Green Development Standards for Sackville

martencrushInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

8 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 23 μέρες)

265 εμφανίσεις







Green Development
Standards for
Sackville



February 2012 
 
Prepared by: 
Kristin Peebles 
Tracey Wade, MCIP, RPP 
 
 
Submitted to the Environmental Trust Fund 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tantramar Planning District Commission 
131H Main Street, Sackville, NB 
www.tantramarplanning.ca
  
 
 
i


Your Environmental Trust Fund at Work
Acknowledgements 

Green  Development  Standards  for  Sackville  continues  the  process  launched  by 
Sustainable  Sackville,  an  initiative  that  compiled  more  than  750  recommendations  from 
community  members;  thus  it  is  to  their  foresight  and  direction  that  Green  Development 
Standards for Sackville owes much of its existence.  
A  special  thank‐you  goes  to  community  members  and  others  who  shared  their 
expertise and knowledge during the completion of this report: Michael Fox, Marcel Daigle, 
Sterling  Marsh,  and  Wanda  Beal.    We  would  also  like  to  acknowledge  the  speakers  and 
members of the New Brunswick Planners Association who contributed their thoughts and 
experiences at the November workshop. 
Green Development Standards for Sackville was made possible by grant from the New 
Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund (ETF). 
 













 
 
ii


Executive Summary 
Over  the  past  few  years,  the  Town  of  Sackville  has  started  moving  towards  a  sustainable 
future, with the goal of balancing social, economic, and environmental aspects of the community. In 
2010,  the  Tantramar  Planning  District  Commission  developed  an  Integrated  Community 
Sustainability Plan (ICSP), Sustainable Sackville, to help guide the Town through this process. Green 
Development Standards for Sackville is a result of the recommendations of Sustainable Sackville, and 
aims to address several of the ICSP’s Goals and Actions. 
The  report  reviews  by‐laws  from  across  Canada  and  the  north‐eastern  United  States  for 
samples  of  sustainable  practices  and  “green”  regulations.    Literature  on  best  practices  was  also 
reviewed  to  ascertain  how  well  these  development  regulations  and  standards  would  work  within 
the  context  of  a  small  rural  community  in  New  Brunswick.    Three  main  areas  were  considered  in 
the  research:    water  efficiency  (including  water  use  and  storm  water  management  techniques), 
renewable energy (including solar and micro‐wind), and green building standards. 
Following  analysis  and  a  workshop  of  planners  and  legal  experts  on  issues  around 
incorporating  sustainable  thinking  into  plans  using  the  Community  Planning  Act  as  the  vehicle  for 
implementation, a number of recommendations were developed. 
WATER CONSERVATION THROUGH LOW‐FLOW FIXTURES 
  Given  the  relative  ease  of  installing  low‐flow  fixtures,  as  well  as  the  environmental  and 
financial  benefits,  a  bylaw  encompassing  low‐flow  toilets,  showerheads,  and  faucet  aerators  is  an 
easy  way  to  achieve  water  conservation  in  an  efficient  and  cost  effective  manner.  The  cost  in  the 
short  term  for  the  fixtures  is  quickly  outweighed  by  the  benefit,  and  the  fixtures  significantly  cut 
down on water consumption in the building in which they are installed.  Therefore, we recommend: 
i)
That the Town of Sackville, in partnership with other local organizations 
(such as EOS) undertake an educational campaign on water conservation 
measures. 
ii)
That  the  Town  of  Sackville  consider  amending  or  developing  an 
appropriate  by‐law  to  introduce  mandatory  low‐flow  fixtures  for  all 
types  of  construction,  including  residential,  industrial,  commercial,  and 
institutional;   
iii)
That  the  Town  apply  this  bylaw  to  all  new  construction  or  renovations 
involving water fixtures; 
iv)
That within the appropriate by‐law, the Town set the following limits: 

maximum capacity for toilets at 6 litres;  

Setting the maximum flow rate at 9.5 litres per minute (lpm) for 
showerheads; 

Setting  the  maximum  flow  rate  at  8.3  lpm  for  both  kitchen  and 
lavatory faucets. 
 
LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS FOR STORMWATER MANAGEMENT 
 
While  Low  Impact  and  Net  Zero  techniques  are  gaining  recognition,  in  Sackville  we  must 
focus  on  what  can  be  adopted  to  reduce  the  flow  of  stormwater  runoff,  something  that  is  of 
 
 
iii


significant concern when taking into account the topography of the town, our location at the head of 
the  Bay  of  Fundy,  and  projections  with  regard  to  climate  impacts  (which  include,  among  other 
things,  increased  frequency  of  severe  storms  and  weather  events).    The  transformation  of  the 
current  stormwater  management  system  would  require  a  transitional  period  and  must  start  with 
extensive education.  As such, it is recommended: 
v)
That the Town of Sackville share information on LID techniques with the 
community. This may include partnering with the Community Garden or 
other local organizations in order to offer workshops on LID techniques, 
such as a course in rain garden construction for residential areas; 
 
vi)
That the Town create an incentive program to encourage establishment 
of rain gardens or rain barrels on private sites (e.g., rebates on plants or 
work). 
 
vii)
That  the  Town  introduce  a  pilot  project(s)  into  the  downtown  to 
demonstrate  the  benefits  of  the  LID  approach  to  storm‐water 
management; and 
 
viii)
That  the  Town  work  towards  adopting  a  bylaw  that  introduces  LID  or 
net‐zero drainage techniques for new developments.  
RENEWABLE ENERGY 
Micro  wind  energy  generation  is  growing  trend  that  offers  a  viable  alternative  for 
individuals looking to reduce their environmental impact.  Given recent technological advances, the 
Town of Sackville might review its Zoning Bylaw and consider the inclusion of micro wind turbines 
within  the  Town’s  limits.  Nonetheless,  it  is  recognized  that  there  may  still  be  reservations 
concerning the use micro wind turbines within Town limits. With this in mind, we recommend: 
ix)
That the  Town of Sackville consider allowing  micro wind turbines in its 
Institutional  and  Mixed  Use  Zones  to  serve  as  a  pilot  study  and  an 
educational tool for their introduction in residential areas; and 
 
x)
That  the  Town  consider  developing  a  policy  that  will  allow  micro  wind 
turbines in all residential zones in the long term. 
SOLAR SITING 
Solar access laws/bylaws and solar siting bylaws/ordinances allow and encourage the use of 
solar energy devices; however, at this time several difficulties remain in the implementation a solar 
access  bylaw  for  the  Town  of  Sackville,  due  to  both  the  lack  of  precedent  within  the  Canadian 
context, and the complications which exist in the regulation of vegetation.  Therefore, to effectively 
encourage  the  use  of  solar  energy  devices  and  solar  siting  at  this  time  we  propose  the  following 
recommendations:   
xi)
That  the  Town  of  Sackville  and  partners  such  as  EOS  Eco‐Energy,  focus 
on education as the means to further the use of solar energy devices and 
residential solar orientation; and 
 
 
iv


xii)
That  the  Town  add  a  new  policy  into  the  Municipal  Plan  to  encourage 
orientation of buildings in order to maximize solar access. 
 
GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS 
The  research  showed  there  are  both  the  ecological  and  financial  benefits  associated  with 
upgrading  the  standards  currently  required  by  the  National  Building  Code  of  Canada  to  those 
required by  the  Model National Energy Code.  The environmental  and financial payback associated 
with  the  increase  of  the  energy  efficiency  of  the  building  far  outweighs  the  initial  increase  in 
building cost. Specifically, we recommend: 
xiii)
That  the  Town  of  Sackville  undertake  a  public  education  campaign  on 
insulation and building standard upgrades, including the development of 
fact sheets on cost savings; and 
 
xiv)
That the Town update its Building Bylaw to include minimum standards 
for  insulation,  doors,  and  windows  based  on  the  Model  National  Energy 
Code. 
DECISION‐MAKING CONTEXT 
  While the door remains open to municipalities to create higher standard by‐laws in terms of 
“green” requirements, to provide complete clarity, we recommend: 
xv)
That the Province of New Brunswick reword s. 59 of the CPA to clarify 
that Municipal Building By‐laws must meet, at minimum, the National 
Building Code; 
 
xvi) That the Tantramar Planning District Commission (TPDC) conduct a critical review of the 
green standards research and the Provincial Planning Legislation for the best options for the 
integration of standards into planning policy and regulation.  
xvii) That the TPDC develop proposals to amend Town By‐laws to convert green standards into 
policy and regulation.  
xviii) That the TPDC develop an action‐based community delivery system consisting of the creation 
and preparation of public educational promotional material i.e. presentations, advertising, 
public service announcements, etc. to educate the public on the personal benefits of green 
development standards and educating the new Town Council on the benefits of adopting 
policies and regulations aimed at increasing green development standards. 
 
