materials,
PITFs

gain valuable experience in both technology and
pedagogy, ATG can work on many more projects than
otherwise possible

Planning PITF Projects


Meet with faculty and potential project staff (teaching
assistants, librarians, etc.)


Train students in pedagogical models and assessment


Ascertain faculty commitment, availability, whether
project will be fully integrated into course,
sustainability


Explain fully how the team operates and what
expectations would be


Expectations of faculty


Participate in planning meetings with ATG, Library, or Art
Museum staff


Participate in regular meetings during the development
period


Work with ATG, Library, Art Museum staff, Fellows, and
others to develop course materials for the project


Update their syllabus and/or assignments to incorporate
materials into the course


Participate in ongoing assessment of technology
integration in the course (interviews, student surveys, etc.)


Share the results of the project as appropriate (via
presentations, written reports, etc.)

Factors for success


Engaged teacher who sees value of project


Explicit educational goals


A project coordinator (if multiple participants)


Commitment over years (funding, porting)


Good documentation (both user and code)


More information on the PITF
Program


Past PITF
project reports


Portfolio of
developed applications

HILT


Harvard Initiative on Learning and Teaching


Based on a $40 million donation from
Gustave

and
Rita Hauser


Goals:


Elevate discussions about teaching across all of Harvard


Explore how new technologies can help teaching


Create opportunities for collaboration

HILT: Components


Annual symposium on teaching for Harvard faculty


Grants program for faculty, student, and staff projects


Establishment of a Teaching and Learning Consortium
comprised of staff in instructional support roles (see
ISST)


IT infrastructure improvements for digital video


Decanal requests for School
-
wide projects

HILT Symposium


Deans selected faculty participants


Daylong event


Speakers from both outside and inside Harvard


Associated Resource Fair where faculty could learn
about Harvard
-
wide instructional support assistance


Demos by some of Harvard’s known educational
innovators

HILT Grants


Innovative


Evidence
-
based


Extendable


List of initial recipients


Work begins July 1
st

HILT TLC


Builds on the success of the Gen Ed ISST


Official liaisons to Hauser Grant projects


Provide forum for problem solving, information
sharing and innovation dissemination


Help the different “tubs” of Harvard learn from one
another


New Digital Video Services


HILT is bootstrapping this group


Will provide infrastructure for automated classroom
and event capture, digital content management,
dissemination and archiving


Initial experiments using Opencast/Matterhorn and
Kaltura

this summer

Student Experience


Attempting to provide a more coherent IT experience
for students in their academic and administrative
work, via:


Service blueprinting of all student
-
facing IT


Founding of a student IT advisory board


Hiring students to sit in on development meetings


Contest to redesign the student portal


Provision of data feeds for campus services for
instructional and student projects (e.g. menus, shuttle
schedules)

EdX


Partnership with MIT (primary partner) and Berkeley


Working with faculty to think about translating a face
to face course to a MOOC (Massively Open Online
Course)


Harvard’s goal is to learn what really works in online
education, share this knowledge with the world, and
use it to improve on
-
campus teaching

EdX
:
HarvardX


Two committees: Course Committee and Research
Committee


Two courses go live October 15


CS50 and Public
Health. Over 100,000 enrolled to date.


3
-
4 additional Harvard courses for spring release


Aiming for quality over quantity and preserving the
uniqueness of each class.


Not “competing” with
Coursera

or
Udacity

Exercise


Based on what you’ve heard so far, how can you adapt
these support models or project ideas to your own
institution? Find a partner or two and discuss.


Could you form an ISST or TLC at your school? Who
would be in it?


Can MOOCs inspire meaningful reflection about on
-
campus pedagogy?


What does your campus need for better support of
teaching and learning?


What models of teaching best fit your goals?

Additional information on Projects


We have an FAS portfolio of finished projects


http://atgportfolio.fas.harvard.edu


Information on PITF projects can be found at
pitf.harvard.edu


Visit
http://annotations.harvard.edu

for more info on
the open source toolkit



ATG website:
http://atg.fas.harvard.edu


Thanks


Questions? Feedback?



katie_vale@harvard.edu