Creation and Governance of Human Genetic Research Databases

mixedminerΒιοτεχνολογία

22 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

321 εμφανίσεις

Creation and Governance of Human Genetic Research Databases
Creation and
Governance

of Human Genetic
Research Databases
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

SCIENCE

HEALTH

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

SCIENCE

HEALTH

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH INNOVATION SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY
INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY
INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH










HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

BIOTECHNOLOGY



SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY
INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY
INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
SCI
ENCE
BIOTECHNOLOGY INNOVATION HEALTH
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY
INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY HEALTH

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY
INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIO
TECHNOLOGY
BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION


INNOVATION HEALTH SCIENCE BIOTECHNOLOGY

HEALTH

SCIENCE

BIOTECHNOLOGY

INNOVATION

SCIENCE
OECD
PUBLISHING
Scientists have known for years that complex diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke,
and diabetes, arise from a complex combination of lifestyle, environmental, genetic and random
factors. Large-scale study of populations may contribute significantly to science’s understanding
of the complex multi-factorial basis of diseases and to improvements in prevention, detection,
diagnosis, treatment and cure. As a result of developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics,
the opportunity to store and analyse increasingly large amounts of genetic data have rendered
possible the creation of large-scale population databases. Genetic research, involving the use
of such databases containing human genetic and genomic data, information, and biological
samples, is thus becoming increasingly feasible.
More recently, the databases being developed include data, information and biological samples
from whole populations. Large-scale population databases which contain a significantly broader
range of information about individuals also raise a number of issues and concerns. While some
of these are not new, the increasing breadth and scope of such databases amplifies them.
Moreover, the combination of a broader set of genetic data and personal information in these
databases raises new issues about the use of such information, especially in a non-clinical or
non-research context. In addition, as such databases will increasingly be international in scope
and cover populations from numerous jurisdictions, new sets of questions will arise.
The OECD organised a workshop in order to begin the process of considering, at the
international level, policy challenges associated with the establishment, management and
governance of human genetic research databases. This report provides an overview of the
complex issues that were discussed at that workshop and which need to be considered or
addressed, in recognition of the significant contribution that human genetic research databases
could play in translating scientific advances into innovation in health.
Creation and Governance

of Human Genetic Research Databases
www.oecd.org
ISBN 92-64-02852-8

93 2006 09 1 P
-:HSTCQE=UW]ZWY:
The full text of this book is available on line via these links
:
http://www.sourceoecd.org/scienceIT/9264028528
http://www.sourceoecd.org/governance/92640
28528
Those with access to all OECD books on line should use this link:
http://www.sourceoecd.org/92640
28528
SourceOECD is the OECD’s online library of books, periodicals and statistical databases. For more information
about this award-winning service and free trials ask your librarian, or write to us at SourceOECD@oecd.org
.
OECD
PUBLISHING
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Creation and Governance
of Human Genetic
Research Databases
001.fm Page 1 Monday, October 23, 2006 12:46 PM
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION
AND DEVELOPMENT
The OECD is a unique forum where the governments of 30 democracies work together to
address the economic, social and environmental challenges of globalisation. The OECD is also at
the forefront of efforts to understand and to help governments respond to new developments and
concerns, such as corporate governance, the information economy and the challenges of an
ageing population. The Organisation provides a setting where governments can compare policy
experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practice and work to co-ordinate
domestic and international policies.
The OECD member countries are: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic,
Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea,
Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Commission of
the European Communities takes part in the work of the OECD.
OECD Publishing disseminates widely the results of the Organisation’s statistics gathering and
research on economic, social and environmental issues, as well as the conventions, guidelines and
standards agreed by its members.
© OECD 2006
No reproduction, copy, transmission or translation of this publication may be made without written permission. Applications should be sent to
OECD Publishing rights@oecd.org or by fax 33 1 45 24 99 30. Permission to photocopy a portion of this work should be addressed to the Centre français
d'exploitation du droit de copie (CFC), 20, rue des Grands-Augustins, 75006 Paris, France, fax 33 1 46 34 67 19, contact@cfcopies.com or (for US only) to
Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), 222 Rosewood Drive Danvers, MA 01923, USA, fax 1 978 646 8600, info@copyright.com.
This work is published on the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. The
opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official
views of the Organisation or of the governments of its member countries.
002.fm Page 1 Monday, October 23, 2006 12:49 PM
FOREWORD –
3



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
Foreword
Under the leadership of the Japanese and Canadian governments and under the aegis
of the Working Party on Biotechnology (WPB), the OECD Directorate for Science,
Technology and Industry (DSTI) organised a Workshop on Human Genetic Research
Databases – Issues of Privacy and Security. While human genetic research databases hold
much potential for improving science’s understanding of disease and complex, multi-
factorial conditions, they also raise numerous challenges. The OECD’s involvement and
work in this field arises from the need to address such challenges.
The Workshop brought together leading experts from numerous jurisdictions,
international organisations, diverse backgrounds including academia, government,
industry and research labs, as well as from different fields including genetics, law,
medical, ethics, philosophy and economics. The aim of this Report is to begin the process
of considering, at the international level, the policy challenges associated with the broader
subject of the establishment, management and governance of human genetic research
databases. Ultimately, this Report aims to provide an overview of the complex issues that
need to be considered or addressed, in recognition of the significant contribution that
human genetic research databases could play in translating scientific advances into
innovation in health.
We are especially grateful to the Japanese and Canadian governments for their
generous sponsoring of the Workshop and support. This Report was written by Ms.
Christina Sampogna, of the Biotechnology Division, OECD. It draws upon the experts’
background papers, commentaries and presentations, recordings of the Workshop, the
Rapporteur’s report, as well as additional research. As this is a rapidly evolving field,
with each human genetic research database continuously reviewing its policies and
approaches, the information contained herein is up to date to August 2006.


TABLE OF CONTENTS –
5



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
Table of Contents
Executive Summary............................................................................................................9
Human genetic research databases...................................................................................10
Establishment of a human genetic research database......................................................10
Data and sample collection and management..................................................................12
Database management and governance...........................................................................14
Commercialisation considerations...................................................................................16

Résumé ..............................................................................................................................19
Bases de données de la recherche en génétique humaine...............................................20
Établissement d’une base de données de la recherche en génétique humaine................21
Collecte et gestion des données et échantillons..............................................................23
Gestion et gouvernance des bases de données................................................................25
Considérations relatives à la commercialisation.............................................................27

Chapter 1. Introduction....................................................................................................29
1.1. Context....................................................................................................................29
1.2. Overview of issues..................................................................................................30

Chapter 2. Human Genetic Research Databases...........................................................35
2.1. Examples of Human Genetic Research Databases.................................................36
2.1.1. The Personalised Medicine Research Project (“Marshfield Project”)......36
2.1.2. CARTaGENE (“CARTaGENE”).............................................................36
2.1.3. Genome Database of the Latvian Population (“Latvian Project”)............38
2.1.4. Icelandic Health Sector Database (“Icelandic HSD”)...............................39
2.1.5. Estonian Genome Project (“Estonian Project” or “EGP”)........................40
2.1.6. The United Kingdom Biobank (“UK Biobank”).......................................41
2.1.7. Translational Genomic Research in the African Diaspora (“TgRIAD”)...41
2.1.8. GenomEUtwin (“GenomeEUtwin Project”).............................................42
2.1.9. The International HapMap Project (“HapMap Project”)..........................43
2.1.10. COGENE (“COGENE”)..........................................................................44
2.1.11. P3G – Public Population Project in Genomics (“P3G”)..........................44
2.2. What is a human genetic research database?..........................................................44
Notes ..............................................................................................................................46

