COMPUTER GAMES SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

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Computer Ga
mes Software Development Programme Handbook


2011
-
12 Edition

1





Faculty of Arts and Media Technologies





COMPUTER GAMES SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME



LEADING TO THE
AWARD
:

BSc (Hons)

Computer Games Software Development





PROGRAMME HANDBOOK



----------
-------------------------

Faculty

Approval
-------------
-----


ONLY i
n cases where this programme handbook is being co
nsidered for validation,
Quality Committee Approval is required through the signature below
before

the
document can be submitted to the University’s QA&E Unit

for consideration by the
Validation

Panel
:


I confirm that this han
dbook is approved by AMT
Quality Committee as ready for
consideration at validation.


Signed: ____
____________
______ Date: __________


Chair, AMT
Qual
ity Committee or Dean of AMT


(remove this

section when

finally publish
ing for staff and students, after validation)

-----------
------------------------

Faculty
Approval
------------------
2


COMPUTER GAMES SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

PROGRAMME HANDBOOK


CONTENTS

1

WELCOME TO TH
E PROGRAMME

................................
................................
....................

4

2

ABOUT THIS PROGRAMME

HANDBOOK

................................
................................
.........

4

3

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
AND CONTENT

................................
................................
....

4

3.1

A
IMS OF THE
C
OMPUTER
G
AMES
S
OFTWARE
D
EVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

...........................

4

3.2

P
ROGRAMME FEATURES

................................
................................
................................
...

5

3.3

P
ROGRAMME STRUC
TURE AND LEVEL OF ST
UDY

................................
................................
..

5

3.4

L
EVELS OF
S
TUDY

................................
................................
................................
............

5

3.5

M
ODULE SPECIFICATIONS

................................
................................
................................
.

6

4

SUPPORT FOR

STUDENTS

................................
................................
................................

6

4.1

P
ROGRAMME MANAGEMENT
AND DELIVERY

................................
................................
.........

6

4.2

K
EY
P
ERSONNEL

................................
................................
................................
..............

6

4.3

I
NDUCTION

................................
................................
................................
.......................

7

4.4

P
ROGRAMME SUPPORT

................................
................................
................................
.....

7

4.5

S
TUDENT
L
IAISON
O
FFICER

................................
................................
...............................

7

4.6

S
TUDENT REPRESENTATIV
ES AND PROGRAMME COM
MITTEE

................................
................

7

4.7

M
ITIGATING
C
IRCUMSTANCES


I
F ILLNESS OR OTHER P
ERSONAL DIFFICULTY A
FFECTS YOUR
ASSESSMENT

................................
................................
................................
..............................

8

4.8

C
OMPLAINTS

................................
................................
................................
....................

8

4.9

S
UPPORT FOR PART
-
TIME STUDENTS

................................
................................
.................

8

4.10

S
TUDENT
S WITH DISABILITIES
,

LEARNING DIFFICULTIE
S OR SPECIFIC NEEDS

...........................

8

5

ACCOMMODATION

................................
................................
................................
.............

8

5.1

T
EACHING ACCOMMODATIO
N

................................
................................
.............................

8

5.2

P
ROGRAMME
-
SPECIFIC LEARNING RE
SOURCES AND FACILITI
ES

................................
............

8

6

TEACHING AND LEARNIN
G

................................
................................
...............................

9

6.1

T
EACHING AND LEARNING

METHODS

................................
................................
...................

9

6.2

P
ERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
PLANNING
(PDP)

AND PROFESSIONAL SKI
LLS

.............................

10

6.3

E
-
LEARNING
,

BLENDE
D LEARNING AND THE P
ROGRAMME

................................
...................

10

7

ASSESSMENT

................................
................................
................................
...................

10

7.1

A
SSESSMENT STRATEGY A
ND METHODS

................................
................................
...........

10

7.2

A
SSESSMENT CRITERIA

................................
................................
................................
...

11

7.3

G
UIDELINES FOR THE PR
EPARATION AND
S
UBMISSION OF
A
SSIGNMENTS

............................

11

7.4

P
ROCED
URE FOR EXAMINATIONS

................................
................................
.....................

12

7.5

P
ROCEDURE FOR MODERAT
ION OF ASSESSMENTS

................................
.............................

12

7.6

R
EFERENCING

................................
................................
................................
...............

13

7.7

U
SE OF UNFAIR MEANS
:

CHEATING
,

COPYING
,

PLAGIARISING

................................
..............

13

7.8

F
EEDBACK ON ASSIGNMEN
TS AND EXAMINATIONS

................................
..............................

13

7.9

A
PPEALS

................................
................................
................................
.......................

13

7.10

R
ELEVANT
U
NIVERSITY ASSESSMENT

REGULATIONS

................................
..........................

13

7.11

I
NDICATIVE ASSESSMENT

SCHEDULE

................................
................................
................

13

7.12

P
ROGRAMME
-
SPECIFIC ATTENDANCE
REQUIREMENTS

................................
.......................

14

8

MODULE OUTLINES AND
LINKS TO MODULE SPEC
IFICATIONS

...............................

14

8.1

L
EVEL
1

(HE4)

M
ODULES

................................
................................
...............................

15

8.2

L
EVEL
2

(HE5)

M
ODULES

................................
................................
...............................

15

8.3

L
EVEL
3

(HE6)

M
ODULES

................................
................................
...............................

16

3


9

FEEDBACK FROM STUDEN
TS

................................
................................
........................

