Academic Catalog 1998-2000 - Offices

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MISSION STATEMENT

Trinity College is a comprehensive university offering a broad range of educational programs that prepare students
across the lifespan for the intellectual, ethical and spiritual dimensions of contemporary work, civic and family life.
Trinity's core mission values and characteristics emphasize:

Commitment to the Education of Women

in a particular way through the design and pedagogy of the historic
undergraduate women's college, and by advancing principles of equity, justice and honor in the education of
women and men in all other programs;

Foundation for Learning in the Liberal Art
s

through the curriculum design in all undergraduate degree programs
and through emphasis on the knowledge, skills, and values of liberal learning in all graduate and professional
programs;

Integration of Liberal Learning with Professional Preparation

thro
ugh applied and experiential learning
opportunities in all programs;

Grounding in the mission of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur and the Catholic tradition
, welcoming persons of
all faiths, in order to achieve the larger purposes of learning in the huma
n search for meaning and fulfillment.




MESSAGE FROM THE PRE
SIDENT

Over a century ago, Trinity College was founded by the Sisters of Notre Dame de
Namur as the nation's first Catholic liberal arts college for women. The Sisters of Notre
Dame had a vision

of an institution for women that would be both national in scope
and built upon a challenging liberal arts curriculum that assumed that women are the
intellectual equals of men. Today, the work and beliefs of the community of the Sisters
of Notre Dame liv
e on as Trinity continues to educate women of all ages and to offer
graduate degrees to both women and men. In addition to supporting 1,500 students in
degree programs, Trinity educates more than 5,000 other students each year in non
-
degree programs rangin
g from professional development workshops for teachers and
school administrators, to Upward Bound classes for high school students, to
Elderhostel programs for retired persons. Beginning with the first graduating class of
1904, the mission of Trinity conti
nues to be realized in the lives of her students,
individuals whose accomplishments range from the halls of Congress to board rooms, classrooms and courtrooms,
laboratories and artists' studios, town hall meetings and family dinner tables.

As the global co
mmunity moves into the 21st century, the significance of educating a new generation of
transformative leaders and engaged citizens equipped with the intellectual perspective and ecumenical knowledge
of liberal learning is as important as any other time in
history. The ability to think critically, to write and speak
clearly, to make ethical judgments, to know the context of history and literature, to understand the fundamental
economic and political forces affecting the psychology of whole peoples, these are

the quantities essential to
effective leadership in our ever
-
changing global environment. These are the hallmarks of a Trinity education.
Liberal learning and continued professional development at Trinity is enriched and enlarged by the resources of
the n
ation's capital, from internships in Congressional offices or scientific laboratories, to research at the Library of
Congress, to participation in classes at any of the major area universities through the Consortium of Universities.

Trinity's commitment to

liberal learning derives its ultimate meaning from the core identity of Trinity as a Catholic
college. Beyond spiritual growth realized through theological studies and liturgies, the Trinity community also lives
its faith through active service to people
in need in Washington and around the country. Trinity's commitment to
faith and liberal learning is also realized in the Honor System that governs all aspects of academic and co
-
curricular
life on campus.

After more than one hundred years since its foundin
g, the work of the Sisters of Notre Dame continues to thrive as
Trinity College remains an institution centered on women and enriched by the Catholic tradition, a place where
new generations of students can gain the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed

in their own lives and give
back to their communities.



GENERAL INFORMATION

Trinity College in Washington, D.C., is dedicated to meeting the educational needs of women of all ages. At the
graduate level, Trinity offers master's degree programs to both wo
men and men. Founded in 1897 by the Sisters of
Notre Dame de Namur, Trinity is one of the nation's first Catholic colleges for women. One hundred years later, the
College continues the founders' commitment to offer students of all faiths a quality academic

program, a value
-
centered education, and a focus on the intellectual development of each student.

Trinity College is empowered by charter to grant undergraduate and graduate degrees. Academic programs are
divided into two areas: the College of Arts and Sc
iences and the School of Professional Studies. By selecting a
course of study in one of the two areas, undergraduates may earn a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science.
Graduate students may choose from programs leading to the Master of Arts, the Master

of Arts in Teaching, the
Master of Education, or the Master of Science in Administration.

Trinity's undergraduate program offers the bachelor's degree to women through its Weekday and Weekend
Programs. Students benefit from an interdisciplinary liberal ar
ts program that prepares them for a lifetime of
career opportunities, and a learning environment committed to developing the leadership skills of women. The
Foundation for Leadership Curriculum in the Weekday Program and the Core Curriculum in the Weekend
Program
combine a foundation of knowledge with practical experiences and professional focus. Trinity offers students many
resources, including a faculty dedicated to teaching, individual academic advisors, Trinity's Advising, Computer,
Writing, and Academi
c Support and Career Services Centers, a wide choice of internships for academic credit, and
the many opportunities available in the nation's capital.

Trinity's graduate program offers master's degrees to both women and men in the areas of management,
comm
unity health promotion, counseling, student development in higher education, curriculum and instruction,
educational administration, and teaching. The graduate programs integrate theory and knowledge with skills and
practical applications. Trinity also off
ers professional development workshops to area educators.

The Trinity Center for Women in Public Policy brings together students, scholars, teachers, and policymakers to
focus on the expanding role of women in a broad range of public policy issues, includi
ng health care, the
environment, poverty, and education. This nonpartisan academic center offers lectures, workshops, and
conferences that explore public policy issues affecting women and sponsors leadership development programs.

FOUNDING AND ACCREDI
TATION

At the time of Trinity's founding in 1897, only men were educated by Catholic colleges. Trinity College was
established to offer equivalent educational opportunities to women of all faiths. Many women and men worked
together to achieve this goal, but the
principal driving force was Sr. Julia McGroarty, Provincial Superior of the
Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, a religious community founded by Sr. Julie Billiart in early 19th
-
century France.
Their congregation currently consists of about 3,000 sisters in Eu
rope, Africa, Asia, North America, and South
America. In addition to a variety of other works, they help support colleges in the United Kingdom, Japan, and the
United States.

Trinity's management and business concerns are vested in a Board of Trustees numb
ering not fewer than nine nor
more than 30 members. At least one
-
third plus one of the board's membership is drawn from the congregation of
the Sisters of Notre Dame, and at least one
-
third of the board members are alumnae of Trinity. The faculty and the
s
tudent body each elect two nonvoting representatives to the board. Responsibility for formulating and
recommending academic policies and programs rests primarily with the faculty, and final decisions are made by
standing committees that often include repre
sentatives of the administration, the faculty, and the student body.

Incorporated under the laws of the District of Columbia in 1897, Trinity College was empowered by Act of Congress
to confer degrees. Its legal title is "Trinity College, Washington D.C."
The College is accredited by the Middle States
Association of Colleges and Schools. Both the graduate and undergraduate programs are accredited by the
National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education Certification (NASDTEC).

Trinity is a member

of the Washington Consortium, which consists of 11 universities (American, Catholic,
Gallaudet, George Washington, George Mason, Georgetown, Howard, Marymount, Southeastern, the University of
the District of Columbia, and the University of Maryland, Colle
ge Park), and one college (Trinity).

Trinity is among the 10% of the nation's colleges and universities to be granted a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa
--

the
country's oldest academic honor society. Trinity's chapter was established in 1971.


TOWARD TRINITY
2000: A STRATEGIC PL
AN TO LAUNCH A NEW T
RINITY CENTURY

Building on its strong foundations, the College now looks forward to a new century
--

for Trinity and the world in
which we live. Toward Trinity 2000: A Strategic Plan to Launch a New Trinity Century,
the result of three years of
campus dialogue, was approved by the Board of Trustees, and provides the vision and roadmap for the future of
the College.

The first six goals of the strategic plan
--

the mission goals
--

reflect the vision and its translation

into programs for
the future of Trinity:

GOAL ONE:

Empowerment for Life Roles addresses Trinity's mission to empower women to achieve success in their many roles
in life, through strong leadership skills, broad knowledge, and competence in all pursuits. T
his goal recognizes that
Trinity's mission can be achieved through a wide variety of programs, undergraduate and graduate and even pre
-
college, serving students of all ages.