Chapter 3. Establishment of an HGRD..........................................................................55
3.1. Nature and Scope of Database................................................................................55
3.1.1. Ensuring representativeness of populations..............................................55
3.1.2. Involvement of children and protected adults...........................................56
3.1.3. Nature of database.....................................................................................56
3.1.4. Intended purposes and uses of the database..............................................58
3.2. Funding of a database.............................................................................................59
3.2.1. Private sector funding...............................................................................59
3.2.2. Public-private partnership.........................................................................60
3.2.3. Public sector funding.................................................................................60
6
– TABLE OF CONTENTS


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
3.3. Legal structure........................................................................................................61
3.3.1. Legal context for databases.......................................................................61
3.3.2. Human rights statutes................................................................................64
3.3.3. Jurisdictional aspects of population databases..........................................64
3.4 Privacy and confidentiality.....................................................................................65
3.5. Public engagement in the establishment of a population database.........................68
3.5.1. Explaining the purpose of the population database...................................68
3.5.2. Approaches to engaging the public...........................................................69
3.5.3. Approaches to ongoing communication strategies....................................71
3.5.4. Implications of communication strategies.................................................72
Notes ..............................................................................................................................74

Chapter 4. Data and Sample Collection and Management...........................................83
4.1. Data and samples....................................................................................................83
4.1.1. Nature of genetic information....................................................................83
4.1.2. Type of data and samples..........................................................................84
4.2. Ownership of data and samples..............................................................................88
4.3. Consent...................................................................................................................89
4.3.1. Nature of consent......................................................................................90
4.3.2. Consent for population databases..............................................................90
4.3.3. Children’s and protected adults’ consent..................................................93
4.3.4. Renewed consent and re-contact...............................................................94
4.4. Right to withdraw...................................................................................................95
4.5. Results....................................................................................................................96
4.5.1. Results back to database............................................................................96
4.5.2. Results back to participants.......................................................................97
4.6. Education and training of data collectors and researchers......................................99
4.6.1. Education and training of data collectors..................................................99
4.6.2. Education and training of researchers.....................................................100
Notes ............................................................................................................................101

Chapter 5. Database Management and Governance...................................................105
5.1. Management and governance of databases..........................................................105
5.1.1. Legislation and regulation of HGRDs.....................................................105
5.1.2. Role of ethics and oversight committees.................................................107
5.1.3. Management of HGRDs..........................................................................109
5.1.4. Powers, compliance and enforcement.....................................................110
5.2. Security of databases............................................................................................111
5.2.1. Custody of code registry.........................................................................111
5.2.2. Limited data release................................................................................111
5.2.3. Limited data access.................................................................................112
5.2.4. Data encryption.......................................................................................113
5.3. Access to population databases............................................................................113
5.3.1. Principles underlying access to HGRDs.................................................113
5.3.2. Purpose and conditions of access to HGRDs..........................................115
5.4. Demise of database...............................................................................................117
Notes ............................................................................................................................119

TABLE OF CONTENTS –
7



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
Chapter 6. Commercialisation Considerations............................................................123
6.1. Intellectual property..............................................................................................124
6.1.1. Intellectual property generally................................................................124
6.1.2. Intellectual property and population databases.......................................124
6.2. Commercialisation ...............................................................................................126
6.3. Benefit sharing.....................................................................................................127
Notes ............................................................................................................................130

Chapter 7. Conclusions...................................................................................................131
7.1. Policy themes arising from the workshop............................................................132
7.1.1. Is genetic information special?................................................................132
7.1.2. Public perceptions...................................................................................132
7.1.3. Public trust..............................................................................................133
7.1.4. Human rights norms and existing legal frameworks...............................134
7.1.5. International harmonisation.....................................................................134
7.1.6. Protection of identifiable information.....................................................134
7.1.7. Linkability...............................................................................................135
7.1.8. Revisiting basic principles......................................................................135
7.1.9. Commercialisation policy.......................................................................136
7.2. Future areas of work.............................................................................................136
Notes ............................................................................................................................138

Glossary...........................................................................................................................141

Workshop Agenda ..........................................................................................................143

List of Workshop Participants.......................................................................................147

Bibliography....................................................................................................................153

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY –
9



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006



Executive Summary
The development of biotechnology and bioinformatics affords the opportunity to store
and analyse increasingly large amounts of genetic data. Genetic research involving the
use of databases containing human genetic and genomic information, sometimes alone or
in combination with other personal or medical information, has thus become increasingly
important. More recently, the databases contemplated and being developed for genetic
research are quite different in nature and larger in magnitude. Many of these emerging
databases focus on and include data, information and biological samples from
populations. These population databases, also referred to as human genetic research
databases (HGRDs), may contribute significantly to science’s understanding of the
complex multi-factorial basis of diseases (genetic and non-genetic components) and
therefore to improvements in detection, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure. Such
databases may contribute significantly to the identification of genes associated with
disease, an understanding of the frequency of genetic variants in particular populations,
and to a better understanding of the reasons for drug reactions (both positive and
negative) and reactions to other environmental factors.
These databases also raise a number of issues and concerns. While some of these are
not new, the increasing breadth and scope of such databases amplifies them. Moreover,
the combination of a broader set of genetic data and personal information in these
databases raises new issues about the use of such information, especially in a non-clinical
or non-research context. In addition, such databases are increasingly international in
scope, covering populations from numerous countries, which raises new sets of issues.
Despite pressing concerns, there is limited international guidance on the
establishment, governance and management of human genetic research databases. While
certain institutions, such as UNESCO and the Council of Europe, have developed
instruments which focus on the use of genetic data, these instruments do not address the
multitude of issues raised by such databases. The underlying motivation for the OECD’s
involvement in this field is the need to address the development, use and access to
population databases containing genetic data and personal/medical information. The aim
of this Report is to begin the process of considering, at the international level, the policy
challenges associated with the broader subject of the establishment, management and
governance of human genetic research databases. Ultimately, this Report aims to provide
a summary of the complex issues that need to be considered or addressed, in recognition
of the significant contribution that human genetic research databases could play in
translating scientific advances into innovation in health.
10
– EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
Human genetic research databases
The linchpin question is the determination of which databases ought to be considered
a human genetic research database. There are numerous types of different databases
including nucleotide sequences, sequences variations, mutation sequences, gene
expression, gene loci, protein structures, as well as model organisms and diseases
(i.e. pathology databases). Many of the databases currently being undertaken share the
characteristic of collecting data, information and biological samples with the aim of
allowing research for one or multiple diseases and conditions. However, the linchpin
question is much broader. The consideration is whether only databases that contain data,
information and biological samples for one or more “populations” or for large subsets of
one or more populations ought to be considered HGRDs.
There are diverse other dimensions to the linchpin question. One dimension is
consideration of whether biobanks/tissue banks that are being amassed, especially within
the private sector, should be included in the definition of HGRDs. Another key dimension
is whether “human genetic research databases” should be considered to include databases
that also contain personal, medical or other data and information. This determination
includes consideration not only of the type of biological samples or information that will
be collected and stored within the database but also the determination of the source of that
information. Genetic data have been broadly defined as “all data, of whatever type,
concerning the hereditary characteristics of an individual or concerning the pattern of
inheritance of such characteristics within a related group of individuals.” Genetic data do
not necessarily include information derived from DNA or RNA specimens; they can be
inferred from family history, medical records or phenotype. Genetic data may be
distinguished from personal genomic data which have been defined as “detailed personal
data derived from analysis of DNA specimens.”
Moreover, consideration should be given to whether HGRDs should include
databases that contain personally identifiable information or only databases that contain
data and information that cannot be associated with or result in the identification of
individuals. Personal data have been defined as “any information relating to an identified
or identifiable individual”. Genetic data may be collected from individuals in different
manners, each associated with varying degrees of identifiability. This complex issue is
related to those raised by anonymisation and linkability of data, which are considered
separately.
Establishment of a human genetic research
database
At the inception of an HGRD, a crucial issue is the nature and scope of the database.
Also critical to the scientific legitimacy of such a database is ensuring that the sample
population chosen is genetically representative of the population it is to serve. Ideally, all
groups should be included in a given study. However, owing to financial and practical
constraints, this is not always feasible. An important consideration is the selection of
criteria that will ensure a careful and rigorous selection process which results in a
representative database.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY –
11



