Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering, 09/08/2011

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1

ASSESSING READINESS
TO OFFER NEW DEGREE
PROGRAMS

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering, 09/08/2011

Assessing Readiness to Offer New Degree Programs is a supplemental campus
-
based document that will

a)

I
nform the academic program development process and

b)

I
llustrate the unit’s readiness to offer the proposed degree program.


The proposing unit is expe
cted to

a)

S
ubmit the assessing readiness document with the proposed program’s planning document and

b)

U
pdate the assessing readiness document as unit conditions change for submission with the proposed
program’s request to establish.


Part One:
Assessing Need for the Program

Need for the Program

As the population ages, the need for advanced

medical

tools
,

devices

and diagnostics

increases along with a need
to improve our understanding of disease states. Thus as this need increases so does the demand for biomedical
engineers. Due to their unique background, biomedical engineers have
one foot grounded in the medical field and
one

foot grounded in engineering principles. By straddling these fields, biomedical engineers form a bridge upon
which medical need, clinical practice, creativity, collaboration and research can travel freely from one side to the
other.

Our students
will
ha
ve a direct impact on the lives and health of those living in eastern North Carolina.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment growth for
biomedical engineering

will increase by
72% over the next ten years illustrating an increasing dema
nd for people in this field. In addition the Labor
Market Information Division of the Employment Security Commission of North Carolina predicts a 38% increase
in biomedical engineering jobs from

2006
-
2016. Thus there is
a demand within the state of North

Carolina for
biomedical engineers.


Table 1:

BLS Growth Projections (in thousands) for Biomedical Engineering and Related Occupations

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos027.htm


Occupational title

SOC
Code

Employment,
2008

Projected

employment,

2018

Change,
2008
-
18

Number

Percent

Biomedical Engineer

17
-
2031

16,000

27,600

11,600

72


Graduates of the program

will

be highly qualified candidates

and prepared

for the Brody School of Medi
cine

(BSOM)
,
the School of Dental Medicine
,
current PhD programs offered
in the
BSOM

and positions in industry.

In addition, this program will
prepare our stud
ents to compete in PhD, medical and dental programs at

other UN
C
constituent institutions
. Upon

completion of

this program students may
ent
er the
education profession
,

improving
the STEM teaching pool for eastern Nort
h Carolina. Students will

be qualified to
compete for programs and

fellowships
in
government
sponsored
research lab
oratorie
s.

Fit with Strategic Plan

This

unique program
,

which

targets an emerging and advanced technological field, integrates with key
components of the ECU mission statement:
t
o serve through education, to serve through research and creative
activity, and to serve through leadership and partnership. The pro
posed MS in
biomedical engineering

is
consistent with and su
pports these components.


This MS program:



Offers a unique graduate education option
preparing
engineers and scientists to meet the challenges of
biomedical discovery and applications of engineeri
ng to medicine
in service to the people of North
Carolina, their health and their welfare
.




2



Provides

opportunities for partnership with the Brody School of Medicine,

School of Dental Medicine,
College of Allied H
ealth Sciences,
industry, government, and d
efense system organizations
.



Enhances new and emerging research opportunities for faculty in the
Brody School of Medicine, School
of Dental Medicine, College of Allied Health Sciences

and the Department of Engineering to form
partnerships in an emerging fi
eld.



Focuses on development of technology professionals in a key field and promotes development of strong
linkages and interactions with the industrial, business, and public sector organizations of eastern North
Carolina.



Advances the art of biomedical e
ngineering
.

T
he proposed MS program specifically addresses the following ECU Strategic Directions and related sub
elements as presented in ECU Tomorrow:

Education for a new century:

We will be responsive to the changing demands of the economy, offering excellent
undergraduate and graduate programs that provide the global skills and knowledge necessary for success in the
twenty
-
first century.

Economic Prosperity in the East
: We will
invest in academic programs that give individuals the right skills and
tools needed to compete and thrive in a twenty
-
first
-
century workplace. We will invest in programs that improve
access to our resources
for communities and individuals.
We will provid
e ongoing educational and learning
opportunities to support the continued development of a competitive workforce for North Carolina.

Biomedical engineering is a

twenty
-
first

century career field which meets the demands of the economy for
excellent graduate programs which allow ECU graduates to compete in the global economy. In addition, this
degree has
the potential to provide a
substantial positive impact
,

improving the res
ources for the regional
community to improve health care and jobs.
Globalization of both engineering and the overall field of
healthcare has been increasing
over

the
past 10
-
20 years and is continuing to increase. Graduates of the
proposed program will ha
ve a strong background in both fields and will be able to compete and contribute to
this growing global economy.

