CS 475 - Networks Fall 2012 - Syllabus

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08/13/2012

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Mark Randall

CS 475
-

Networks

Fall 201
2

-

Syllabus


Instructor

Mr. Mark Randall



KC
-
274, 488
-
248
,
Randall@evansville.edu


Home page:
http://csserver.evansville.edu/~
mr63


Catalog Data

Digital data communication systems
in hardware and software, synchronous and asynchronous
communication, standards, protocols, network configurations, network applications.


Objectives

Students will understand the fundamentals of computer networking. Students will learn to write computer
a
pplications that communicate over a network using the sockets API. Students will complete several
network programming projects that require the use of sockets. In particular,




Students will know the layers of the OSI stack and the functions they provide
in Network
communication.



Students will know different encoding techniques such as NRZ, NRZI, Manchester, 4B/5B.



Students will have a strong understanding of routing hardware and the TCP/IP protocol.



Students will understand basic WAN Design and will be
able to design a small wide area
Network.



Students will understand framing and how it works.



Students will understand different error checking techniques such as checksum and CRC.



Students will understand reliable transmission techniques such as stop and w
ait, sliding window,
and flow control.



Students will understand the Ethernet topology.



Students will understand switched networks and packet oriented networks.



Students will know what comprises datagrams.



Students will understand virtual circuit switching.



Students will understand source routing.



Students will have an understanding of bridges and switches and algorithms they use such as the
spanning tree algorithm.



Students will understand how broadcast and multicast function.



Students will have an understa
nding of switches and their design, such as the crossbar, knockout,
sunshine, and shared media.



Students will understand the Banyan and Batcher Networks.



Students will understand the TCP/IP protocol and how to subnet and supernet.



Students will understand
fragmentation and reassembly techniques.



Students will understand the hardware used in developing a WAN.



Students will gain hands on experience in the configuration of routers and switches.



Students will understand DHCP servers, DNS servers, and Name Serve
rs.



Students will understand routing protocols such as RIP and OSPF.




Prerequisites:

CS 215, MATH 222


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Required Textbook

Larry Peterson and Bruce Davie,

Computer Networks
-

A Systems Approach, 5/e
, 2012, Morgan
Kaufmann Publishers, ISBN
-
13: 978
-
0
-
12
-
3850
59
-
1.


Daily Requirements

Daily reading assignments. Many class periods will include an in
-
class exercise. These are due at the
beginning of the following class. No late work will be accepted. All lecture slides and notes will be
posted to the course w
ebsite no later than 4:30pm the afternoon of the class period.


Programming Projects

There will be several (5
-
8) programming projects during the course of the semester. The projects will
require that you develop a network application or simulate a network

communication protocol. Unless
otherwise indicated all programming projects must compile (without warnings) and run (without errors)
on csserver.


Network Exploration Projects

There will be multiple (4
-
8) projects that require you to use Wireshark and
other tools to explore and
analyze network protocols.


Exams and Evaluation

There is a written midterm exam and a written final exam. The final exam is on Wednesday, December
14, the very last day of finals, at 8:00am. Final grades will be based on the f
ollowing weighted
distribution:



40%

Written midterm and final exams (20% each)


20%

Programming projects


20%

Network exploration projects


10%

Homework


10%

In
-
class exercises


Final grades are based on the final weighted percentage with
adjustments depending on class distribution.
The A/B line will be no higher than 90% with subsequent grade levels every 10%.


Late Homework and Projects

Homework and projects are due at the instructor's office and/or electronically as appropriate by
4:30pm
on the date specified unless otherwise noted. Any assignments arriving after 4:30pm are considered late.
The following automatic late penalties will be applied:



10%

if handed in by 4:30pm, one day late


20%

if handed in by 4:30pm, two days late


30%

if handed in by 4:30pm, three days late


Unexcused late work will not be accepted for credit after three days after the due date without prior
arrangements. For the purpose of counting days, Friday 4:30pm to Monday 4:30pm is considered one
day. P
lease note that the purpose of the automatic late extension is to allow students leeway when
needed. It is usually better to hand in something late and completed than on
-
time and incorrect.
However, chronically handing in late submissions will lower your

final grade.