GOAL T
W
O:

Foundations in Liberal Learning stresses the essential foundation of the

liberal arts as the philosophical platform
for the empowerment expressed in Goal One. This goal also embraces Trinity's integrated view of learning from
the broad base in the liberal arts to the specialized disciplines of the professions, thus enabling Tr
inity to define
with greater clarity her own historic curricular continuum from undergraduate through graduate studies.

GOAL THREE:

A Community of Faith, Justice and Honor clearly states Trinity's deep and abiding commitment to those moral and
spiritual va
lues that emanate from the Catholic tradition and that are shared by the many faith traditions present
on campus, reaffirming the centrality of faith and worship in the academic community, reinforcing the necessity of
living faith through service, and rede
dicating the campus community to the principles of the Honor System.

GOAL FOUR:

Commitment to the Education of Women states a theme that, much like Goal Three's affirmation of faith values, is
implicit in all of the other goals, namely, that the mission an
d programs of Trinity are primarily dedicated to the
development of women in preparation for their work in public and private life. A primary commitment to women,
however, does not exclude men entirely, as the presence of men in the graduate program and in

residence on
campus attests. This goal speaks to the primary commitment to women in language and with an intent that is
inclusive and affirmative, not isolated or negative.

GOAL FIVE:

Diversity and Community also addresses an identity that is implicit in
all goals for Trinity, namely, the fact that the
ideal of the "Trinity community" embraces all races, cultures, religions, languages, ages, and socioeconomic
backgrounds, drawing all Trinity women together with a common sense of purpose rooted in the belie
f in human
dignity and determination to act that grows stronger with intellectual attainment and leadership development.

GOAL SIX:

Centers of Academic Distinction calls for Trinity to develop a specific reputation for excellence in select fields,
emanating

from the College's own curricular strengths. The centers that Trinity seeks to develop include the Trinity
Center for Women in Public Policy, the Clare Boothe Luce Program in Mathematics and Natural Science, Urban
Teacher Preparation, and Lay Leadership i
n the Church.

Achieving the six mission goals of Toward Trinity 2000 will require resources equal to the ambition of the College's
vision for the future. The resource goals of the strategic plan outline the resource development strategies in six
areas: Fin
ances, Enrollment Development, Institutional Advancement, Human Resources, Quality of Campus Life,
and Facilities. Highlights of the resource goals include an increase in all enrollments and the successful planning,
implementation, and completion of a capi
tal campaign for facilities and technology development.


TRINITY'S CAMPUS

Trinity's 26
-
acre wooded campus, located on Michigan Avenue at Franklin Street, is in a residential neighborhood
just two
-
and
-
one
-
half miles north of the United States Capitol, and e
asily accessible. Trains to Washington, D.C.,
arrive at Union Station, which is just minutes from Trinity, and National Airport is only 20 minutes away. By car,
Trinity can be reached by all major routes into Washington, D.C. In addition, Trinity operates
a shuttle to the
nearby Brookland/CUA Metrorail station, and Metrobuses stop directly in front of the campus.

Trinity's facilities are housed in seven buildings. The Main Building, begun in 1899 and completed in 1909, houses
all administrative offices, mos
t classrooms and faculty offices, the post office, the campus bookstore, meeting
rooms and lounges, and a residence hall. The Science Building houses classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices
for Trinity's science programs, as well as the Computer Cent
er. The Sister Helen Sheehan Library has a collection of
approximately 150,000 volumes on open shelves. In addition to the Main Building, there are three residence halls:
Cuvilly, Kerby, and Alumnae; Alumnae Hall also houses the campus dining facilities. N
otre Dame Chapel, dedicated
in 1924, won the 1925 Gold Medal for ecclesiastical architecture.

ACCESS FOR INDIVIDUA
LS WITH DISABILITIES

Trinity College is committed to making the facilities and services of the campus accessible to those with disabilities
th
rough reasonable accommodations. Specific requests regarding access should be directed to the
Office of
Admissions

(for prospective students) or the
Dean of Student Services

(for enrolled students and visitors). Trinity's
compliance officer for the America
ns with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act is the
Director of Human Resources.



ACADEMIC AND CO
-
CURRICULAR ACTIVITIE
S

For Trinity students, an active life outside of the classroom is an integral part of the college experience.

Many
choose to explore the varied cultural, historical, and community events that Washington, D.C., offers. A student
can research her family tree at the National Archives, attend a play or hear a symphony at The Kennedy Center,
see heads of state, visit
the White House, or serve as a Smithsonian volunteer.

The campus itself provides a wide range of activities. Students who join the athletic teams face physical challenges
together. Attending a lecture by a Supreme Court justice can offer new insights into
how legal precedents are set.
Helping at a local shelter often leads to a new understanding of human needs and perseverance. Trinity provides a
variety of programs to meet the needs of its diverse community, which includes weekday, weekend, and graduate
st
udents; commuter and resident students; and national and international students. When these groups work
together, there is a dynamic opportunity for sharing insights and experience.

THE STUDENT ASSOCIAT
ION AND THE HONOR SY
STEM

The Student Association (SA),

through its three parts
--

the Student Government Association (SGA), the Judicial
Association (JA), and the Community Activities Association (CAA)
--

represents the student body. The SGA acts as
the policy making branch of the SA. Weekday, weekend, and gr
aduate students each elect a Student Government
Association. The presidents of these SGAs meet as the SA's Federation of Leaders. The JA has a dual role. One is to
disseminate information and engage the community in discussions about the Honor System; and
two, to act as the
official hearing committee for students accused of violating College rules and regulations. The CAA represents
more than 20 student organizations, and facilitates campus activities and club programming.

All members of the Trinity communi
ty
--

students, faculty, and staff
--

are expected to uphold a way of life that
embraces personal integrity and responsibility, the foundation of the Honor System. The Honor System has been
part of Trinity since 1913. Each person accepts the responsibility

to uphold the Honor System. This includes the
corresponding obligation to assist others to maintain the standards. Thus, the Honor System involves both
personal and community participation and commitment. Working together, Trinity students achieve individ
ual
integrity, a shared trust among all members of the community, and a shared sense of responsibility to uphold the
Honor System.

"I realize the responsibility involved in membership in the Trinity College community. I agree to abide by the rules
and regu
lations of this community. I also affirm my intention to live according to the standards of honor, to which
lying, stealing, and cheating are opposed. I will help others to maintain this responsibility in all matters essential to
the common good of the com
munity."

STUDENT TRADITIONS

Trinity celebrates many traditions. Class colors
--

red, blue, green, and gold
--

were chosen by the first four
graduating classes. At the end of the year, graduating seniors bequest their color to the incoming first
-
year class,

creating a common bond between every fourth class. During the academic year there are special days for the
celebration of individual classes according to "class color."

Other long
-
standing traditions at Trinity include: the First
-
Year Medal Ceremony, Soph
omore Pin Ceremony, Junior
Ring Mass, Cap & Gown Sunday, Founders' Day, Family Weekend, and Well Sings.

CAMPUS MINISTRY

As a Catholic college, Trinity supports the belief that God renders ultimate meaning to our lives and endeavors.
Trinity's mission envis
ions women as leaders in church and society acting on the values of justice and freedom.
Trinity College Campus Ministry opens doors of opportunity for the continued growth of students of all faiths. By
offering students faith
-
filled opportunities to pray,

to question, and to analyze the world, Campus Ministry
sponsors programs on justice education, leads community and volunteer service, plans regularly scheduled and
special liturgies, and organizes retreats.

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT,

LEADERSHIP, AND COMM
UNITY S
ERVICE

Trinity offers a variety of opportunities for learning and experience outside the classroom. Through the Office of
Student Activities and the Student Government Associations, student organizations conduct campus
-
wide events
for entertainment, cultur
al enrichment, political awareness, and charitable service. Student
-
run clubs such as the
College Democrats and College Republicans, the Black Student Alliance, the Athletic Association, and the Latin
American Association sponsor specific programs relevant

to their missions. Trinity students manage three
publications: The Record (literary magazine), Trinilogue (yearbook), and the Trinity Times (newspaper). Trinity also
has chapters of two national honor societies
--

Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Sigma Lambda.

AT
HLETICS

Trinity offers many opportunities for women athletes to excel and develop the necessary skills for competition in
intercollegiate athletics. Dedicated coaches bring years of experience, knowledge, and motivation to the program,
and their coaching p
hilosophy encourages athletes at all skill levels to participate.