16

10

HEALTH AND SAFETY AN
D WELFARE

................................
................................
......

16

11

STUDENT DISC
IPLINE

................................
................................
................................
..

16

APPENDIX 1: PROGRAMM
E SPECIFICATION

................................
................................
.......

17

APPENDIX 2: CURRICUL
UM OUTCOMES MAP

................................
................................
.....

20

APPENDIX 3: CURRICUL
UM SKILLS MAP

................................
................................
.............

21

APPENDIX 4: ASSESSME
NT SUMMARY TABLE

................................
................................
..

22

Computer Ga
mes Software Development Programme Handbook


2011
-
12 Edition

4



1

WELCOME
TO THE PROGRAMME


On behalf of all the staff with
in
t
he Faculty of Arts and Media Technologies
, I
’d

like to welcome
you to the University of Bolton.


Within the
Faculty
, it is our aim to provide an excellent service and to make your studies as
rewarding and fulfilling as possible.

The Computer Games So
ftware Development
programme

is challenging, but ultimately a very rewarding programme.


We expect that you attend your classes as scheduled and participate fully in them. We require
you to treat your fellow students and tutors with respect and considerati
on, as you would expect
them to treat you. If there are things that could be changed for the better, we would welcome
your comments.


I
’d
like to take this opportunity, on behalf of the
Faculty
, to wish you every success in your
Computer Games Software D
evelopment
programme.


2

ABOUT THIS PROGRAMME

HANDBOOK


Th
is

Programme Handbook, together with the following

sources,
constitute

the definitive
information about your
programme
:




The
Faculty

of
Arts and Media Technologies

(
AMT
)

Faculty

Handbook

available at
http://
www.bolton.ac.uk/amt
/



The University of Bolton Web Site
http://www.bolton.ac.uk


Th
e
Programme H
andbook contains information
that is
specific to
your
programme
.

P
lease refer
to

the sources above as well as

this Programme Handbook.

If there is any information that you
find unclear, your
Tutor or Programme Leader

will
be happy to
help
,

so please ask if
you
need
such help.

3

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
AND CONTENT

3.1

Aims of the
Computer Games Software Development
programme

The aims of the
BSc (Hons) Computer Games Software Development

programme are

to
provide
students with the opportunity

to
:




Develop intellectual capabilities of
research
, problem
-
solving, evaluation and synthes
is.



To provide students with a broad education in computer game design, development and
technology, with a special emphasis on the technical aspects of game production.



To equip students with the skills (especially programming) and knowledge
,

necessary to
pursue a successful career in industries specialising in the creation and distribution of
leisure and entertainment computing technologies.



To use Computer Games Software Development methods and techniques as a vehicle
for introducing the theoretical, inte
llectual, creative and dynamic aspects of computing.



To promote innovation and creativity assisted by rapid technological change.


5


3.2

Programme features

For students pursuing the BSc (Hons) Computer Games Software Development programme of
study,
skills in pr
ogramming are paramount. As such, students utilise the C++

programming
language, the main programming language in the development of commercial games, for the
whole of the three years of study.


In addition, students are given
modules in mathematics and
physics to support development in
2D and 3D game environments, which is deemed as essential by employers in the games
industry. Also, this programme gives students the opportunity of using development
environments, such as Unreal Tournament, to enable sop
histicated games designs to be
produced. Additionally, programming iPhone / iPod game applications is also currently taught
using the Objective C programming language.

3.3

Programme structure and level of study

The
BSc (Hons) Computer Games Software Developm
ent programme

is studied over three
years. The modules offered for the
BSc (Hons) Computer Games Software Development
programme

are given in the table below.


Level

Module
Code

Module Title

Credits

HE4

CGD1001

CGD1003

CGD1004

GAD1004

Applied Physics

Prog
ramming for Games
(two semesters)

Games Mathematics

Games Design 1
(two semesters)

20

40

20

40

HE5

CGD2000

CGD2001

CGD2003

LCT2500

LCT2502

LCT2614

Mathematical Physics

Games Hardware and Peripherals

Data Structures for Games

Games Entertainment Technology

2

Software Engineering

Project Skills

20

20

20

20

20

20

HE6

CGD3002

LCT3001

LCT3003

Advanced Games Technology
(two
semesters)

Project
(two semesters)

Business of Computer Games

60

40

20


In order to obtain a classified honours degree
,

full
-
time

students

take two 20 credit modules
(one in each
semester) in their first year

as well as two 40 credit module across semesters 1
and 2. In the second year, students take six 20 credit modules
(three per semester)
. In the final
year, students take one 20 credit mo
dule in
semester

1,

as well as a 60 credit module and a 40
credit module across semesters 1 and 2.


For
part
-
time
students the
programme is

studied over a longer period,
with modules worth a
maximum of 40 credits
per semester.


3.4

Levels of Study

Each level o
f your programme involves greater academic challenge and progressively higher
levels of intellectual comprehension and analysis together with the application of subject
specific and transferable skills. Each successive level also involves more independent
academic activity on the part of the student.


The degree classification is based on level HE5 and level HE6 module grades
, as outlined
within the

AMT

Faculty handbook.



6


3.5

Module specification
s

The programme consists of a number of
modules
.
Each module is
o
utlined

in section
8

with
links to the University’s online module database
.
The module specifications explain the pu
rpose
and content of the module and they

give information about how it is to be assessed, and other
useful info
rmation such as an indicative reading list.


4

SUPPORT FOR

STUDENTS

4.1

Programme management and delivery

Your programme is managed by Steve Manning, the Computer Games Software Development
Programme Leader.