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
Another issue pertinent to the nature and scope of the database is whether or not
children should be allowed to participate in genetic studies. Some have argued that young
children should be excluded from genetic studies. This, however, would severely obstruct
research on genetic diseases which occur early in life. Others have argued in favour of
including children, but have often tied their support for inclusion to the issue of consent.
Consideration should be given to whether or not children should be included in
population database studies, and if so what are the appropriate safeguards.
The intended uses of the population database should also be determined at inception.
This determination is especially important in order to ensure that appropriate information
can be provided to the participants in the project. One of the obvious objectives in
establishing HGRDs will be to carry out research. However, one issue will be whether the
specific nature of the intended research may be determined or determinable at the time
that the HGRD is established or at the time of the collection of biological samples, data
and information. The degree to which this determination may be made will have
implications for issues pertaining to consent, to communication with the community and
to building public trust. Another set of determinations pertain to whether the biological
samples, data and information collected in a database could or should be allowed to be
employed for other purposes. Therein, a key consideration is whether HGRDs should be
allowed to be used for non-scientific/medical research purposes. Examples of other
purposes for which the contents of a database could be employed include the delivery of
clinical genetic services, law enforcement, insurance, legal actions and identification
purposes (e.g. for military or civil).
Different funding structures are available for the establishment of HGRDs: for-profit
(i.e. private undertaking), not-for-profit (i.e. public undertaking) or mixed model
(i.e. public-private partnerships). For example, the Icelandic Health Sector Database was
envisaged as a for-profit endeavour, the Estonian Genomic Database was conceived as a
mixed model, and the United Kingdom Biobank database was established as a not-for-
profit undertaking. What criteria should be employed to determine whether an HGRD
should be a public, private or mixed- model undertaking?
The collection of a large number of data and information about a given individual
raises numerous privacy and confidentiality issues. Privacy is generally considered to
mean the right to be left alone. In the context of genetic research, it could also mean the
right not to know genetic information. Genetic information obtained in the research
context raises unusual privacy concerns because it has the potential to generate
information and knowledge beyond that which was originally sought, and because it
raises the possibility that researchers obtaining the information might be obligated, in
some situations, to provide that information back to the patients who contributed DNA
samples.
Confidentiality connotes the notion of a professional keeping information private
once it has been revealed by a client, and is part of a fiduciary relationship. In the context
of genetic research, the concern is most often related to keeping genetic information that
is collected in a research setting from third parties such as health insurers or employers.
However, in the computer age, there are now also concerns about violation of databases
or the sale of genetic information for marketing purposes.
Privacy and confidentiality issues may vary with the type of database. Database
systems built for the purpose of finding answers to only one or a limited number of
research problems may raise different considerations from broad population databases. In
the case of specific research databases, the manner in which data are collected, stored and
12
– EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
accessed will be more targeted and more limited. In such cases, the storage of the
information may be simpler (e.g. not connected to an external network). However, in the
case of an HGRD, the information collected and stored in the database may be more
broadly accessed. Conversely, the information contained in specifically-targeted
databases may be more easily linked back to identifying information and therefore enable
identification. Large population databases, by their very size, may reduce this type of risk.
An important consideration is the principles that should be established to ensure that the
participant’s privacy and confidentiality are respected.
Another factor that influences the issue of privacy and confidentiality is the nature of
the biological samples, data and information collected. Identified samples pose the most
direct challenges to privacy and confidentiality. Thus, many researchers have chosen, or
have been required, to use coded, unlinked or unidentified samples. Even though direct
identifiers have been removed from coded samples, they may remain identifiable and thus
still present privacy and confidentiality concerns. Researchers often find coded samples
more valuable (even critically so, in certain types of research) than unlinked or
unidentified samples because the linkage with identity provides a way to follow up with
individuals in longitudinal studies. Therefore, it has been advocated that this type of
linkage cannot, and should not, be completely prohibited. To ensure privacy and
confidentiality of databases with coded material, technical and procedural computer
security (including control and monitoring of access to, and transport of, data) may be
essential. An important element is the measures that should be undertaken to ensure the
protection of the data and information contained within databases.
In establishing a population database, public support is essential, given that
participation is voluntary. This implies that the collection of biological samples, data and
information and the inclusion in the HGRD of these depend on the consent of the donor.
It may be difficult to estimate participation rates in projects where benefit is indirect,
long-term and at the population level, especially in resource-poor communities or
populations with different beliefs, cultures or languages. In order to build public trust, it
will be important to bridge the distance between the research community and participants.
However, the manner in which public support is elicited may vary considerably. In
seeking to establish an HGRD, the methods employed to engage the public, the
information that should be provided, and the manner for communicating it most
effectively are important factors.
Data and sample collection and management
The cornerstone of a human genetic research database is the data, information and
biological samples collected and stored therein. At the outset, one important consideration
is whether the data, information and biological samples should be unidentified
(i.e. anonymous), unlinked (i.e. anonymised), coded (i.e. linkable or identifiable), or
identified. Such considerations may have implications for issues of privacy and
confidentiality as well as participants’ involvement. Each of these approaches has
advantages and disadvantages which must be assessed in light of the HGRD’s objectives
and purpose. For example, anonymous data may raise the least risk for breach of privacy
but may not be as valuable for researchers, especially for longitudinal studies.
HGRDs raise issues with respect to ownership of the data, information and the
biological samples collected. Irrespective of whether the database is a private, public or a
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY –
13