Trinity's athletic program was elected by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as a Division III
provisional member. Trinity participates in six intercollegiate sports: crew,
field hockey, indoor track and field,
lacrosse, soccer, and tennis. Trinity is a founding member of the Atlantic Women's Colleges Conference. All of the
intercollegiate teams, with the exception of crew and indoor track and field, compete in this conferenc
e. Trinity's
teams abide by the rules of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and are members of the US Women's
Lacrosse Association, US Rowing Association, US Field Hockey Association, the US Track and Field Association, and
the Intercollegiate T
ennis Association. In addition, Trinity Recreational Sports (Rec Sports) offers opportunities for
students to participate in a variety of sports.

RESIDENT AND COMMUTE
R POLICIES

Because Trinity's educational mission and philosophy extends well beyond the cl
assroom to include a range of
learning opportunities and developmental experiences, Trinity encourages all weekday students to live on campus.
Residential living enables students to explore the rich dimensions of community life and embark on their own
pers
onal development with the guidance of professional staff.

All students in residence must be on a meal plan provided by the College. The Dean of Student Services may grant
exemptions from the meal plan for documented health reasons for which a diet prescrib
ed by a physician cannot
be accommodated by food services.

Lockers and mailboxes are available to all weekday commuter students. Lounges are available in Main Hall to
mingle, study, and relax.

RESERVATION DEPOSITS
: RETURNING UNDERGRA
DUATE RESIDENT STUDE
NTS

Returning resident students deposit $100 each year on or before March 30; no refunds of this deposit will be made
after May 1. Room contracts for students will not be issued until this payment is received; it will be credited to
spring semester expenses o
f the following year.

Returning students choose their rooms each spring, and new students are assigned rooms. Students must vacate
residence halls 24 hours after the last day of the examination period unless special permission has been granted.
The room wi
ll be checked by the residence director when the student is ready to leave. Any charges, either for
damages or for cleaning, will be placed on the student's account.

SHUTTLE SERVICE

Shuttle services are extended as a free service to the entire Trinity comm
unity. Transportation is provided from the
Main Building to the Brookland/Catholic University Metro station parking lot. Schedules are available from the
Campus Safety Office.

HEALTH AND COUNSELIN
G SERVICES

The Health and Wellness Center provides primary h
ealth care and health education for students. The overall goal
of the Health and Wellness Center is to educate the community about healthy life choices. Before entering the
College, each student age 26 and under must complete and submit a medical questionn
aire, a physical
examination report, and a record of all immunizations to health services. All students are required to carry their
own, or purchase college
-
sponsored health insurance. A registered nurse and a part
-
time medical doctor are on
staff to care
for students.

Emphasizing a wellness approach to health care, a full
-
time personal counselor is available to students in the
Health and Wellness Center. The counselor can provide confidential assessment and referral services. Outreach
workshops and program
s focus on personal growth and developmental issues.

ENROLLMENT SERVICES

Enrollment Services is primarily responsible for assisting and supporting Weekend College, Graduate, and
"returning women" weekday students in planning their academic careers at Trini
ty. The staff is available to meet
with students for program advisement, registration, schedule adjustments, declarations of majors, and to review
core and major requirements. In addition, the office coordinates orientation for Weekend College and Graduate
s
students, manages the Trinity Experiential Lifelong Learning (TELL) program and all prior learning assessment, and
provides a bi
-
weekly newsletter called The Grapevine.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT CEN
TER

The Academic Support Center provides programs which support the academic mission of the College. To be certain
that education is accessible to Trinity's diverse population, the center offers services for all students and provides
special support for select
ed students. The general services offered include: learning skills assessment and
workshops, advising, life skills workshops, and tutoring services across al disciplines.

CAREER SERVICES

Career Services provides co
-
curricular programs which focus on the de
velopment of leadership, life skills, and life
-
long learning. Because women serve in many roles in society, career services offers diverse career planning
programs designed to help support and empower women as they make life choices and/or transitions. Ser
vices are
available to all students and alumnae/alumni.

COMPUTER CLASSROOMS
AND LABS

Trinity College has Macintosh and IBM
-
compatible computer classrooms for Macintosh and Windows based
instruction. In addition to computers in the classrooms, there are com
puters in the Computer Labs, the Library,
and the Writing Center.

THE WRITING CENTER

The Writing Center is open during day, evening, and weekend hours to give all students individual feedback about
their writing. During one
-
to
-
one conferences, students can

discuss specific assignments, share developing drafts,
and ask basic questions about writing. The Writing Center is staffed by faculty members and peer advisors who can
carefully review student writing and offer specific recommendations for improvement.

T
he Writing Center also offers free evening and weekend writing workshops in organization, revision, grammar,
punctuation and documentation.

On
-
line help is available, for students who have access to a computer and a modem. Via electronic mail (e
-
mail),
stu
dents can ask writing
-
related questions and even send and receive drafts of papers.

SISTER HELEN SHEEHAN

LIBRARY

The Sister Helen Sheehan Library houses approximately 150,000 volumes with an on
-
line public access catalog
system and access to the World Wide

Web. The Sheehan Library is affiliated with the Washington Research Library
Consortium, which provides students access to a catalog of more than five million volumes in the libraries of
American, Catholic, Gallaudet, George Mason, George Washington, Marym
ount, and the University of the District
of Columbia. The library also enjoys a reciprocity agreement with Georgetown University, which gives students and
faculty direct access to Georgetown's collection.

CHILD CARE

Trinity College operates a Child Activit
y Center on its campus to provide quality child care for children of Trinity
students, faculty, and staff. To obtain a fee schedule or arrange for child care, contact the Child Activity Center at
(202) 884
-
9593. Please note that unless a child is enrolled
in the Child Activity Center or some other formally
organized program of Trinity College, children should not be present on Trinity's campus.



SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Trinity students find the nation's capital is an exciting place to learn. The White House, the
Library of Congress, the
National Archives, the National Gallery of Art, embassies, countless government agencies, national and
international associations, and businesses all become sites of research, field trips, internships, and part
-
time jobs.
Learning
at Trinity extends beyond the classroom.

Trinity is dedicated to empowering women to make a difference in our society. Special programs which develop
leadership skills in our students and expose them to the workings of public policy include the Trinity Cen
ter for
Women in Public Policy, the Model Assembly of the Organization of American States, and the Public Leadership
Education Network (PLEN).

ENGINEERING DUAL DEG
REE PROGRAM: THE "3
-
2" PROGRAM

Trinity College and The George Washington University offer a D
ual Degree Program in Mathematics/Natural
Science and Engineering. After three years of academic study in a physical science or mathematics at Trinity
College, the student will apply for transfer to The George Washington University and complete two years o
f study
in mechanical engineering with optional medical preparation. At the end of the five years, the student in the
program will earn a B.A. degree from Trinity College and a B.S. in Engineering from The George Washington
University.

Mechanical engineeri
ng encompasses a vast diversity of industrial activities. Mechanical engineers conceive, plan,
design, and direct the manufacture, distribution, and operation of complex systems. Applications include
aerospace, energy conversion, computer
-
aided design and
manufacturing, power and propulsion systems,
robotics, and control systems.

The medical preparation option leads to a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and prepares the student
for application to medical school. The student is also prepared to wo
rk in research and development or to pursue
graduate study in the fields of biomechanics and biotechnology. Students interested in this program should
contact Dr. Hollis Williams, program chair.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND
LANGUAGE (ESL) PROGR
AM

The English as a S
econd Language (ESL) Program is designed to meet the needs of Trinity students for whom
English is not the first language. Classes focus on all areas of English skills
--

speaking, listening, reading, and writing
--

to help students gain proficiency in com
municating clearly and effectively. An English placement test and/or
interview is used for entering students. Students take appropriate ESL courses in conjunction with their regular
course load. All ESL courses carry regular college credit and are applicab
le toward the Trinity degree.

INTERNSHIPS

At Trinity College, the goal is to educate students for life, not only through academic training, but also through
aggressive career preparation. It is well known that work experience is an important factor in the
competitive
process of applying for a professional position. Whether a young woman wishes to start her career upon
graduation or to go on to graduate school, it is imperative that she have experience in her chosen field. To this
end, Trinity's internship p
rogram is an integral part of a student's education.