Your programme of study is delivered by Module Tutor
s within the
Faculty of Arts and Media
Technologies
. A Personal Tutor from the Computer Games Software Development programme
team will be allocated to you at the start of your course.


4.2

Key Personnel


Key Personnel

Name

Position

Location

Tel

Email

Rache
l McLean

Academic Manager

C2
-
08a

3829

R.McLean@bolton.ac.uk

Steve Manning

Programme leader
. Year
1/2/3 Personal tutor.
Applied Physics,
Mathematical Physics
,

Programming for Games
and
Games Entertainment
Technology 2 tutor

C2
-
06a

3587

sm8@bolton.ac.uk

Louise Blenkharn


Business of Computer
Games
tutor

C2
-
06a

3588

lrb1
@bolton.ac.uk

Phil Carlisle

Advanced Games
Technology tutor

C2
-
06

3438

pac2
@bolton.ac.uk

Andrew Chittenden

Software Engineering tutor

C2
-
07a

3859


ac2
@bolton.ac.uk

Amanda Dewhurst


Bus
iness of Computer
Games tutor

C2
-
04

3627

ad1
@bolton.ac.uk

Craig Fortune


Games Design 1 and
Games Hardware
architecture and Peripherals
tutor

C2
-
06

3545

cf2
@bolton.ac.uk

John Gray

Project skills tutor

C2
-
04

3407

J.Gray@bolton.ac.uk

Adam Isherwood

Projec
t coordinator

C2
-
01a

3075

ai1@bolton.ac.uk

Peter Lager


Programming for Games,
Data Structures for Games
and Games Entertainment
Technology 2 tutor

C2
-
10a

3568

pkl1@bolton.ac.uk

Abdul Razak


Games Mathematics tutor

C2
-
06a

3476

A.Razak@bolton.ac.uk

Andr
ew Williams


Advanced Games
Technology tutor

C2
-
08a

3839

adw1
@bolton.ac.uk


See also the online “Staff Search” at

http://data.bolton.ac.uk/staffsearch/StaffSearch.php

7


This enables you t
o locate contact details for every member of the University’s staff.

4.3

Induction

At the beginning of your programme you will receive an induction which will introduce you to:




the programme


structure, content

and

assessment
,



tutors
;



management personnel
(
e.g., Programme Leader);



roles and responsibilities of key personnel
;



health and safet
y
;



Moodle

(T
he University of Bolton’s virtual learning environment
)
;



P
ersonal
D
evelopment
P
lanning

(PDP)
;



facilities at
University of Bolton (including the library and on
line facilities).


Also, a
n online

diagnostic mathematics test will be taken by students, which identifies potential
weaknesses in algebra. An online algebra tutorial
is also made available to students, which
supports student
s’

perceived weaknesses in alg
ebra.

4.4

Programme support

Substantial support is available, both academic or otherwise
, as outlined within the

AMT

Faculty
handbook.


4.5

Student Liaison Officer

There
is
a

Student Liaison Officer for the
Faculty

of
Arts and Media Technologies
. The
University’s

Student Liaison Officers can
help students to get the most out of their time whilst
they are University of

Bolton students by providing:



a

confidential listening ear
;




a
dvice, information and guidance about University support services
;



s
upport to
help th
em
d
evelop their skills for studying;



a

means to feed back
their

views to the University
.

Please contact the Student Liaison Officer for
details of drop
-
in times, worksho
ps and
appointment availability. You can find further information about the Universit
y’s Student Liaison
Officers and the service they provide at:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/Students/AdviceAndSupport/StudentLiaisonOfficers/Home.aspx

4.6

Student rep
resentatives and programme committee

The
Programme Committee meets periodically and includes student representatives
, one for
each year of the programme,

chosen by the students themselves.


Information about being a student rep
resentative

is avail
able on t
he Student’s Union web
site at:


http://www.ubsu.org.uk/


(Click “Course Reps”)


The
Programme Committee is part of the University’s quality assurance system. It comprises

staff who teach o
n the programme, the Progr
amme L
eader

and student representatives. The
8


committee is a place where changes

to the programme
, problem areas and positive aspects
about the programme are raised and discussed.



Student feedback is sought on an ongoing basis
through discussion and the

completion of
questionnaires

as we believe that you
,

as participants
,

are invaluable in helping to maintain and
improve the quality of the provision.


The
student representatives

are important to the quality of the course, as they represent the
views of a
ll students in their respective
years.


4.7

Mitigating Circumstances



If illness or other personal difficulty affects your
assessment

Please refer to the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook
at
http://
www.bolton.ac.uk/amt

for infor
mation on

mitigating circumstances



which is about what to do if illness or other factors beyond your
control
affect
s

your performance in assessment
.


4.8

Complaints

We hope that if you feel dissatisfied with any aspect of your programme you will appro
ach t
he
personnel identified
above
,

and the problem will be resolved to your satisfaction. However,
should you wish to make a formal complaint
,

refer to the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook where the
procedure is explained and further information identified.


4.9

Support for
part
-
time students

The university offers support to part
-
time students alongside full
-
time students and additional
support to part
-
time students, including additional funding opportunities. Also, all part
-
time
students are allocated the Programme leader,
Steve Manning, as their personal tutor.

4.10

Students with disabilities, learning difficulties or specific needs

Please
refer to the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook
and
www.bolton.ac.uk

for information relating to
assessment for st
udents with disabilities or affected by special circumstances.


