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INSTRUCTOR:

Dr. Raymond E. Menard


Office: SC
239C (Gibbs Campus)


Phone: 341
-
3561


Email:
menard.ray@spcollege.edu


Office Hours: M/W 8:00
-
8:30AM and 10:30
-
11:00AM (CLW)





T/Tr 12:45
-
2:45 PM (SPG)


AC
ADEMIC DEPARTMENT
:

Baccalaureate Biology Program


Dr. Linda G. Gingerich/ Academic Chair


Office: SS 120


Phone: 791
-
2538


COURSE PREFIX AND NUMBER: MCB 3020C


COURSE NAME: Microbiology with Laboratory

Microbiology is the study of organisms and agents too
small to be seen clearly by the
unaided eye. Topics will include microbial metabolism, nutrition, growth and control,
molecular biology and microbial genetics, diversity of the microbial world, microbial
ecology, microbial diseases and host defenses. The l
aboratory portion will complement
lecture topics and include the application of fundamental techniques used in isolation,
cultivation, and identification of microorganisms and using microorganisms to study
current topics in biotechnology


MEETING INFORMATI
ON:

Lecture class meets in NM201 Monday and Wednesday from 8:30
-
10:30am

Lab meets in NM263 Monday and Wednesday from 11:00am
-
1:00pm

ATTENDANCE:

Attending class and being an active participant are crucial to your success in
this class. The majority of the e
xam material will come from notes presented in class, so regular
attendance should improve your exam scores. Attendance will be taken every class period and
students who miss are responsible for all work due that day as well as any material presented in
cl
ass that day. If you must miss class due to a serious illness or other event, please let me know
so that I am aware of the situation.



SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:


If you wish to request accommodations as a student with a
documented

disability, please make
a
n appointment with the Learning Specialist on campus. If you have a documented hearing loss,
please contact the Program for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing at 791
-
2628. If you need assistance
during an emergency classroom evacuation, please contact your campus
learning specialist
immediately about arrangements for your safety. The Office of Services for Students with
Disabilities can be reached at 791
-
2628 or 791
-
2710 (CL), 341
-
4758 (SP/G), 394
-
6108 (SE)

712
-
5789 (TS) or 341
-
4532 (AC).



COURSE GOALS:


1. The

student will explain and evaluate core principles of microbiology.



2. The student will
explain

microbial nutrition, microbial growth, and microbial
metabolism.


3. The student will demonstrate an understanding of microbial molecular biology,
bacterial

genetics, biotechnology, medical microbiology and immunology.



4.

The student will illustrate the diversity of the microbial world, describe microbial
ecology, and evaluate microorganisms in various environmental situations.


5.

The student will recognize m
icrobial diseases, identify methods of microbial control
and discriminate between environmental and chemical control of microbial growth.


6.

The student will illustrate
advanced

techniques for microscopy, lab safety,
biotechnology protocols and bacterial sta
ining.


7.

The student will evaluate bacterial culturing and microbial isolation techniques.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:



1. The student will explain and evaluate core principles of microbiology by:




a.

discussing key historical events in microbiology and immuno
logy




b.

differentiating between the major groups of microorganisms and viruses.



c
.

correlating the structural differences in cell walls to Gram positive and Gram


negative stains in bacteria.



2.

The student will
evaluate

microbial nutrition, mic
robial growth, and microbial
metabolism by:




a.

classifying microorganisms based on their nutritional requirements.




b.

describing the major chemical and physical growth factors that affect microbial


growth.




c.

analyzing microbial growth u
sing various measurement methods.


d
.

illustrating an in
-
depth knowledge of photosynthesis, cellular respiration and the
electron transport chain.


3.

The student will demonstrate an understanding of microbial molecular biology,
bacterial genetics, biote
chnology, medical microbiology and immunology by:



a. discriminating between DNA replication, RNA transcription, and protein translation.



b. comparing and contrasting re
gulation of gene expression in p
rokaryotes and


e
ukaryotes.



c. analyzing g
ene sequences to determine if mutations have occurred, and if so to


discuss what effects these mutations may cause.



d. describing the polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing and operating a


thermal cycler to perform the polymerase chain re
action.



e. discussing the impact of genetic engineering on human health and the


environment.



f. evaluating RNA level gene expression and microarray analysis.


g. isolating DNA and interpreting DNA restriction digest electrophoretic gels.


h.
conducting and analyzing experiments to transform bacteria with plasmids



containing genes for selected proteins.


i. interpreting data from simulated HIV ELISA experiments.


j. analyzing and interpreting data and writing comprehensive laboratory repor
ts.