Trinity College has an excellent reputation for matching students with internships that provide students the
opportunity to explore their academic and professional interests. To assist the Trinity studen
t, the Office of
Academic Support and Career Services maintains an internship database, which contains all internship sites
currently available, as well as information on past internship sites that have successfully accommodated Trinity
students. Recent in
ternship sites include Senate and Congressional offices, the White House, research laboratories,
television stations, hospitals, federal agencies, museums, and accounting firms. Students interested in receiving
academic credit for an internship complete th
e application form, register and pay for the course, and complete all
course requirements. Forms are available from both the Office of Academic Support and Career Services and the
Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.

MENTOR PROGRAM

The Mentor Program
exposes Trinity students to specific work environments by providing supportive relationships
with Trinity graduates who have achieved positions of influence in government, business, communications, the
arts, or health care. Through a continuing relationshi
p and meetings several times a year, the student gains
valuable insight into the day
-
to
-
day reality of her mentor's professional life and develops important career
contacts. Unlike an internship, the Mentor Program allows students to work out their own ter
ms of involvement,
and these alliances often become the start of lifelong friendships.

MODEL ASSEMBLY OF TH
E ORGANIZATION OF AM
ERICAN STATES

The Organization of American States (OAS) invites select colleges and universities to send highly qualified student
s
to represent a country at the Annual Model Assembly. Selected Trinity students are given the opportunity to
participate with students from more than 30 institutions in a simulation of the deliberative and political process of
an international body. Repre
sentatives debate key economic, political, social, and cultural issues currently facing
the Americas, from efforts to stop drug trafficking to the external debt crisis. The Annual Model Organization of
American States General Assembly Program is coordinate
d by the Spanish Program at Trinity. For information on
course requirements, see Interdisciplinary Courses in the Undergraduate Programs of Study section of this catalog.

PUBLIC LEADERSHIP ED
UCATION NETWORK (PLE
N)

Trinity College is a member of the Public
Leadership Education Network (PLEN), a consortium of women's colleges
working together to prepare women for public leadership. PLEN believes that "women's participation in shaping
public policy is critical," and recognizes that "effective, ethical leaders
are urgently needed." Through PLEN,
students study the policy process with women leaders in PLEN seminars held in Washington, D.C., and abroad. Past
workshops have included "Women and International Policy," "Women and Congress," "Women and Law," and
"Women

in Public Policy."

The PLEN network is a valuable source of information about internships, seminars, and other resources for women
students wishing to take full advantage of the myriad of learning opportunities in the nation's capital. Since Trinity
Colle
ge is a member of the consortium, students receive the designated student discount.

POST
-
BACCALAUREATE PREMED
ICAL CERTIFICATE PRO
GRAM

The Post
-
Baccalaureate Premedical Certificate Program at Trinity College is designed for women who want to
design a career

in the health professions, but need the basic science and mathematics courses required by most
medical schools. Post
-
baccalaureate students attend classes during the weekdays, enjoying the advantages of
Trinity College's small class size and personal atte
ntion. Generally, new students begin their studies in the fall
semester.

STUDY ABROAD

One of the most exciting possibilities students have is the opportunity to participate in a study abroad program.
Trinity offers the chance to study abroad for a year, a
semester, or even two weeks. A study abroad experience is
one of the best ways to increase student awareness of the ever increasing global community. Students can gain
fluency in another language, or study the political, social, and economic issues facing
a particular region. As
students learn more about another country and culture, they learn more about themselves.

TRINITY'S STUDY ABRO
AD PROGRAMS

Trinity College sponsors two short
-
term programs. "International Business: Emerging Markets" is offered in the
spring semester and focuses on a different area of the world each year. Combining classroom work with a 10
-
day
overseas study tour, students focus on the changes and challenges taking place in the global business
environment.

Trinity's May Term in Mexico,
affiliated with the Center for Bilingual
-
Multicultural Studies in Cuernavaca, offers
students a two
-
week immersion program in the Spanish language and Mexican history and culture. Students
combine small
-
group classes in Spanish with field trips to sites em
phasizing Mexico's rich cultural heritage. In
addition, living with Mexican families offers opportunities for cultural learning and discovery beyond the
classroom.

OTHER STUDY ABROAD P
ROGRAMS

For those interested in other study abroad options, Trinity help
s students learn about and apply to approved
programs offered by other schools and educational institutions. Students can learn more about the rain forests in
Costa Rica, study Shakespeare at Oxford, or serve as a volunteer in Ghana, just to name a few opt
ions. To learn
more about the study abroad options offered by Trinity, contact the Director for Intercultural Programs. Students
must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 to participate and choose from programs approved by Trinity.

TRINITY CENTER FOR
WOMEN IN PUBLIC POLI
CY

The Trinity Center for Women in Public Policy brings together students, scholars, teachers, and policymakers to
focus on the expanding role of women in a broad range of public policy issues, including health care, the
environment, po
verty, and education. This nonpartisan academic center offers lectures, workshops, and
conferences that explore public policy issues affecting women and sponsors leadership development programs.

TRINITY EXPERIENTIAL

LIFELONG LEARNING (T
ELL)

Trinity College

recognizes that college
-
level learning may occur in a variety of settings. Trinity's Experiential
Lifelong Learning Program (TELL) enables students to claim this knowledge and receive appropriate academic
credit. Documentation and evidence must be present
ed about the learning experience and the level of the learning
that has occurred. Before applying for TELL, a student must successfully complete at least 12 credits at Trinity and
a college
-
level English composition course. A student who wishes to apply fo
r TELL must attend a TELL orientation
workshop. After attending the workshop, the student applies for the TELL program by completing an application
and paying an application fee. If accepted, the student registers for and completes a portfolio preparation
course
(INT 300 TELL Seminar). The TELL Seminar and submission of portfolios must take place at least three semesters
before graduation.

With faculty approval, a student may earn up to 16 experiential learning credits at the 200 level. Additional credits
m
ay be awarded for experiential learning evaluated at the 300 level or higher. The maximum for any type or level
of experiential learning (TELL, CLEP, DANTES, ACE/PONSI) is 30 credits. Any experiential learning credits awarded
must be in addition to the min
imum 32 Trinity credits required for a degree. For additional information about TELL,
contact the Office of Enrollment Services.

ELDERHOSTEL

Trinity College extends a welcome to older adults to take advantage of a unique opportunity for intellectual and
so
cial renewal. The Trinity College Elderhostel Program is a full
-
time, year
-
round program that offers week
-
long
courses for students 55 years and older, taught by experts on a variety of topics, including the Information
Superhighway, Impressionism in Washi
ngton, D.C., and Politics and the Media. Elderhostel guests stay in Trinity's
Elderhostel quarters, and have access to college facilities such as the library, tennis courts, and the chapel. For
information on the
Elderhostel Program
, contact the Director of Elderhostel at 202
-
884
-
9399.

THE CONSORTIUM

Trinity College is a member of the
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area
, which cons
ists
of 11 institutions (American University, Catholic University of America, George Washington University, George
Mason University, Georgetown University, Howard University, Marymount University, The University of the District
of Columbia, the University
of Maryland, College Park, Southeastern University, and Trinity).

Through the Consortium, weekday and graduate students at Trinity can participate in special programs and take
courses offered by other institutions of higher education. Enrollment is subject

to the regulations of the
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area (available from the Office of the Registrar) and
Trinity regulations (see the
Academic Pol
icies

section of this catalog).

SPECIAL PROGRAMS FOR

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Reflecting the College's commitment to assisting students in their transition from high school to college, Trinity
offers several special programs to high school students.

HIGH
SCHOOL ARTICULATION
PROGRAM

Qualified high school seniors and highly gifted juniors may apply for admission to any Trinity course open to first
-
year students. If accepted, the high school student will enroll as a special nondegree student at Trinity and pa
y the
usual per
-
credit fee. At the student's request, an official transcript of the work completed will be sent to the
college of her choice for consideration as credit eligible for transfer toward a degree. If the student decides to
come to Trinity after
high school, the credit is applicable toward her degree. Listed below is the procedure for
admission:

1. The Admissions Director will review the following:

a. the student's official high school record;

b. the student's own statement of reasons for applying

to the course, and;

c. a recommendation from a high school guidance counselor (assessment of maturity, personal, and social
readiness).

