BS Bioinformatics - Loyola University Chicago

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College of Arts and Sciences


Chairperson's Application for Approval of a New Major


DATE:

3/4/04

TO:



Academic Council, CAS


FROM:

Prof.
William Honig

DEPARTMENT: Compu
ter Science

1.
PROPOSED NEW MAJOR:




Major Title:
Bioinformatics

2.

CROSS
-
DEPARTMENTAL OR INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJOR (yes/no):

Yes



If yes, which department(s):


Biology, Computer Science, Chemistry and Mathematics & Statistics. Letters of support attach
ed.



Signature(s) of Concurring Chairperson (
on original forms)
:



Date


3.

PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING REGARDING THIS PROPOSED NEW MAJOR:




Rationale for adding this major
: (attach additional page(s), as necessary)

Please see attached proposal





Are available resources (e.g., faculty, library, laboratory) adequate for the major? (yes/no)



Please see attached proposal.




Are adequate resources available in the library? (Yes or No)



Please see attached proposal and budget.


Signature of Bibliographe
r


(on original form)
:



Date



4.

PLEASE ATTACH:



A detailed description of the new major



List of required courses



List of elective courses


2



List of college core requirements



A suggested sequence of courses by semester/by

year.



A description of resources required for implementation of the new major.



Will a new course(s) be required for the new major? If yes, indicate name of the course below
and include the new course form and syllabus for consideration and approval at

the same time the
major is being reviewed.



New Course(s):


5.

SIGNATURES: (on original form)



Chairperson



Date



Academic Council Representative



Date



Academic Dean


Date



Vice President of Academic Affairs





Date



Registrar's Approval:





Date



N
ew Major Code: __ __ __ __ __ __



Note: After approval has been given, and the major is added to the SIS Database, this form will be returned
to the Academic Dean, who will forward an approved copy to the chairperson of the initiating dep
artment.


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B.S.
Bioinformatics


A New Undergraduate Major



28 March 2004



Executive Summary


Roughly two decades ago, the first research works were

published

in a field yet to be
called Bioinformatics.

W
ith the advent of newer co
mputer technologies, and
bioengineering equipment, Bioinformatics experienced explosive growth in the
following years.
Years of hard work by the research community came to fruition and
in a

histor
ic White House event on June 26, 2000

President Clinton ann
ounced that
the international Human Genome

Project and Celera Genomics Corporation have
both completed an initial

sequencing of the human genome
--

the genetic blueprint
for human beings.

This has created excitement all around the world because the
syner
gistic study of systems biology, chemistry, and computer science is being
conceived as holding the answers to a number of questions that could change peoples
lives dramatically, cure diseases, or prevent them from occurring in the first place.
With the ex
citement comes the realization that a new breed of knowledge workers is
needed to support the growth. Academic institutions around the world have
recognized the need to create knowledge workers in this area by designing degree
programs.


Structure

This
proposal describes Loyola’s initiative in creating a new B.S. degree in
Bioinformatics. This initiative started three years ago when faculty members from
Computer Science, Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics started exchanging ideas.
The major has seven
new courses in Bioinformatics with a total of 74 credits to be
completed toward the degree. It has a strong foundational background and expects to
appeal to the creative minds among Loyola’s students.


Competition and Positioning

In the Chicago area, UI
C has an undergraduate degree program and
Northwestern has a graduate program in Bioinformatics. UIC’s program is part of the
Bioengineering department and hence requires courses in engineering for its degree.
Loyola is in a strong and unique positio
n to
integrate scientific knowledge with

liberal arts core to offer the Bioinformatics degree program to our students.


Career Opportunities for BS Bioinformatics Graduates


One of the pioneers and best minds in computer science Donald Knuth stated
in an addr
ess to students and faculty at MIT recently, that the intersection of Biology,
Computer Science, and Chemistry is the nex
t high growth area owing to the deep
complexity of things in nature. Indeed, c
areer opportunitie
s are plentiful
for
Bioinformatics gra
duates who choose to go to i
ndustry.
Furthermore, many

opportunities are available for graduates to pursue research and graduate education.