4.

The student will illustrate the diversity of the microbial world, describe microbial
ecology, and evaluate microorganisms in various environmental situations by:


a.

describing taxonomy and the phenetic system.


b. explaining how microorganisms

are classified based on cell type, morphology,

metabolism, and reproduction.


c. identifying differences in the domains: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya.


d. comparing and contrasting multiplication of bacteriophages and plant and
animal
viruses.


e.
discussing the ecological niches of microbes and their symbiotic relationships.


f. recognizing differences in microorganisms in aquatic and terrestrial environments.


g. performing standard plate counts and coliform plate counts.


h. assessing the effe
cts of
temperature
, pH,
oxygen concentration
and osmolarity on
bacterial growth.


i. comparing oxygen requirements of selected microorganisms.


j. i
dentifying organisms based on ci
trate utilization, sugar fermentation, oxidase and
catalase production.


k
. analyzing results from qualitative tests on selected water samples.


5.

The student will recognize microbial diseases, identify methods of microbial control
and discriminate between environmental and chemical control of microbial growth by:


a.

evaluating met
hods to detect viral and bacterial infections.


b.

describing factors involved in disease.


c.

discussing major routes of transmission of human
diseases.


d.

comparing and contrasting nonspecific and specific defenses of the host.


e.

identifying mechanisms by which v
iruses and bacteria evade host defenses.


f.

characterizing the modes of action of antimicrobial drugs from a molecular and
biochemical perspective.


g.

examining published data on newly emerging microbial and viral diseases and their
impact on society.


h.

explain
ing Koch’s postulates.


i.

interpreting data on the effectiveness of alcohol as an antiseptic.


j.

explaining the effects of UV irradiation on microbial growth.


k.

determining the susceptibility of bacteria to selected antibiotics and disinfectants.


l.

evaluating th
e effectiveness of disinfectants on fomites.


6.

The student will illustrate
advanced

techniques for microscopy, lab safety,
biotechnology protocols and bacterial staining by:


a.

determining biologically safe levels of selected microorganisms.


b.

following standa
rd laboratory rules and proper disposal of biological waste.


c.

completing the steps of the Gram stain to correctly identify Gram positive and
Gram negative bacteria.


d.

employing differential staining methods to identi
fying mycobacteria
, endospores
and capsul
es.


e.

comparing and contrasting various types of microscopes and their uses.


7.

The student will evaluate bacterial culturing and mi
crobial isolation techniques by:


a.

employing proper aseptic technique.


b.

performing streak plate and pour plate methods to obtain

pure cultures.


c.

analyzing data from serial dilutions.


d.

operating a spectrophotometer to measure cell density.


e.

using critical thinking skills to determine the identity of unknown specimens.





PREREQUISITES :

BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM

1045, CHM 1
0
45L, CHM 1046,
CHM 1046L, CHM 2210, CHM2210L, CHM 2211, and CHM 2211L.


GRADING:


Grading System:





Grading Scale:

3 Lecture Exams (100pts)


300


A (900
-
1000 points)



1 Final Exam (200pts)



200


B (800
-
899 points)

Student Presentations




50


C (700
-
799 points)



3 Lab Exams (100pts)



300


D (600
-
699 points)




Lab Reports





100


F (
<

599)





Unknown Lab Report




50










Total Points Possible:


1000


Lecture Exams:


The lecture exams will primarily focus on material presented i
n lecture with some
reading material included from your text book, or other sources The exams will consist of a
combination of multiple choice, matching, short answer and essay questions. The Final Exam
will consist of questions from the last section of l
ecture material as well as a comprehensive
portion. If you are more than 10 minutes late for an exam you will not be able to take the exam
that day.



Lab Exams:


The lab exams will primarily focus on material presented in lab with some reading
material i
ncluded from your lab book. The exams will consist of a combination of multiple
choice, fill in the blank, short answer, and essay questions. Lab exams will also include a
“practical” portion which will have various stations containing experimental data f
or you to
interpret, or specimens to identify.


Make
-
up Exams:


Any student missing a lecture exam may take a make
-
up provided they have a legitimate
excuse for missing class (i.e. severe illness with doctor’s note, family emergency).
All scores
on make
-
up exams will be reduced by 10% each time you need to take one.