 
 
 
 
v


Table of Contents: 
Acknowledgements..............................................................................................................................i
 
 
Executive Summary.............................................................................................................................ii
 
 
1.0
  
I
NTRODUCTION
.................................................................................................................................1
 
 
2.0
  
W
ATER 
C
ONSERVATION
......................................................................................................................2
 
 
2.1
 
Reducing Water Consumption: Low‐Flow Fixtures.....................................................................3
 
2.1.1
 
Low‐Flow Fixtures in Municipal Bylaws.....................................................................................3
 
2.1.2
 
Low‐Flow Fixture Benefits.........................................................................................................4
 
2.1.3
 
Recommendations for Sackville................................................................................................5
 
 
2.2
 
Ecological Stormwater Treatment...............................................................................................6
 
2.2.1
 
LID Techniques..........................................................................................................................7
 
2.2.2
 
LID and Municipal Stormwater Management...........................................................................9
 
2.2.3
 
LID Costs..................................................................................................................................10
 
2.2.4
 
Net Zero Policies......................................................................................................................11
 
2.2.5
 
Recommendations for Sackville..............................................................................................12
 
 
2.3
 
Further Reading.........................................................................................................................13
 
 
3.0
  
R
ENEWABLE 
E
NERGY
........................................................................................................................15
 
 
3.1
 
Small Wind Energy Systems.......................................................................................................16
 
3.1.1
 
Key Considerations..................................................................................................................17
 
3.1.3
 
Other Concerns.......................................................................................................................19
 
3.1.4
 
Recommendations for Sackville..............................................................................................20
 
 
3.2
 
Solar Access Laws......................................................................................................................21
 
3.2.1
 
Solar Siting...............................................................................................................................22
 
3.2.2
 
Recommendations for Sackville..............................................................................................23
 
 
3.3
 
Further Reading.........................................................................................................................23
 
 
4.0
 
G
REEN 
B
UILDING 
S
TANDARDS
.............................................................................................................25
 
 
4.1
 
Provincial and Municipal Green Building Standards.................................................................26
 
4.1.1
 
Model National Energy Code Minimum Recommendations...................................................27
 
4.1.2
 
Estimated Short‐Term Cost of Upgrading the Building Code..................................................29
 
4.1.3
 
Estimated Cost Savings............................................................................................................30
 
4.1.4
 
Recommendations for Sackville..............................................................................................31
 
 
4.2
 
Further Reading.........................................................................................................................32
 
 
 
vi


 
5.0
  
L
EGISLATIVE 
A
BILITY TO 
I
MPLEMENT 
“G
REEN
”.......................................................................................33
 
 
6.0
 
  
O
UTCOMES OF THIS 
P
ROJECT
.............................................................................................................35
 
 
7.0
 
  
C
ONCLUDING 
R
EMARKS
....................................................................................................................36
 
 
Appendix 1: Low‐Flow Toilet Regulations...................................................................................................37
 
 
Appendix 2: Low‐Flow Showerhead Regulations........................................................................................40
 
 
Appendix 3: Low‐Flow Faucet Aerator Regulations....................................................................................42
 
 
Appendix 4: Environmental Consequences of Traditional Stormwater Management...............................45
 
 
Appendix 5: Low Impact Development Bylaws and Ordinances................................................................47
 
 
Appendix 6: Canadian Green Roof Bylaws..................................................................................................48
 
 
Appendix 7: Water Conservation Voluntary Measures..............................................................................49
 
 
Appendix 8:  Comparison of Sample Canadian and American Small Wind Turbine Zoning Bylaws...........48
 
 
Appendix 9: Solar Access Ordinances.........................................................................................................52
 
 
Appendix 10: Solar Siting Ordinances.........................................................................................................55
 
 
Appendix 11: Third Party Certification Green Building Certification and Bylaws.......................................56
 
 
 
ADDENDUM 1:  Fact Sheets on Project 
 
ADDENDUM 2:  Media coverage of project
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  1 

1.0  Introduction 
In  cities  and  towns  today,  urban  living  and  development  all  too  often  pose  a  direct 
threat  to  the  surrounding  natural  environment.  Water  is  consumed  at  an  alarming  rate, 
depleting  potable  water  supplies  and  creating  waste,  road  runoff  contaminates  surface 
waters  and  kills  living  organisms,  natural  spaces  disappear  with  new  developments,  and 
energy  consumption  from  non‐renewable  sources  increases  yearly  as  inefficient  buildings 
continue  to  be  built.  It  would  be  wrong,  however,  to  see  this  relationship  as  inevitable  or 
unpreventable. Despite the continued growth of many towns and cities, municipalities have 
the capacity to change this trend, and restore a healthy balance between development and 
natural environment. Indeed, in many cases, it is local governments in Canada and around 
the  world  that  are  at  the  forefront  of  the  movement  to  introduce  “green”  or  “sustainable” 
standards into their policies and bylaws, rather than waiting on federal or provincial/state 
governments to work through legislative change.  In doing so, many local governments are 
finding  that  environmental  initiatives  actually  save  money  and  increase  the  economic 
viability and liveability of the communities which they represent.  
The  Town  of  Sackville  began  its  movement  towards  a  sustainable  future  with  the 
development  of  an  Integrated  Community  Sustainable  Plan  (ICSP)  in  2010.  The  goal  of 
Sustainable  Sackville  was  to  strike  the  balance  between  the  social,  economic,  and 
environmental  pillars  of  community  life.
1
  Creating  Green  Development  Standards  for 
Sackville  comes  from  a  recommendation  within  the  Sustainable  Sackville  Goals  and 
Actions.
2
    Specifically,  this  report  addresses  the  Built  Environment  goal  of  undertaking  a 
study  of  best  practices  on  green  development  standards,  Infrastructure  and  Adaption 
actions  that  call  for  safe  and  ample  water  supply,  as  well  as  responsible  storm‐water 
management.
3
  It  also  considers  the  Energy  Strategy  sections  that  address  renewable 
energy and amending the building code to increase energy efficiency.
4
   
The  purpose  of  Green  Development  Standards  for  Sackville  is  to  provide  a  range  of 
viable  policy  and  regulatory  alternatives  for  the  Town  of  Sackville  by  studying  the  best 
practices  and  initiatives  of  municipalities  in  Canada,  the  United  States,  and  around  the 
world. The report is laid out in three broad sections:  1) Water Conservation, 2) Renewable 
Energy, and 3) Green Building Standards.  Each section is further divided into subsections 
containing  actions  and  recommendations  that  can  be  used  to  achieve  the  overall  goal.    A 
number  of  appendices  provide  further  information  and  link  sample  municipal  bylaws,  as 
well as other relevant information.  The Town of Sackville will be able to use this report to 
implement  certain  sustainable  measures  into  its  policies  and  bylaws,  and  provide  an 
example to other municipalities in New Brunswick and across Canada to do the same. 
 
                                                           
 
1
 Tantramar District Planning Commission, “Sustainable Sackville”, Tantramar District Planning Commission, 2010, 
2‐3. 
2
 Tantramar District Planning Commission, “Sustainable Sackville”, Section 4.0. 
3
 Tantramar District Planning Commission, “Sustainable Sackville”, 10. 
4
 Tantramar District Planning Commission, “Sustainable Sackville”, 38. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  2 

2.0    Water Conservation 
Water  is  an  abundant  natural  resource  in  Sackville.  For  this  reason,  many  people 
question  the  need  to  introduce  policies  or  bylaws  that  regulate  its  consumption  in  this 
community. Indeed, it is noted in the following pages and attached appendices that many of 
the  more  stringent  water  conservation  bylaws  and  policies  have  emerged  from  Western 
Canada,  where  water  shortages  pose  a  persistent  problem.  However,  assuming  we  have 
lots  of  water  fails  to  take  into  account  the  long‐term  consequences  of  inadequately 
protecting  the  water  supply.  Clean  and  abundant  water  is  essential  for  both  ecosystems 
and  communities  to  prosper,
5
  and  as  such,  water  conservation  policies  should  not  be 
limited  to  reactionary  circumstances,  when  the  water  supply  has  become  so  depleted  or 
contaminated that it is essential to protect it. In addition, the over‐consumption of potable 
water  contributes  to  the  accumulation  of  sewage  and  wastewater  to  be  processed  and 
treated  before  it  can  re‐enter  the  natural  system.  Reducing  water  consumption  also 
minimizes the need for water treatment facilities, as well as the associated costs. 
Importantly,  water  conservation  policies  are  not  only  concerned  with  reducing 
consumption;  low  impact  development  (LID)  techniques  are  aimed  at  preserving  the 
natural hydrologic cycle that is often damaged by urban development and traditional storm 
management techniques.
6
  Urbanization increases hard or impervious surfaces, destroying 
natural  drainage  systems,  and  altering  the  hydrology  of  the  area.  Traditional  stormwater 
management  techniques  approach  runoff  as  “undesirable”,  and  encourage  the  creation  of 
infrastructure,  such  as  curbs  and  gutters,  to  quickly  remove  the  excess  water  from  urban 
areas.
7
  This  not  only  depletes  groundwater  supplies,  but  also  carries  urban  pollution  and 
contaminants  to  surface  water  bodies,  damaging  aquatic  habitat.
8
  By  minimizing 
impervious surfaces, and encouraging natural filtration, the contamination of surface water 
caused by untreated runoff entering the watershed can be averted.  A number of examples 
from the New England states and beyond are examined for compatibility with the Town of 
Sackville. 
  In  2010,  Nova  Scotia  recognized  the  need  for  a  proactive  approach  to  water 
protection, and released a long‐term strategy for the province entitled Water for Life, Nova 
Scotia’s Water Resource Strategy. Among other things, the strategy highlights the necessity 
of clean, fresh water for Nova Scotia’s ecosystems and economic prosperity.
9
 Although New 
                                                           
 
5
Nova Scotia Environment, “Water for Life, Nova Scotia’s Water Management Strategy”, Government of Nova 
Scotia, 3. 
http://www.gov.ns.ca/nse/water.strategy/docs/WaterStrategy_Water.Resources.Management.Strategy.pdf. 
6
 United States Environmental Protection Agency New England, “Incorporating Low Impact Development into 
Municipal Stormwater Programs”, US EPA, April 2009, 1. 
www.epa.gov/ne/npdes/stormwater/assets/pdfs/IncorporatingLID.pdf. 
7
 Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, Programs and Planning Division, 
“Low Impact Development Design Strategies”, Prince George’s County, June 1999, 1‐4. 
http://www.epa.gov/owow/NPS/lid/lidnatl.pdf.
 