Since 2004, the

ECU BS in engineering program
has had a positive impact
on industry and economic
development in

eastern North Carolina.

Faculty from the
biomedical and bioprocess undergraduate
concentrations
work regularly with

industry and
economic development professionals from across the region
.
The Department of Engineering’s active

Engineering Advisory Board (EAB) includes two econom
ic
development professionals, one from Pitt County and one from the East Region. The time and effort spent by
the 40+ members of the EAB
are

testament to the fact that local industry cares very much about the program.

A number of the EAB members are from
healthcare
-
related industries,

providing internships and senior
capstone project opportunities. Members of the EAB
are strong contributors to the
department
.

ECU will increase investment in innovation and research
: We will be the third
-
largest research un
iversity in the
University of North Carolina system, exceeding $100 million in external support for our programs. We will lead in
innovation in health sciences and information technology and seek to develop products that compete in the
growing knowledge
-
ba
sed economy. We will invest in interdisciplinary research centers that will support the
region’s growth in health care, tourism, education, marine trades, and biotechnology. We will focus on developing
applied, translational, and externally focused resear
ch that emphasizes the economic and physical health of our
citizens.

Health Care and Medical Innovation:

ECU will save lives, cure diseases, and positively transform the quality of
health care for the region and state. ECU will expand our research in he
alth sciences with a particular emphasis
on the health concerns of the region and state. We will expand biomedical and health
-
related research funding to
$75 million annually.

The MS in
biomedical engineering

will have a positive impact
on the
research pr
oductivity of the university,
support innovation in health sciences, support interdisciplinary research improving health care and
biotechnology, and
support overall

improvement of the health of
the
citizens

of North Carolina
.

By


3

emphasizing the application

of engineering and mathematics to medical research, the

proposed program
advances the u
niversity’s focus on improving student STEM proficiency.

Impact on other Unit Programs

The proposed program does not compete with any program either within the
Engineering Department, or within
the College of Technology and Computer Science generally. This program will be the fi
rst e
ngineering graduate
program available at ECU.

More broadly, the proposed MS in
biomedical engineering

complements many programs in
a variety of colleges
across both campuses of ECU. For example, the new graduate engineering program integrates well with the MS
in
b
iomedical
s
ciences, offered by the BSOM. The
b
iomedical
s
cience program emphasizes basic science,
medical, pharmaceutical,

and biotechnology research.

In addition, the proposed program integrates very well with the
i
nterdisciplinary
d
octoral
p
rogram in
b
iological
s
ciences

(IDPBS)
. This program currently offers graduate curricula and research
in the areas of biology,
chem
istry and

biomedical science
s
. T
he proposed program will

compl
e
ment these research areas, and will
expand course selection for graduate students both in engineering and in the above disciplines.

Drs. Bossetti and
George have been accepted as participants
in the IDPBS. The experience gained in advising students in the
IDPBS will translate well to advising students in the proposed MS in biomedical engineering.

The average enrollment over the next five years is estimated to be approximately 10 students per ye
ar although
this number may increase
when additional faculty are

hired. The
five year
cumulative
enrollment target is

25
students. This program will attract quality students from the Department of Engineering’s BS program,
Thomas
Harriot College of Arts
and Sciences
,
pre
-
med students with quantitative research interests, and basic science and
engineering students from across the state.


Comparison to Similar Programs in Other Universities

Within North Carolina, there are five universities offering master
s in biomedical engineering (NCA&T,
UNC/NCSU Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering

(2)
, Wake Forest

(joint program with Virginia Tech)
(10)
, and Duke

(17)
), two of which are private universities.
The numbers in parentheses indicate the number of
MS d
egrees awarded in AY
2008
-
09

(source is ASEE Profiles)
.
Therefore there is still a need to be fulfilled
within the state of North Carolina for

the

training of biomedical engineers. East Carolina

University

has
an
advantage
,

both nationally and regionally
,

as the

only university within the
University of North Carolina

that
offers academic programs in engineering, medicine, dentistry, business and allied health on one campus.
This
proximity of complementary programs provides an unequaled opportunity for col
laboration and professional
growth of faculty, staff, and students.

This program will expand research and competitive
,

externally funded grant opportunities for faculty in
engineering
and other collaborati
ng

departments.
The curriculum development team wi
ll

design an innovative
research intensive curriculum founded on engineering education research. Such an innovative curriculum
would
be competitive for extramural funding and national recognition
.

Accreditation Standards

There are no standard accreditin
g b
odies for graduate programs in b
iomedical engineering.

Part Two: Assessing Readiness of Current Faculty

Complete the Faculty Information Sheet (attached, with instructions for downloading from Sedona) for each
individual who will serve as a core
faculty member, actively involved in delivering the proposed program.

