Cloud Computing - Educause

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3 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 1 μήνα)

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1


Overview of Cloud Computing



Preparing your Campus for a
Private Cloud



Above the Campus Opportunities




Agenda

2



Explosion of options and content
producers. The democratization of
content. YouTube 2B views a day.



Service
-
Oriented Architecture and Web
Services drive application growth.



New tools put application development
into everyone’s hands


the
democratization of technology.



Personal broadband makes it possible
to access it all cheaply.



A disappearing line between what is
offered inside and outside campus.



Every discipline needs computing


should they use consumer services?

.

The Pace of Technology is Dizzying

3

4

“Cloud Computing refers to both the
applications delivered as services over the
Internet and the hardware and systems
software in the datacenters that provide
those services. The services themselves
have long been referred to as
Software as a
Service

(SaaS). The datacenter hardware
and software is what we will call a Cloud.
When a Cloud is made available in a pay
-
as
-
you
-
go manner to the general public, we
call it a Public Cloud; the service being sold
is
Utility Computing
. We use the term
Private Cloud to refer to internal datacenters
of a business or other organization, not
made available to the general public. Thus,

Cloud Computing is the sum of SaaS and
Utility Computing, but does not include
Private Clouds
.” (pg. 1)

Berkeley Researchers View of Cloud

“The National Institute of Standards and Technology
(NIST) defines cloud computing as a "
pay
-
per
-
use
model
for enabling available, convenient and
on
-
demand
network access to a
shared pool
of
configurable computing resources (e.g., networks,
servers, storage, applications and services) that
can be
rapidly provisioned and released

with
minimal management effort or service provider
interaction."



NIST Cloud Definition

April 2009

5


A model of computation and data storage based on “pay
as you go” access to “unlimited” remote data center
capabilities


A cloud infrastructure provides a framework to manage
scalable, reliable, on
-
demand access to applications


Cloud services provide the “invisible” backend to many of
our mobile applications


High level of elasticity in consumption


Historical roots in today’s Internet apps


Search, email, social networks


File storage (Live Mesh, Mobile

Me, Flicker, …)



Basic Cloud Definitions

6

Details and Examples of Cloud

7

So we will just buy everything from
the cloud and won’t need IT, right?



The Role of Cloud in Campus IT


Not exactly….



http://www.dvorak.org/blog/wp
-
content/uploads/2010/04/cloud.jpg

8

9


Scale Matters
-

Even Locally

10

Adoption

Standardization of Product

High

Low

Low

High

large,
standardized

small,
specialized



Identify local duplication.
Plan for transition during
refresh.



Any aggregation is better
than none. Start small




Funding model clarity is
critical. Activity based
costing for services




Once standardized
services can be evaluated
against cloud.


Cloud
Services

IT is shifting from developing technical solutions
to enabling efficient solutions through a mix of
sourced technology services.


How do we do that?



-

Embrace change



-

Streamline adoption



-

Provide integration



-

Facilitate reuse


While protecting privacy, reducing institutional
risk, ensuring continuity, meeting regulatory
compliance and high availability requirements.







….And do it all for less $$$.








The New IT

11

IT Organizations Must Evolve

SILO

SILO

SILO

SILO

SILO

SILO

SILO

12

Associate Vice Chancellor

Chief Information Officer

Chancellor

Setting the stage for expanded supply

13


Start by selecting one or two areas of focus:


Client layer


Applications layer


Data layer


Infrastructure layer

Achieving Scale

14

Cloud Computing Layers

15

Range in size from “edge” facilities
to megascale.

Economies of scale

Approximate costs for a small size
center (1K servers) and a larger, 100K
server center.

Each data center is

11.5 times

the size of a football field


Technology

Cost in small
-
sized

Data
Center

Cost in Large

Data Center

Ratio

Network

$95 per Mbps/

Month

$13 per

Mbps/

month


7.1

Storage

$2.20 per GB/

Month

$0.40 per GB/

month


5.7

Administrat
ion

~140 servers/

Administrator

>1000
Servers/

Administrator


7.1

Scale Matters in the Cloud

Containers: Separating Concerns

17

Petabytes

Doubling every

2 years

Experiments

Archives

Literature

Simulations

Instruments

The Challenge
:

Enable Discovery
.


Deliver the capability to mine,


search and analyze this data


in near real time.

Enhance our Lives

Participate in our own heath


care. Augment experience


with deeper understanding.

The Future: an Explosion of Data

18


The Client: Too personal, too dynamic


Application: Requires architecture decisions on
platform as a service to achieve scale


Data: Data management tools not consistent
across disciplines. Many policy issues.


Infrastructure: Less visible to end users, can
use regular refresh cycles to augment startup
costs.

Where to focus to achieve scale

19


Cycles and storage are mostly invisible to end users


but very useful to IT folks


developers and data
management teams.



Each faculty member wants or needs their own
cyberinfrastructure and requests expansions via grant
process.



The result is ‘clusteritis’ where an ever increasing
number of individual clusters are populating nearly every
higher ed campus



Three options:


Private Clouds


you build out your own infrastructure locally


Public Clouds


Leverage public cloud infrastructure


Community Clouds


partner with similar entities to create scale

Infrastructure: Cycles and Storage

20


Develop solutions to maximize existing assets


Prepare
for transition as part of regular refresh.


Have your costing models done


what does it fully cost
for you to provide the service?



Personalized: Enable the solutions to be customizable to
the individual consumers of the service.



Dynamic: Architect solutions that can scale (up and
down) very quickly.



Easily provisioned: Make it very (VERY) easy to use the
services and scale them based on need.



Critical Success Factors

21

Private Cloud vs. Public Cloud

http://wikibon.org/blog/private
-
cloud
-
computing/

22



$0.00
$0.50
$1.00
$1.50
$2.00
$2.50
$3.00
$3.50
$4.00
$4.50
Aug-06
Nov-06
Feb-07
May-07
Aug-07
Nov-07
Feb-08
May-08
Aug-08
Nov-08
Feb-09
May-09
Aug-09
Nov-09
Feb-10
Rates
by Storage
Tier,
$/GB/Month

0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
Aug-06
Nov-06
Feb-07
May-07
Aug-07
Nov-07
Feb-08
May-08
Aug-08
Nov-08
Feb-09
May-09
Aug-09
Nov-09
Feb-10
Total Allocated SAN Capacity, Terabytes

Mass Tier
Economy Tier
Standard Tier
Mid Tier
High Tier
23

Case Study: Private Cloud
-

ShaRCS


24


Annotated Human Genome Data provided by ENSEMBL



The Ensembl project produces genome databases for human as well as
almost 50 other species, and makes this information freely available.



Various US Census Databases from The US Census Bureau



United States demographic data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 US Censuses, summary
information about Business and Industry , and 2003
-
2006 Economic Household Profile Data.



UniGene provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information



A set of transcript sequences of well
-
characterized genes and hundreds of
thousands of expressed sequence tags (EST) that provide an organized view of the
transcriptome.



Freebase Data Dump from Freebase.com



A data dump of all the current facts and assertions in the Freebase system.
Freebase is an open database of the world’s information, covering millions of topics in
hundreds of categories. Drawing from large open data sets like Wikipedia,
MusicBrainz, and the SEC archives, it contains structured information on many
popular topics, including movies, music, people and locations


all reconciled and
freely available.

Case Study: Public


Crowdsourced
Data

EC2 Open Up Many Research Options:

25

Above
-
Campus Services

Shaping the Promise of Cloud Computing for Higher
Education


by Brad Wheeler and Shelton Waggener

Illustration by Randy Lyhus ©2009

EDUCAUSE Review, Nov/Dec 2009