5

ACCOMMODATION

5.1

Teaching a
ccommodation

The offices of staff
for

the
Faculty of Arts and Media Technologies

administration team
are
accommodated in
C2
-
13.

Teaching rooms are located in

C
-
block, D
-
Block,
Eagle Tower

and
Holts Mill
.


Timetables showing the appropriate room numbers and facilities for each module are displayed
at the beginning of each semester
on the programme notice board located
outside the Faculty
programmes office C2
-
13.


5.2

Programm
e
-
specific learning resources and facilities

There are three dedicated games laboratories, currently rooms C1
-
06/8, C2
-
03 and C2
-
08.
Rooms C1
-
06/8 and C2
-
03 are used for teaching games related modules. Room C2
-
08 is used
exclusively by third year games s
tudents for project work.


9


Open access arrangements are available for all the games rooms, outside of any timetabled
sessions.

In addition, dedicated games machines are available in Open Access rooms in Eagle
campus.


In addition, numerous games specific
textbooks are available within the learning resource
centre and it is recommended that students visit the centre to view the extensive resources on
offer.


6

TEACHING AND LEARNIN
G

6.1

Teaching and learning methods

A variety of teaching and learning methods are e
mployed throughout the programme in order to
ensure the acquisition and development of appropriate concepts, knowledge and skills. Some of
these you will experience during formally timetabled classes with a module tutor. Others you
may adopt personally to
facilitate your own learning.


It is important to realise that the time spent with a tutor during formally timetabled classes is only
a small part of the learning time identified for a module. In addition to the contact time with
lecturers, a significant a
mount of personal study should be undertaken. It is advisable to allow
at least 5
-
7 hours of personal study time, per week for each 20 credit module. This personal
study time should be spent, for example, engaging in general background reading, preparing

for
seminar activities, working on assignments or revising for examinations. Early in your studies,
guidance will be provided as to how you can make best use of this time. As you progress
through your programme however, this guidance will become less stru
ctured and prescriptive.
By the third year of your programme it is expected that you will demonstrate significant
independence in your study taking responsibility for the management of your own learning time.


The methods described below are the ones most
commonly employed by tutors during your
time in the classroom. However, individual module tutors are free to introduce techniques that
they view as especially suitable in aiding learning in their specialist area. (See
Module Guides

for specific teaching an
d learning strategies)
.



Lectures:

Lectures play an important part throughout the course and will feature in a number of
modules. They involve the dissemination of theoretical and empirical information by a lecturer
and provide a basic framework that stud
ents can build upon through their reading and through
other classroom activities.



Seminars:

Seminars involve groups of students who meet with a tutor to discuss further
reading, issues and problems arising from lecture material, or to undertake case stud
ies or
problem
-
solving exercises. It is common for further reading on a particular topic to be assigned,
and one student may be required to present an oral synopsis to provide a basis for discussion.
Seminars play an important part in encouraging students
to think critically about the subject, to
analyse theory and information in a systematic fashion, and to enhance understanding of
conceptual issues.


Practicals
:

Practicals

are also employed in some modules and may involve the development of
technical and
other
skills
such as programming, application use,
research methods, the
application of statistics

and

presentations, as well as problem solving through the evaluation of
case
-
study material.

General assistance with assignment
work may be offered in practi
cals
, and
they play an important part in increasing students’ confidence in dealing with the subject matter.


10


Tutorials:


A tutorial is a period of time devoted to a student individually, usually by the module
tutor, to focus on a particular area or topic.

These are usually individually based but may be
shared with students who are studying a similar area/issue. Students should prepare for
tutorials, which are usually associated with an assignment, by bringing any plans for discussion.


Other teaching and
learning methods:

These
may

include site visits

to architectural sites of
interests, game developer
organisations

or

guest speakers.


Informal Group Study Sessions:

Laptops can be booked out from the library issue desk and
used for group work in the Social

Learning Zone. Furthermore, there are a number of group
study rooms in the library that can also be booked for meetings and/or presentation practice and
365 which has 5 games computers for use 24 hours / day.


6.2

Personal de
ve
lopment planning
(PDP)
and profe
ssional skills

Throughout your programme you will be encouraged to reflect on the development of your
academic and professional skills, and make recommendations for self
-
improvement as a result
of this. Specifically this ability to appraise your performanc
e an
d set targets will be developed in
Games Design 1 at HE4, Project Skills at HE5 and the Project Module in HE6.


6.3

E
-
learning, blended learning and the programme

All modules on the Computer Games Software Development programme support the use of the
Unive
rsity’s Virtual Learning Environment, (VLE), currently, Moodle. Typically, lecturers place
useful module resources, such as teaching schedules and weekly lecture / tutorial notes

and
software resources, on the Moodle VLE. In many modules, students may ta
ke online tests and
upload assignment work within Moodle.


In addition, an online diagnostic mathematics test is taken by all Computer Games Software
Development students in Induction week, and an online tutorial system to support the diagnostic
test is al
so made available to students.


7

ASSESSMENT

7.1

Assessme
nt
strategy

and methods


Assessment serves several functions. The obvious and primary function is to evaluate student
achievement. However, assessment also serves to help
students

organise and develop
thei
r

learning. Feedback from assessment serves an important educational function and can help
students

develop
their

skills and understanding of
their

own strengths and weaknesses.


A range of assessments are employed on
the programme, including reports, cou
rsework, in
-

class assessment
, portfolios, presentations and examinations (see
module specifications
).