8
 For more details on the environmental consequences of traditional stormwater management see Appendix 4. 
9
Nova Scotia Environment, “Water for Life, Nova Scotia’s Water Management Strategy”, 3. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  3 

Brunswick  is  both  unique  and  distinct  from  Nova  Scotia,  such  a  proactive  approach  to 
water  conservation  in  the  Maritimes  deserves  attention;  water  is  fundamental  to  the 
vitality of every province and community, and needs be conserved and protected for future 
generations, notwithstanding its relative abundance here in the Maritimes. Keeping this in 
mind,  this  section  will  examine  potential  water  conservation  policies  and  bylaws  for  the 
Town  of  Sackville.  First,  it  will  look  at  low‐flow  fixtures  as  a  simple,  yet  effective,  way  to 
reduce water consumption. Second, it will survey LID techniques to suggest more effective 
and environmentally‐friendly stormwater management techniques for the Sackville area.  
 
2.1  Reducing Water Consumption: Low­Flow Fixtures 
 
Low‐flow  fixtures,  including  toilets,  showerheads,  and  tap  aerators,  are  an  effective 
and  cost‐efficient  means  to  reduce  water  consumption,  and  thus  waste,  that  have  been 
adopted  by  several  Canadian  municipalities  and  provinces.  The  greatest  portion  of 
household  water,  on  average  28%,  is  used  by  the  toilet.
10
  Replacing  an  old  toilet,  which 
typically  uses  13‐25  litres  per  flush,  with  a  low‐flow  toilet  that  uses  6  litres  or  less,  can 
reduce household consumption up to 20%, or 30,000 litres of water per year for a family of 
four.
11
 Showerheads are the next greatest users of water, with flow rates of 15‐20 litres per 
minute  (lpm),  or  22%  of  household  water  use.  Kitchen  and  bathroom  faucets  have  flow 
rates  of  10‐20  lpm,  and  account  for  10‐15%  of  water  consumption.  By  installing  low‐flow 
showerheads  and  tap  aerators,  this  kind  of  water  consumption  can  be  cut  in  half.  Taken 
together,  low‐flow  toilets,  showerheads,  and  tap  aerators  can  reduce  household  water 
consumption as much as 30%.
12
  
 
2.1.1  Low­Flow Fixtures in Municipal Bylaws  
Low‐flow  toilets,  showerheads,  and  tap  aerators  are  commonly  combined  in  water 
conservation  bylaws,  policies,  building  codes,  and  green  building  standards  in  order  to 
achieve maximum water saving, although the flow‐rate and conditions attached vary.
13
 The 
majority  of  bylaws  require  the  installation  of  low‐flow  fixtures  in  new  construction  and 
when renovations involving plumbing fixtures occur. In some cases, this may apply only to 
residential  or  multi‐residential,  however  many  bylaws  also  require  low‐flow  fixtures  for 
commercial,  industrial,  institutional,  and  municipal  buildings.  Public  washrooms, 
particularly in Calgary, Sundre, and Edmonton, Alberta have stricter regulations for faucets, 
                                                           
 
10
 CRD Water Services, “Low Flow, The Only Way to Go”, Capitol Regional District. 
http://www.crd.bc.ca/water/conservation/household/toilets/documents/low‐flow‐brochure.pdf. 
11
CRD Water Services, “Low Flow, The Only Way to Go”. 
12
 Canadian Mortgage and Housing Water and Energy Saving Tips, “Install Water Conserving Fixtures,” Canadian 
Mortgage and Housing.  
http://www.cmhc‐schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/bude/himu/waensati/waensati_020.cfm. 
13
 For a comparison between the standards and conditions on low flow fixture bylaws and building codes see 
appendices 1‐3. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  4 

toilets  and  urinals  than  those  for  private  use.  There  are  even  some  small  towns,  such  as 
Sundre,  Cochrane, and Olds,  Alberta  that  have  stricter regulations for  all  low‐flow  fixtures 
than Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, the B.C. Building Code, the  Nova Scotia Building Code 
and green standards such as the R‐2000.
14
 In addition, a number of municipalities have also 
included  recommended  voluntary  measures,  rebates  and  incentives  to  encourage 
individuals to purchase low‐flow toilets and front loading washers.
15
  
 
2.1.2  Low­Flow Fixture Benefits 
Low‐flow fixtures, however, are not just an effective way to preserve the environment 
for both the community and local ecosystems, they are easy and cost‐efficient to install, and 
provide  quick  savings  for  the  individual.  Not  only  does  lower  water  consumption  reduce 
the  cost  for  the  water  itself,  but  also  the  costs  associated  with  water  heating.
16
  The 
following  diagrams  from  the  Canada  Mortgage  and  Housing  Association  demonstrate  the 
estimated rate of payback on toilets, showerheads and faucets: 
 
Table 1: Payback on Toilets
17

Typical annual toilet water consumption of a 
residence with three occupants 
100 m3 
Typical annual cost for water  Approximately $100 
Estimated replacement cost of toilets  Approximately $180/ toilet 
Annual  reduction  in  water  costs  with  low‐
flow toilet (6 litres maximum per flush) 
$75 savings per year 
Simple Payback  Less than three years 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
 
14
 For example, while the latter maintain a maximum flow rate of 9.5lpm for showerheads, the former’s regulation 
is  7.6lpm.  In  the  case  of  tap  aerators,  the  majority  again  conform  to  higher  standard,  8.3lpm,  while  Sundre, 
Cochrane, and Olds restrict the flow to 5.7lpm
 
15
 See Appendix 7 for more details. 
16
Canadian Mortgage and Housing Water and Energy Saving Tips, “Install Water Conserving Fixtures”.  
17
 Rate of payback will vary depending on flush capacity of existing toilets, number of flushes per occupant/day, 
fixture replacement/installation cost, and water and sewer costs/ cubic meter. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  5 

Table 2: Payback on Showerheads and Faucet Aerators:
18
 
Typical  cost  of  low  flow  showerheads  (9.5 
L/m) 
less than $10 per unit 
Typical  cost  of  low  flow  kitchen  and 
bathroom faucet aerators (8.35 L/m)  
approximately $1.50 per unit 
Annual  shower  and  water  faucet 
consumption  for  typical  faucet  and 
showerheads with three occupants 
135 m
3
 
Estimated replacement cost  ‐ $20 per suite 
Reduction  in  water  and  energy  costs  with 
low flow fixtures 
‐$100/ suite or 45% 
Simple Payback  Less than three months 
 
It  should  be  noted  that  these  tables  demonstrate  the  cost  savings  to  the  individual 
replacing  an  existing  fixture.  Payback  for  new  construction  would  begin  significantly 
sooner,  if  not  immediately,  since  in  most  cases,  the  cost  difference  between  low‐flow 
fixtures and non‐water saving fixtures is negligible.  
 
2.1.3  Recommendations for Sackville 
Given  the  relative  ease  of  installing  low‐flow  fixtures,  as  well  as  the  environmental 
and  financial  benefits,  a  bylaw  encompassing  low‐flow  toilets,  showerheads,  and  faucet 
aerators  is  an  easy  way  to  achieve  water  conservation  in  an  efficient  and  cost  effective 
manner.  The  cost  in  the  short  term  for  the  fixtures  is  quickly  outweighed  by  the  benefit, 
and the fixtures significantly cut down on water consumption in the building in which they 
are  installed.  It  would  not  cause  any  undue  stress  or  cost  to  Sackville  residents,  and,  as 
demonstrated by the adoption of such standards by other small Canadian municipalities, as 
Sundre,  Alberta,  and  the  province‐wide  adoption  of  mandatory  low‐flow  fixtures  in  the 
Nova  Scotia  Building  Code,  is  appropriate  for  a  town  of  Sackville’s  size  and  location. 
Therefore, it is recommended:  
i)
That  the  Town  of  Sackville,  in  partnership  with  other 
local 
org
anizations  (such  as  EOS)  undertake 
an  educational 
campaign on water conservation measures.
 
 
                                                           
 
18
 Rate of payback will vary depending on flow rates of existing fixtures, type of fuel used to heat water, typical 
shower usage, number of units replaced, fixture replacement cost, and water and sewer costs. For more 
information see Canadian Mortgage and Housing Water and Energy Saving Tips, “Install Water Conserving 
Fixtures,” Canadian Mortgage and Housing. http://www.cmhc‐
schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/bude/himu/waensati/waensati_020.cfm. 
 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  6 

ii)
That  the  Town  of  Sackville  consider  amending  or  developing  an 
appropriate by‐law to introduce mandatory low‐flow fixtures for 
all  types  of  construction,  including  residential,  industrial, 
commercial, and institutional;   
 
iii)
That  the  Town  apply  this  bylaw  to  all  new  construction  or 
renovations involving water fixtures; 
 
iv)
That  within  the 
appropriate  by
‐law,  the  Town  set  the 
following limits: 

maximum capacity for toilets at 6 litres;  

Setting  the  maximum  flow  rate  at  9.5 
litres  per 
minute (l
pm
)
 for showerheads; 

Setting  the  maximum  flow  rate  at  8.3  lpm  for  both 
kitchen and lavatory faucets. 
 