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
mixed-model endeavour, the issue of who should be able to claim title to the data,
information and biological sample arises. The ownership issue includes not only
consideration of the immediate question of proprietorship but also longer-term
implications, for example for the database’s functioning or any commercialisation being
contemplated. Equally important is the issue of remuneration for the provision of the
biological samples, data and information. Whether or not to remunerate participants,
beyond simple reimbursement of basic expenses, is another important issue. It includes
consideration of whether such activity is permitted pursuant to the applicable national or
regional law, as well as whether it may affect the credibility of the HGRD, the
researchers, and collectors as well as its representativeness.
Informed consent is one of the most complex issues for human genetic research
databases. Informed consent has become the pillar for protecting autonomy in research
involving human subjects. Within the medical/scientific field, informed consent generally
presumes the ability to indicate clearly to the participant the use and purpose of the
particular research activity. While this is feasible for purpose-specific research, the very
nature of HGRDs renders the provision of this type of information difficult. Therefore,
the issue becomes what constitutes informed consent within the context of an HGRD
given that the purposes for which the data, information and biological samples are
collected and the uses for which they may be employed, usually, may be described only
in a general manner. Many have queried whether the traditional model of informed
consent is applicable in the context of HGRDs or whether a new model/paradigm should
be developed. For example, some authors have advocated blanket consent. Others have
advocated a general consent for limited purposes, with the undertaking to return to the
participant should the proposed uses go beyond those limited purposes.
Additional consent questions raised by HGRDs include children’s consent and
renewed consent. In situations where a determination has been made about the
involvement of children in genetic studies and HGRDs, consideration of the
consequences of their involvement and the manner in which to obtain consent is
primordial. For young children, obtaining consent may involve obtaining the consent of
the parents. For older children, consent may involve a variety of approaches depending on
their level of development and understanding. Issues that arise in the context of renewed
consent include returning to the participant to obtain consent for new uses in the context
of the HGRD. For example, the question arises of whether a new consent is required
when existing databases are converted to HGRDs.
Re-contacting participants, in any of the above-mentioned situations, raises practical
difficulties (e.g. the person may have died or moved away) but also more complex issues,
such as whether or not the person wished to be re-contacted. This question involves
consideration of a principled approach to re-contacting participants. As well,
consideration should be given to whether participants ought to be provided with
information pertaining to the issue of re-contacting prior to obtaining their initial consent.
Having voluntarily contributed to an HGRD, participants may, at some point wish to
withdraw from the study and have their biological samples, information and data
destroyed. One issue is whether HGRDs’ should adopt a policy pertaining to participants’
right to withdraw their data, information and samples and related issues, including
whether this is possible and if, so under what circumstances. In some cases, it may be
possible for participants to withdraw their data, information and biological samples
throughout the duration of the HGRD. In others, depending on the manner in which the
HGRD is established, it may be possible to withdraw data, information and biological
14
– EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
samples only prior to their anonymisation. Moreover, the right of withdrawal may entail
various options. For example, if the participant’s data have been included in information
provided to a third party, it may not be possible for these to be selected or withdrawn.
In many epidemiological studies, information or results are provided back to either
the database and/or the participant. However, given the breadth of an HGRD, the question
is whether or not the providing back of results is feasible or desirable. First, there is the
issue of whether or not results from users of the data and samples should be returned to
the database. While the providing of results back to the database may enrich it overall,
quality assurance of the results provided and included in the database is an important
consideration. A second set of issues pertain to the providing back to the participants
results derived from the use of the data and biological samples contained in the HGRD.
Given the breadth and purpose of HGRDs, the issue is whether it is feasible to
contemplate a policy of providing results back to participants and the value of doing so,
especially if provided outside of a clinical context.
The training of health-care professionals and researchers will be important to the
success of an HGRD. Health-care professionals responsible for the recruitment of
participants and collection of the data (i.e. interviews, questionnaires, medical
examination, drawing of blood, transfer of the information collected) may not be familiar
with genomic research. Thus, a policy for training such health-care professionals may be
important. For example, such a policy may include a protocol explaining their role to
general practitioners, outlining the information they may divulge to the participants, and
guiding them in the appropriate handling of contentious situations.
Database management and governance
The governance of databases involves numerous operational, technical and legal
issues, including consideration of applicable legislation and regulation, the role of ethics
and oversight committees, the powers, compliance and enforcement attributes granted to
the HGRD, the security features of the database, access to the database and the demise of
an HGRD.
In the establishment of an HGRD the question arises of whether the database should
result from a statute or be independent of an act of parliament. For example, the Estonian
Genomic Database and the Icelandic Health Sector Database would be the creation of an
act of parliament. Conversely, the UK Biobank and the Canadian CARTaGENE initiative
were established independent of specific legislation but are subject to a number of
existing legislation. There are advantages and disadvantages in establishing a database via
an act of parliament versus a softlaw instrument, such as a memorandum of
understanding.
A review of most HGRD initiatives reveals that they require some form of oversight
committee, but the composition and formation vary across projects. The role, function
and nature of the oversight committee in the governance of an HGRD should be
addressed. The composition of the oversight committee, especially whether it should be
multi-disciplinary, the term for an individual’s appointment, a policy or approach for
determining which issues should be submitted for the consideration of the oversight
committee are all important issues. For example, the Ethics Committee of the Estonian
Genomics Database ensures compliance with ethical guidelines, and any requests on
behalf of projects seeking access to the Database may be submitted for its consideration.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY –
15



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
An important set of issues for HGRDs concerns the powers, the ability to ensure
compliance and the mechanisms for enforcement of decisions. Such powers, or the lack
thereof, may have implications for ensuring that privacy and security policies are
respected, and for ensuring that a private entity to which commercialisations rights are
granted respects these rights and does not act in an abusive manner. For example, since
the Icelandic database would operate by licence, the power to revoke that licence is a
means of effecting compliance. If any of the provisions of the operating licence or the
enabling legislation are violated, the Minister can issue a written warning, and set a
deadline by which action must be taken. Inaction or intentional and gross negligence may
result in revocation of the licence.
Given the potential for misuse of data and samples collected in HGRDs, the security
of the database is primordial. This is both a legal and a technical question. Given the
objective of such databases, considerations of the best methods for ensuring security,
ensuring that access occurs only in the permitted manner, and ensuring that access to the
data and samples is not stifled are significant. One method proposed is through custody of
a code registry. This method would be most valuable for protecting the confidentiality of
data in databases wherein links are maintained between data and personal identifying
information. In this approach, the custodian could be a person who is under the duty of
non-divulgation of confidential information, such as a medical doctor. An additional
security feature of this approach may be the use of stand-alone computers for handling
personal identifiers and other personal information, including health data, so as to reduce
the risk of unauthorised access of networked computers.
Another approach to ensuring security and protecting privacy is to limit the amount or
type of data released or accessible to researchers using the HGRD. This may involve a
combination of legislation and technical solutions. For example, it could include limiting
the bin size or ensuring that data and information are not made available to researchers if
the data sample does not involve more than a certain number of individuals. Similarly,
privacy and confidentiality may be protected by limiting or monitoring access to the data.
A simplified way of doing this is to allow only researchers with approved passwords to
access a database. A more sophisticated version of this strategy is to use rule-based
control of access to data, instead of, or in addition to, human intervention. This method
would allow different users to access different categories of data and information
according to their roles. An alternative is to allow a very limited set of analysts to query
the primary data directly. In this scenario, “outside” researchers would be allowed to
query the data only indirectly, through these analysts, and would only receive
summarised answers to their queries (e.g. means, P-values, etc.).
A common method for enhancing data privacy is encryption, most often either one-
way or public-key. This method may also be used in conjunction with the methods
described above. Since encryption can be fairly easily implemented, it is assumed that
data transferred to and from research databases will be encrypted in some way. However,
it must be recognised that encrypted data can also be decrypted, so encryption should not
be relied upon as the only means of privacy protection.
Given that the fundamental purpose of HGRDs is to foster research, access to the
database raises crucial issues. Key questions for consideration include who should have
access to the database (e.g. only researchers, public- and/or private-sector researchers),
the manner in which access should be given (directly versus via an internal researcher),
whether access should be free or for a fee (who should pay the fee and what should it be),
and to what should access be given (e.g. to the whole database, to parts and which ones,
16
– EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
only to certain data and then only in an anonymised manner). Another key issue is the
purpose for which access should be granted.
While there are few examples of HGRDs that failed or were terminated (for example,
the Tongan database that was to be established by Autogen Limited), the possible demise
of an HGRD should be considered as early as possible, especially when establishing its
governance structure. Consideration should be given to clearly determining the
consequences of its demise. This could include, for example, whether all of the data and
the samples are to be maintained or destroyed and whether participants should be notified
of the demise of the database. If the database is operated by a private undertaking,
consideration of whether provision should be made for a government to retain the right to
have the database handed over to them or whether a government should reserve at least a
right of first refusal. Such considerations will be influenced by the applicable legislation.
For instance, many countries have enacted legislation prohibiting the sale of human tissue
or materials. The consequence of the application of such statutes would need to be taken
into account.
Commercialisation considerations
HGRDs raise issues with respect to commercialisation, including intellectual
property, the actual commercialisation of the database and/or it components and benefit-
sharing.
Intellectual property broadly refers to the legal rights which result from intellectual
activity in the industrial, scientific, literary and artistic fields. One set of issues raised by
HGRDs pertains to the intellectual property rights (IPRs) that may arise as a result of
research employing data or samples accessed from a database. In such circumstances,
questions arise of who owns the invention and who is under an obligation to ensure that
the relevant IPRs are protected. Another important consideration is access to a follow-on
innovation developed using data and samples from the database. A policy that would
balance follow-on access while permitting a return on investment would also be an
important consideration. Intellectual property issues may also arise with respect to the
database itself, including database rights, where they exist, copyright protection for the
software and other rights that allow the database to operate effectively.
With respect to commercialisation, the first consideration is whether or not it is
desirable to commercialise the database and/or whether commercialisation is in line with
the participants’ expectations. If commercial exploitation of the database is undertaken,
consideration should be given to the manner in which this should be carried out. For
instance, commercialisation could be on an exclusive or non-exclusive basis. If the
commercial exploitation were to be undertaken on an exclusive basis, it would be
essential to consider how to ensure fair access to the database and how to ensure
compliance with competition law. The question of whether or not the database could be
sold or transferred for consideration would also be important.
The issue of benefit sharing is a complex one with many aspects that vary depending
on the structure of the database. For instance, in the context of an HGRD established as a
public-private partnership or as a private undertaking, consideration should be given to
whether the government should be entitled to some compensation from the private entity
and the form of such compensation. In the case of the Icelandic Health Sector Database,
for example, the Licence Agreement would have required payment to the government of
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY –
17