Coursework
:

For a number of modules, students will be requir
ed to produce course work which
will include artefact creation, reports or both. You may
also be required to present this work for
critique by the teaching staff and your peers. Reports

assess understandi
ng of the thrust of the
task

set, whether you have introduced and appreciate the relevance of appropriate material to
the topic in hand and u
nderstand its implications, whether you can analyse and evaluate
information and whether you can communicate your
ideas clearly. Coursework is

typically set to
assess the learning outcomes related to understanding key concepts, demonstrating critical
evalu
ations, and demonstrating the capacity to think independently.

This work

should also
identify pu
blished background research that are linked to the task set, together with the
student’s
rationale for their study, the way in which the study was carried out,
and the results
11


and analysis of
research undertaken
. The requ
ired length of coursework and reports

can vary
depending upon the purpose of the assignment for which the work is assessed. You will be
given guidance by the teaching staf
f on any specific requir
ements and s
tudents
will be
given
guidance on the format required for the report.


Presentations:

Students are required to make oral presentations in a number of modules.
Some modules may specify such a presentation as part of t
heir assessment, whilst
pres
entations in other modules may not be part of the formal assessment.


Practica
l Sessions
:
Students are required to demonstrate
technical understanding of game
development applications in relation to a set task.



Portfolios:
Portfolios are an

essential par
t of all students’ job prospects.

As part of
the
Computer Games Software Development course students are required to complete the
Business of Computer Games module

w
h
ere
students will be required to compile a
n online

portfolio

of work.



In
-
Class Assessme
nt:

In
-
class

assessment can be in the form of tests under examination
conditions (open or closed book), practical task
s

or presentations of work. These can be time
limited and or scheduled to a specific time and date or class session. This work must be
com
pleted on time and in the time slot allocated. Additional time will be allowed for those
students who have been granted this concession by means of assessment of needs by the
disability service. This type of assessment cannot be submitted late and should b
e considered
in the same way as an examination
.


Examinations:

A number of modules will require you to sit an examination. Different
examinations take different formats and it is important that you check with your Module Tutor
the question format, and what

materials, if any, can be taken into the examination room.


The assessment methods for each module are identified in the Module
Guides
given out at the
beginning of the teaching period. The
M
odule
Guides
also provide information on assignment
submission d
ates and will allow you plan your work load effectively.


The assessment strategy for the programme is designed to ensure that students achieve the
overall aims and learning outcomes of the programme, as well as the learning outcomes for
individual modules
. Appendix

4

illustrates the mix of assessment methods which allows
students to develop their intellectual capabilities, as well as key transferable skills.

7.2

Assessment criteria

Specific criteria within modules will vary from assignment to assignment and w
ill be made clear
to you before you embark on any task. In addition to these module specific criteria, there are a
set of general assessment criteria for the Modular Programme Scheme, which will also apply.
The
general
assessment criteria are described in
the
AMT Faculty Handbook.

See Appendix
2
for details of
outcomes
for each module on the Computer Games Software Development
programme.


7.3

Guidelines for the preparation and Submission of Assignments

You can only make one formal submission of work for formal

assessment prior to the
assessment board.

Once submitted, you cannot subsequently add further material to be
considered. See the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook for details of how to submit your work and how to
obtain a receipt.


12


If electronic submission of assessme
nt work is required, such as uploading within Moodle,
details stated within the specific assessment, should be adhered to.


7.4

Procedure for examinations

Examinations are normally held during the final week of each semester. Resit examinations are
normally h
eld in May
/ June
and September. Exam timetables are posted on the University Web
pages and on notice boards well in advance of the exam period.


It is your responsibility to note the dates of any examination, including resit
examinations and ensure that
you are available to take them.


Please note that

we do not accept holiday bookings as a legitimate reason for missing an
examination.


Examinations take a variety of forms. Please ensure you check the format of your examination
in advance.


It is impor
tant that you prepare fully for examinations. Revision slots are indicated on your
module calendar and on “Make
-
good
-
sheets”. Failure to attend these and other timetabled
sessions will seriously jeopardise your success in examinations.


You will need to ch
eck the room location and equipment requirements in advance. Please
ensure that you reach the examination room
at least 15 minutes prior to the timetabled start
.


If you require any special examination arrangements to be made
, such as extra time as the
re
sult of a special need,

please ensure that your Module Tutor and the
Faculty

Office are made
aware of these well in advance.


7.5

Procedure for moderation of assessments

There is a robust system of moderation in place for ensuring the quality and consistency o
f
marking both within modules and between them. For each assignment submitted

/ examination
script
,

the identified marking tutor first marks the scripts. A sample equating to approximately
the square root of the module cohort (e.g. 5 scripts selected from
a cohort of 25 students) is
selected, representative of the range of marks awarded. A second tutor then marks this sample.


This second marking is normally undertaken without sight of the first marking tutor’s summary
comments or knowledge of the mark awa
rded, although where the script has been annotated,
the second marker would have sight of these annotations. The two sets of marks are then
compared and, if in close agreement, a final moderated mark determined. If the two sets of
marks are significantly d
ifferent then further action is agreed which may require the whole
cohort of scripts being remarked.


A similar sample of assignment

/ examination

scripts is then sent to the external examiner for
further moderation. In most cases this sample would be the

same as that which had been
internally moderated. However where time is limited, internal and external moderation may have
to occur in tandem. In this case, two samples would be selected, one for internal moderation
and one for external moderation. The ex
ternal examiner’s comments are taken into account at
the relevant programme examination board
,

at which time any further adjustment of the
assignment

/ examination

marks is agreed.