Please see attached
.

Provide a summary of faculty readiness in the unit to include the cumulative totals of the following:

Faculty Readiness Summary (with emphasis on the last five
years)

Number of core faculty at each rank who will be actively engaged in this program


Professor

1



4

Associate Professor

3

Assistant Professor

3

Number of core faculty with experience directing theses/dissertations

5

Number of scholarly and
professional activities related to proposed degree (with
emphasis on the past 5 years)
:


Number of publications related to proposed degree

39

Number of grants & contracts submitted and awarded related to proposed degree

38

Invited research
presentations outside ECU

8
9

Patents/disclosures/copyrights

12

Participation in scholarly collaborations with other universities, laboratories, & centers
:

Number of faculty

8

Service on related national/international boards or committees
: Number of
faculty

7


Part Three: Assessing Adequacy of Instructional/Research Facilities and Personnel to Support the
Program

Instructional and Research Facilities

Implementation of the proposed degree program will require additional
laboratory and office
space beyond
the facilities employed by the BS in biomedical engineering, the BSOM, and the
d
ental school. Future
growth or expansion will be funded based on university and
UNC
-
GA

models as is currently the case.

The faculty associated with the proposed

program will mentor graduate research using the equipment and
facilities described below. This equipment, and the associated lab
oratory

space, are already in place, and are
actively used in current research.

The Department of Engineering supports a numbe
r of laboratories across several engineering
disciplines
.

Within
biomedical engineering
, there are several lab spaces housing a variety of equipment. Room 350 (1200
sq. ft.) in the Science and Technology Building houses a compl
e
ment of advanced electronics

fabrication and
test equipment. This equipment includes an MSO4054B 500 MHz mixed
-
signal oscilloscope; a Tektronix
AFG3022B 25 MHz, dual
-
output arbitrary waveform generator; Tektronix P5205 high
-
voltage differential
probe and ADA400 differential preampli
fier; a TCP0030 current probe; and an Agilent 34410A digital
multimeter. Room 243 in the Science and Technology Building is predominantly a teaching laboratory space.
Within that space are several fully stocked electronics test benches, including Agilent

E3631A triple
-
output
power supplies; Agilent 34410A digital multimeters; Agilent 33220A, 20 MHz arbitrary waveform generators;
and Agilent 5000 series oscilloscopes.

Additional high
-
end electronic measurement and test equipment is available in the Biosen
sors Research Lab.
Specific equipment includes Agilent MSO6034A oscilloscope, 1682A logic analyzer, 6622A power supply,
34410A digital multimeter, 33220A function generator, Cadence P
-
SPICE, Electronics Workbench Multisim,
soldering stations, wireless com
munication modules (Bluetooth, Zigbee) and development tools, medical
sensors, personal computers, LPKF print circuit board rapid
-
prototype machine, Microchip Integrated
Development Tools, software licenses for LabVIEW, MATLAB, Solidworks, and NI
-
ELVIS.


The Bioprocess Engineering Laboratory (1100 sq. ft.) is a teaching and predominantly research laboratory,
located in room 131 of the Science and Technology Building.

Current courses in upstream bioprocessing
(wet
-
lab techniques, bacterial cultures in bo
th shaker flasks and benchtop bioreactors, and cell harvesting) and
downstream processing (distillation, extraction, affinity chromatography) are taught in this laboratory each
semester.

The major equipment housed in the laboratory that is available for t
eaching and research includes
two 5L and two 2L benchtop bioreactors (Sartorius BioStat Aplus), GE AKTA Purifier system, centrifuge
(Beckman Coulter Avanti J
-
E), top loading autoclave for the bioreactors (Hirayama HICLAVE), front loading
autoclave (Tuttnau
er Brinkmann 2540E), table
-
top shaker/incubator, pH meter (Thermo Orions Star series),
sonic dismembrator (Fisher Model 100), spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer Lambda 45 UV/VIS), bath


5

sonicator, analytical balance (Mettler Toledo), stir/hot plates, lyophiliz
er (Labconco Freeze Zone 4.5),
luminometer (Promega Glomax 20/20), fluorometer (Promega, Modulus), three
-
door chromatography cabinet,
protein and DNA electrophoresis equipment, thermal cycler, and small equipment and tools to conduct
molecular biology rese
arch (micropipettes, table
-
top centrifuge, etc.).

In addition, this facility houses a TA Instruments AR
-
2000 stress
-
controlled Rheometer, an Olympus BX
-
51
reflected light microscope with a 12MP digital camera and bright field/dark field/fluorescence, and a

ramé
-
hart Model 250 Standard Contact Angle Goniometer/Tensiometer for contact angle and surface tension
measurements.