2.2  Ecological Stormwater Treatment 
 
Unlike communities in western Canada, the lack of water has rarely been a concern in 
Sackville.  Given the Town’s low‐lying topography, it is also important to acknowledge that 
freshwater  flooding  has  historically  been  an  issue,  with  the  last  major  flood  having 
occurred in the 1960s, a flood which is used as the basis for floodplain mapping used in the 
Town  and  by  the  Planning  Commission.    Considering  the  projections  related  to  climate 
change  in  Sackville  specifically,  which  include  increased  frequency  of  intense  rainfall 
events  which  could  lead  to  flooding,  stormwater  management  becomes  a  key  concern 
related to infrastructure and Town capital investment.
19
 
The  goal  of  ecological  stormwater  treatment  techniques,  such  as  Low  Impact 
Development  (LID),  “is  to  reduce  runoff  and  mimic  a  site’s  predevelopment  hydrology  by 
infiltrating,  filtering,  storing,  evaporating,  and  detaining  storm‐water  runoff.”
20
  LID 
accomplishes  this  by  using  and  re‐creating  natural  features  to  allow  the  water  flow, 
collection, and absorption to occur as close as possible to the natural hydrology of the land. 
To  do  this,  various  techniques  can  be  used,  including  bio‐retention  facilities,  permeable 
pavement,  rain  gardens,  green  roofs,  and  rain  barrels.  Unlike  traditional  stormwater 
management,  which  seeks  to  remove  water  as  quickly  as  possible  from  urban  areas,  LID 
sees “stormwater as a resource rather than a waste product,” and incorporates the rain into 
the landscape where it falls.
21
 
Because  of  LID’s  policy  of  treating  stormwater  at  the  source,  LID  can  be  adopted  at 
various  scales  –  from  a  residential  lot,  main  street,  or  parking  lot  to  an  entire  city  or 
                                                           
 
19
 The Tantramar Flood Risk Project has developed several storm scenarios and projections.  This is part of a wider 
collaborative effort being led by the NB Department of Environment.  www.atlanticadaptation.ca
 
20
 United States Environmental Protection Agency New England, “Incorporating Low Impact Development into 
Municipal Stormwater Programs”, 1. 
21
 United States Environmental Protection Agency New England, “Incorporating Low Impact Development into 
Municipal Stormwater Programs”, 1. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  7 

district.  Hence,  it  is  not  necessary  for  a  city  or  town  to  adopt  LID  techniques  for  all 
stormwater,  but  rather  every  small  project  contributes  to  the  larger  goal  of  reducing 
stormwater  drainage  and  the  contamination  of  surface  water.  Therefore,  it  is  possible  for 
the  Town  of  Sackville  to  identify  and  implement  a  number  of  LID  practices  without 
converting  its  whole  drainage  system.  Furthermore,  such  LID  projects  could  serve  as  an 
example  for  Sackville  residents  to  be  used  on  their  properties,  as  well  as  for  other 
municipalities.  
Another  example  of  ecological  stormwater  treatment  is  the  “net  zero”  approach  to 
development.  “Net Zero” is when storm water is treated as a site asset and is incorporated 
into  the  design  of  a  development.    A  design  standard  is  established  to  ensure  the  post‐
development  volumes  and  total  suspended  solids  concentrations  will  not  exceed  the  pre‐
development  volumes  and  concentrations.    Two  local  examples  are  presented  using  this 
approach. 
2.2.1  LID Techniques 
There are many LID practices and techniques that can be used to control stormwater 
and  minimize  urban  pollutants,  depending  on  the  size  and  location  of  the  developed  area. 
Municipalities  may  choose  to  regulate  new  developments  in  order  to  ensure  that  some 
natural  features  are  preserved,  and  impervious  areas  are  minimized,  thus  maintaining 
some  of  the  natural  hydrology  of  the  area.  According  to  the  US  Environmental  Protection 
Agency,  developers  “can  use  conservation  designs  to  preserve  important  features  on  the 
site  such  as  wetland  and  riparian  areas,  forested  tracks,  and  areas  of  porous  soils.”
22
  The 
conservation of land may take many forms, including arranging development into clusters, 
setting aside a percentage of land for open space, reducing the width of driveways, having 
shared  driveways,  or  reducing  housing  setbacks  in  order  to  allow  shorter  driveways. 
Reducing street widths, eliminating unnecessary parking spaces, and keeping sidewalks to 
one  side  of  a  primary  road,  preferably  separated  by  a  buffer,  also  helps  to  reduce 
unnecessary runoff.
23
   
In addition, the natural drainage of new developments may be further guaranteed by 
ensuring  that  impervious  areas  remain  as  disconnected  as  possible,  and,  where  possible, 
permeable materials are used in their place.
24
 Runoff from rooftops, driveways, roads, and 
other impervious surfaces can be redirected into natural areas to be infiltrated, or captured 
in rain barrels for future use in gardens and other non‐potable uses. Large paved areas can 
be  designed  to  divide the  flow  directions to  allow  the  separate  treatment  of  smaller  flows 
                                                           
 
22
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, US EPA, December 2007, 3. 
http://www.epa.gov/owow/NPS/lid/costs07/documents/reducingstormwatercosts.pdf. 
23
 Maine Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Land & Water Quality, “Maine Stormwater Best 
Management Practices”, Government of Maine, January 2006,  3‐3. 
http://www.maine.gov/dep/blwq/docstand/stormwater/stormwaterbmps/index.htm.
 
24
 United States Environmental Protection Agency New England, “Incorporating Low Impact Development into 
Municipal Stormwater Programs”, 3. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  8 

on‐site
25
  or  existing  topography  can  be  maintained  to  ensure  diverse  flow  paths.
26
  In 
addition, pervious paving stones and gravel can be used to replace traditional materials for 
parking lots and driveways. Contrary to popular myth, pervious  paving stones do function 
effectively  during  winter  months,  speeding  snow  and  ice  melt,  and  dramatically  reducing 
the need for road salt.
27
 This is an additional benefit to LID techniques, as salt runoff from 
roads and parking areas contaminates both surface and ground water, destroying sensitive 
habitat  of  animal  and  fish  species.
28
  Green  roofs  also  contribute,  among  other  things,  to 
reducing storm‐water runoff and overflow.
29
 
Some  municipalities  may  wish  to  adopt  LID  techniques  for  more  than  just  new 
developments  and  drain  areas  that  are  already  constructed.  Furthermore,  the  above 
techniques  may  not  be  sufficient  for  developments,  making  additional  drainage  systems 
necessary to ensure the proper removal of stormwater. There are several natural vegetated 
systems  that  can  be  created  to  control  and  filter  stormwater  flow  for  different  locations, 
from property owners in residential areas to streetscapes and parking lots.  
One of the principal ways additional stormwater is processed is through bio‐retention 
structures,  which  capture,  hold,  and  filter  the  water.  Bio‐retention  was  developed  in  the 
1990s  by  Prince  George’s  County  in  Maryland  as  a  way  to  use  a  conditioned  planning  soil 
bed  to  treat  stormwater  runoff.
30
  According  to  Prince  George’s  County,  bio‐retention  is  a 
“water  quality  control  practice  using  the  chemical,  biological,  and  physical  properties  of 
plants,  microbes,  and  soils  for  removal  of  pollutants  from  storm‐water  runoff.”
31
  Bio‐
retention  designs  come  in  many  shapes  sizes,  and  designs  depending  on  the  location  (e.g. 
parking  lot,  street)  and  level  of  filtration  needed  (those  located  next  to  gas  stations,  and 
other  high  pollution  areas  require  more  intensive  filtration  designs).  However,  they  have 
several key features including a ponding area, ground cover layer, planting soil, in situ soil, 
plant  material,  inlet  and  outlet  controls.
32
  The  most  common  bio‐retention  projects  for 
residential  areas  are  called  rain  gardens,  and  are  relatively  simple  to  build.  Essentially,  a 
rain  garden  is  a  depression  in  the  ground  designed  to  capture  and  hold  water,  typically 
                                                           
 
25
 Maine Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Land & Water Quality, “Maine Stormwater Best 
Management Practices”, 3‐4. 
26
 Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, Programs and Planning Division, 
“Low Impact Development Design Strategies”, 2‐9. 
27
 United States Environmental Protection Agency New England, “Incorporating Low Impact Development into 
Municipal Stormwater Programs”, 3. 
28
 See Appendix 6 for more details. 
29
 Ryerson University, “Report on the Environmental Benefits and Costs of Green Roof Technology for the City of 
Toronto”, City of Toronto and Ontario Centres of Excellence – Earth and Environmental Technologies (OCE‐ETech), 
October 31, 2005, ii. http://www.toronto.ca/greenroofs/findings.htm.
 
30
 Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, Programs and Planning Division 
“Low‐Impact Design Strategies, An Integrated Design Approach”, 4‐8/9.  
31
 Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, “Bioretention Manual”, Prince 
George’s County, December 2007, 2. 
http://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/der/esg/bioretention/bioretention.asp.
 