4




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE


IN


BIOINFORMATICS



A Proposal for a New Interdisciplinary Major

Submitted by the

Dep
artment of Biology

Department of Computer Science

Department of Chemistry

Department of Mathematics and Statistics


March, 2004


Committee members: Howard Laten (Biology), Ken Olsen (Chemistry), Timothy
O’Brien (Mathematics and Statistics), and
Chandra N.
Sekharan

(Computer
Science), Chairperson





5



BACKGROUND

The world is becoming increasingly more globalized and interconnected through
the use of computer technology, which is pivotal to the research of numerous academic
disciplines and has been responsibl
e for many recent advances in healthcare, finance,
medicine, commerce, and the basic sciences. Domains of scientific inquiry that depend
heavily on computer technology will continue to grow dramatically in the next decade,
especially those domains that ar
e most synergistic and interdisciplinary. Computer
technology has encouraged the cross
-
fertilization of ideas across traditionally disparate
areas of learning, resulting in the formation of new fields of exploration and application.
For example, the field
of computing has become a focal point for interdisciplinary
pursuits
in widely diverse areas such as

business, communications, (Loyola’s

ICT minor
is an example), healthcare informatics, computational chemistry, and computational
finance. Most notably, in
the previous two decades, computer scientists, biologists,
chemists, and mathematicians have launched the di
scipline of Bioinformatics as

an
innovative and rich area of scientific discovery that has the potential to dramatically
change people’s lives. This

proposal describes a plan to implement a Bioinformatics
major in Loyola University Chicago’s (LUC) College of Arts and Science (CAS). The
proposed major would be located at LUC’s Water Tower Campus (WTC).


Bioinformatics i
s the study and design
of mat
hematical, statistical, and
com
puting methods

to solve biological problems by analyzing DNA, amino acid
sequences, and related genetic information.

The Human Genome Project and its
ancillaries (e.g., proteomics, the study of the life
-
creating proteins enco
ded by genes) are
creating immense databases of genetic information; analyses of these databases are
revolutionizing the field of biology.


Participation in this revolution requires knowledge
of the life sciences and sophisticated computer skills for readi
ng large databases, creating
new software, developing new computer code, and the like.

Bioinformatics
specialists
(i.e., bio
informaticians) will be needed

in conducting
the

analyses
of data
and in generating new knowledge that will transform the practice
of
medicine and the treatment of disease, thereby enhancing our prospects for longer and
healthier lives. For example, bioinformaticians will help scientists make informed

6

predictions about the locations and functions of genes on a particular strand of DNA
.
This information could someday be translated into direct medical applications if disease
-
causing genes can be

altered before they cause

pernicious effects.

We are proposing an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Science (BS) major in
Bioinformatics.

The
CAS is uniquely qualified to offer this proposed interdisciplinary
major because of the expertise of its faculty and the curricular strengths of its majors in
the departments of Biology, Computer Science, Chemistry, and Mathematics and
Statistics, which ar
e the principal contributors to the proposed Bioinformatics major.


These departments already have extensive course offerings that will support the proposed
major. Bioinformatics will tie those courses together in a pedagogically rigorous and
exciting lear
ning opportunity for LUC undergraduates. The interdisciplinary curriculum
of the proposed major will provide the educational experiences needed for positions in
the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries and for future graduate studies in
Bioinformati
cs and other emerging areas of computer science, biology, biochemistry, and
biostatistics.

The CAS has significant experience with undergraduate interdisciplinary
programs in the life sciences, including an Environmental Sciences major and a
Neuroscience m
inor. Therefore, the college is prepared to move forward with the
successful implementation of a proposed major in Bioinformatics.

Across the

country
,
universities are responding to the need for Bioinformatics
professionals by initiating a variety of spe
cialized degree programs.

In the Chicago
metropolitan area, however, where knowledgeable Bioinformatics professionals are
sorely needed, few educational programs are available, especially at the undergraduate
level.
Northwestern offers an MS degree in Comp
utational Biology and Bioinformatics
and
UIC has a Bioengineering program

in which Bioinformatics option is available at all
levels.
In contrast, elsewhere in the country, undergraduate majors in Bioinformatics are
being offered at a number of educational

institutions such as Baylor University, Canisius
College,
Rockhurst University,
Wellesley College, California State University, the
University of California at Santa Cruz, the University of California at San Diego,
Brigham Young University, Wright State U
niversity, and the Roc
hester Institute of
Technol
o
gy. Graduate program in Bioinformatics is

available in Boston College,
Georgetown
,
and
Marquette
.



7

The Bioinformatics major at Brigham Young University, for example, was started
in 2003 and requires 62 hou
rs of coursework: 17 hours in Biology, 10 hours in
Chemistry, 18 hours in Computer Science, and 17 hours in Mathematics and Statistics.
Sample courses from the major include Molecular Biology, Genetics,

Genomics,
Computational Biology, Bioethics, Bioinform
atics, General College Chemistry,
Introduction to Computer Programming, Data Structures, Advanced Programming
Concepts, Calculus, Statistical Theory, and Organic Chemistry. To date, the major has
accepted 41 students; it has an enrollment capacity of 50 st
udents. (Source: Dr. Keith
Crandall, Director of Bioinformatics Program.)