The Engineering Department maintains a variety of industr
ial quality fabrication and
mechanical engineering
instrumentation equipment, in
cluding (but not limited to) lathes, milling machines, a variety of welders, a
band saw, workbenches, vices, a wide assortment of hand tools, a phototachometer, an extensometer, a shear
test fixture, durometers, and hardness testers.

East Carolina Univer
sity maintains and supports shared research facilities and services
.

Shared equipment available on ECU’s main
campus includes an Accelerator Laboratory
, Acoustic Laboratory,
Biomedical Laser Laboratory, Biomedical Optics Laboratory, Genomics and Bioinforma
tics Laboratory, High
Performance Computing Facility, Nuclear Magnetic
Resonance

Spectroscopy Laboratory and Mass
Spectrometry Facility.

The computing needs of
b
iomedical
e
ngineering graduate students will be supported by the department
, High
performance c
omputing laboratory and

Information Technology and Computing Services (ITCS).

The laboratories listed above, and any office space, are equipped with the computers needed to perform data
analysis or other research related tasks. ITCS supports additional st
udent computing needs through two
unique servi
ces: high performance computing

and the Virtual Computing Lab. The high performance
computing capabilities offered by ITCS are optimized for solving some of the advanced computational
problems that arise in eng
ineering research. The Virtual Computing Lab, located at NC State University,
provides remote access to a variety of advanced software packages. ITCS provides this access through ECU’s
network.

In addition, the
C
ollege of Technology and Computer Science
will provide an array of support that will
include software, hardware, and technical services support. Examples of support include desktops on demand,
virtual servers on demand and network attached storage space. In addition, TECS technical services can
pr
ovide support for cluster computing and remote display of graphically intensive applications.

Research facilities supported by the Brody School of Medicine include
:

Major laboratory equipment is available in the Brody Medical Sciences Building (3S
-
16, 400
sq. ft), including
a laminar flow hood, chemical hood, three CO
2

water
-
jacketed incubators, centrifuge with rotors, labo
ratory
refrigerator and freezer;

an inverted

microscope
, upright

microscope and dissecting microscope;

distilled
water source, balance,
and pH meter.

The Brody School of Medicine also offers core facilities to support east and west campus research efforts.
These facilities include a flow cytometry/confocal microscopy facility, an electron microscope lab, a
histology lab, and a phosphor
-
i
maging/fluorescence imaging lab. Shared resources include (but are not
limited to) centrifuges, electrophoresis equipment, various imaging systems, chromatography systems, an
ultrasound machine, microscopes, and spectrophotometers.

The Tissue Culture Faci
lity located in room 279 Warren Life Science Building (LSB 279, 800 sq ft) offers
additional lab space. Major equipment includes four bench top work areas with adjacent laminar flow hoods,
one chemical hood, two CO
2

water
-
jacketed incubators, tabletop cent
rifuge with rotors, laboratory refrigerator,
two laboratory freezers (
-
20° C,
-
80° C), a Dewar liquid nitrogen cell storage system, inverted and upright
light microscopes, a digital camera with C
-
mount, and distilled water source.



How will assignment of
this space to the proposed program impact existing programs?



6

The spaces proposed are currently available for us
e

by our faculty and will not impact existing program
utilization of the space
.



Describe additional facilities or specialized equipment that
would be needed over the next five years.

With the growth of the program additional space will be needed for graduate student desk space and for new
faculty members
.



Describe current holdings in library resources in the proposed program and projected lib
rary resources needed
to support the proposed program.

Current journal subscriptions and books are sufficient to start the proposed program

including the
Journal of
Biomechanic
s,

the
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
,
Medical and Biological Engineering

and
Computing
, several
IEEE Transactions

series, and the
Journal of Neural Engineering
.

A few additional
subscriptions (for example,
Journal of Biomechanical Engineering
) may need to be added over the first five
years.



Provide e
-
mail verification of co
nsultation with Office of Space Management about the feasibility of new or
additional space needs for the proposed
program.

Please see attached email.

Personnel



What additional personnel would be needed to make the proposed program successful for growth and
development over a five
-
year period?

-

Faculty



1 additional position in Year 3

-

Two p
ost
-
doc
toral

associates
, one r
esearch technician
, and one
additional posi
tion to oversee
research and graduate lab courses

-

Graduate assistants



10

by Year 5

-

Other staff



0.5 additional position to oversee graduate program paperwork



What will be needed to recruit such individuals and what is the recruitment market like?