2. If all the above warrant that the student's application be given serious consideration, the instructor of the
course

the applicant wishes to take will interview the student. Final approval is at the discretion of the instructor.

HIGH SCHOOL/COLLEGE
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (
HI
-
SCIP)

Participants in the Hi
-
Scip Program at Trinity are accepted as part
-
time special students for
one academic year.
Students choose from courses that are specifically identified by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and may
receive a maximum of four credit hours in the fall semester and eight credit hours in the spring semester.

TRINITY UPWARD BO
UND PROGRAM

The purpose of the Trinity Upward Bound Program, fully funded by the U.S. Department of Education, is to make a
college education accessible to low
-
income senior high school students and potential first
-
generation college
students. Through care
ful academic preparation and counseling, the program helps students to identify and
understand their own goals, and then learn about the tools available to achieve those goals. The process
strengthens motivation and self
-
esteem. The Trinity Upward Bound Pr
ogram is open to both young women and
young men in high school

During the academic school year, students receive tutoring and attend Saturday classes in reading, English, science,
Spanish, and mathematics. There are also courses, seminars, and workshops to

help develop the knowledge and
dedication required of first
-
year college students.

A summer session, designed to give students a genuine academic experience, provides course work over a six
-
week period. During the summer, recreational and cultural program
s are combined with required study hours,
creating a balance between hard work and leisure, and establishing a wholesome environment for learning and
teaching. Students learn important skills, such as how to write an essay, study, and take examinations. Id
eally,
Trinity Upward Bound participants find a new respect for their own abilities and motivation as they learn how to
succeed in an academic environment.



THE TRINITY CURRICUL
UM

To succeed in today's rapidly changing world you must become a self
-
directe
d, independent learner. You must be
able to communicate clearly, think analytically, and solve problems creatively. These skills are some of the tangible
results of Trinity's curriculum. Trinity's curriculum consists of two components: the Foundation for L
eadership
Curriculum and Major Programs in the weekday program, and the Core Curriculum and Major Programs in the
Weekend College (see the Weekend College section for information on the Core). This structure offers flexibility
and professional focus to mee
t each student's interests and aspirations.

FOUNDATION FOR LEADE
RSHIP CURRICULUM (FL
C)

Trinity College's Foundation for Leadership Curriculum (FLC) is an interdisciplinary, liberal arts program offering a
coherent approach to education by linking the liber
al arts with practical experience and a professional focus.
Central to this curriculum is an appreciation for the interdependence of the liberal arts and the development of
leadership skills.

This curriculum is goal directed rather than discipline based an
d includes two components, a Seminar Sequence
and Curricular Areas. Designed to provide a coherent support structure and enrichment for each individual, the
Foundation for Leadership Curriculum is completed over four years and becomes an integral part of t
he student's
total curricular experience.

GOAL STATEMENT

The curricular goals guide the development of all courses selected for this curriculum. All goals are equally
important, yet each is emphasized at different points throughout the curriculum. This goa
l
-
based structure gives
each student a unique opportunity to build an integrated and coherent curriculum, with an emphasis on individual
aspirations and life goals.

PREAMBLE

From its foundation and through its historic mission as a Catholic college for wom
en, Trinity's identity has been
grounded in the Judeo
-
Christian faith and in the tradition of liberal education. Trinity welcomes students of all
faiths and calls on them to grow in their understanding of ultimate meanings and values. Trinity's curriculum
is
designed to engage students in the search for truth in all its complexity, and to enable them to discover the power
of integrated learning to transform themselves and to enlarge their perspective of the world. Trinity seeks
especially to prepare women f
or leadership rooted in the ethic of mutuality and shared responsibility. The College
strives, therefore, to educate students to articulate their visions and so to equip them to become leaders who
empower and facilitate the varied communities in which they

participate. This vision informs the goals of the
curriculum:

1. QUEST FOR ULTIMAT
E MEANING

To enable all students to explore freely and in depth questions of ultimate meaning and values and to provide the
intellectual discipline for this exploration thro
ugh philosophical and theological reflection.

2. ETHICAL INSIGHT F
OR PERSONAL, PROFESS
IONAL, AND SOCIAL LI
FE

To require students to examine ethical values and theories with intellectual clarity and critical rigor, and to
confront the ethical issues that ar
ise in every dimension of human activity.

3. LIBERAL ARTS FOUN
DATION

To provide students with a strong foundation in the liberal arts, to enable them to appreciate the
interconnectedness of the liberal arts disciplines, and to use their liberal learning
for the application and practice
of critical and analytical habits of thought.

4. FOCUS ON GENDER

To focus on the historical, political, and social realities that have shaped and continue to shape the gender roles of
women and men, in order to encourage th
e development of knowledgeable action, as well as knowledge of the
issues, therefore providing students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to meet the challenge of
leadership in personal, community, and professional spheres.

5. DIVERSITY,

PLURALISM, CITIZENSH
IP

To challenge students to see the world as a global community and to develop those cross
-
cultural perspectives and
skills that will prepare them to live in an international and interdependent society.

6. SELF
-
DIRECTED LEARNING

To dev
elop active learners who are able to form effective problem
-
solving strategies, while shaping and selecting
the systems and skills necessary for the challenges of the future.

STRUCTURE AND REQUIR
EMENTS

The Foundation for Leadership Curriculum consists of t
wo components: the Seminar Sequence and the Curricular
Areas.

THE SEMINAR SEQUENCE

Trinity's curriculum engages students in a demanding and directed search for meaning and truth, beginning with a
series of interdisciplinary seminars to be completed through
out the undergraduate program. The sequence
provides an interactive learning experience for students and faculty that fosters intellectual inquiry and analysis.
All students complete three seminars. The required First
-
Year Seminar focuses on a faculty sele
cted theme and
challenges the student to confront contemporary issues. The second seminar, which is selected during the second
or third year, emphasizes shared learning. The third and final seminar, focuses on major issues, emphasizing
experiential learnin
g, integration, and synthesis. A summary follows:

Seminar I (INT 115 First
-
Year Seminar) 3 cr

Emphasizes active and cooperative learning and challenges students to question and confront. Required for all
first
-
year students.

Seminar II 3 cr

Students select

an approved seminar to fulfill this requirement during their second or third year. This seminar
engages the student in active shared learning and in a comparative, interdisciplinary analysis of special topics.

Seminar III 3 cr

Students, with their advisor
s, determine the appropriate seminar which requires expertise in a major and the
readiness for a combination of experiential learning, integrative analysis, and synthesis. This seminar is completed
during the students' final semesters.

CURRICULAR AREAS

Thi
s component of the curriculum introduces the student to a diversity of academic disciplines and increases her
understanding of the connections between different areas of study. Students investigate and analyze such topics
as: the physics of music; theologi
cal perspectives of economics; the ethics of corporate life; and/or the
interdependence of biology, chemistry, and political science.

Curricular Areas represent six distinct fields of knowledge. Courses are divided into two segments: Level I courses
(usual
ly listed as 100
-
200 in the catalog) introduce the student to the content and methodology of the liberal arts;
Level II courses (often listed as 300
-
400 in the catalog) expand upon the student's experience and offer an
opportunity for in
-
depth, interdiscip
linary explorations.

Each student completes requirements in the six areas at two different levels. A student may count a course for
only one level area at Level 1 and Level 2. Although some courses are approved at more than one area, a course
may only be c
ounted once to fulfill an area requirement. Students select a minimum of 12 courses from Level I and
four courses from Level II. The six curricular areas are:







Level I

Level I

I. Communication Skills

(3
-
15 cr. hrs.)

(12 cr. hrs.

from at least

3
areas)*

II. Cultural Diversity

(6 cr. hrs.)

III. Traditions and Legacies

(6 cr. hrs.)

IV. Knowledge and Beliefs

(6 cr. hrs.)

V. Scientific and Mathematical Inquiry

(7 cr. hrs.)

VI. Individual and Society

(6 cr. hrs.)

*Students select three or
four courses (12 credits) at Level II. These courses must be
selected from three different areas, based on individual student preference.

AREA DESCRIPTIONS (S
EE COURSE LISTINGS F
OR APPROVED FLC COUR
SES)

AREA I: COMMUNICATIO
N SKILLS

Area Objectives:
Courses enable students to develop critical communication skills, which allow them to listen,
write, and speak effectively in both academic and professional settings, to conduct and organize research, to
manage technology, and to write and speak a second l
anguage.