The Bioinformatics major at Wellesley College requires 57 hours of coursework,
including Introduction to Organismal Biology with Lab, Computer Programming and
Problem Solving, Intro
ductory Chemistry with Lab, Calculus, BioInformatics Proteomics
of Eucaryotic Cells with Lab, Data Structures, Fundamental Algorithms, BioInformatics,
Organic Chemistry, Probability and Elementary Statistics, and Molecular Biology with
Lab. The college’s B
ioinformatics major was started in 2002
-
2003 and has approximately
35 students. (Source: Dr. Takis Metaxas, Chairperson of Computer Science.)

Baylor University started its Bioinformatics major in 1999 and currently has 100
students. The major requires
86 hours of coursework: 35 hours in Computer Science, 23
hours in Biology, and 28 hours in Mathematics and Chemistry. (Source: Dr. Don Gaitros,
Chairperson of Computer Science.)

A
t Canisius College, the Bioinformatics major requires 80
-
88 hours. The majo
r

started accepting students in f
all 2002 and currently has 10 students. (Source: Dr. Debra
Burhans, Director of the Bioinformatics Program.)

MARKET AND ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS

The Bioinformatics major will appeal to students with strong interests in biol
ogy
and computers; will add depth overall to LUC’s impressive natural science curriculum;
and will complement the university’s current course offerings in Biology, Computer
Science, Chemistry, Mathematics and Statistics.


Although a Bioinformatics major wi
ll
primarily attract new students to LUC, the curriculum also provides opportunities for
current students to pursue a cutting
-
edge educational program. Current and future career
pursuits for Bioinformatics majors are numerous, especially in healthcare firm
s and in

8

pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. According to Dr. Martina Newell
-
McGloughlin, who chairs the life sciences informatics program for all the University of
California schools, many universities are now creating programs in Bioinformatics t
o
meet the growing need for professionals in the area. Furthermore, government agencies
are providing increasing numbers of funding opportunities for research and training in the
field of Bioinformatics. Dr. Leena Peltonern, chairperson of the Department o
f Human
Genetics at UCLA, noted that, “there is a crying need for experts in Bioinformatics, and
this is not something that will just fade away.” Similarly, Dr. Barry Hamory, a partner in
the recruiting firm, SciTech, stated that “Bioinformatics is one the

biggest areas of our
recruiting business,” and job candidates in the field can command high salaries from
computer companies because of their combined skills in computer science and biology.
Fall 2002 issue of Occupational Outlook Quarterly published by t
he Bureau of Labor
Statistics mentions Bioinformatic
s

specialist as one of the top 30 new and emerging
occupations.
Hence, the field of Bioinformatics has excellent growth prospects, and its
graduates will have a wide variety of career choices. The gradua
tes of undergraduate
Bioinformatics programs who seek advanced degrees will be broadly qualified for
graduate programs in biology, biochemistry,

bioinformatics, and

computer science.


According to employment experts, “Bioinformatics will grow by leaps and
bounds both as a science and as an industry in coming decades, carving out new
opportunities for businesses, drug discovery, and health care.” The job titles of persons
working in the field include: Bioinformatics Programmer, Associate Bioinformatics
Scie
ntist, Research Assistant in Bioinformatics, Bioinformatics Software Analyst,
Scientific Applications Manager, Bioinformatics Specialist, Genome Analyst, and
Bioinformatics Analyst. We project 25 new LUC students will enroll in the
Bioinformatics major eac
h year.

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

The Bioinformatics major program will be le
d by a director selected from the

facu
lty of one of the participating departments

and will be administered by the CAS
under the auspices of the Dean of the CAS. The director is expected

to have overarching
interests in sciences and informatics and the administrative vision required for
successfully establishing and growing the proposed major. Two additional faculty

9

positions to support the major are sought at the rank of Assistant Profes
sor. One of these
positions will be filled by an individual with expertise in Computer Science and Biology,
the other with expertise in Computer Science and Chemistry. The new faculty persons
will hold joint appointments in the departments of Computer Sc
ience, Biology, and
Chemistry

in a manner consistent with their expertise and qualifications.
The new hires
are primarily responsible for teaching the proposed new courses in the major.
T
he
program will be administered by

a coordinating committee consist
ing of the

Director of
the program,
two new faculty persons and additio
nal faculty members from

the major’s
participating departments.