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
i) an annual fixed fee, earmarked for the promotion of health care and R&D; and ii) 6%
of the profits of the Licensee, capped at ISK 70 million a year. If monetary compensation
is the option favoured, the use made of these sums would be an important consideration.
Moreover, compensation may also take a non-monetary form, such as technical or
scientific support. Benefit-sharing also raises the issue of whether or not the participant
should be entitled to individual benefits arising from the database. For example, whether
participants would be entitled to share in the profits of a successful invention developed
using samples, data and information contained in the database. A further issue is whether
participants should be given the right to access other, non-monetary benefits, such as the
products developed as a result of outside research but involving data and samples from
the HGRD.


RÉSUMÉ –
19



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006



Résumé
Les progrès de la biotechnologie et de la bioinformatique nous permettent aujourd’hui
de stocker et d’analyser des quantités croissantes de données génétiques. Les recherches
en génétique qui mettent à profit les bases de données contenant des informations
génomiques et génétiques humaines, utilisées seules ou en conjugaison avec des
informations personnelles ou médicales, prennent donc de plus en plus d’ampleur. Les
bases de données récemment conçues et développées pour les besoins de la recherche
génétique marquent un tournant évident, qu’il s’agisse de leur taille ou de leur nature.
Bon nombre de ces nouvelles bases privilégient, et donc accumulent, des données,
informations et échantillons biologiques à l’échelle de populations. Ces bases de données
populationnelles, appelées également « bases de données de la recherche en génétique
humaine » (BRGH) peuvent apporter une précieuse contribution à l’étude des origines
complexes des maladies multifactorielles (composantes génétiques et non génétiques) et,
partant, au progrès en matière de dépistage, de prévention, de diagnostic, de traitement et
de remède. Elles peuvent être très utiles pour identifier les gènes associés à certaines
maladies, connaître la fréquence des variants génétiques dans certaines populations, et
mieux comprendre les raisons des réactions (positives et négatives) aux médicaments et
aux différents facteurs environnementaux.
Ces bases de données posent cependant un certain nombre de questions et problèmes.
Si ces questions ne datent pas d’hier, elles prennent aujourd’hui une nouvelle dimension
du fait de l’ampleur et du contenu toujours plus vaste de ces bases de données. De plus, le
croisement de différentes données génétiques et d’informations à caractère personnel
dans ces bases soulève de nouvelles questions concernant l’usage de ces informations,
notamment hors du cadre de la recherche et des études cliniques. Par ailleurs, un nombre
croissant de bases de données ont une envergure internationale puisqu’elles couvrent des
populations de plusieurs pays, ce qui soulève encore d’autres questions.
En dépit de l’actualité de ces questions, il existe assez peu d’orientations
internationales concernant l’établissement, la gouvernance et la gestion des bases de
données de la recherche en génétique humaine. Certaines institutions, telles que
l’UNESCO et le Conseil de l’Europe, ont mis au point des instruments relatifs à
l’utilisation des données génétiques, mais ceux-ci n’abordent pas les problèmes que
soulèvent ces bases. Si l’OCDE a décidé de s’engager dans ce domaine, c’est parce
qu’elle considère qu’il est nécessaire d’aborder la question du développement, de
l’utilisation, et de l’accès aux bases de données populationnelles contenant des données
génétiques et des informations personnelles/médicales. L’objet du présent rapport est
d’amorcer la réflexion internationale sur les défis que posent aux pouvoirs publics
l’établissement, la gestion et la gouvernance des bases de données de la recherche en
20
– RÉSUMÉ


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
génétique humaine. Le rapport se propose en outre de récapituler les questions complexes
qu’il conviendra de prendre en considération et de traiter, compte tenu du rôle de premier
plan que pourraient jouer ces bases de données pour mettre le progrès scientifique au
service de l’innovation dans le domaine de la santé.
Bases de données de la recherche en
génétique humaine
La question essentielle est d’abord de déterminer quelles bases doivent être
considérées comme des BRGH. Il existe en effet plusieurs types de bases, notamment sur
les séquences de nucléotides, les variations de séquences, les séquences de mutation,
l’expression génétique, les loci génétiques, les structures protéiques, et également les
organismes et maladies modèles (bases de données sur les pathologies). Par ailleurs, bon
nombre des bases de données qui voient le jour actuellement ont en commun de collecter
des données, informations et matériel biologiques qui serviront à la recherche sur de
multiples maladies et conditions. Cependant, la question se pose en réalité en termes
beaucoup plus larges puisqu’il faut tout d’abord se demander si les BRGH doivent
n’inclure que les bases de données contenant des informations à l’échelle de
« populations » ou de larges sous-groupes de population.
Cette question comporte de nombreux autres aspects. Par exemple, les biobanques et
les collections de tissus privées constituées par beaucoup d’entreprises privées doivent-
elles être considérées comme des BRGH ? Les bases de données contenant des
informations personnelles, médicales ou autres, doivent-elles être considérées comme des
bases de données de la recherche en génétique humaine ? Il s’agit de définir non
seulement le type de matériel biologique ou d’informations qui sera collecté et stocké,
mais aussi les sources de ces informations. Les données génétiques ont été
schématiquement définies comme « les données, de tous types, concernant les
caractéristiques héréditaires d’un individu ou le mode de transmission de ces
caractéristiques dans un groupe d’individus apparentés ». Les données génétiques ne
comprennent pas nécessairement des informations obtenues à partir d’échantillons
d’ADN ou d’ARN ; elles peuvent être tirées de l’histoire familiale, des dossiers médicaux
ou des phénotypes. Elles doivent être distinguées des données personnelles sur le génome
qui ont été définies comme des «données personnelles détaillées tirées de l’analyse
d’échantillons d’ADN ».
Il importe encore de se demander si les BRGH doivent inclure les bases de données
qui contiennent des informations sur des personnes identifiables ou seulement les bases
de données contenant des données et informations ne pouvant être associées à un individu
ou utilisées pour le retrouver. Les données personnelles ont été définies comme « toute
information concernant un individu identifié ou identifiable ». Les données génétiques
peuvent être recueillies auprès des individus de différentes manières, plus ou moins
identifiables. L’anonymisation et la possibilité de mettre en relation les données, posent
un problème complexe qui sera examiné séparément.
RÉSUMÉ –
21



