Genetic Engineering Technology in Industrial Pharmacy - GBV

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11 Δεκ 2012 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

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Genetic Engineering Technology
in Industrial Pharmacy
Principles and Applications
edited by
JOHN M. TABOR
Bristol-Myers Company
Syracuse, New York
MARCEL DEKKER, -INC. New York and Basel
Content s
Preface Hi
Contributors v
PARTI PRINCIPLES
1. An Introduction to Genetic Engineering 3
JohnM. Tabor
I. Introduction 3
II. First Impressions 3
III. Genes and Gene Expression 4
IV. Applied Science 8
V. Genetic Engineering: A Commercial Venture 12
VI. Conclusion 1 3
References 1 3
2. Gene Cloning 1 7
CarolJ. Whitkop and Shu-Jen D. Chiang
I. Introduction 1 7
II. Nucleic Acid Isolation 18
III. Cloning Vectors 2 1
IV. Enzymes Used in Molecular Cloning 30
V. Cloning Methods 3 5
VI. Conclusion 5 1
References 5 2
vii
viii CONTENT S
3. Gene Expression 6 5
Suo Win Liu
I. Introduction 6 5
II. Gene Expression in E. coli 6 6
III. Gene Expression in Gram-Positive Bacteria 73
IV. Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae 77
V. Gene Expression in Baculovirus 81
VI. Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells 83
VII. Summary 9 9
References 10 0
4. Fermentation Scale-Up of Genetically Engineered Microbial Strains 115
Richard P. Elander
I. Introduction 11 5
II. Design and Operation of Contained Fermentors 116
III. Characteristics of Fermentation Processes 119
IV. Cell Growth and Production Regulation 121
V. Product Biosynthesis and Accumulation 122
VI. Instrumentation and Bioprocess Control 123
VII. Computer Control of Fermentation Processes 125
VIII. Types of Recombinant Products 126
IX. Summary 12 7
References 12 8
PART II APPLICATIONS
5. Industrial Enzymes in Drug Development 133
William V. Burnett and Thomas G. Heckler
I. Introduction 13 3
II. Penicillin Amidases 13 5
III. Carbohydrase Enzymes 13 9
IV. Chymosin from Calf Stomach 141
V. Cephalosporium acremonium Isopenicillin N Synthetase 143
VI. Future Directions 14 5
VII. Conclusion 14 8
References 14 9
CONTENTS i x
6. Antibiotic Biosynthesis Genes and Their Use in Developing New
Antibiotics from Microorganisms 155
Charles A. Omer
I. Introduction 15 5
II. Previously Developed Methods for Isolating New Antibiotics 156
III. Genetic Systems and Molecular Tools for Analysis of
Antibiotic Biosynthesis 157
IV. Cloning and Analysis of Antibiotic Biosynthesis Genes 159
V. Genetically Engineered Hybrid Antibiotics 172
VI. Conclusion 17 5
References 17 7
7. Second Generation Molecules via Site-Specific Gene Alteration 185
Glenn R. Larsen
I. Introduction 18 5
II. Protein Structure 18 7
III. Second Generation Protein Program Design 190
IV. Examples of Engineered Proteins of Therapeutic Potential 201
V. Future Perspectives 21 1
References 21 1
8. Disease Diagnosis Using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms 219
Helen Donis-Keller
I. Introduction 21 9
II. Genetics Background 22 0
III. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms 221
IV. Genetic Linkage Mapping 22 7
V. Diagnostic Testing with RFLPs 23 1
VI. Current RFLP Diagnostic Tests 245
VII. Conclusion 26 7
References 26 7
9. Prospects in Gene Therapy 29 9
Dennis L. Cooper, Ram Narayanan, and Joseph R. Bertino
I. Introduction 29 9
II. Potential Approach to Gene Therapy 300
III. Somatic Cell Gene Transfer 30 1
IV. Prospects for Gene Therapy 310
References 31 3
x CONTENT S
10. Genetic Engineering in the Pharmaceutical Industry:
Current and Future Goals 31 9
Richard P. Elander
I. Introduction 31 9
II. Current Uses of Genetic Engineering in the
Pharmaceutical Industry 32 0
III. Major Areas for Genetic Engineering in the
Pharmaceutical Industry 32 2
IV. Commercial Aspects of Genetic Engineering in the
Pharmaceutical Industry 33 2
V. Priorities for Future Genetic Engineering Research 334
References 33 5
Glossary 339
Index 349