Student advising will be done primarily by the Director with
help from members of the coordinating committee

and other

faculty from the respective
departments
.

Staff for the program will include a new computer system administrator
and a
new
half
-
time administrative assistant. After its first six years of implementation,
the proposed major will be formally evaluated for
further support and expansion. The
Bioinformatics major’s resource needs and timeline for implementation are presented in
the last section of the current proposal.

The Bioinformatics major will be administered

at WTC where
Bioinfo
rmatics
students will take

a sizable number

of their classes.

Other new majors are being
considered for approval at

WTC. Therefore, we anticipate that a full complement of
CAS’s core curriculum classes will be offered at WTC as these majors are approved.
Bioinformatics students wil
l be advised to take their CAS core courses at WTC

whenever
possible
. In addi
tion, the Department of Computer Science

will also be located at WTC in
Fall 2004, which will facilitate and support the implementation of the Bioinformatics
major.

LEARNING OUT
COMES ANDASSESSMENT

Graduates with B.S. Degrees in Bioinformatics
are
expected to:



exhibit technical skills at the interface of biology, computer science, chemistry,
and mathematics;



show capability in basic laboratory techniques in biology and chemistry a
nd in
programming and exploratory techniques in computer laboratories;



demonstrate competency and problem
-
solving abilities in the computational
components of biology and chemistry;


10



employ basic mathematical and statistical techniques to analyze results
obtained
from laboratory experiments;



understand key problems
, proposed solutions, and

advances in the bioinformatics
field; and



demonstrate effective and ethical decision
-
making abilities in facing issues
relating to human and animal lives.

Assessment of

the curriculum and of the outcomes achieved by students will
determine the usefulness of the Bioinformatics major in shaping the careers of
students. The participating departments will critically assess their course modules and
laboratory exercises at the

end of each academic year by examining students’
evaluations of courses and their experiences in the major.

The impact of
Bioinformatics education will be gauged by tracking the careers of students and the
jobs that are available in the field. For exampl
e, we will collect employment data
from Bioinformatics employers (e.g. pharmaceutical and agricultural companies)
nationally, and parti
cularly from those in the upper Midwest
.


We will also survey
faculty persons at other institutions where our former stud
ents are continuing their
graduate studies.

The Bioinformatics coordinating committee will integrate all these
data and use them in setting the future direction of the major.

PROPOSED CURRICULUM

Biology


1.

BIOL 101: (3 credits)

2.

BIOL 282: Genetics (3 credits
)

3.

BIOL 283: Genetics Lab (2 credits)

4.

BIOL 390: Molecular Biology Lab and Lecture (4 credits)

5.

BIOL 387: Genomics new course (3 credits)

6.

BIOL 388: Bioinformatics (3 hours)

7.

BIOL 394: Ethical Issues in Bioinformatics (1 hour)

19 credits


Computer Science


1.

CO
MP 170 Intro. Programming (3 credits)

2.

COMP 271 Data Structures (3 credits)

3.

COMP 211 Discrete Structures (3 credits)

4.

COMP 363 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credits)

5.

COMP 171 Scripting Languages: Lab Practicum new course(1 credit)


11

6.

COMP 251: Database

Design (3 credits)

7.

COMP 383 Computational Bioinformatics new course (3 credits)

19 credits


Chemistry


1.

CHEM 101: General Chemistry (3 credits)

2.

CHEM 102: General Chemistry (3 credits)

3.

CHEM 223: Organic Chemistry (3 credits)

4.

CHEM 224: Organic Chemistry (
3 credits)

5.

CHEM 111,112,225,226: Laboratories (4 credits)

6.

CHEM 361: Biochemistry (3 credits)

7.

CHEM 365: Proteomics new course (3 credits)

22 credits


Mathematics and Statistics


1.

MATH 131 Calculus I (3 credits) **

2.

MATH 132 Calculus II (3 credits) **

3.

STA
T 335 Introduction to Biostatistics (4 credits)

4.

STAT 337 Quantitative Methods in Bioinformatics new course (4 credits)

14 credits


Total: 74 credits


** MATH 161, MATH 162 can be substituted for these courses.


Proposed New Courses


The following

n
ew courses are introduced

for the proposed major. A s
yllabus and
new course form has

been prepared for each and submitted to the curriculum committee
of academic council.

1.