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
Établissement d’une base de données de la
recherche en génétique humaine
Il importe, avant de mettre en place une BRGH, de définir sa nature et son champ
d’application. Il est en outre nécessaire, pour assurer sa validité scientifique, de veiller à
ce que l’échantillon de population choisi soit génétiquement représentatif de la population
à laquelle elle doit servir. Idéalement, tous les groupes devraient être inclus dans une
étude donnée. Cependant, cela n’est pas toujours possible pour des raisons financières et
pratiques et il importera donc d’établir les critères qui permettront d’assurer un processus
de sélection rigoureux et précis pour obtenir une base de données représentative.
Toujours en ce qui concerne la nature et le champ couvert par la base de données, il
importe de décider si les enfants doivent ou non participer aux études génétiques.
Certains estiment qu’il faut en exclure les jeunes enfants. Un tel choix risque cependant
de freiner sérieusement la recherche sur les maladies génétiques intervenant dans les
premières années de la vie. D’autres préconisent au contraire d’inclure les enfants mais en
insistant sur l’idée de participation consentie. Il convient de déterminer si oui ou non les
études des bases de données populationnelles doivent comprendre les enfants, et dans
l’affirmative, de définir des garanties appropriées.
Il importe également de déterminer, dès sa création, à quoi va servir la base de
données. Cela est extrêmement important si l’on veut pouvoir fournir aux sujets
participants les informations dont ils ont besoin. La recherche sera évidemment un des
principaux objectifs de la création d’une BRGH. Toutefois, il faut se demander si la
nature spécifique des recherches à entreprendre est déterminée ou déterminable au
moment de la création de la BRGH ou de la collecte des échantillons biologiques,
données et informations. Cela aura des conséquences pour les questions de consentement,
de communication avec la communauté et de mise en confiance du public. Il faudra aussi
décider si l’on pourra, ou devra, autoriser des utilisations secondaires des données,
informations et échantillons biologiques collectés dans la base de données. Dans ce cadre,
il sera indispensable de décider si la BRGH pourra être utilisée à d’autres fins que la
recherche scientifique/médicale. Parmi les utilisations secondaires il y aurait
éventuellement la prestation de services de génétique clinique, l’exercice des pouvoirs de
police, l’assurance, les actions en justice et l’identification (par exemple, militaire ou
civile).
Les bases de données peuvent être envisagées selon différents modèles : à but lucratif
(entreprise privée), sans but lucratif (entreprise publique) ou structure mixte (partenariat
public-privé). Il existe actuellement des bases de données fondées sur des structures très
diverses. Citons l’exemple de la Biobanque islandaise (Icelandic Health Sector Database)
qui avait été envisagée comme une entreprise à but lucratif, la Biobanque estonienne
(Estonian Genomic Database) qui a été conçue comme une base de données mixte, et la
BioBank du Royaume-Uni qui est un projet à but non lucratif. Quels critères appliquer
pour déterminer si la BRGH sera une entreprise publique, privée ou mixte ?
La collecte d’un grand nombre de données sur chaque individu pose de nombreux
problèmes de protection de la vie privée et de la confidentialité. Le respect de la vie
privée s’entend généralement comme le droit d’être « laissé en paix ». Dans le contexte
de la recherche génétique, il pourrait plutôt s’agir du droit de ne pas connaître
l’information génétique (droit de ne pas savoir). Les informations génétiques obtenues
dans le cadre de la recherche posent des problèmes inhabituels de protection de la vie
22
– RÉSUMÉ


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
privée parce qu’elles permettent de générer des informations et des connaissances qui
vont au-delà de leur finalité initiale, et aussi parce qu’il existe un risque que les
chercheurs qui obtiennent ces informations soient obligés, dans certaines situations, de les
communiquer aux patients qui ont fourni des échantillons d’ADN.
L’idée de protection de la confidentialité renvoie à la notion de conservation par un
professionnel d’une information privée confiée par un client, et à celle de rapport de
confiance. Dans le contexte de la recherche génétique, il s’agit le plus souvent de faire en
sorte que les informations génétiques recueillies dans le cadre d’un travail de recherche
ne soient pas accessibles à des tiers, notamment aux assureurs et aux employeurs.
Toutefois, à l’ère de l’informatique, le risque de piratage des bases de données, ou de
vente des informations génétiques à des fins commerciales, ne peut être exclu.
Les questions de protection de la vie privée et de confidentialité dépendent du type de
base de données. Les bases constituées pour apporter des réponses à un seul ou à un
nombre limité de problèmes scientifiques ne poseront pas les mêmes difficultés que les
bases concernant des populations entières. Dans le premier cas, la collecte, le stockage et
l’accès aux données seront plus ciblés et plus limités. Le stockage des informations risque
d’être plus simple (sans connexion à un réseau externe, etc.) Les informations recueillies
et engrangées dans le cas d’une BRGH risquent en revanche d’être plus largement
accessibles. D’un autre côté, les informations contenues dans des bases de données bien
ciblées pourraient permettre plus facilement de retrouver une information identifiante et
donc d’opérer une identification. Les grandes bases populationnelles devraient réduire ce
type de risque, du simple fait de leur taille. Il importe de réfléchir aux principes à mettre
en place pour assurer le respect de la confidentialité des données et de la vie privée des
sujets participants.
Les problèmes de confidentialité et de respect de la vie privée sont aussi liés, dans
une large mesure, à la nature des données, informations et échantillons biologiques
collectés. Les échantillons identifiés sont les plus directement concernés par la protection
de la vie privée et la confidentialité. Pour cette raison, beaucoup de chercheurs ont choisi,
quand cela ne leur a pas été imposé, d’utiliser des échantillons codés, non retraçables ou
non identifiés. Même si les identificateurs directs ont été retirés des données codées,
celles-ci peuvent encore être identifiées et continuent donc de poser un problème de
protection de la vie privée et de la confidentialité. De l’avis de nombreux chercheurs, les
échantillons codés sont préférables (voire tout à fait préférables dans certains types de
recherche pour lesquels ils sont indispensables) aux échantillons non retraçables ou non
identifiés parce que les liens avec l’identité du sujet permettent de suivre des individus
dans les études longitudinales. En conséquence, il a été constaté que ce type de
corrélation ne pouvait et ne devait pas être complètement interdit. Pour garantir le respect
de la vie privée et la confidentialité des bases de données contenant du matériel codé, il
faudra bien souvent recourir à des procédures techniques de sécurité informatiques
(contrôle et surveillance de l’accès et du transport des données, par exemple). Il sera donc
essentiel de déterminer les mesures à prendre pour assurer la protection des données et
informations contenues dans les bases de données.
L’établissement d’une base de données populationnelle ne peut se faire sans
l’adhésion du public sachant que la participation est librement consentie. Cela signifie
que la collecte de données, informations et échantillons biologiques et leur stockage dans
la BRGH sont tributaires du consentement du donneur. Il sera sans doute difficile de
prévoir le taux de participation dans le cas de projets dont les retombées bénéfiques
seront indirectes, à long terme et au niveau de toute la population, surtout dans les
RÉSUMÉ –
23