Course Goals:

Goal 3
-

Liberal Arts Foundation

Goal 4
-

Focus on Gender

Goal 6
-

Self
-
directed Learning

Required: Level I
-

Three to six hours of a second language at elementary level (may be waived)

Three hours communication/writing course

Three
hours mathematics (may be waived)

Three hours elective

Level II
-

Student preference

AREA II: CULTURAL DI
VERSITY

Area Objectives: Courses in this area enable students to acquire an understanding of multicultural content and
contact, to develop an appreciat
ion of diverse cultures, and to develop an understanding of the role of cultures in
the various disciplines.

Course Goals:

Goal 2
-

Ethical Insight for Personal, Professional, and Social Life

Goal 3
-

Liberal Arts Foundation

Goal 4
-

Focus on Gender

Goal 5

-

Diversity, Pluralism, Citizenship

Required: Level I
-

Six hours

Level II
-

Student preference

AREA III: TRADITIONS

AND LEGACIES

Area Objectives: Courses enable students to develop a historical understanding of the humanistic and artistic
traditions and
to appreciate the legacies of Western and United States culture.

Course Goals:

Goal 3
-

Liberal Arts Foundation

Goal 4
-

Focus on Gender

Goal 5
-

Diversity, Pluralism, Citizenship

Required: Level I
-

Six hours

Level II
-

Student Preference

AREA IV: KNOWLED
GE AND BELIEFS

Area Objectives: Courses strongly encourage students to develop an appreciation for intellectual and religious
traditions, and to acquire an in
-
depth understanding of the ways of knowing.

Course Goals:

Goal 1
-

Quest for Ultimate Meaning

Goal 2
-

Ethical Insight for Personal, Professional, and Social Life

Goal 6
-

Self
-
directed Learning

Required: Level I
-

Six hours

Level II
-

Student preference

AREA V: SCIENTIFIC AND MATHEMATICAL INQUIRY

Area Objectives: Courses invite and challenge stude
nts to acquire an understanding of the modes of scientific and
mathematical inquiry, and to develop an appreciation for the role of science in society.

Course Goals:

Goal 2
-

Ethical Insight for Personal, Professional, and Social Life

Goal 3
-

Liberal Arts

Foundation

Goal 6
-

Self
-
directed Learning

Required: Level I
-

Seven hours, including one laboratory science course

Level II
-

Student preference

AREA VI: INDIVIDUAL
AND SOCIETY

Area Objectives: Courses call upon students to understand individual and grou
p behavior as it influences the
person and the institutions that shape human communities through the modes of social science inquiry, and to
develop an appreciation for citizenship and service to others.

Course Goals:

Goal 2
-

Ethical Insight for Personal,

Professional, and Social Life

Goal 4
-

Focus on Gender

Goal 5
-

Diversity, Pluralism, Citizenship

Required: Level I
-

Six hours

Level II
-

Student preference

Because the Foundation for Leadership Curriculum is designed to provide coherent support and enri
chment for
each student's major program and selected life focus, students complete the FLC over a four
-
year period. The
order and selection of courses should be determined in consultation with the student's academic advisor. Course
selection is directed by

the student's choice of major, focus area, and life
-
long goals. Each course helps build the
liberal arts foundation that supports the individual student's program.



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE
S AND MAJORS

ACADEMIC DEGREES

The requirements for a Bachelor of Arts

degree in the Weekday Program include the accumulation of at least 128
semester hours, the fulfillment of the Foundation for Leadership Curriculum, and the completion of a major
program. If a student meets these conditions by completing 90 or more semeste
r hours in the division of
mathematics and natural sciences, she will qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science degree
is also awarded for the business administration major.

The Weekend College Program offers the Bachelor of Arts de
gree in selected majors and the Bachelor of Science
degree in business administration. Majors and selected minors offered in the Weekend College Program are listed
in the Weekend College Program section of this catalog.

MAJOR PROGRAMS

Trinity offers an app
roach to majors that provides interdisciplinary support and enhances each program of study.
This approach creates an essential link between the liberal arts, the major, and a selected professional focus.

When choosing a major, a student is encouraged to se
lect a self
-
designed focus area. For example, a major in
environmental studies may choose to concentrate on policy implications or applications for the corporate sector. A
sociology or psychology major may want to focus on a career in health care, environm
ental policy, or corporate
management, and select the related internship experiences; a history major may choose to focus on public policy,
law, education, or a Ph.D. program. This creates a broad range of professional options for each Trinity student and
an enriched academic environment for the community.

Academic programs at Trinity are separated into two areas: the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of
Professional Studies.

The College of Arts and Sciences is separated into three divisions:

AR
TS

AND HUMANITIES

Chair
-

Yvonne Dixon, Associate Professor of Art History

Majors:

Art History

English

Language and Cultural Studies

Minors:

Art History

Bioethics

English

Environmental Ethics

French

Music

Philosophy

Spanish

Theology

Women's Studies

SOCIAL
SC
IENCES

Chair
-

W. Bradford Mello, Assistant Professor of Communication

Majors:

Communication

Economics

History

Human Relations

International Studies

Political Science

Psychology

Public Affairs (Weekend Only)

Sociology

M
ATHEMATICS AND NATUR
AL SCIENCES

Chair

-

Hollis Williams, Assistant Professor of Physics

Majors:

Biology

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Environmental Science

Mathematics

Physical Science

Minors:

Biology

Chemistry/Biochemistry

Environmental Science

Mathematics

Physics

The School of Professional Studies

serves two undergraduate major programs:

EDUCATI
O
N

Chair
-

Barbara Kasten, Associate Professor of Education

Majors:

Education (Weekend Only)

Early Childhood Education (Weekend Only)

Elementary Education (Weekend Only)

Minors:

BA/MAT Education Program

Elem
entary Education (Weekday Only)

Early Childhood Education (Weekday Only)

Special Education (Weekday Only)

Secondary Education (Weekday Only)

BUSINESS

Chair
-

Sharon Levin, Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Major:

Business Administration

Major
Requirements

There are three approaches to the major program: the traditional major in one discipline, the interdisciplinary
major, and the individualized major. The specific requirements for receiving a degree in one of the disciplines listed
above are li
sted in the Undergraduate Programs of Study section of this catalog. Students should declare their
major during their second academic year.

THE INDIVIDUALIZED M
AJOR

Individualized majors are unique because they are not structured by a program or combinatio
n of programs.
Instead, they grow out of an individual student's interest in a particular problem; a given profession; or a period,
place, or theme to be approached from multiple points of view. Individualized majors must be designed with and
supported by
a faculty advisor, in accordance with the student's abilities and goals. They must also show
coherence and continuity of purpose.

Students considering individualized majors must consult with their faculty advisor who can provide detailed
information about
the application, development, and evaluation of such a proposal. The Committee on Scholastic
Standing and Degrees must approve the proposal for implementation of an individualized major. Proposals are
usually submitted during the sophomore or early junior
year. Applications submitted after the beginning of the
second semester of the junior year will not be approved.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Students can receive recognition for an area of strength outside of their major field by choosing to complete a
minor area
of study. The requirements for a minor in a particular area of study are listed in the Undergraduate
Programs of Study section of this catalog.

Upon completion of the requirements of any minor or concentration, a student must complete the appropriate
form,

have it signed by the program director, and submit it to the Office of the Registrar. The minor will then be
added to the student's record.

ELECTIVES

Students choose electives from programs complementary to their major. In consultation with an advisor, st
udents
can choose electives that reflect personal interests or career goals. Professional Studies courses may be taken in a
variety of fields, as well as internships, which offer job
-
related experience and learning.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

All students have an a
cademic advisor to assist them with academic planning and interpretation of academic
policies and procedures. With her advisor, the student learns to explore academic interests, to recognize academic
strengths, and to identify resources to address weakness
es. During each registration period, the student and her
advisor select courses which are consistent with the overall degree objectives. Frequent advisor contact ensures
that students receive timely information and make progress toward the completion of th
e degree.