BIOL 394: Ethical Issues in Bioinformatics (1 credit):

The collection and
analyses o
f genetic information are forging unprecedented inroads into the areas
of DNA identification and manipulation, and revolutionizing several fields such
as, reproductive biology, health care, criminal justice, personal security, and
agriculture. Applications

of knowledge in most of these areas have ethical
implications, the serious consideration of which lags far behind technological
advances in the field. This course addresses issues that must be carefully
examined in order to make ethical decisions regardin
g the management and
application of bioinformational data.


12

2.

BIOL 388: Bioinformatics (3 credits):

(already approved by the Academic
Council)
.

This course examines the tools of Bioinformatics and applies them to
the same kinds of problems that are prese
ntly being tackled by molecular,
medical, agricultural, developmental, and evolutionary biologists. Students will
search databases and recover genes, dissect gene structures, and analyze gene
relationships within families and among taxa. The lectures will

focus on genetic
concepts and tools that are essential for the competent use of computer
applications and the prudent interpretation of data outputs. Additional lectures
will

discuss the nature of the computer algorithms used in the design of computer
sof
tware in Bioinformatics and how these computer rules reflect genetic
observations.

3.

BIOL 387: Genomics (3 credits):

Genomics is the study of the genome and its
actions. The term genome refers to the DNA contained in a cell including both the
chromosomes in

the nucleus and the DNA in the mitochondria. Genomics
examines the inner workings of genes and their inter
-
relationships in order to
identify their combined influence on the growth and development of the
organism. This course introduces students to geneti
c mapping and how genomes
are sequenced using computer techniques. Other topics include DNA microarrays
and genomic circuits.

4.

COMP 171 Scripting Languages
Practicum (1 credit):

This course will teach
students how to program computers for Bioinformatics
packages. Scripting
languages are, in general, interpreted and offer a
n easier alternative to learning
programming using
traditional programming languages. This course will cover
Perl and Python, the scripting languages of choice for bioinformatics applic
ations.

5.

COMP 383 Computational Bioinformatics (3 credits):

This course will feature
the latest advances in computational biology and computational chemistry via
algorithms and software packages. New foundational topics are covered in graph
theory and
discrete mathematics along with applications in biology and chemistry.
Some of the topics include: gene sequencing, pattern matching, map assembly,
gene prediction, and computational proteomics.


13

6.

CHEM 365 Proteomics (3 credits):

Proteomics describes and
deciphers the
protein structures that are the result of biochemical interactions encoded in a
genome.
To understand these processes, proteins have to be identified, sequenced,
categorized, and classified with respect to their function and interaction in a
protein network.
This course will teach students how to characterize functional
protein net
works,
examine their dynamic alteration during physiological and
pathological processes.
The course will also cover techniques to analyze and
identify proteins usi
ng protein databases and study protein to protein interactions
in the discovery of drugs for diseases..

7.

STAT 337 Quantitative Methods in Bioinformatics (4 credits):

Introductory
courses in statistics or biostatistics prepare students and researchers to per
form
basic
statistical analyses. These include
simple linear regression or correlation,
paired or two
-
sample t
-
tests, one
-

or two
-
way ANOVA, and analysis of
covariance.


However, practitioners are often faced with other types of data for
which these metho
ds are invalid.


Basic statistical analyses have been adapted and
generalized to categorical data techniques, generalized and nonlinear regression,
multivariate methods and repeated
-
measures techniques, survival analysis, cluster
and tree
-
based methods, an
d spatial statistics. These methods are the focus of this
course and each will be illustrated with real
-
life examples of databases and
problems.

The course will concentrate on applications, and, as such, theory will
not be emphasized. This course also cove
rs the fundaments of experimental
design and analysis, simple and multiple linear regression, generalized linear and
nonlinear regression, multivariate analysis, including MANOVA, repeated
measures, survival analysis (e.g., Cox proportional odds, log
-
rank
tests, Kaplan
-
Meier estimation), clustering techniques (e.g., Bioinformatics) and spatial
statistics.


Students will be required to analyze real
-
life data sets using statistical
packages such as, Minitab, SAS and SPSS.

EQUIPMENT

Bioinformatics courses will

use

high
-
speed computer/servers with relevant
software, a server/workstation, a local area network of computers, database files, and
high
-
speed Internet con
nections, including Internet 2 and existing biology and chemistry

14

laboratories. These

will allow st
udents to
pursue

the following

curricular

activities: (a)
combining overlapping raw DNA sequences to form "contigs" and to align and compare
related DNA or protein sequences, (b) searching databases for sequences similar to a
known sequence; (c) recognizi
ng motifs in DNA or protein sequences; (d) conducting
phylogenetic reconstructions based on sequence data; (e) analyzing individual characters
and their effects on such reconstructions; and (f) querying and constructing customized
databases.