Valid excuses for missing exams, missing classes, and handing assignments in late include illness, family
emergencies, religious observances, official UE events such as varsity games and concerts, etc. They do
not include (most) work confli
cts, studying for other classes, leaving a day early or staying home an extra
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Mark Randall

day over a weekend or holiday, etc. In general, an excused absence is one caused by circumstances
beyond your control.


The instructor will rely on your integrity for getting wo
rk excused. If you have a valid excuse, email a
note to the instructor. For religious observances and official UE events, you must inform the instructor
that you will be absent
before

the absence occurs, otherwise it will be considered an unexcused absen
ce.


Excused work must be made up within one calendar week from the original due date for full credit. Late
excused work will not be accepted Exceptions will be made for serious or prolonged illness, or other
serious problems. Please note: It is your re
sponsibility to take care of missed or late work.


Attendance Policy

Attendance is important and expected. Attendance records will be maintained in accordance with Federal
Law, but will not be used in the determination of grades, except to the extent it
affects the in
-
class
exercise portion of your grade and in borderline cases. Students are responsible for all material covered
in class. If you miss a class, find out what was covered from another student. You are responsible for
checking the course hom
e page for new assignments even if you miss class.


Honor Code

All students are expected to adhere to the University's Honor Code regarding receiving and giving
assistance. Two specific guidelines are in force for this course.


Written homework and in
-
cla
ss exercises are for you to gain experience and practice. You may
collaborate with your classmates, but each student should submit a solution in his/her own words that
reflect his/her understanding of the solution. Ultimately you will be required to demo
nstrate your
proficiency of the material on exams. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you attempt all
homework and in
-
class problems on your own before finding a solution from another source.


Projects
are to be solely your own work

unless otherwise

noted. Discussing the meaning and general
solution techniques of an assignment with other students is permitted. For example, discussing "How is
this assignment similar or different from problems presented in the text or in lecture?" is acceptable.


Ask
ing another person for assistance on
specific

items in your own code also is permitted, but you may
not observe another person's solution or code in any format for the purposes of studying or copying it,
with or without that student's permission.


If the
re is any doubt as to whether assistance is acceptable, consult the instructor.















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Reading Schedule

This is a tentative schedule of topics for this course. You are expected to have read the assigned material
before coming to class.


Week
of

Mon

Tuesday

Wed

Thursday

Fri

08/2
1




Course Outline/Introduction


08/28


Section 1.1
-
1.2

Applications, Requirements


Section 1.3
-
1.4

Architecture, Programming


09/04


Section 1.4
-
1.5

Programming, Performance


Section 2.1
-
2.3

Encoding, Framing


09/11


Section 2.4
-
2.5

Error Detection, Reliable Transmission


Section 2.6
-
2.7

Ethernet, Wireless Networks


09/18


Section 3.1
-
3.2

Switching, Bridges, Internetworking (IP)


Section 3.2

Internetworking (IP)


09/25


Section 3.3

Routing


Network Architecture
(Guest Lecture)


10/02


Section 4.1

The Internet


Instructor out No Class


10/9


FALL BREAK

NO CLASS


Section 4.2
-
4.4

Multicast, MPLS, Mobile IP


10/16


Section 5.1
-
5.2

UDP, TCP


Section 5.3
-
5.4

RPC, RTP


10/23


Midterm Exam Review



Midterm Exam



10/30


Section 6.1
-
6.2

Resource Allocation, Queuing


Section 6.3
-
6.4

Congestion Control and Avoidance


11/06


Section 6.5

Quality of Service


Section 7.1
-
7.2

Data Formatting and Compression


11/13


Section 8.1
-
8.3

Cryptographic Tools


Section 8.4
-
8.5

Secure Communication, Firewalls


11/20


Section 9.1

Email, Web


THANKSGIVING BREAK

NO CLASS


11/27


Section 9.2
-
9.3

Multimedia, DNS


Section 9.4

Overlay Networks



12/04


Course Review

R/S
Day




The final exam for this
course is Wednesday, December
10
, 8:00am
-
10:00am