ADVISING FOR MEDICAL

SCHOOL AND OTHER HEA
LTH PROFESSIONS

A liberal arts education is recognized as excellent preparation for medical school, as well as related professions.
Students interested in pursuing a career in the health professions often
choose a major in biology, biochemistry, or
chemistry; however, it isn't always necessary to major in a science. The goal is to plan an academic program that
satisfies the requirements of the intended professional school while also enhancing the student's
intellectual,
social, and personal development. A high proportion of Trinity graduates who have applied to professional schools
have been accepted.

All students interested in medical school must fulfill the pre
-
medical requirements as outlined in "Medical
School
Admissions Requirements," a publication of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Minimally, these
requirements include one year of biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics, each with a
laboratory. These courses should be co
mpleted in the junior year so that the student can take the Medical College
Admissions Test during the second semester of the junior year. Mathematics and English may also be required or
strongly recommended, and specific medical schools often have additio
nal requirements. Students interested in
dental school should consult "Admission Requirements of U.S. and Canadian Dental Schools." Requirements for
dental schools are similar to medical schools, and there is a Dental Admission Test.

The Pre
-
Medical/Health

Professions Advisory Committee provides special assistance to students interested in
careers in the health professions. This committee also writes letters of evaluation as part of a student's application
to medical, dental, or veterinary school. Any stude
nt interested in a health career should contact a member of the
committee or the Director of Career Services, as early as possible (preferably during the first year). The Registrar
will provide names of the committee members.

ADVISING FOR THE LEG
AL PROFESS
ION

The Legal Professions Advisory Committee provides a coordinated process to help students explore law
-
related
careers. The process includes assistance from Career Services, faculty members, and panels on the legal
profession.

One objective of the commit
tee is to guide students toward courses that develop relevant skills such as
quantitative and verbal analysis, writing, research, and oral communication. By following this process, any Trinity
major can be an appropriate preparation for a career in the leg
al professions. Individual assistance is available for
students making applications to law schools and considering other legal paths.

For additional information, contact a member of the Legal Professions Advisory Committee, or the Director of
Career Servic
es.



ACADEMIC POLICIES

All students should review Trinity College's academic policies, described in this section. For additional academic
policies for Weekend College and the Graduate Programs, refer to those sections in this catalog.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

BACHELOR'S DEGREE

There are three specific requirements to graduate and receive a bachelor's degree: successful completion of 128
semester credit hours, fulfillment of the College's Foundation for Leadership Curriculum (FLC) or Core Curriculum,
and the co
nclusion of a major program's course of study. A minimum of 128 semester hours is required for
graduation. The cumulative GPA required to graduate must be 2.0 or greater.

Curriculum requirements are discussed in the sections describing the Foundation for L
eadership Curriculum (see:
The Trinity Curriculum) and the Core Curriculum (see: Weekend College), while information about individual
majors is listed in the Undergraduate Degrees and Majors section. To receive a degree and graduate, it is
important to sel
ect courses with the assistance of an advisor to ensure that all program requirements are satisfied.

ACADEMIC DEGREES

BACHELOR OF ARTS AND

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

The requirements for a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree include the accumulation o
f at least 128
semester hours, the fulfillment of the Foundation for Leadership Curriculum or Core Curriculum, and the
completion of the specific studies of a major program. Completion of degree requirements includes a Senior
Assessment.

BACHELOR OF SCIENC
E

BUSINESS ADMINISTRAT
ION MAJORS
-

WEEKDAY AND WEEKEND
COLLEGE

A Bachelor of Science degree in business administration is available to both weekday and Weekend College
students. (See Business Program.)

SCIENCE MAJORS
-

WEEKDAY

A Bachelor of Science degree
is available to students enrolled in the Weekday Program. To qualify for the Bachelor
of Science degree in the sciences, students must meet all the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree
including 90 or more semester hours in the division of mathemat
ics and natural science.

WEEKEND COLLEGE

The Weekend College offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, as well as a Bachelor of Science degree. Please review the
Weekend College section of this catalog for a listing of applicable majors and minors.

SECOND BACCALAU
REATE DEGREE

A graduate of any accredited college, including Trinity College, may earn a second baccalaureate degree at Trinity
College by completing an additional 32 hours at the College, provided the work when completed fulfills all general
requirements
for graduation from Trinity, as well as all of the specific requirements in the major subject of the
second degree as specified in the College catalog in effect at that time.

BA/MAT TEACHER PREPA
RATION PROGRAMS

In response to national trends and the pressu
re for increasing the scope of material used in preparing teaching
professionals, Trinity College initiated a BA/MAT plan for students in its teacher preparation programs. Students
are required to major in the liberal arts and complete a structured and seq
uenced minor in education. Upon
completion of the bachelor's degree, the student enters a master's program in her area of specialization: early
childhood, elementary, or special education. The program is also offered in selected areas of secondary educatio
n
(i.e., science and English education).

ADVANCED STANDING FO
R R.N.S

Students who have earned the R.N. degree from an accredited school of nursing may be awarded up to 32 credits
for their clinical work in addition to any other transfer, CLEP, or advanced
placement credit. For specific
information concerning advanced standing, students should consult with the Transfer Counselor in the Admissions
Office.

DECLARATION OR CHANG
E OF MAJOR

Students must declare a major before the end of their second academic year
, or at the completion of 56 credit
hours. Official forms for declaration or change of major are available from academic advisors and the Office of the
Registrar. To declare or change a major, a student must first obtain the approval of the chair of the pr
ogram she
plans to enter, and proceed through the process with an unofficial transcript when seeking the approval of her
faculty advisor. The student submits the appropriate forms for the declaration or change to the Office of the
Registrar. In the case of

a change of major, she should also inform the director of the program she has left.
Students should retain a copy of the official form obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

INTERDISCIPLINARY MA
JORS

Interdisciplinary majors are designed and administer
ed by more than one program. They are available in the
following fields:

Environmental Science (Weekday Only)

Human Relations

International Studies

Language and Cultural Studies (Weekday Only)

Physical Science

Public Affairs (Weekend Only)

Please review th
e Undergraduate Programs of Study section of this catalog for a discussion of the specific
requirements for receiving a degree in an interdisciplinary major.

MINORS AND AREAS

Students may elect to complete a minor area of study. The requirements for a mino
r in a particular area of study
are listed in the Undergraduate Programs of Study section.

Students can develop a specialty within their major field by completing selected courses within the major.

To declare a minor, a student must fill out the appropriat
e form with the signed approval of the program chair and
present it to the Office of the Registrar. Upon receipt, the student's academic transcript will be updated to reflect
the minor.

SECOND LANGUAGE WAIV
ER

A student whose first language is not English m
ay apply to the Committee on Scholastic Standing and Degrees for a
waiver of the second language requirement if:

The student can demonstrate competency in her first language. Proof can be submitted in the form of a high
school or college transcript, offici
al documentation from an expert, or approval by a Trinity College language
faculty member.

CHANGE OF ADVISOR

A student wishing to change her advisor should obtain the proper forms from the Office of the Registrar. All
arrangements for changing advisors sho
uld be made between the student and advisor. Students are encouraged to
select faculty advisors best suited to assisting their planning for academic work and career goals.

STUDENT STATUS

WEEKDAY

A full
-
time student registers for 12 to 18 credit hours in a
semester. A normal full
-
time course load consists of 15 to
18 hours each semester.

Part
-
time students must register for no more than eight semester hours.

Degree or matriculated students have been formally admitted to a degree program at Trinity College.

N
ondegree or special students have not been admitted to a degree program; they enroll for a limited period, often
with the intent to transfer credit earned at Trinity to another institution. Nondegree students must complete
application forms with the Admiss
ions staff.

WEEKEND

A full
-
time student registers for 9 to 12 credit hours in a semester. Qualified students may take additional courses
in the College's Weekday Program with the approval of their advisor.

ACADEMIC STANDING

The number of completed semester

hours determines a student's class. For admission to full sophomore status, a
student must have completed 24 semester hours that can be counted toward a degree. For full junior status, 56
semester hours are required; for full senior status, 92 semester ho
urs.