IMPLEMENTATION

SCHEDULE

The proposed major is ready for implementation in Fall 2004. The sample four
-
year schedule presented below indicates that
all but one of the
new courses for the major
can

be taken in the third year of undergraduate study.
COMP 1
71 is also in the
proposed
new BA major. While the sample schedule indicates that students would take it in the
second semester, it could also be taken in the second or third year.
Hence we have ample
time to market the major to both current and incoming students.
The new

director needs
to be appointed at the earliest
and the two additional faculty positions should be fille
d
during academic years

2005
-
200
7
. The full
-
scale marketing of the program, including the
distribution of advertisin
g materials, should also be during t
he

academic year 2004
-
2005.



SAMPLE FOUR
-
YEAR SCHEDULE



FALL

SPRING

YEAR 1


BIOL 101

CHEM 102 & CHEM 112

CHEM 101 & CHEM 111

COMP 271

COMP 170

MATH 132

MATH 131

ENGLISH 106

ENGLISH 105

COMP 171: Scripting Languages, 1 credit.


HISTORY CORE

16

1
7

YEAR 2


BIOL 282


BIOL 37
1: GENOMICS

CHEM 223 and CHEM 225

CHEM 224 and CHEM 226

COMP 211 Discrete Structures

COMP 363: DESIGN & Analysis of Algo.

PHILOSOPHY 120

PHILOSOPHY CORE

BIOL 283

(2 credits)

THEOLOGY CORE

15

16


15



YEAR 3


CHEM OR BIOL 36
1

BIOL 388: Bioinformatics

CAS
ELECTIVE


BIOL 394: Ethical Issues in Bioinformatics
1 credit

COMP

251
: DATABASE DESIGN

STAT: 335 Biostatistics 4 credits

STAT 337: Quant. Methods in Bioinfor.

LITERATURE CORE

CAS
ELECTIVE

THEOLOGY CORE

SOCIAL SCIENC
E CORE

17

16

YEAR 4


CHEM 365: Proteomics

BIOL 390 [MB LAB] 4 credits

COMP 383: COMPUTATIONAL
BIOINFORMATICS

SOCIAL SCIENCE CORE

PHILOSOPHY CORE

LITERATURE CORE

LITERATURE CORE

COMMUNICATIONS/EXPRESSIVE
ARTS CORE

THEOLOGY CORE

HISTORY CORE

15

1
6

6
3

6
5



LIBRARY RESOURCES


The following journals and books are a representative collection of resources
integral to the new program. The number and type of actual library acquisitions will be
determined later.

Journals

1.

Applied Bioinformatics

2.

Applied Genomics and Proteomics (both published by Open Mind Journals)

3.

In Silico Biology

4.

Computational Methods in Molecular Biology

Books

1.

Introduction to Molecular Biology: Interdisciplinary Statistics by Michael S.
Waterman

2.

Bioinformatics Computing by Bryan Bergeron, M.D. (2003)

3.

Exploration and Analysis of DNA microarray and protein array

data by
Amaratunga, D. and Cabrera, J. (2004)


16

4.

Mathematical and Statistical Methods for Genetic Analysis by Kenneth Lange,
2nd edition (2002)

5.

Statistical Analysis of Gene Expression Data by Speed, T (ed) (2003)

6.

The Analysis of Gene Expression Data: Methods

and Software by Parmiginai, G,
Garrett, E.S., Irizarry, R.A. and Zeger, S.L. (eds.) (2003).

7.

Textbooks in the syllabi for the new courses.


Resource Needs and Timeline


Description



Needed timeframe

Program Director

Fall 2004

Assistant Professors (2 ne
w hires)

Fall 2005
-
2007

System Administrator

Fall 2005

Part
-
time Secretary

Fall 2004

Computers, Misc. Hardware & Software:

Fall 2005

--
Server,Printers


--
Misc. Hardware & Software


--
Networking and maintenance support




Supplies

+mailing


Fall 200
4

Advertisement, Brochures

Fall 2004

Travel & Meetings
:

Fall 2005

Subscriptions

Fall 2005

Books

Fall 2005
-
2007

Other: Faculty Start
-
Up Funds

Fall 2005
-

2007


Faculty Recruiting Costs

Fall 2004