In the case of final year projects, all are internally moderated and a sa
mple externally
moderated.

13


7.6

Referencing

Please see the
AMT Faculty

Handbook which contains useful
“Quick Start”
guidance on
both
Harvard and Numeric
referencing.


For the Computer Games Software Development programme, the Harvard notation system is
used for

referencing.


7.7

Use of unfair means
: cheating, copying, plagiarising

“Unfair means” includes copying the work of others (plagiarism) and passing it off as your own,
and other forms of cheating in examinations and coursework. See the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook
for

vital

advice on how to avoid this and
to be made aware of
what will happen to you if you use
unfair means.

7.8

Feedback on assignments and examinations

The programme team will aim to mark your work within
15 working days
.

Please be patient when awaiting feedb
ack for marked work; we pride ourselves on the
thoroughness of our marking and this is therefore a time
-
consuming activity.


When your marked
work

is returned to you
,

it will be accompanied by
written and, where
possible, verbal
feedback which will help yo
u to understand the rationale for the mark achieved,
and also help you improve your performance in future assignments.
In the case of
presentations, you may well receive verbal feedback at the time, and where appropriate, written
feedback when your tutor
has had time to write it.


If you have failed the

ass
essment,
this feedback will be especially important, as you will have to
rectify any shortcomings if you are given a referral assignment. The referral assignment may be
different from the original, fail
ed assignment.


7.9

Appeals

If you wish to appeal against the decision of an examination board / assessment board,
please
refer to the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook.

7.10

Relevant University a
ssessment regulations

The assessment regulations that apply to this programme are
located at:


http://www.bolton.ac.uk/studentcentre/


u
nder the section on “Regulations
,

Policy and procedures”.


There you will find the regulations for undergraduate programmes or postgraduate progra
mmes,
as appropriate.


Please also refer to

the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook

which includes how many of the University’s
policies, procedures and regulations are implemented in this
Faculty
.


7.11

Indicative assessment schedule

Each module will require successful compl
etion of a number of assessments so that a module is
passed. A module guide should be provided for each module, which should outline the number,
type and issue and completion dates for each assessment.

14


7.12

Programme
-
specific a
ttendance requirements

You are re
sponsible for attending all learning and teaching sessions associated with your
programme of study.


You should notify your Module Tutor
(
s
),

in advance
,

if you expect to be absent from
a
timetabled session. Prior permission must be obtained from your Prog
ramme Leader for
planned absences for two or more days during term time.


In relation to unplanned absences, you should contact your Module Tutor within

24 hours of the
missed session(
s
)
.

.

If you fail to explain any absences, you may be contacted by
Fa
culty

Staff.

We will endeavour
to help you if your absence is due to mitigating circumstances.


A student may be asked to supply documentary evidence to justify their absence. Where there
is no valid reason for unsatisfactory attendance, a student may be
issued with a formal written
warning. Furthermore
,

a formal report on a student’s attendance may be made to the student’s
sponsor, including an employer, the Local Authority and/or the Student Loan Company.


A student who fails to respond to warnings abou
t their attendance may be required to enter into
a formal Attendance Agreement. Such students may be withdrawn from their programme if they
breach the terms of their Attendance Agreement.


In accordance with UK immigration law, a report will be made to the

UK Border Agency, if an
International student holding a student visa is absent from the University for more than 10
working days without authorisation.


Full details of the “Student Attendance Policy” are available via the “Policies and Procedures”
sectio
n of the “Current Students” portal on the University website.



8

MODULE OUTLINES AND
LINKS TO MODULE SPEC
IFICATIONS


The table below provides a hyperlink, for those who are reading this document online, to the
University’s module database. The module databa
se stores the official “syllabus” (we call them
module specifications) that define the module, its content, the learning outcomes student are
working towards, the assessment criteria staff will use to assess students’ work, the indicative
reading list for
the module and so on.


Simply click the link and you will be taken directly to the module specification.


Please note that the module database contains the official specification

of the module. If there is
ever any dispute over any other description of the

module, the module specification in the
module database will prevail
.

Any other version or description of the module, perhaps
an
introductory explanation or a simplified guide, or clarification does not have the status of being
definitive information, and

you should always refer to the module specification in the module
database
online at:


http://data.bolton.ac.uk/academicaffairs/view_modulelist.asp


if you are unsure.


15



8.1

Level
1 (HE4) Modules



Code

Title

Description

Credits

Click
Link to full
module
specification

CGD1001


Applied Physics


An introduction to physics often
used within games development.

20

CSF

CGD1003


Programming for
Games


A two semester module teaching
basic concepts of C++ up to
completing a 2D game.

40

CSF

CGD1004


Games Mathemat
ics


An introduction to mathematics
often used within games
development.

20

CSF

GAD1004

Games Design 1

An introduction to the student to
the tools, techniques and met
hods
used in the creation of interactive
content for computer games

40

CSF



8.2

Level 2 (HE5) Modules


Code

Title

Description

Credits

Click Link to full
module
specifica
tion

CGD2000


Mathematical
Physics


The purpose of this module is to
equip students with a working
knowledge of the use and
implementation of physics
-
based,
dynamic models as used in
computer games.

20

CSF

CGD2001


Games Hardware
and Peripherals

To understand the
issues related
to

differing hardware environments
and peripherals.

20

CSF

CGD2003


Data Structures for
Games

This module aims to provide
students with an introduction to
data structures and algorithms
underpinning games development.