GRADING SYSTEM

Grade Point Average (GPA) is determined by the average of grade points earned in a semester. Trinity uses the
following point system:

A

4.0


C

2.0

A
-

3.7


C
-

1.7

B+

3.3


D+

1.3

B

3.0


D

1.0

B
-

2.7


D
-

0.7

C+

2.3


F

0.0

Designations not carrying any quality points include:

P = Pass

NP = No Pass

I = Incomplete

IP = In Progress (for Graduate Programs Only)

W = Withdrawal

WP = Withdrawal Passing

WF = Withdrawal Failing

MINIMUM GRADE POINT
AVERAGE FOR MAJOR

A minimum GPA of 2
.0 is required in a major. Specific policies regarding "Ds" will be determined by the major
programs.

REGISTRATION

During registration week near the end of each semester, each matriculated student registers for courses she plans
to take during the followin
g semester. Before registering, a student meets with her advisor to help her select
courses and to explain to the advisor how projected courses relate to academic goals.

Each semester, all students register with the Office of the Registrar. No student may
register until she has first
received financial clearance from the Business Office. Registrations will not be processed until all financial holds
are cleared.

PASS/NO PASS (P/NP)
GRADING OPTION

With advisor approval, students may take one course per academ
ic year on a Pass/No Pass (P/NP) basis. The
quality of work must be equivalent to a "D" to receive a passing grade, and a P/NP grade does not count in
determining a student's GPA. A student may use the P/NP option only four times while completing her
under
graduate degree; classes that may only be graded P/NP are not considered part of the four.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION C
REDIT FOR ATHLETICS

Trinity students may choose to receive up to a maximum of three physical education credits for participation in the
U.S.
Rowing Association, NCAA approved sports, or other athletic programs. All three credits cannot be earned in
the same sport.

The following guidelines apply to the awarding of physical education credits to students participating in sports
activities:

1. Only

three credit hours of physical education may be applied toward a Trinity degree.

2. Students must decide whether or not to receive physical education credit for a sport by the end of the first two
weeks of the season.

3. Before the end of the first two w
eeks, students must register for the credits.

4. Coaches will organize individual meetings with students in which students submit a statement of goal(s) to be
achieved for the season.

5. Athletes are required to submit weekly logs, including personal comme
nts regarding goal achievements. Other
requirements include a summary of her log (general obstacles she confronted and goals that were achieved) that is
submitted at the end of the season.

6. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. Students who decide to wit
hdraw from the athletic credit option must drop
the physical education credits by the withdrawal deadline, as is the case with other academic credits, or a grade of
"F" will be assigned.

AUDITING CLASSES

Students are encouraged to visit other classes. No f
ormal permission is needed, but good judgment should be used
when considering the class size and the planned activities of a given class meeting.

For formal audit (i.e., one recorded on the student's transcript), a student must have the permission of the
i
nstructor as well as that of her advisor. An auditor must register for the course and attend class meetings
regularly. Credit is not awarded for an audited course. Any full
-
time (12 credits or more) student may audit a
course free of charge. Part
-
time stud
ents auditing weekday, weekend, evening, or graduate classes must pay a fee
of $205.00 per credit hour.

COURSE CHANGES

Students may add or drop courses without academic penalty during the designated schedule adjustment period at
the start of each semester.

During this period students may also change to or from the "P/NP" (Pass/No Pass)
grading option, change to or from a formal audit, or alter their credit status in courses carrying variable credit. A
financial obligation due to a course change must be paid

before the change will be processed.

After the schedule adjustment deadline (listed in the Academic Calendar), changes in course registration may not
be made except for extraordinary reasons. Formal application must be made through the Vice President for
Academic Affairs to the Committee on Scholastic Standing and Degrees. After the end of the first quarter, no
course may be removed from a student's record. Students who fail to officially withdraw, or meet course
requirements, are liable to receive a faili
ng ("F") grade.

WITHDRAWAL FROM A CO
URSE

Once the schedule adjustment period has passed, a student may not have a course removed from her record.
Students may withdraw from courses at any time up until the semester deadline. (See Academic Calendar.) A
desi
gnation of "WP" (Withdrawal Pass) or "WF" (Withdrawal Fail) will appear on the student's transcript. In
unusual circumstances the designation "W" may be used. Furthermore, students are responsible for the partial or
full tuition payment for courses from wh
ich they have withdrawn. The withdrawal/refund schedules are discussed
in the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Withdrawal from a course after the course change period is a serious academic matter and should be considered
only in exceptional c
ircumstances. Forms for course withdrawal are available from the Office of the Registrar; they
must be signed by the course instructor and the student's academic advisor before formal approval may be
requested from the appropriate Academic Dean. Instructor
s will designate the student's academic status at the
time of withdrawal as "WP," "WF," or "W." This will be recorded on the withdrawal form and the final grade sheet.

REPEATING COURSES

If a student repeats a course, the more desirable grade will be calcul
ated when determining GPA and total credits.
A notation will appear on the transcript indicating that the course has been repeated.

INCOMPLETE GRADE

A grade of "Incomplete" is recorded only in cases judged sufficiently serious by the instructor. In all cas
es, the
student and instructor must fill out and sign a Contract for Incomplete form, no later than the end of the final
examination period, stipulating the work to be done before the grade and credit for the course will be recorded.
Forms are available fr
om the Office of the Registrar.

Resolution of the "Incomplete" must be reported to the Office of the Registrar within four weeks after the last day
of the final examination period. During the summer session, resolution must be reported within four weeks af
ter
the last day of class. Students must submit work sufficiently in advance of these dates to allow instructors time for
grading. Extensions of the "I" contract require the approval of the Subcommittee on Special Cases of the
Committee on Scholastic Stand
ing and Degrees. Grades that are still incomplete after the deadline are changed
from "Incomplete" to "F."

COURSES AT OTHER INS
TITUTIONS

Students planning to take courses at another institution (during any semester or summer months) should first
obtain app
roval from their faculty advisor and from the program chair for the proposed area of study before the
end of the semester prior to the semester they plan to take the course(s). A student who does not follow these
procedures has no guarantee that the credit
s earned will apply to the Trinity degree. Transfer courses will be
transcripted "TR" unless the course was completed at a Consortium school.

Students may normally transfer no more than six credits from a single summer session and no more than 12
credits o
ver an entire summer. Exceptions require approval by the Subcommittee on Special Cases of the
Committee on Scholastic Standing and Degrees.

WASHINGTON CONSORTIU
M REGULATIONS

Through the Consortium, full
-
time weekday degree students at Trinity can participa
te in special programs and take
courses offered by other member institutions. Enrollment is subject to the regulations of the Consortium of
Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area (available from
the Office of the Registrar
) and Trinity
regulation
s. Students should confer with the Registrar, who is the Consortium Coordinator.

Trinity Consortium regulations are listed below:

1. Trinity students may take Consortium courses only if the courses will not be available at Trinity during the
semester.

2.
Only full
-
time degree students are eligible for Consortium privileges. Exceptions require approval by Trinity's
Consortium Coordinator. First
-
year, first semester students are ineligible to participate.

3. Students must demonstrate the relevance of propose
d Consortium course(s) to their academic and post
-
college
goals. This rationale must be submitted with the registration form.

4. Before advisor approval is given, the student must obtain approval from the appropriate Trinity program chair in
the subject ar
ea involved (or the Trinity Consortium Coordinator for courses in subjects without corresponding
programs at Trinity).

5. Students on probation or carrying a grade of "Incomplete" should take Consortium courses only in extraordinary
circumstances; approval

is required from Trinity's Consortium Coordinator.

6. Students wishing to take more than two Consortium courses in any given semester must obtain approval from
Trinity's Consortium Coordinator.

7. All registrations for Consortium courses must receive fina
l approval from the appropriate Academic Dean.

8. The final grade received in a Consortium course is recorded on the Trinity transcript and calculated into the
student's grade point average (GPA).

9. Students participating in Consortium courses or programs

must arrange for their own transportation.

CONSORTIUM POLICY ON

INCOMPLETE ("I") GRA
DES

Students who arrange grades of Incomplete at a visited institution should note that the time limits for making up
the incomplete are not to exceed those of the home in
stitution. However, a faculty member at the visited
institution may require an earlier deadline.

TRANSCRIPTING CONSOR
TIUM GRADES

While Trinity College is not responsible for delays in the reporting of grades from visited institutions, the grades of
courses

taken through Trinity approved Consortium or programs, such as the Council for International Education
Exchange (CIEE), are recorded on the transcript and calculated into the student's grade point average (GPA).