To

recruit the one additional faculty member a start
-
up package will be needed to attract highly qualified
individuals. Graduate assistantships will be needed to attract quality graduate students. As biomedical
engineering is a specialized field most indus
try jobs require at least a
n

MS degree

illustrating a high
demand for the program
.

Part Four: Assessing Financial Resources to Support the Program



Describe existing financial resources to be devoted to the proposed program.


The Department of Engineering currently has 17.5 FTE faculty positions, with
seven

of the current
faculty supporting the
b
iomedical
e
ngineering
c
oncentration
indirectly
. Allocation of two additional
positions has been made for the coming year, and a portio
n of 1.5 FTE of those positions will support
b
iomedical
e
ngineering. Faculty resources are sufficient for initiation of the program.



Describe what additional financial resources would be needed over the next five years and their proposed
sources of fundi
ng.

-

Ten graduate assistantships at $1
5
,000 each

-

Five out of state tuition remissions
, phased in over five years

-

One additional faculty member in Year 3 of the MS Program

-

Two postdoctoral associates to support the research and educational objectives of the
program




What new financial resources will come to the university based on the projected increase in enrollment?


At our projected enrollment of 25 MS students, taking 1
8

credits of engineering courses
during the course
of their program
, the additional
student credit hours will justify one additional faculty position. In
addition, the students will be involved in performance of externally
-
funded research programs, which will
result in additional funding for ECU, along with indirect costs. Additional scho
larship will also result
from the program.



7


We believe there is considerable potential for patents to result from the research and development
conducted as part of this program. As an example, Dr. Jason Yao of Engineering and
Dr. Greg Givens of
Communicati
on Sciences and Disorders have filed a patent for “
Internet
-
based Multi
-
user Diagnostic
Hearing Assessment Systems Having Client
-
server Architecture with User
-
based Access Levels for
Secure Data Exchange
,” p
rovisional patent, 2009
-
2010; currently filing PC
T (Patent Cooperation Treaty)
to protect intellectual property rights
worldwide
. The university share of the royalties would generate
financial resources.



Will the program students contribute to the financing of the program through teaching, research,
and clinical
practice?


The students will contribute by
serving as teaching assistants in the undergraduate program

and
performing externally funded research.



What are your plans for the program if the financial resources anticipated for the program (enr
ollment, external
support, etc.) are 25% lower and 50% lower than expected?


Considering the current strength of the program and the growth in the related networking jobs forecasted
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
a decline in program enrollment is unli
kely
. Current employment and
labor projections in biomedical engineering related areas are very strong. If the decision was made to cut
resources at the University or College level, possibly by refusing the graduate assistantships or the
additional faculty li
ne in Year 3, the program would still be viable. Reduction of the number of
assistantships would effectively reduce the “quality” of the students in the program since the best students
would find assistantships at other universities and our program would b
e forced to admit students who are
not able to find assistantships elsewhere. If the additional faculty position were refused, the projected size
of the program might be reduced. In addition, the potential for research efforts in
b
ioengineering would be
re
duced overall if faculty numbers are lower.


Part Five: Assessing External Support and Collaboration



List of a
ctive grants/contracts specifically related to the proposed program.


Award No.

Title

Faculty
Member

Sponsor

Award

Primary Biomedical
Engineering Faculty

R01
-
HL091348


Mechanisms for stem cell
differentiation into cardiac
myocytes (co
-
investigation
with Duke University)

Muller
-
Borer
(co
-
investigator
)

National
Heart, Lung,
and Blood
Institute

$357,612

R01
-
HL
081720


NO
-
independent

cGMP
regulation of vascular
remodeling

Muller
-
Borer
(co
-
investigator)

National
Heart, Lung,
and Blood
Institute

$252,325



Assessment of myocardial
cellular transplantation via
multiple delivery modes

Muller
-
Borer
(Co
-
PI)

The Eastern
Carolina
Cardiovascular
Institute &
BSOM

$125,000



Role of thymosin B4 in
stem cell engraftment and
myocardial tissue
regeneration

Muller
-
Borer
(PI)

East Carolina
University
Division of
Research and
Graduate
Studies

$40,000



8



Effects of
cardiopulmonary bypass
on adult stem cell
transplantation

Muller
-
Borer
(co
-
investigator)

East Carolina
University
Division of
Research and
Graduate
Studies

$25,000

Associated Engineering Faculty

A11
-
0048
-
001

Engineering
photoreceptor
-
controlled
aggregation and
disaggregation of
nanoparticles

Limberis (PI)

NC
Biotechnology
Center

$75,000

A10
-
0176
-
001

Integration of hands
-
on
short course into a
bioprocess engineering
curriculum

Williams (PI)

NC
Biotechnology
Center

$40,480

A10
-
0043
-
0001

Portable cyber
-
laboratories:
virtual

instruments and affordable
prototyping kits to
enhance learning and
improve access to
electrical engineering
education

Yao (PI)

NSF

$88,100

A08
-
0053
-
0001

Design and

development
of educational modules for
bioprocess engineering

Williams (PI)

NSF

$136,480



Describe existing collaborative efforts related to the proposed program with community or state agencies, other
institutions of higher education,
federal laboratories or agencies, national centers, or other external
organizations.