This penalty
applies to ANYONE taking a make
-
up, No Exceptions!

The 10% penalty is additive, so the
first make
-
up is
-
10%, the 2
nd

-
20%, the 3
rd

-
30% etc… Make
-
up exams must be taken within

one week of the original test date and note that
make
-
up exams will contain different
questions than the original.


Student Presentations:


Within the first 2 week of classes there will be a list of topics you may choose from to do
a presentation. Dependi
ng on total enrollment of the class the presentations will be done
individually or in groups. This presentation HAS TO BE POWER POINT and should be
10
-
15
minutes

long. In addition to the Oral presentation, a SHORT write up of the topic is also
required.



Lab Reports:


Lab reports are assigned throughout the semester to help you understand the experiments
better. Refer to the schedule for the due dates on these reports.
Reports will only be accepted at
the
beginning

of lab on the day they are due.

I will no
t accept late or emailed
reports
. If you can not be in lab for any reason email the report to a fellow student and
ask them to hand it in for you. I am unable to print your assignments for you.


Unknown lab Report:

You will be given an unknown bacteria to
identify towards the end of the semester. You will use
techniques learned in class to identify this unknown. You will then submit a comprehensive lab
report on this specimen.


Lab Attire: In this lab we are working with MICRO
-
ORGANISMS. Therefore it is imp
ortant
that you wear the proper clothes. NO OPEN TOED SHOES….you do not want to spill
any cultures on your skin. We will discuss safety during the first lab period. Also, if you
have long hair, please have it pulled back, we will use Bunsen burners in this

class and
you don’t want to set your hair on fire.

You need to wear a lab coat. Please put your name on the lab coat and bring a bag to
store it in.



Grades Changes:

Please follow the guidelines listed below if you feel that an answer on an
exam, quiz, h
omework, or other assignment has been erroneously marked incorrect. I will either
post a key or go over questions/answers in class with you for any assignments/quizzes/exams
that are given.


1)

Please circle the answer in question and return to me within one
week from the day
you receive the assignment/exam back.

2)

I will review the appropriate answers and determine if your grade needs to be
adjusted. I will return your assignment/exam back to you within one week from the
time you give it to me.

3)

The time frame t
herefore for changing a grade on any given assignment is TWO
WEEKS. If for some reason you are ill or otherwise engaged, you may make an
appointment with me, but the appointment needs to be made within the two week
time frame.


Please do not ask me during
class time to review your papers for a grade change as there is no
time for me to assess the situation while in class.


Classroom Behavior:


Success in this and any college class requires good note taking, test taking , and study
skills. Please ask me for

assistance with any of these areas. Do not wait until mid
-
term before
trying to improve your work. Start asking questions and looking for help early on if you need it.
In addition, attending class means more than just showing up. Come prepared to take

notes, ask
questions, and listen. Please be considerate of other students as well as myself during lecture. It
is distracting to hear someone talking or laughing during lecture so please refrain from side
conversations during lecture.
Students who con
tinue to cause disruptions in class will be
asked to leave the classroom.

For more detailed information on proper student conduct please
see the code of conduct in your course catalog.


Please turn off all beepers and cell phones while in class.

Cell ph
ones going off during class
are a distraction during lecture and exams. You will be given one warning if your cell phone
goes off during class before being asked to leave class for that period. If you need to use your
phone please do so outside class eve
n if this is during a break time.


Finally, coming late to class is distracting to me and, more importantly, your fellow
students so please be on time for all class meetings.

In addition, missing the first 10 minutes
of class means you will miss important

announcements about the schedule, assignments, quizzes,
etc. If you do arrive late please enter the class and take your seat quietly. Do not ask students or
myself questions at this time or copy notes that you missed. You can ask questions or copy note
s
after class.


Anyone arriving more than 10 minutes late for an exam will be asked to leave and will have to
take the exam late with the 10% penalty as per the make
-
up exam policy.
For more detailed
information on proper student conduct please see the co
de of conduct in your course
catalog.


ACADEMIC HONESTY:


St. Petersburg College has an academic honesty policy. It is your responsibility to be
familiar with the policies, rules and consequences of violations. Read about the policy at:
http://www.spcollege.edu/webcentral/admit/honesty/htm
. There is no tolerance for cheating
and academic dishonesty. The penalty can range from a zero on that assignment or exam to
a grade of F in the class
.









