Lies, damned lies and knowledge

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6 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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Lies, damned lies and knowledge
management
Dr George Argyrous
Hong Kong
25 January 2010
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
Overview

The evidence
-
based policy „project‟

Some reservations

A middle ground

Tradition, habit, and judgment in decision
-
making

Knowledge management: turning tradition, habit, and judgment into evidence

Knowledge management and leadership: adding to complexity or making
decision
-
making simpler?

The next step: turning knowledge into evidence
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
The evidence
-
based policy „project‟

Naïve version of the evidence based decision
-
making:

evidence cuts through competing interests/ideologies/politics

points to the (single) rational/best
-
way of way doing things

Do „what works‟!

Evidence
-
based policy is more open and democratic: “evidence
-
based policy
making processes as part of a robust culture of policy contestability” (Australian
PM Kevin Rudd)
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
Some reservations

Evidence gathering/analysis/interpretation adds a new layer for debate and
disagreement rather than removing the sources of debate and disagreement

Clear evidence does not always produce clear answers: requires interpretation

Good evidence can be used to justify bad policy

Good policy can be held back by lack of evidence

Ignores other bases for decision
-
making: tradition, authority, best
-
guess,
political viability
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
A middle ground

Recognition that evidence does not point to a „true north‟ for better policy and
decision
-
making

Accept that:

the outcome is evidence
-
informed or evidence
-
influenced or evidence
-
aware
decision
-
making

other factors and forces have a legitimate place in the process, including
values, politics, and experience

But still worth pursuing the ideal of evidence
-
based policy
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
Tradition, habit, and judgment in decision
-
making

Tradition, habit, and judgment often counter
-
posed to evidence
-
based decision
making

Decisions made on assumptions of what has worked in the past, based on the
intuition of the individuals involved

Habit may be used more as the amount of information increases

But when incorporated into a formal knowledge management system becomes
another key source of evidence
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
Turning tradition, habit, and judgment into knowledge

Questions for the audience:

Do you know what data and information sources your own agency already
holds?

Are you making full use of the information held in your own agency?

Making Informed Decisions
Report recognizes KM is both a technical and cultural
practice
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
Knowledge management and leadership

The challenge for leaders: will KM add to complexity or simplify decision
-
making?

Leadership can ensure that KM is not an end in itself, but part of a process

Leadership can define what knowledge needs to be managed

Leadership can give clarity to the objectives of KM:

Conduct knowledge audit

Implement taxonomy

Build content repositories for organization domains

Document organization processes

Capture lessons learnt

Capture best practices

Capture customer knowledge

Implement enterprise portal

Implement document / content management system

But … leadership can be challenged by KM
Knowledge management and evidence
-
based decision
-
making
The next step: turning knowledge into evidence

Knowledge needs to be used (effectively )if knowledge is to become evidence

Increases the demand on public sector agencies to improve capacity for
evidence
-
based decision
-
making

What does this involve?

Improving the skill
-
base of public sector workers

Development of guidelines and „how to‟ manuals for government agencies to
use

More active role for central data collection agencies

Closer integration of public sector agencies and outside „experts‟

The risk: when knowledge is collected with a decision
-
making process in mind,
can become the focus of action rather than input to action