The Engineering Department maintains a collaborative relationship with the following industry partners,
who are members of the Engineering Advisory Board:

-

B
ecton
D
ickenson

Medical

-

Pitt County Memorial Hospital

-

G
laxo
S
mith
K
line
, Inc.

-

Pharmaceutical Calibrations and Instrumentation

-

Pioneer Surgical Orthobiologic, Inc.

-

DSM Pharmaceutical

Products, Inc
.

-

DSM
-
Dyneema, LLC

-

Triangle Biosystems

Inc
.

-

Wyeth Vaccines

-

NC Biotechnology C
enter

-

Pfizer

-

NASA Langley Research Center

-

NAACO Materials Handling Group

-

PCS Phosphate

-

Metrics, Inc.

-

Avoca



9

The Engineering Advisory Board is comprised of
approximately 40

members from industry, consulting
firms, academia, and government laboratories. The b
oard meets twice per year to review current and
planned programs, review student achievement, and to provide guidance on future directions of the
program. The board is extremely active, and the department chair maintains contact with the board
throughout t
he year.
A number of these organizations participate in the department’s Senior Capstone

Design Project, and
offer collaborations for graduate level research projects.

The faculty is continuously
pursuing
industry and government partners. A new partner f
or 2011 is the Centers for Disease Control
who
is

sponsoring a
Senior
Capstone Project.






How do you plan to use external funding to support the proposed program? To what agencies or programs
would proposals be submitted and with what timeframe?


The following external agencies support academic
biomedical engineering

research, both nationally and
regionally:

-

The National Institutes of Health.

One of the stated goals of the NIH is to foster creative discoveries,
innovative research strategies, and
their applications as a basis for protecting and improving health.
The NIH realizes this goal by supporting a wide range of research activities, through the 27 Institutes
and centers that comprise this federal organization. Specific institutes that are p
ertinent to the
propose
d program include the National I
nstitute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB),
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institute of General
Medical Sciences (NIGMS), and the National Hear
t, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).


The NIH also funds research projects at less
-
established research universities through several grant
mechanisms. One such mechanism is the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) grant,
which is specifically
designed to stimulate biomedical research at institutions that provide
baccalaureate and advanced degrees.


-

The National Science Foundation.

A well
-
established federal agency created “to promote the
progress of science; to advance the national health, pro
sperity and welfare; to secure the national
defense…” This organization has a long
-
standing history as a major source of federal funding for a
wide assortment of cutting
-
edge STEM research.


-

Department of Defense.

The DoD provides a number of grant mecha
nisms through the
Defense
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Office of Naval Research (ONR), Air Force Office
of Scientific Research (OSR), and the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI). A
popular graduate fellowship program offe
red by the DoD, is the National Defense Science and
Engineering Graduate Fellowship. This program provides
three

years of support for studies in
biosciences, electrical engineering, and cognitive, neural, and behavioral sciences.


-

The North Carolina Biote
chnology Center.

The NC Biotech center is a state
-
funded, privately held
non
-
profit organization dedicated entirely to biotechnology development. The mission of this center
is to provide long
-
term economic and societal benefits to North Carolina by suppo
rting biotechnology
research, commercialization, collaboration, and education. The NCBC funds biotechnology research
in areas such as nanobiotechnology and combination medical devices. The center also funds
multidisciplinary research, for projects consis
ting of scientists from at least three distinct fields.

The engineering faculty supporting the proposed program has experience applying for, and receiving,
external funding from the above organizations. The stated goals of each grant agency, and the fundi
ng
programs offered, align with the research background of the faculty. Specifically, the proposed
biomedical engineering

graduate program will foster research in the following areas: neural and cardiac
electrophysiology, cardiac stem cell therapies, comp
utational hemodynamics, blood flow analysis using
MRI, medical imaging, and medical device design and MRI compatibility.



10

Research efforts in these areas are either ongoing through existing grants (listed above), or are already in
development. Faculty memb
ers in the proposed program are currently preparing competitive grant
applications for initial submission in the 2010
-
2011 and 2011
-
2012 academic years.