20

CSF


LCT2500


Games
Entertainment
Technology 2

Use advanced programming
techniques within a game
development environment.

20

CSF


LCT2502


Software
Engineering

To
gain an understanding of
design of games software.

20

CSF


LCT2614

Project Skills

T
o develop students’ research,
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16


8.3

Level 3 (HE6) Modules


Code

Title

Description

Credits

Click Link to full
module
specification

CG
D3002


Advanced Games
Technology




To enable students to develop
using a wide variety of advanced
games programming concepts

6
0

CSF


LCT3001


Project

To demonstrate

students’
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䍓C


i䍔PMMP

Bu獩湥獳sof
䍯Cpu瑥爠rames

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䍓C




9

FEEDBACK FROM STUDEN
TS

As discussed above, we welcome your feedback and hope you will provide feedba
ck on your
experiences through Programme Committee, module evaluations, and discussion
.



All students have the opportunity to contribute to the monitoring and enhancement of their
course of study. You can approach your
M
odule
T
utor,
Programme

Leader/Pers
onal Tutor or
the
Head

of the
Faculty

on an informal level to discuss issues. The Programme Committee is
also an important forum at which elected Student Representatives can speak on behalf of their
peers. Student representatives for the Programme Committe
e are elected at the beginning of
each academic year and are requested to convene student meetings where issues for the
Programme Committee meetings can be raised and discussed. All Student Representatives
receive formal training from the Students Union.


In addition to the Programme Committee system you are required to complete a module
feedback form for each module in each semester. Furthermore, at least once in your
programme you will be requested to complete a programme questionnaire. Survey feedback i
s
important as it is used by the Programme Team and central

services to enhance the quality of
provision and improve the student learning experience
.


10

HEALTH AND SAFETY AN
D WELFARE

Ple
ase see the
AMT

Faculty

Handbook
and
www.bolton.ac.uk

for

g
eneral

information about
health and safety at the University
, including First Aid and Emergency actions
.


When in a

work
-
experience placement organisation, you should follow the organisation’s health
and safety policy and regula
tions.


11

STUDENT DISCIPLINE

The University procedures in respect of student discipline apply and can be found at
www.bolton.ac.uk
.



Computer Ga
mes Software Development Programme Handbook


2011
-
12 Edition

17


APPENDIX
1
: PROGRAMME SPECIFIC
ATION



BSc

(Hons) COMPUTER GAMES SOFTWARE DEVELOPME
NT
(July 2010)



1. Qualification

BSc (Hons)


2. Programme Title

Computer Games
Software
Development

3. UCAS Code

3 Year
G450

short form

BSC/CGD

4. Programme Type

Modular Single

Full
-
time and Part time

5. Main Purposes and Distinctive Features of the Prog
ramme


i.

To provide students with a broad education in computer game design, development
and technology, with a special emphasis on the technical aspects of game
production.

ii.

To equip students with the skills (especially programming) and knowledge necessary
t
o pursue a successful career in industries specialising in the creation and distribution
of leisure and entertainment computing technologies.

iii.

To use Computer Games Software Development methods and techniques as a
vehicle for introducing the theoretical, in
tellectual, creative and dynamic aspects of
computing.

To promote innovation and creativity assisted by rapid technological change.



6. What a graduate should know and be able to do on completion of the programme

The programme outcomes have reference to
the benchmark statement for Computing
(C)
,
and the International Game Developers Association curriculum framework.(
GDA).


Knowledge and understanding in the context of
the subject(s)

i.

formal understanding of game play &
game design. (
GDA)

ii.

knowledge of the
underlying theory,
concepts and principles of computer
game development.
(C)

iii.

an understanding of the business
constraints and financial requirements in
computer game development.
(C) (GDC)

adequate breadth of skill and knowledge to
ensure flexibility.


Cog
nitive skills in the context of the subject(s)

i.

critically evaluate games software in
both conceptual and completed forms.

(GDA) (C)

ii.

analyse and specify computer based
systems for use in interactive
entertainment.

(GDA) (C)

iii.

Deploy effectively the methods

and
tools used in the definition, construction
and development of fully functioning
computer games.
(GDA) (C)



Subject
-
specific practical/professional skills

i.

Use appropriate theory, practice and
tools, for the specification, design, and
implementation o
f computer
-
based
games.
(C)

ii.

Use core analytical techniques and
design tools.
(GDA)

iii.

Work as part of a development team.

(C)

iv.

Write computer programs.


Other skills (e.g. key/transferable) developed in
subject or other contexts

i.

make effective use of general I
T
facilities
(C)

ii.

communicate effectively, orally
electronically and in writing.
(C)

iii.

manage and organise.
(C)

iv.

solve numerical problems and analyse
information.
(C)

v.

solve practical programming problems.

vi.

independent study, self
-
appraisal
(reflection) and goal

setting

vii.

literature review skills


viii.

employability skills


18


7. Qualities, Skills & Capabilities Profile

The educational and training goals of the programme seek to develop and demonstrate
the following qualities, skills, capabilities and values in its gradua
tes


A Cognitive

B Practical

C Personal & Social

D Other

Game design and
documentation.

Applied Problem
solving.

Analysis of
information.


Software design,
implementation and
testing.

Hardware
evaluation and
effective use.


Self
-
motivation.

Organisation,

communication and
time management.

Technical report
writing.

Presentation skills.

Investigation skills.