32
 Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, Programs and Planning Division 
“Low‐Impact Design Strategies, An Integrated Design Approach”, 4‐9.
 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  9 

from roof runoff. The size of the garden depends on the size of the roof being drained.
33
 In 
urban  areas,  more  complex  bio‐retention  units  can  be  used  to  drain  parking  lots,  main 
streets,  and  other  impervious  areas.  As  can  be  seen  from  these  examples,  on‐site 
stormwater  control  practices  such  as  bio‐retention  serve  a  practical  purpose,  removing 
stormwater and filtering out pollutants, but also can be easily integrated into landscaping, 
and provide an aesthetic appeal in addition to the functional benefit.
34
  
Low  impact  landscaping  is  another  LID  option  for  both  residential  and  commercial 
developments. Low impact landscaping techniques utilize specific plants to reduce labour, 
water,  and  chemical  inputs
35
.  Native  plants,  drought  tolerant  plants,  converting  turf  to 
shrubs  and  trees,  reforestation,  longer  grasses,  and  wildflower  meadows  are  all  examples 
of low impact landscaping that can  be employed to meet these ends.
36
 
 
2.2.2  LID and Municipal Stormwater Management 
LID  practices  are  popular  in  many  municipalities  across  the  US,  and  have  been 
adopted as official policy by several states, including Maine, New Hampshire, New England, 
and  Massachusetts.  There  have  been  a  number  of  model  ordinances prepared  by  both  the 
states  and  private  groups  for  implementation  in  American  municipalities,  which  provide 
excellent  examples  for  the  adoption  of  LID  techniques.
37
  New  Hampshire  has  published 
model  ordinances  on  low  impact  landscaping,  and  stormwater  management,  while 
Massachusetts  published  a  general  ordinance  on  low  impact  Development.
38
  Horsley 
Witten  Group  prepared  stormwater  management  bylaws  for  the  towns  of  Duxbury, 
Marshfield  and  Plymouth,  Massachusetts.
39
  All  these  model  ordinances  provide  for 
extensive  transformation  of  the  municipal  stormwater  system  and  landscaping  design 
along  the  LID  principals,  although  they  include  some  exceptions.  LID  is  also  common  in 
Britain, where it is known as Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS), and is promoted by the 
Scottish  Environmental  Protection  Agency,  the  Environment  and  Heritage  Service  in 
                                                           
 
33
 For more information see University of Connecticut, “Rain Gardens, A Guide for Homeowners”. 
http://www.sustainability.uconn.edu/pdf/raingardenbroch.pdf.
 
34
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, 4. 
35
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, 5. 
36
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, 5. 
37
 For a comparison between LID ordinances see Appendix 5. 
38
 New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, “Innovative Land Use Planning Techniques”, 
Government of New Hampshire,  October 2008. 
http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/repp/documents/ilupt_complete_handbook.pdf. 
Smart Growth/Smart Energy Tool Kit, “Model Impact Development (LID) Bylaw, Massachusetts Office of Coastal 
Management Zone. http://www.mass.gov/envir/smart_growth_toolkit/bylaws/LID‐Bylaw.pdf.
 
39
 Horsley Witten Group, “Model Stormwater Management Bylaw”, Prepared for the Towns of Duxbury, Marshfield 
& Plymouth, December 31, 2004. http://www.horsleywitten.com/pubs/MSM‐bylaw‐regs.pdf. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  10 

Northern Ireland and the Environmental Agency for England and Wales as a way for British 
municipalities to mitigate surface water contamination and flooding risk.
40
  
While  use  of  LID  principals  has  become  more  common  in  the  New  England  states, 
they have yet to find wide spread acceptance in Canada; however, there has been a growing 
trend  in  stormwater  management  techniques  using  LID,  particularly  in  Western  Canada. 
The  Greater  Vancouver  Regional  District  (GVRD)  has  adopted  a  manual  to  aid 
municipalities  in  implementing  some  LID  measures
41
,  and  the  City  of  Coquitlam  has 
recently released the Low Impact Development Policy and Procedures Manual.
42
 The District 
of  Lantzville,  B.C.  updated  its  Subdivision  and  Development  Bylaw  in  2005  to  reflect  LID 
principals.
43
  Some  municipalities  in  Alberta  have  also  adopted  bylaws  with  voluntary 
measures that encourage the use of rain barrels and ecological landscaping, using local and 
drought  tolerant  plants  in  residential  areas  in  order  to  minimize  water  consumption,  as 
well  as  fertilizers  and  pesticides.
44
  In  addition,  Port  Coquitlam  B.C.,  Richmond  B.C.,  and 
Toronto have all recognized the benefits of green roofs, and adopted bylaws that mandate 
their  use  on  buildings  over  a  certain  size.
45
  LID  techniques  have  also  been  adopted  in 
individual  projects,  such  as  the  Crown  Street  redevelopment  project  in  Vancouver,  which 
retrofitted  1,100‐foot  block  with  a  naturalised  streetscape  designed  to  retain  over  90 
percent of its stormwater. Among other things, the project reduced street width from 28 to 
21  feet,  and  introduced  vegetated  roadside  swales  and  structured  grass  (grass  that  is 
supported in order to prevent its compaction and enable infiltration).
46
 
2.2.3  LID Costs 
One  of  the  main  questions  for  municipalities  is  the  difference  in  cost  between  LID 
techniques  and  traditional  stormwater  management.  A  report  put  out  by  the  US  EPA 
suggests  that  LID  strategies,  in  most  cases,  reduces  costs  between  15%  and  80%  when 
compared  to  traditional  stormwater  management.
47
  The  report  surveyed  seventeen 
different  LID  projects  across  the  US  and  Canada,  and  compared  them  to  the  cost  of 
completing  the  project  with  traditional  infrastructure.  Although  in  one  case,  the  costs  did 
                                                           
 
40
 UK Environmental Agency, “Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS) An Introduction”, Environmental Agency, 3. 
http://81.29.86.172/~nwdatk99/toolkit/docs/25‐SUDS_EA.pdf. 
41
 Lanarc Consultants Ltd., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd., & Goya Ngan, “Stormwater Source Control Design 
Guidelines 2005”, Greater Vancouver Regional District, 2005. 
http://www.waterbucket.ca/rm/sites/wbcrm/documents/media/65.pdf. 
42
 Dayton and Knight, Ltd. Consulting Engineers, “City of Coquitlam Low Impact Development Policy and 
Procedures Manual”, Coquitlam, January 2005. http://www.coquitlam.ca/NR/rdonlyres/2D5BEB15‐F830‐49A0‐
BC6E‐C09F03374665/33947/LowImpactDevelopmentPolicyProceduresManualV3WithCo.pdf. 
43
 District of Lantzville, “District of Lantzville Subdivision and Development Bylaw No. 55 2005”, District of 
Lantzville. 
http://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/Library/Bylaws_From_Local_Governments/Land_Use_Zoning/Subdivision_and_Develo
pment_Bylaw‐‐Lantzville‐‐2005.pdf/. 
44
 See Appendix 7 for more information on the various voluntary measures implemented by municipalities. 
45
 See Appendix 6 for more information on green roof bylaws. 
46
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, 16. 
47
 For more information see United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through 
Low Impact Development (LID) Strategies and Practices”, US EPA, December 2007. 
http://www.epa.gov/owow/NPS/lid/costs07/documents/reducingstormwatercosts.pdf. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  11 

exceed  the  traditional  curb‐and‐gutter,  it  is  perhaps  not  surprising  that  on  the  whole  the 
reduced amount of infrastructure required for LID strategies resulted in significant savings. 
The report noted that the main variables determining cost difference were plant material, 
site  preparation,  soil  amendments,  under  drains,  connection  to  municipal  storm‐water 
systems, and increased project management.
48
 However, it also noted a number of benefits 
to  LID  systems  that  could  not  be  calculated  in  monetary  terms,  including  aesthetic  value, 
rising real estate prices, and more public spaces.
49
 
2.2.4  Net Zero Policies 
Net  Zero  is  another  way  to  look  at  storm  water  management  from  an  urban 
perspective.      There  are  two  New  Brunswick  examples  where  a  design  standard  has  been 
established for industrial developments to ensure the post‐development volumes and total 
suspended  solids  concentrations  will  not  exceed  the  pre‐development  volumes  and 
concentrations.   For example, the City of Moncton seeks to incorporate green space areas 
and  include  conservation  measures  along  water  courses  and  wetlands  that  fall  within  its 
industrial development zones.  Specifically, Policy 6.1.7, the Moncton Municipal Plan states: 
“With  respect  to  introducing  better  storm  water  management  approaches  to  minimize 
impacts  on  the  environment,  individual  property  owners  will  be  responsible  for  the 
controlled  discharge  of  storm  water  from  their  property.  With  a  standard  of  net  zero 
developers in the city’s industrial parks will be required to adopt practices to meet such a 
standard.”
50
    Further,  Section  6.1.8  then  states  that  City  Council  requires,  “a  zero  net 
discharge  of  storm  water  from  industrial  properties  and  shall  require  the  City’s 
Engineering  Department  incorporate  these  measures  into  the  drainage  plan  approval 
process  prior  to  a  development  and  building  permit  being  issued.”    The  onus  is  on  the 
developer to meet these guidelines and provide plans that guarantee the net zero outcome 
of stormwater discharge into the storm sewers. 
The  second  local  example  comes  from  the  City  of  Dieppe  which  has  developed  a 
similar policy for industrial areas, as well as for residential and commercial areas within its 
boundary.
51
  The City incorporated storm water retention ponds in its industrial park as an 
economic  and  environmental  response  to  potential  issues.    Through  its  municipal  plan 
policies,  the  City  requires  that,  “The  increase  in  run‐off  that  can  result  from  new 
development is minimized through ‘net‐zero’ surface water management practices and the 
use  of  storm  water  retention  ponds  and  other  appropriate  storm  water  management 
techniques.”    Such  policies  are  complimented  by  proposals  by  the  City  to  construct 
retention  ponds  in  strategic  areas  of  the  community,  acquiring  lands  for  public  purposes 
from  developers  on  which  to  develop  low  impact  measures,  and  to  formally  adopt  using 
                                                           