Lecture Textbook:
Willey’s Prescott Principles of Microbiology: ISBN# 9780077213411


Laboratory Manual:
Benson’s Microbiology Lab Manual: ISBN# 9780073522555


COURSE SCHEDULE:

MCB 3020C Microbiology
LECTURE
--

Tentative Schedule Summer 2010

Te
xt: Prescott’s Principles of Microbiology by Willey, Sherwood, and Woolverton

Lecture

M/W

Topic

Chapters

1

5/17


Course Introduction.

Introduction to Microbiology

1,2

2

5/19

Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Function

3, 4

3

524

Viruses, oth
er Acellular Agents, Nutrition

5, 6

4

5/26

Microbial Growth, Control of Microbes, Antimicrobial
Chemotherapy

7, 8, 31


5/31

NO Class: Memorial Day


5

6/2

Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Intro to Metabolism, Catabolism

31, 9, 10


6

6/7

EXAM 1: Chapters 1
-
8,

31

Anabolism

11

7

6/9

Gene Regulation of gene expression


12, 13

8

6/14

Genetic variation, Genomics, Biotechnology

14, 15,16

9

6/16

Microbial Evolution, Taxonomy, Arachaea, Deinococci, and
Gram Negative Bacteria

17, 18, 19

10

6/21

Proteobacteria, diff
erentiation based on DNA sequencing

20, 21, 22

11

6/23

Exam 2 (Chapters 9
-
16)

Eukaryotic microbes, viral diversity

23, 24

12

6/28


Ecology and Symbiosis

25, 26, 27

13

6/30

Host defenses

28, 29

14

7/5

No Class, Fourth of July Observed


15

7/7

Exam 3 (C
hapters 17
-
24)

Pathogenicity, Clinical Microbiology and Immunology

30, 32

16

7/12

Epidemiology

33

17

7/14

Applied Microbiology

34, 35

18

7/19

Student Presentations



7/21

FINAL EXAM



MCB 3020C Microbiology

Laboratory
--

Tentative Schedule Summer 2
010

Lab Manual: Benson’s Microbiological Applications 11
th

Ed. By Alfred E. Brown

Lab

M/W

Topic

Lab book pg#

1

5/17

Introduction to the Lab; Requirements; Lab Safety

Basic bacterial morphology. Use of the microscope

Ubiquity of Bacteria (TSA plating of E
nvironmental Samples)

IX
-
XV

3
-
8, 55
-
59

2

5/19

Fungi, Protozoa, Algae, Cyanobacteria

41
-
53

61
-
67

3

5/24

Aseptic Techniques, Pure Culture Techniques

Wet Mounts

69
-
93

124
-
125

4

5/26

Smear Preparation

Simple and Gram Staining Techniques

95
-
99

109
-
111


5/3
1

Memorial Day: No LAB



5

6/2

EXAM 1

Capsule, Endospore, and Acid Fast staining*

103
-
104

113
-
118


6

6/7

Examination of Water samples

Staphylococci Isolation and Identification*

391
-
396

447
-
451

7

6/9

Gram Negative Intestinal Pathogens

MR
-
VP Tests, Citra
te Test, SIM, Oxidase and Catalase
production, Fermentation

Capsule, Endospore, Acid Fast Lab Report Due

265
-
279

469
-
473

8

6/14

Phenylalanine Deaminase Test and Urease

UV Light Radiation*

Staphylococci Identification Lab Report Due

221
-
223

281
-
285

9

6/16

Enumeration of Bacteria

Cultivation of Anaerobes

145
-
157

10

6/21

EXAM 2

Begin Unknowns
*

Antibiotic Disk Tests
*

UV Radiation Lab Report Due

235
-
242

257
-
295

11

6/23

Continue Unknown

pBlu Transformation

Handout

12

6/28


Continue Unknowns

Quick PCR*

Gel El
ectrophoresis

433
-
436

Handout

13

6/30

Finish Unknowns

Mini
-
prep Isolation of Plasmids

Antibiotic Disk Lab REPORT DUE

437
-
442

Handout

14

7/5

HOLIDAY: No LAB


15

7/7

Restriction Enzyme Mapping

Water quality testing

PCR LAB REPORT DUE

Handout

16

7/12

Simu
lation of HIV detection by Elisa*

Handout

17

7/14

REVIEW

Unknown Lab Report Due


18

7/19

Final Lab Exam/ Elisa Lab Report Due