8. Duration and Structure of Programme/Modes of Study/Credit Volume of Study Units

(3 Years full
-
time; 4½
-
5 years part
-
time). Honours Degree = 36
0 credits; Intermediate Awards of
Diploma of Higher Education and Certificate of Higher Education available at 240 and 120 credits
respectively. All Honours degrees must include the study of 120 credits at Level H
E6
.


Part II

Students take
9

(Single) Mo
dules



HE6

Honours

Modules



Core Modules


CGD3002

LCT3001

LCT3003

Options

(
normally 20 credits each)














HE5

Honours
Modules



CGD2000

CGD2001

CGD2003

LCT2500

LCT2502

LCT2614


Part I (Level HE4
)

Students take
4

(Single) Modules


First Year

Part
-
Time
Equivalent



CGD1001

CGD1003

CGD1004

GAD1004



9. Learning, Teaching and Assessment
Strategy


Learning and Teaching Methods

Active learning is promoted by
lecturers, seminars,
demonstrations, tutorials, videos
and guided student
-
centred
activit
ies.


Practical skills will be acquired
through laboratory sessions,
demonstrations, assignments
and projects.




10. Other Information
(including

compliance with relevant
University policies)


Date programme first offered

1/9/2002



Admissions Criteria

Standard Requirements




Non Standard Entry







19



Assessment Methods

Assessment tasks are linked to
the learning outcomes of each
module, and are normally
completed by the end of each
module.


Written examinations (closed /
open book), essays,
assignments, projects, in
-
class
tests (practical, written or online),
demonstrations and viva voce.




Assessment Classification System





Honours Classification Bands




Indicators of Quality and Standards

University of Bolton Quality procedures, including:

Examinati
on boards

Programme quality meetings

Annual programme reports

Internal moderation

External examiner review

Internal subject reviews

QAA reviews

Student programme and module feedback






Computer Ga
mes Software Development Programme Handbook


2011
-
12 Edition

20


APPENDIX
2
:
CURRICULUM OUTCOMES
MAP


This table shows how they add
ress the learning outcomes for the
Computer Games Software Development

programme
.


LEARNIG
OUTCOME

CGD1003

GAD1004

CGD1001

CGD1004

LCT2500

LCT2502

CGD2001

CGD2000

CGD2003

LCT2614

LCT3003

LCT3001

CGD3002

K1

X

X



X




X




X

K2

X

X



X

X



X



X

X

K
3











X



K4

X

X

X

X

X

X


X

X


X

X

X

S1

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X



X

X

S2

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X



X

X

S3


X









X


X

S4

X


X


X

X

X

X

X




X

C1


X








X



X

C2

X

X



X

X

X


X




X

C3

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X




X

O1

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

O2

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

O3

X

X



X

X



X

X

X

X

X

O4

X


X

X

X

X


X

X

X


X

X

O5

X




X

X

X


X




X

O6


X








X



X

O7


X








X

X

X

X

O8


X








X

X

X

X














LEARNING OUTCOMES


Knowledge and understanding

Graduates will have demonstrated:

K
1

formal understanding of game play & game design.

K2

knowledge of the underlying theory, concepts and principles of

of computer game development.

K3

an understanding of the business constraints and financial

requirements in computer game development
.

K4

adequate breadth of skill and knowledge to ensure flexibility


Subject
-
specific practical/professional skills

Ability to:

S1

Use appropriate theory, practice and tools, for the specification,

design, and implementation of computer
-
based games.

S2

Use

core analytical techniques and design tools.

S3

Work as part of a development team.

S4

Write computer programs
.


Cognitive skills

Ability to:

C1

critically evaluate leisure software in both conceptual and completed forms

C2

analyse and specify computer
-
b
ased systems for use in interactive
entertainment.

C3

Deploy effectively the methods and tools used in the definition, construction
and development of fully functioning computer games.


Other skills

Capacity to:

O1

make effective use of general IT faciliti
es

O2

communicate effectively, orally electronically and in writing.

O3

manage and organise.

O4

solve numerical problems and analyse information.

O5

solve practical programming problems.

O6

independent study, self
-
appraisal (reflection) and goal setting

O7

literature review skills

O8

employability skills
21


APPENDIX
3
:
CURRICULUM SKILLS MA
P

Curriculum Skills Map

LEVEL


Modules


Learning to Learn

Communication

Group
-
work/
Working
with
others

Problem
-
solving
and
Planning

Self
Management

Use of
ICT

Numeracy

HE4








CGD1001




X


X

X

CGD1003




X


X


CGD1004




X


X

X

GAD1004

X

X

X

X

X

X


HE5








CGD2000




X


X

X

CGD2001




X


X


CGD2003




X


X


LCT2500




X


X

X

LCT2502




X


X


LCT2614

X

X


X

X

X


HE6








CGD3002


X


X

X

X

X

LCT3001

X

X


X

X

X


LCT3003


X


X


X


22


APPENDIX
4
:
ASSESSMENT
METHOD
SUMMARY TABLE

Approximate balance of assessment methods by module



ASSESSEMENT
METHOD

(%)

CGD1001

CGD1003

CGD1004

GAD1004

CGD2000

CGD2001

CGD2003

LCT2500

LCT2502

LCT2614

CGD3002

LCT3001

LCT30
03

PRESENTATION


5


5




5



10

10

10

PRACTICAL TESTS


30


20










COURSE WORK

40

65

50

75

50

50

100

95

50

100

70

90

40

IN CLASS TEST

30













EXAMINATION

30


50


50

50



50


20


50