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
communautés dépourvues de ressources ou chez les populations qui ne partagent pas les
mêmes croyances et la même culture ou parlent une autre langue. Pour gagner la
confiance du public, il sera important d’établir une passerelle entre la communauté
scientifique et les sujets participants. Toutefois, toutes sortes de méthodes peuvent être
appliquées pour mettre le public en confiance. Lors de la création d’une BRGH, il sera
essentiel de définir les méthodes qui seront employées pour associer le public, les
informations qu’il importera de fournir et les options les plus efficaces pour les
communiquer.
Collecte et gestion des données et
échantillons
Les données, informations et échantillons biologiques collectés et stockés constituent
la pierre angulaire de toute base de données de la recherche en génétique humaine. La
première question est de savoir si ces données, informations et échantillons biologiques
doivent être non identifiés (anonymes), non retraçables (anonymisés), codés (chaînables
ou identifiables) ou identifiés. Les choix opérés auront des conséquences pour la
protection de la vie privée et de la confidentialité et la participation du public. Chacune de
ces formules présente des avantages et des inconvénients qui doivent être évalués au
regard des objectifs et de la vocation de la BRGH. Par exemple, les données anonymes
réduisent le risque d’atteinte à la vie privée mais présentent moins d’intérêt pour les
chercheurs, en particulier pour les études longitudinales.
Les BRGH posent aussi la question de la propriété des données, informations et
échantillons biologiques collectés. Que la base de données soit une entreprise privée,
publique ou mixte, il conviendra de se demander qui pourra revendiquer des droits de
propriété sur les données, informations et échantillons biologiques. Le problème de la
propriété nécessite une réflexion sur les choix immédiats mais il a également des
implications à long terme, par exemple pour le fonctionnement des bases de données ou
en cas de projet de commercialisation. La rémunération des données, informations et
échantillons biologiques fournis est un autre aspect important. Déterminer s’il faut ou non
rémunérer les donneurs, au-delà du simple remboursement des frais de base, constitue
une autre étape importante. Il faut pour cela se demander si la législation nationale ou
régionale applicable autorise une telle activité, et si ce type d’approche risque d’affecter
la crédibilité et la représentativité de la BRGH, etc.
Le consentement éclairé est l’un des problèmes les plus complexes que posent les
bases de données de la recherche en génétique humaine. Le consentement éclairé est
devenue la pièce maîtresse de la protection de l’autonomie de la recherche faisant
intervenir des sujets humains. Dans le domaine médical/scientifique, le consentement
éclairé suppose généralement la possibilité d’indiquer clairement au participant
l’utilisation et la finalité du travail de recherche considéré. Si cela est faisable pour les
projets de recherche ciblés, la nature même des BRGH fait qu’il est souvent difficile de
fournir ce type d’information aux sujets pressentis. Par conséquent, la question est de
savoir ce qu’il faut entendre par consentement éclairé dans le contexte d’une BRGH,
sachant que le but de la collecte des données, information et échantillons biologiques et
l’usage qui en sera fait ne pourront généralement être décrits qu’en termes généraux. De
nombreux auteurs se sont demandé si le modèle traditionnel du consentement éclairé était
applicable dans le contexte des BRGH ou s’il ne fallait pas plutôt créer un nouveau
modèle/paradigme. Certains ont préconisé un modèle de consentement général. D’autres
24
– RÉSUMÉ


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
ont recommandé un consentement général initial pour certains usages, l’entreprise devant
reprendre contact avec le participant pour obtenir son assentiment dès lors que d’autres
usages sont envisagés.
Les autres questions soulevées par les BRGH dans ce domaine concernent le
consentement des enfants et le consentement renouvelé. Lorsque la participation
d’enfants à des études génétiques et à l’établissement de la BRGH a été approuvée,
l’étude des conséquences d’une telle participation et des modalités d’obtention de
l’assentiment sera primordiale. S’agissant des jeunes enfants, il pourra s’agir de recevoir
l’assentiment des parents. Pour les enfants plus âgés, différentes approches pourront être
envisagées en fonction de leur niveau de développement et de compréhension. Le
consentement renouvelé pose aussi toute une série de problèmes notamment liés à la
nécessité de recontacter le participant pour lui faire renouveler son consentement, par
exemple pour autoriser de nouvelles utilisations, et à la possibilité de conversion de bases
de données en BRGH, qui pourra impliquer, ou non, un renouvellement des
consentements.
La nécessité de reprendre contact avec les sujets participants, dans les différents
scénarios que l’on vient d’évoquer, ne va pas sans difficultés pratiques (la personne peut
être décédée ou avoir déménagé) mais soulève aussi d’autres questions plus complexes
(par exemple, la personne souhaite-t-elle ou non être recontactée). Il conviendrait peut-
être dans ce contexte de définir les principes à suivre dans cette démarche. Il faudrait en
outre se demander si les participants doivent être informés des possibilités de reprise de
contact avant d’accorder leur consentement.
Après avoir accepté de participer à une BRGH, certaines personnes peuvent à un
moment donné souhaiter se retirer d’une étude et faire détruire leur données, informations
et échantillons biologiques. Il importe donc de déterminer si la BRGH acceptera que des
sujets participants aient le droit de retirer leurs données, informations et échantillons. Il
faudra donc bien préciser si cela est possible et dans quelles circonstances. Dans certains
cas, les participants auront la possibilité de retirer leurs données, informations et
échantillons biologiques de la BRGH toute au long de sa durée de vie. Dans d’autres, en
revanche, selon la façon dont aura été mise en place la BRGH, ils pourront le faire avant
que les données soient anonymisées. De plus, le droit de retrait peut revêtir plusieurs
formes qu’il importera de définir. Par exemple, si les données d’une personne figuraient
dans des informations communiquées à une tierce partie, il risque de ne pas être possible
de les retirer ou de les extraire.
Les résultats et informations tirées des études épidémiologiques sont souvent
communiqués aux sujets. Cependant, compte tenu de la taille des BRGH, on doit
s’interroger sur la faisabilité et l’opportunité de rendre compte des résultats aux sujets.
Premièrement, les résultats obtenus par les utilisateurs des données et échantillons
doivent-ils être communiqués à la base de données ? Cela permettrait certes d’enrichir la
base de données, mais se pose alors la question de la qualité des résultats fournis.
Deuxièmement, en ce qui concerne la communication des résultats aux participants,
compte tenu à nouveau de la taille et de la vocation des BRGH, la question est de savoir
s’il est réaliste d’envisager une politique de communication des résultats aux sujets et
l’intérêt d’une telle démarche, surtout si elle intervient hors du cadre clinique.
La formation des chercheurs et des professionnels de santé jouera un rôle important
dans la réussite des BRGH. Les professionnels de santé chargés du recrutement des
participants et de la collecte des données (interviews, questionnaires, examens médicaux,
prélèvements sanguins, transfert des informations recueillies) ne seront pas forcément
RÉSUMÉ –
25



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
spécialistes de la recherche génomique. En conséquence, il sera important d’adopter une
politique de formation de ces professionnels. On pourrait, par exemple, établir un
protocole pour expliquer aux généralistes leur rôle et quelles informations divulguer aux
sujets, et les guider dans la gestion de certaines situations délicates.
Gestion et gouvernance des bases de données
La gouvernance des bases de données fait intervenir toute une série de questions
techniques, opérationnelles et juridiques, renvoyant notamment à la législation et à la
réglementation applicables, au rôle des comités d’éthique et de surveillance, aux
questions de compétences, droits et obligations des BRGH, à la sécurisation des bases de
données, aux questions d’accès et à la suppression d’une BRGH.
Il importe de déterminer, lors de la mise en place d’une BRGH, si la création de la
base de données doit être entérinée ou non par la législation. Par exemple, la Biobanque
de l’Estonie et celle de l’Islande ont été approuvées par le parlement de ces pays, alors
que la Biobank du Royaume-Uni et le projet canadien CARTaGENE existent
indépendamment de toute loi habilitante mais sont subordonnées à différents textes
existants. La création d’une base de données sanctionnée par acte parlementaire ou au
contraire par un instrument non contraignant de type mémorandum d’accord, présente à la
fois des avantages et des inconvénients.
L’examen de la plupart des projets de BRGH révèle qu’ils doivent tous être
supervisés d’une façon ou d’une autre par un comité de surveillance dont la composition
et la formation varient toutefois selon les cas. En établissant le régime de gouvernance
des BRGH, il importe de définir le rôle, la fonction et la nature du comité de surveillance.
S’agissant de la composition du conseil du comité de surveillance, on se demandera, par
exemple, s’il doit être pluridisciplinaire, combien de mandats les membres du conseil
pourront exercer au maximum et quelles stratégies ou approches adopter pour déterminer
les questions qui devront être portées à l’attention du comité de surveillance. Par
exemple, le Comité d’éthique de la Biobanque estonienne assure le respect des principes
d’éthique et chacun est autorisé à s’adresser à lui pour demander l’accès à la base de
données.
Les compétences et l’aptitude des BRGH à assurer le respect et la mise en application
des décisions sont aussi des points importants à aborder. De l’étendue de ces prérogatives
dépendra la possibilité d’assurer le respect des mesures de protection de la vie privée et
de la confidentialité, et de garantir que l’entité privée détenant des droits de
commercialisation respecte ses engagements et n’outrepasse pas ses droits. Par exemple,
la base de données islandaise fonctionnerait sous licence et la possibilité de révoquer cette
licence est un moyen d’assurer le respect des dispositions prévues. Si les conditions de la
licence d’exploitation ou de l’acte habilitant ne sont pas respectées, le ministre peut
émettre un avertissement écrit, et imposer la prise de mesures correctives dans un délai
fixé. En cas d’inaction ou de faute lourde intentionnelle la licence peut être révoquée.
Compte tenu du risque d’utilisation abusive des données et échantillons conservés
dans les BRGH, la sécurité de ces bases de données est primordiale. Cet aspect a des
implications juridiques et techniques. Il importe de définir, connaissant l’objectif de la
base de données, les meilleures méthodes qui permettront d’assurer la sécurité, de
n’autoriser l’accès que selon les modalités autorisées, et d’assurer que l’accès aux
données et échantillons n’est pas entravé. L’une des méthodes possibles consiste à tenir
26
– RÉSUMÉ


CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
un registre des codes. Si les données peuvent être reliées à une information personnelle
identifiante, le meilleur système de protection de la confidentialité des données est sans
doute de conserver un registre de codes permettant d’anonymiser des données en ayant la
possibilité de les retrouver. Le gardien officiellement en charge du registre devra gérer
celui-ci en toute confidentialité. La personne occupant cette fonction sera assujettie à
l’obligation de non divulgation des informations confidentielles ; il pourra s’agir par
exemple d’un médecin. De plus, des ordinateurs autonomes pourraient être utilisés pour
gérer les identificateurs individuels et les autres informations personnelles, notamment
sur la santé, afin de réduire les risques de piratage sur un réseau.
On peut également choisir, pour assurer la sécurité et la protection de la
confidentialité des bases de données génétiques, de limiter la quantité ou le type des
données diffusées ou accessible aux chercheurs qui utilisent les bases. Cette option
combine des solutions législatives et techniques. Par exemple, on peut décider de faire en
sorte que les données/informations ne soient communiquées aux chercheurs qu’à partir
d’une certaine masse critique d’individus. On peut aussi protéger la vie privée et la
confidentialité en limitant ou en contrôlant l’accès aux données. Une façon simple de
procéder est de n’ouvrir l’accès de la base qu’aux chercheurs possédant un mot de passe
autorisé. Cette formule existe sous une forme plus sophistiquée consistant à utiliser un
système à base de règles pour contrôler l’accès aux données, en remplacement ou en
complément de l’intervention humaine. Avec ce système, les différents utilisateurs sont
autorisés à accéder à différentes informations selon leurs fonctions. Il est aussi possible
de n’autoriser qu’un très petit nombre d’analystes à interroger directement les données
primaires. Dans ce scénario, les chercheurs « extérieurs » pourront accéder à ces données
seulement de façon indirecte, par l’intermédiaire de ces analystes, et ne recevront que des
réponses synthétiques à leur demande (par exemple, moyennes, valeurs prédictives, etc.).
La cryptographie, asymétrique ou à clé publique, peut être utilisée pour renforcer la
protection des données. Cette méthode peut être utilisée en conjonction avec les autres
méthodes décrites ci-dessus. Le cryptage étant assez facilement réalisable, on peut
supposer que les données transférées dans les bases de données et extraites de ces bases
seront cryptées d’une façon ou d’une autre. Force est de reconnaître toutefois que les
données cryptées peuvent être décryptées, c’est pourquoi le cryptage ne peut garantir à lui
seul la protection de la vie privée.
Sachant que l’objectif premier des BRGH est de faciliter la recherche, l’accès aux
bases de données revêt une importance primordiale. Un certain nombre de questions
doivent donc être résolues : qui doit avoir accès à la base de données (uniquement les
chercheurs, les chercheurs du secteur public ou du secteur privé, etc.), comment ouvrir
l’accès (directement ou par l’intermédiaire d’un chercheur interne), l’accès doit-il être
libre ou payant (qui doit acquitter le droit d’accès et quel en sera le montant) et à quelles
informations donner accès (toute la base de données, certaines parties seulement et
lesquelles, uniquement certaines données et seulement sous forme anonymisée, etc.).
Autre point à déterminer : quels motifs doivent justifier l’accès.
Bien qu’à l’heure actuelle il existe peu d’exemples de BRGH avortés ou sans
lendemain (à part la base de données de Tonga qui devait être créée par Autogen
Limited), il pourrait être utile d’étudier sans délai le cas de l’éventuelle suppression d’une
BRGH, notamment du point de vue de sa gestion. Il faudra déterminer clairement les
conséquences d’une telle suppression. Il conviendra de se demander, par exemple, si
toutes les données et échantillons doivent être conservés ou détruits ; et si les sujets
participants doivent être informés de la disparition de la base de données. Si la base de
RÉSUMÉ –
27



CREATION AND GOVERNANCE OF HUMAN GENETIC RESEARCH DATABASES – ISBN-92-64-02852-8 © OECD 2006
données est administrée par une entreprise privée, il faudra déterminer si des dispositions
peuvent être prises pour que le gouvernement ait le droit de reprendre la base ou si un
gouvernement peut se réserver au moins un droit de préemption. Il faudra pour cela
examiner la législation applicable. Par exemple, de nombreux pays ont adopté une
législation qui interdit la vente de tissus ou de matériels humains. Les conséquences de
telles dispositions devront aussi être prises en compte.
Considérations relatives à la
commercialisation
Les BRGH soulèvent de très nombreuses questions relatives à la commercialisation,
notamment eu égard aux droits de propriété intellectuelle, aux modalités concrètes de
commercialisation d’une base de données et au partage des bénéfices.
On entend généralement par propriété intellectuelle les droits conférés par une activité
intellectuelle dans le domaine industriel, scientifique, littéraire et artistique. Les BRGH
soulèvent toute une série de questions concernant les droits de propriété intellectuelle
dans le cas de recherches ayant utilisé des données et matériels tirés d’une base de
données. Dans ce cas, il faudra se demander qui est le détenteur de l’invention et qui a
l’obligation de veiller à ce que les droits de propriété intellectuelle applicables soient
protégés. Un autre aspect important est celui de l’accès à l’innovation dérivée des
données et échantillons d’une base de données. Il pourrait être utile d’envisager une
stratégie permettant à la fois de maintenir l’accès et d’obtenir un retour sur
investissement. La base de données elle-même peut poser des questions de propriété
intellectuelle, notamment les droits sur cette base, lorsqu’ils existent, la protection du
droit d’auteur pour le logiciel et les autres droits permettant d’assurer le bon
fonctionnement de la base de données.
En ce qui concerne la commercialisation, la première chose à prendre en
considération est l’intérêt que présente la commercialisation de la base de données et si la
commercialisation correspond aux attentes des sujets participants. Si l’exploitation
commerciale de la base de données est approuvée, il conviendra de déterminer la
procédure à suivre. Il importera notamment d’examiner si cette commercialisation doit se
faire, ou non, sur la base de l’exclusivité. Si c’est le cas, il conviendra de veiller à assurer
l’équité d’accès à la base de données et le respect de la législation sur la concurrence. Il
sera essentiel de déterminer si la base de données peut ou non être vendue ou transférée
moyennant contrepartie.
La question du partage des bénéfices est également complexe et présente de
nombreuses facettes qui varient en fonction de la structure de la base de données. Par
exemple, dans le cas d’une BRGH ayant le statut de partenariat public-privé ou
d’entreprise privée, il conviendra d’établir si le gouvernement doit recevoir une
compensation de l’entité privée et, dans ce cas, sous quelle forme. Par exemple, dans le
cas de la Biobanque islandaise, le titulaire de la licence devrait, moyennant certains
ajustements, payer au gouvernement i) un montant annuel fixe, destiné à financer la
promotion des soins de santé et de la R-D ; et ii) 6 % des profits, plafonnés à 70 millions
ISK par an. Si la compensation financière est l’option retenue, il sera important de
déterminer comment seront utilisés les sommes dégagées. De plus, la compensation