 
48
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, 9. 
49
 United States Environmental Protection Agency, “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low Impact Development 
(LID) Strategies and Practices”, 8‐9. 
50
  City of Moncton Municipal Development Plan, By‐law Z‐102.  Consolidated October 14, 2011. 
http://www.gmpdc.ca/webcura/files/779.pdf
 
51
  City of Dieppe Municipal Development Plan, By‐law Z‐6, 2008.  http://www.gmpdc.ca/webcura/files/431.pdf
 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  12 

less  conventional,  more  environmentally‐friendly  storm‐water  management  techniques  in 
all developments.
52
 
2.2.5  Recommendations for Sackville 
While  these  techniques  are  gaining  increasing  recognition  both  in  Canada  and 
internationally, the question remains as to how they pertain to Sackville, and what can be 
adopted to improve the treatment of stormwater runoff. While it is certainly worthwhile to 
review the precedents set by other municipalities, and tailor them to meet local conditions 
in  Sackville,  the  transformation  of  the  current  stormwater  management  system  would 
require a transitional period. According to Prince George’s County, one of the cornerstones 
of  the  LID  approach  is  public  outreach.  This  both  encourages  the  installation  of  LID 
techniques into private developments, and ensures the proper maintenance once installed 
into new developments. Without knowledge of what LID is, and how it works, LID systems 
in  private  developments  will  not  function  in  the  long‐term  due  to  lack  of  proper 
maintenance. By introducing certain educational materials and programs, as well as a few 
pilot  projects,  the  Town  of  Sackville  could  not  only  begin  to  disseminate  further 
information on the benefits of LID strategies, and encourage homeowners to adopt them as 
part  of  their  landscaping,  but  also,  in  the  long  term,  begin  to  lay  the  groundwork  for 
implementing  these  practices  in  new  developments,  and  in  various  parts  of  the  town. 
Therefore the following recommendations are put forward for consideration: 
v)
That the Town of Sackville share information on LID techniques  with 
the  community.  This  may  include  partnering  with  the  Community 
Garden  or  other  local  organizations  in  order  to  offer  workshops  on 
LID  techniques,  such  as  a  course  in  rain  garden  construction  for 
residential areas; 
vi)
That  the  Town  create  an  incentive  program  to  encourage 
establishment  of  rain  gardens  or  rain  barrels  on  private  sites  ($50 
rebates on plants or work). 
 
vii)
That  the  Town  introduce  a  pilot  project(s)  into  the  downtown  to 
demonstrate  the  benefits  of  the  LID  approach  to  storm‐water 
management; and 
 
viii)
That the Town work towards adopting a bylaw that introduces LID or 
net‐zero drainage techniques for new developments. 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
 
52
 Section 3.2.2.2, City of Dieppe Municipal Development Plan. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  13 

2.3  Further Reading 
Canadian Mortgage and Housing Water and Energy Saving Tips. “Install Water Conserving 
Fixtures”. Canadian Mortgage and Housing. http://www.cmhc‐
schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/bude/himu/waensati/waensati_020.cfm
 
City of Dieppe, City of Dieppe Municipal Development Plan.  2008.  Prepared by the Greater 
Moncton Planning District Commission.  
http://www.gmpdc.ca/webcura/files/431.pdf
 
City of Moncton, City of Moncton Municipal Development Plan.  Consolidated October 14, 
2011.  Prepared by the Greater Moncton Planning District Commission. 
http://www.gmpdc.ca/webcura/files/779.pdf
 
Dayton and Knight, Ltd. Consulting Engineers. “City of Coquitlam Low Impact Development 
Policy and Procedures Manual”. Coquitlam. January 2005. 
http://www.coquitlam.ca/NR/rdonlyres/2D5BEB15‐F830‐49A0‐BC6E‐
C09F03374665/33947/LowImpactDevelopmentPolicyProceduresManualV3WithC
o.pdf
  
Horsley Witten Group. “Model Stormwater Management Bylaw”. Prepared for the Towns of 
Duxbury, Marshfield & Plymouth. December 31, 2004. 
http://www.horsleywitten.com/pubs/MSM‐bylaw‐regs.pdf
  
Lanarc Consultants Ltd., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd., & Goya Ngan. “Stormwater 
Source Control Design Guidelines 2005”. Greater Vancouver Regional District. 2005. 
http://www.waterbucket.ca/rm/sites/wbcrm/documents/media/65.pdf
  
Maine Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Land & Water Quality. “Maine 
Stormwater Best Management Practices”. Government of Maine. January 2006. 
http://www.maine.gov/dep/blwq/docstand/stormwater/stormwaterbmps/index.
htm
  
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. “Innovative Land Use Planning 
Techniques”. Government of New Hampshire. October 2008. 
http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/repp/documents/ilupt_co
mplete_handbook.pdf
  
Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, Programs and 
Planning Division. “Low‐Impact Design Strategies, An Integrated Design Approach”. 
Prince George’s County. June 1999. http://www.epa.gov/owow/NPS/lid/lidnatl.pdf
  
Prince George’s County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources. “Bio‐retention 
Manual”. Prince George’s County. December 2007. 
http://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/der/esg/bioretention/bioretention.asp
  
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  14 

Ryerson University. “Report on the Environmental Benefits and Costs of Green Roof 
Technology for the City of Toronto”. City of Toronto and Ontario Centres of 
Excellence – Earth and Environmental Technologies (OCE­ETech). October 31, 2005. 
http://www.toronto.ca/greenroofs/findings.htm
  
Smart Growth/Smart Energy Tool Kit. “Model Impact Development (LID) Bylaw. 
Massachusetts Office of Coastal Management Zone. 
http://www.mass.gov/envir/smart_growth_toolkit/bylaws/LID‐Bylaw.pdf
  
UK Environmental Agency. “Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS) An Introduction”. 
Environmental Agency. http://81.29.86.172/~nwdatk99/toolkit/docs/25‐
SUDS_EA.pdf
  
United States Environmental Protection Agency New England (EPA). “Incorporating Low 
Impact Development into Municipal Stormwater Programs”. US EPA, April 2009. 
www.epa.gov/ne/npdes/stormwater/assets/pdfs/IncorporatingLID.pdf
  
United States Environmental Protection Agency. “Reducing Stormwater Costs through Low 
Impact Development (LID) Strategies and Practices”. US EPA. December 2007. 
http://www.epa.gov/owow/NPS/lid/costs07/documents/reducingstormwatercos
ts.pdf
  
University of Connecticut. “Rain Gardens, A Guide for Homeowners”. University of 
Connecticut. http://www.sustainability.uconn.edu/pdf/raingardenbroch.pdf
  
Washington State University and Puget Sound Action Team. “Low Impact Development, 
Technical Guidance Manual for Puget Sound”. Washington State University. January 
2005. http://www.psp.wa.gov/downloads/LID/LID_manual2005.pdf
  
 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  15 

3.0   Renewable Energy 
Support  for  renewable  energy  systems  that  provide  clean  alternatives  to  traditional 
energy  sources  is  on  the  rise  both  in  Canada  and  internationally.  In  a  recent  report,  the 
Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate  Change  (ICPP)  suggests  that  close  to  80  percent  of  the 
world’s energy supply could be generated by alternative sources if it has the support of public 
policies.  If  this  occurs,  between  220  and  560  gigatonnes  of  greenhouse  gas  emissions  (GHGs) 
could  be  saved  from  2010‐2050.
53
  In  Canada,  Natural  Resource  Canada’s  CanmetENERGY 
program  is  aimed  at  developing  alternative  energy  technologies  in  order  to  meet  energy 
demands
54
.  New  Brunswick  is  following  in  this  trend,  and  has  committed  to  increasing  the 
amount  of  energy  generated  by  alternative  sources,  including  hydro,  wind,  and  biomass.
55
 
Currently,  however,  the  majority  of  New  Brunswick’s  power  (53%)  is  derived  from  GHG 
emitting sources, coal, oil, and natural gas.
56
 
Table 3: 2010­2011 NB Power Distribution
57
 
Fuel 
Percent 
Nuclear  0% 
Oil  16% 
Hydro  17% 
Purchases  27% 
Wind  2% 
Biomass  1% 
Coal  25% 
Natural Gas  12% 
 
However, while governments tend to focus on large scale generation projects, there are 
a number of small renewable energy systems, particularly wind and solar, that individuals can 
use to generate their own clean energy while simultaneously reducing their power bills. Often 
the  main  obstacle  to  the  use  of  these  kinds  of  systems  is  municipal  policies  which  prohibit 
their  use,  or  insufficient  regulations  to  protect  and  encourage  individuals  to  purchase  and 
make  use  of  them.  By  adopting  zoning  bylaws  and  policies  that  favour  the  use  of  renewable 
                                                           
 
53
 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (ICPP) Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate 
Change Mitigation, “PRESS RELEASE: Potential of Renewable Energy Outlined in Report by the Intergovernmental 
Panel on Climate Change”, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, May 9, 2011. http://srren.ipcc‐
wg3.de/press/content/potential‐of‐renewable‐energy‐outlined‐report‐by‐the‐intergovernmental‐panel‐on‐
climate‐change. 
54
 Natural Resources Canada CanmetENERGY, “Renewables”, Natural Resources Canada. http://canmetenergy‐
canmetenergie.nrcan‐rncan.gc.ca/eng/renewables.html. 
55
 Government of New Brunswick, “Renewable Energy Sources”, Government of New Brunswick. 
http://www.gnb.ca/0085/renewable‐e.asp. 
56
 Jeannot Volpe and William M. Thomson, “Final Report, New Brunswick Energy Commission”, New Brunswick 
Energy Commission, 2010‐2011, 8. http://www.gnb.ca/0085/pdf/EnergyCommFinal%20Report%20English.pdf. 
57
 Jeannot Volpe and William M. Thomson, “Final Report, New Brunswick Energy Commission”, 8. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  16 

energy systems, municipalities can aid in the movement away from traditional power sources, 
decreasing GHG emissions while providing viable alternatives for the future.   
The  Town  of  Sackville  can  contribute  to  the  movement  toward  renewable  energy  by 
reviewing  its  current  zoning  bylaws  and  policies  and  revising  them  to  permit  the  use  of 
alternative small energy systems. This next section will provide a synthesis of the bylaws and 
policies set out by other municipalities in order to suggest the best practices to both encourage 
and  permit  the  use  of  small  renewable  energy  systems  for  the  Town  of  Sackville.  First,  it will 
examine  the  current  status  of  small  wind  energy  systems  bylaws,  key  considerations,  and 
common  concerns.  Second,  it  will  look  at  solar  access  and  solar  siting  laws,  bylaws,  and 
regulations that would facilitate the use of solar energy devices in the Town of Sackville. 
 