As mentioned in the personnel requirements, the program can be started with current faculty personnel

and resources, however to initiate research momentum
, funding for graduate assistants may be needed
during the start
-
up period. This will allow for preliminary research to be conducted preparing the core
engineering and collaborating faculty to compete f
or external funding.





11








12

Faculty Information Sheet

Name:

Odis Hayden Griffin, Jr., Ph.D., P.E
.

1.

Rank
:
Professor and Chair, Department of Engineering at East Carolina University

2.

Degrees
:



Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
,
Blacksburg, Virginia

Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Mechanics, June, 1980. Course work primarily in area of solid
mechanics. Dissertation “Three Dimensional Inelastic Finite Element Analysis of Laminated Composites.”
Use of finite element method with
a modified Hill
-
type yield criterion and flow rule to study interlaminar
stresses in laminates subject to thermal and mechanical loading.



Texas Tech University
,
Lubbock, Texas

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, May 1971. Course work primarily in thermodynamics and
heat transfer. Thesis, “A New Theory of Protoplasmic Streaming.” Application of nonequilibrium
thermodynamic principles to living cells.

Bachelor of Science

in Mechanical Engineering, August 1970. Course work in thermodynamics, heat
transfer, machine design, fluid dynamics, strength of materials, and metallurgy.

3.

Teaching Experience related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past five years)

Workload
assignment: 15% teaching, 85% administrative



July 2010 to present
,
Professor and Chair, Department of Engineering
,
East Carolina University
,
Greenville, North Carolina 27858

Leading the faculty of the East Carolina University Department of Engineering. Ser
ve as chief
administrative officer, reporting to the Dean of the College, responsible for department’s resources, staff,
and budgets. Provide leadership for the department in accomplishing departmental mission and setting
and achieving goals. Promote excel
lence in teaching and advising, scholarship, research productivity,
economic development, and professional service. Serve as principal advocate for the department within
the College, serving on the Administrative Council. Ensure proper application of tenur
e and promotion
policies set forth in the
East Carolina University Faculty Manual
. Conduct annual faculty activity
planning and evaluation. Working to evaluate possible new concentrations in the BS in Engineering
program and working with a faculty group to

develop a MS in
biomedical engineering

degree program.



May 2004


June 2010
,
Professor and Head, Department of Engineering Education (departmental name
change)
,
College of Engineering
,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
,
Blacksburg, Virgini
a
24061
-
0218

Planned and led changes in the department from a primarily teaching
-
only, freshman engineering program
to a degree
-
granting, research
-
oriented department, increasing external research funding from near zero in
2003 to several million dollars a
t the present time, including three NSF CAREER Awards (Borrego,
Paretti, and Johri) and one PECASE (Borrego). Added new faculty in the area of academic assessment,
technical communications, engineering design, and learning sciences. Led and participated in

research
proposals in the area of engineering education. Diversified the faculty from all white males (1997) to a
department in which half (9 of 18) of the faculty are women, with good ethnic and disciplinary diversity
as well. Tenure outcomes for faculty

hired since 1997 were good, and newer hires are progressing well
toward tenure due to continuous attention to faculty development, assessment, and feedback.

Beginning in 2004, I led the effort to create a graduate program from scratch, culminating in a Ph
.D. in
Engineering Education, which accepted students in January 2008 and currently has 15 Ph.D. candidates.
Have developed and taught or co
-
taught five new engineering education graduate courses: “Preparing for
the Engineering Professoriate,” “Teaching En
gineering,” “Practicum in the Engineering Classroom,”
“Training System Design,” and “Foundations of Engineering Education.” Led the development of a
Graduate Certificate in Engineering Education which is in place and has approximately 20 students


13

participa
ting. Presented the new courses and degree programs at all committees and commissions
reviewing it for approval and also presented at the Board of Visitors and State Council of Higher
Education for Virginia. Served as Graduate Program Director from January

2008 to February 2009.
Presented information on engineering education and our graduate program to a Virginia General
Assembly subcommittee considering creation of K
-
12 level standards of learning and other programs in
Virginia public schools.

In 2006 my d
epartment was one of two university departments designated as a University Exemplary
Department for
developing and sustaining innovative and effective departmental approaches to
introductory courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. These awards ar
e highly competitive and
result in a $20,000 award to the department. As a group the faculty decided to spend the award on new
office furniture as we moved into newly renovated space that I spent approximately two years working
with the Provost and the Dea
n to obtain for the department. I am currently on the team that is providing
design information for a new engineering building.

Worked with college development office personnel to gain gifts for laboratory renovation, facility
maintenance, support for
academic programs, and overall department support from both alumni and
industry. Have obtained gifts in the form of cash, stock, hardware, and shop equipment.