3.1  Small Wind Energy Systems 
 
 Small wind power systems have gained increasing popularity as a way for individuals to 
generate clean renewable energy for their home or business, while simultaneously decreasing 
the cost of their utility bill. Notably, this trend for micro‐generation has taken off in the United 
States, which currently leads the world’s production in small wind turbines
58
. In Canada, wind 
power  generation  is  relatively  new.  Nonetheless,  provincial  governments  in  Ontario,  PEI,  and 
Nova Scotia have all indicated support of wind and renewable energy in their planning acts.   It 
is  up  to  municipal  governments  to  implement  bylaws  that  allow  small  wind  energy  systems; 
however,  to  date  the  majority  of  local  governments  have  focused  on  large‐scale  commercial 
wind  farms  due  to  pressure  from  commercial  wind  developers.
59
  Despite  this,  there  are  a 
growing number of both Canadian and American municipalities that have adopted small wind 
energy systems into their zoning bylaw, although the standards  and conditions attached vary 
widely.
60
 Due to its geography, the Town of Sackville is in an ideal position to take advantage 
of the advances in small wind power technology, and reduce its carbon footprint by permitting 
small  wind  energy  systems  in  its  zoning  bylaw.  Although  the  Town  of  Sackville  Zoning  Bylaw 
No.  212  does  allow  for  small  wind  systems  in  Rural  Residential  (RR)  zones, 
Industrial/Business  Park  (IND)  zones,  and  Agricultural/  Conservation  (A/C)  zones,  they  are 
not permitted in any urban zone.
61
 It is therefore necessary to consider changes to the zoning 
bylaw  in  order  to  allow  residents,  businesses,  and  institutions  within  the  town  to  take 
advantage of small wind energy systems. 
                                                           
 
58
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “Distributed and Community Wind”, AWEA. 
http://www.awea.org/learnabout/smallwind/index.cfm. 
59
 eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study, 
Development of Siting Guidelines and A Model Zoning By‐law for Small Wind Turbines”, Canadian Wind Energy 
Association (CanWEA), Revised April 2006, 5. 
http://www.canwea.ca/swe/pdf/canwea_small_wind_siting_guidelines_en.pdf   
60
 See Appendix 8 for more information on municipal bylaws concerning wind energy systems. 
61
 Town of Sackville, “Town of Sackville Zoing By‐law No. 212”, 2008, 35‐56. 
http://www.sackville.com/assets/uploads/files/2011/5/BY‐_LAW_NO._212‐_ZONING_BY‐_LAW.pdf. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  17 

3.1.1  Key Considerations 
1) Power Output 
The  primary  opportunity  for  the  Town  of  Sackville  is  in  “micro”  or  “mini”  wind  energy 
systems,  which  are  used  as  a  supplement  to  the  power  provided  from  local  utilities.  If  wind 
speeds are too slow (usually below 2/3 metres per second), there will be no output from the 
turbine.  However,  as  wind  speeds  increases,  the  amount  purchased  from  the  utility  will 
simultaneously  decrease.
62
  The  amount  of  energy  derived  from  a  micro  wind  system  varies 
depending on wind speed and turbine size (e.g.  1kW). There is currently no consensus on the 
definition  of  a  micro  wind  energy  system  among  Canadian  zoning  bylaws,  American  zoning 
ordinances,  or  manufacturers.  However,  the  Canadian  Wind  Energy  Association  (CanWEA) 
offers  the  following  description  after  a  survey  of  Canadian  small  wind  turbine  retailers, 
manufacturers,  and  other  stakeholders:  wind  turbines  up  to  1kW  typically  mounted  on  11‐
20m  towers.
63
  Despite  this  definition,  however,  the  Town  of  Sackville  may  wish  to  consider 
allowing a higher power output than defined by CanWEA as micro turbines. In Nova Scotia, the 
Municipality  of  East  Hants  and  has  chosen  to  remain  within  this  boundary,  and  permit  mini 
wind  turbines  no  greater  than  1kW  in  all  zones.  Nonetheless,  the  Town  of  Stratford,  PEI,  has 
set  the  maximum  capacity  is  5kW  rather  than  1kW,  and  many  other  municipalities,  including 
Toronto, have not specified a maximum capacity, instead depending on the required setback to 
regulate the height of the tower permitted, and thus the maximum size of turbine which can be 
usefully set at such a height. 
2) Setback Distance 
The  setback  distance,  which  indicates  how  far  a  turbine  must  be  situated  from  a 
neighbouring  building  or  property  boundary,  is  an  essential  component  of  bylaws  governing 
wind  turbines.  Although  there  is  wide  variation  in  setback  regulations  throughout  North 
America,  both  the  American  Wind  Energy  and  Association  (AWEA)  and  the  Canadian  Wind 
Energy Association (CanWEA) agree that the most common standard is the height of the tower 
plus  the  length  of  a  single  blade.
64
  CanWEA  suggests  that  in  some  circumstances  it  has  been 
recommended that mini turbines could be set back just two‐thirds the height; nonetheless, it is 
still most common to setback the turbine a minimum of its height from any road, utility lines, 
or right of way
65
. Although, as AWEA notes, today small wind turbines are made to withstand 
hurricane  force  winds,  and  therefore  it  is  highly  unlikely  that  they  would  come  down  even 
during  severe  winter  storms,  in  the  improbable  case  of  malfunction,  and  to  alleviate  the 
concern of neighbouring residents, the former setback is still the primary standard.  
                                                           
 
62
 CanWEA Small Wind Energy, “FAQ”, CanWEA. 
http://www.canwea.ca/swe/faq.php?id=6#howdoresturbineswork. 
63
 eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study”, 3. 
64
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest: How and Why to Permit for Small Wind 
Systems, A Guide for State and Local Governments”, AWEA, September 2008, 8. 
http://www.awea.org/learnabout/smallwind/index.cfm. 
   eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study”, 14. 
65
  eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study”, 14. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  18 

3) Tower Height and Lot Size: 
The  height  of  the  turbine’s  tower  is  not  always  regulated  by  zoning  bylaws.  Some  feel 
that the turbine height should be limited in residential areas  due to aesthetic and neighbourly 
considerations,  and  therefore  height  is  controlled  in  some  zoning  bylaws.
66
  However,  others 
feel  that  the  setback  restrictions  coupled  with  the  maximum  height  recommended  by  the 
manufacturer  is  sufficient  to  restrict  the  height  of  the  turbine.  Thus,  the  recently  enacted 
bylaw in the Town of Stratford, PEI only contains the clause that the turbine’s height must not 
exceed  that  recommended  by  the  manufacturer;  however  the  setback  restrictions  are  2.1 
times  the  turbine’s  height,  sufficiently  ensuring  that  small  lots  will  have  much  smaller  wind 
energy systems than those with more space.
67
  
Similarly, AWEA suggests that lot size regulations, which limit the height and size of the 
turbine,  have  “no  meaningful  effects”  as  setback  requirements  are  usually  more  restrictive, 
rendering further regulation unnecessary.
68
 
4) Turbine Density 
The majority of bylaws limit wind energy systems to one per lot in urban areas.  However 
Great Falls, MT, permits more than one to be present provided that all the standards are met. If 
this is desired by the municipality, AWEA suggests there should be no problem allowing more 
than one turbine per lot without any additional regulation.
69
   
5) Rotor Diameter and Blade Clearance: 
Both  rotor  diameter  and  blade  clearance  from  above  the  grade  or  roofline  are 
occasionally  regulated  by  zoning  bylaws.    Since  the  Town  of  Sackville  would  include  only 
micro  turbines  within  the  urban  limits,  regulating  the  rotor  diameter  and  blade  clearance  is 
most likely sufficiently governed by the output of the turbine.  
6) Sound 
The  sound  generated  by  wind  turbines  has  decreased  significantly  over  the  years. 
Today’s  turbines  have  better  insulation,  lower  rotation  speeds,  fewer  moving  parts,  no 
gearboxes,  and  more  efficient  blades  that  make  them  barely  audible  over  ambient  sounds.
70
 
Only  during  major  storms  do  turbines  increase  significantly  in  noise,  however  during  these 
events the ambient noise tends to increase as well, sufficiently masking the increase in sound 
generated  from  the  turbines.  Some  bylaws,  however,  have  chosen  to  regulate  the  sound  level 
to ensure minimal disturbance of the neighbourhood as possible. In addition, the World Health 
Organization  (WTO)  notes  that  non‐continuous  noise  of  45  decibels  (dBA)  and  continuous 
indoor noise at 30dBA will disturb sleep patterns. Therefore, the WTO and recommends that a 
                                                           
 
66
 eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study”, 13. 
67
 See Appendix 8 for small wind energy systems bylaws. 
68
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest”, 9. 
69
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest”, 14. 
70
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest”, 11.  
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  19 

30  dBA  standard  should  be  set  to  prevent  sleep  disturbance.
71
  Most  municipalities  have 
chosen  not  to  regulate  the  sound  of  wind  turbines,  however  the  Town  of  Stratford,  PEI,  has 
specified that sound “shall not exceed more than 5 decibels (dBA) above background sound, as 
measured at the exterior of the closest neighbouring inhabited dwelling for wind speeds below 
10m/s except during short term events such as utility outages and/or severe wind storms”. In 
addition, the bylaw states that the maximum allowed sound in residential areas shall be 45dBA 
for wind speed 10m/s as measured at the exterior of the existing (or future) closest dwelling. 
The responsibility for ensuring compliance to these standards rests with the town staff.
72
 
7) Visual Appearance 
  
Some  bylaws  have  chosen  to  regulate  the  appearance  of  the  wind  turbine  system, 
prohibiting  signage  and  commercial  markings,  as  well  as  appropriate  colour  schemes.  If 
there  is  general  concern  to  the  aesthetics  of  the  wind  energy  systems,  this  may  be  an 
effective way to mitigate it. However, such a clause is at the discretion of the town.  
 
8) Removal 
 
Particularly  in  the  US,  some  towns  require  a  policy  that  ensures  the  removal  of 
turbines  which  no  longer  function  to  prevent  it  becoming  an  eyesore.  Once  again,  this  is 
entirely at the town’s discretion. 
 
3.1.3  Other Concerns 
  
Property  Values  –  To  date,  neither  micro  wind  energy  systems  nor  commercial  wind 
farms have been shown to have any negative impact on property values.
73
  In fact, a 2003 
study  by  Renewable  Energy  Policy  Project  suggested  that  property  values  actually  rose  in 
proximity to 10 wind installations.
74
 
 
Shadow Flicker – According to AWEA, shadow flicker is only an issue with large, utility 
sized  wind  turbines.  Small  and  micro  wind  turbines  have  small  blade  profiles  and  make 
faster rotations making shadows essentially invisible. Turbines will not spin until minimum 
wind  speed  has  been  achieved,  so  it  is  unlikely  that  shadows  will  cause  any  problems.  In 
addition,  AWEA  suggests  that  the  setbacks  dictated  by  the  bylaw  should  be  sufficient  to 
counter any potential infringements.
75
 
 
Birds  –  One  of  the  most  strongly  voiced  concerns  over  the  installation  of  wind 
turbines is the harm they pose to birds. Although there certainly have been instances which 
wind  turbines  have  caused  bird  deaths,  research  suggests  that  the  severity  of  this  threat 
                                                           
 
71
 Brigitta Berglund, Thomas Lindvall, and Dietrich H Schewela, “Guidelines for Community Noise”, World Health 
Organization, 1999. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/1999/a68672.pdf. 
72
 Town of Stratford PEI, “Zoning and Subdivision Control (Development) Bylaw Amendment, Bylaw Number 29‐B 
(Part III)”, 4. http://townofstratford.ca/sites/default/files/policy_bylaw/Stratfords_Wind_Energy_Bylaw_29‐B.pdf. 
73
 eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study”, 13. 
74
 eFormative Options, LLC & Entegrity Wind Energy Systems, Inc., “Small Wind Siting and Zoning Study”, 14. 
75
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest”, 15. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  20 

has  been  exaggerated.  Commercial  wind  farms  have  caused  0.03%  of  all  human‐related 
bird  deaths  to  date,  while  house  cats  and  glass  windows  cause  10,000  times  more  bird 
deaths than wind turbines.
76
  
 
Table 4:  Bird Death Statistics
77
 
Causes of Bird Death  Number of Bird Fatalities  Reference 
Glass Windows  100 to 900+ million  Dr.  Daniel  Kelm  of 
Muhleberg College 
House Cats  100 million  The  National  Audubon 
society 
Automobiles/Trucks  50 to 100 million  National  Institute  for  Urban 
Wildlife  and  U.S.  Fish  and 
Wildlife Service 
Electric  Transmission  Line 
Collisions 
Up to 174 million  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Agriculture   67 million  Smithsonian Institution 
Communication Towers  4 to 10 million   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Hunting   More than 100 million  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Wind Turbines  <40,000  National Research Council 
 
 
Icing  –  For  colder  climates  like  in  Sackville,  the  loss  of  ice  from  the  blades  is  a 
legitimate  safety  concern.  However,  AWEA  notes  that  the  weight  of  the  ice  slows  the 
rotation of the blades, and thus ice is not tossed or thrown from the blades as many believe, 
but rather drops directly below the turbine.
78
 
 
3.1.4  Recommendations for Sackville 
 
Micro wind energy generation is a growing trend in municipalities across Canada and 
the  United  States.  Given  recent  technological  advances  and  a  growing  need  for  renewable 
energy  sources,  micro  wind  energy  offers  a  viable  alternative  for  individuals  looking  to 
reduce their environmental impact. However, in Sackville, as in many other municipalities, 
the  Zoning  Bylaw  inhibits  their  installation  in  urban  areas.  In  order  to  reduce  Sackville’s 
dependence on traditional energy sources, and increase the use of clean renewable energy, 
it  is  necessary  for  the  Town  of  Sackville  to  review  its  Zoning  Bylaw  and  consider  the 
inclusion of micro wind turbines within the Town’s limits. Nonetheless, it is recognized that 
there may still be reservations concerning the use micro wind turbines within Town limits. 
With this in mind, we recommend: 
 
ix)
That  the  Town  of  Sackville  consider  allowing  micro  wind  turbines  in 
its Institutional and Mixed Use  Zones to serve as a pilot study and an 
educational tool for their introduction in residential areas; and 
                                                           
 
76
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest”, 19. 
77
 Jacques Witford Environmental Engineering Scientific Consultants, “Final Report”, 13.
 
78
 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), “In the Public’s Interest”, 19. 
 
 
 
Green Development Standards for Sackville – Final Report (ETF 2011­2012)  21 

x)
That  the  Town  consider  developing  a  policy  that  will  allow  micro 
wind turbines in all residential zones in the long term. 
 
3.2  Solar Access Laws 
 
Currently,  the  Town  of  Sackville’s  regulations  do  not  prevent  solar  energy  systems 
from  being  used  in  development  as  an  energy  source  within  its  zoning  bylaw.  However, 
neither  do  they  encourage  adoption  of  solar  energy  options.  Further,  the  current  bylaw 
makes no provisions that guarantee solar access for the individual installing such a system. 
Over  time,  growing  trees,  shrubs,  and  other  manmade  obstructions  on  neighbouring 
properties may block the sunlight and prevent the device from functioning effectively.  This 
not only greatly reduces the individual’s ability to derive their power from this source, but 
also  discourages  its  installation  since  long  term  operation  is  needed  to  make  solar  energy 
devices cost‐effective.  
Solar  access  laws  protect  the  right  of  one  property  to  receive  sunlight  without 
obstruction from neighbouring properties.
79
 Solar access laws have been widely adopted in 
the US
80
, however remain virtually unheard of in Canada.
81
 The first solar access laws in the 
US were introduced in California in 1978 as a result of the oil shortage in the late 1970s.
82
 
The Solar Rights Act established an overarching framework within the state of California to 
encourage  the  use  of  solar  energy  and  to  prevent  local  governments  from  prohibiting  its 
use,  while  the  Solar  Shade  Control  Act  prohibited  the  shading  of  solar  energy  devices.  
Among  other  things,  the  Solar  Shade  Control  Act  states  that  further  plant  growth  shall  not 
shade  a  collector  more  than  10  percent  between  10am  and  2pm,  but  does  not  regulate 
plants  already  in  place.
83
  Since  that  time,  solar  access  laws  of  varying  degrees  have  been 
adopted by 34 states.
84
 
 Solar  access  laws,  however,  have  not  just  remained  at  the  state  level.  In  A 
Comprehensive  Review  of  Solar  Access  Laws  in  the  United  States,  Kettles  writes  that  such 
solar access policies are within the mandate of local governments under the framework of 
their  land  use  policies,  and  have  already  been  introduced  into  several  local  governments 
within  the  US.
85
    She  provides  the  details  of  a  few  exemplary  solar  access  laws  from 
municipalities in the US, including the City of Gainsville, Florida, which permits the removal 
of  protected  trees  when  they  inhibit  the  installation  of  solar  equipment,  and  the  City  of 
                                                           
 
79
Colleen McCann Kettles, “A Comprehensive Review of Solar Access Laws in the United States, Suggested
Standards for a Model Statue and Ordinance”, Florida Solar Energy Research and Education, October 2008, 1.
http://www.solarabcs.org/about/publications/reports/solar-access/pdfs/Solaraccess-full.pdf. 
80
Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan, “Background Paper: Solar Access Legislation”, Saskatchewan,
October 2007, 2. http://sklr.sasktelwebhosting.com/LRC%20Solar%20Access.pdf. 
81
Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan, “Background Paper: Solar Access Legislation”, 6. 
82
Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan, “Background Paper: Solar Access Legislation”, 8. 
83
 California, Solar Shade Control Act, 1978. http://www.mcsolar.com/data/California_Solar_Shade_Control_.pdf.