Overall management of departmental budget of approximately $2M. In 11 years as department head, w
as
never over budget, even though considerable resources were directed toward development of new courses,
supporting the success of new faculty, creation of spaces for hands
-
on learning, and development of a
PhD program. Department typically teaches 7,000
-
8,000 student credit hours annually.

Serving on the Program Assessment Committee of the Advisory Board for the University of Texas at El
Paso College of Engineering. Regularly review papers for JEE, AEE, ASEE, ASME, iNEER. Served on
NSF grant review panels

twice for CCLI grants. Served on numerous College and University level
committees. Most recently served on search committees for Director of Academic Assessment, Assistant
Director of Academic Assessment, and Director of the Center for Excellence in Under
graduate Teaching.
Served on the VT
-
Science Museum of Western Virginia Partnership Task Force and the Organizing
Committee for the Governor’s Conference on STEM Education.



August 1997


May 2004
,
Professor and Director, Division of Engineering Fundamentals

(renamed as
Department of Engineering Education in 2004)
,
College of Engineering
,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute &
State University
,
Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
-
0218

In addition to regular duties of a faculty member in the College of Engineering, oversee t
he efforts of the
Engineering Fundamentals faculty and staff. The faculty currently has 14 members, including two part
-
time professional advisors. There are three full
-
time classified staff. Managing the Joseph F. Ware, Jr.
Advanced Engineering Laboratory,

an undergraduate student project laboratory with projects spanning
numerous departments in the College of Engineering, Pamplin College of Business, and the College of
Arts & Sciences. Leading the review and revision of the freshman engineering curriculum.

Teaching
courses in Engineering Fundamentals (problem solving, programming, introduction to design, and
engineering graphics) and Mechanical Engineering (Advised Mini Baja Team, which is the capstone
design project for some students, from August 1995 to M
ay 2001).

Instituted policies for common syllabi, common tests, and common final exams in introductory
engineering courses. Currently responsible for managing enrollments, assigning faculty teaching loads,
and overseeing development of EF teaching schedule
. Have encouraged, with success, EF faculty to write
grant proposals, leading to several faculty who buy out of courses with project money. Scholarly
production is also increasing steadily.



14



July 1993


August 1997
,
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs,
College of Engineering
,
July 1994


August 1997
,
Professor of Engineering Science & Mechanics
,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State
University
,
Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
-
0217

In addition to regular duties of a faculty member in the College of Engineerin
g, have responsibility for the
undergraduate program of the College. Responsible for preparing ABET materials for College and
coordinating departmental packages for Fall 1995 visit, with highly successful outcome. Serve on
numerous College
-

and University
-
level task forces, commissions, and committees. Responsible for
assembling departmental offerings for summer school and overseeing College summer school budget
($725K
-
$825K). Advise students on major changes, approve exceptions to University and College
po
licies for undergraduates. Working on evaluation of curriculum and curriculum reform including course
overlap between departments, cross
-
listing common courses. Chairing college
-
level committee assigned
to review the undergraduate curriculum and revise fro
m the beginning courses. Work with College
Curriculum Committee for review of all proposed course modifications and inclusion of Engineering
courses in the University Core Curriculum. Visit community colleges to recruit students, assist with in
-
house recru
itment and retention programs. Proposed a new category for students wanting engineering who
had previously been offered a general studies curriculum so that they are now students in Engineering and
are able to take Engineering courses without difficulty. T
he first class of these students was admitted in
the Fall 1994, and we are currently evaluating their performance. General response from students and
parents has been overwhelmingly positive. Work with Admissions, Provost’s Office, Registrar’s Office,
and
other Associate Deans across the University in dealing with student admissions, appeals for academic
exceptions, and resolving graduation problems.

During the period 1996
-
1998 I was the leader of the team that designed, oversaw the renovation, and
directed

the operations of the Joseph F. Ware, Jr. Advanced Engineering Laboratory. The Ware Lab, as it
is popularly known, is one of a few such facilities in the country dedicated to undergraduate engineering
projects. The Ware Lab (
http://www.eng.vt.edu/warelab/
) is a 10,000 square foot facility with a machine
shop, welding shop, design studio, and work bays for student projects. Opened in September 1998, the
Ware Lab has been a great success.

Courses taught include:

ESM 1000, Statics; ESM 4044, Mechanics of Composite Materials; ESM
4734/AOE 4024, Introduction to the Finite Element Method; ESM 3074 (now 2074), Computational
Methods; ESM 2004, Mechanics of Deformable Bodies; ESM 5184, Special Study (Scientific Visual
A
nalysis); ESM 5734, Introduction to the Finite Element Method; ESM 6734, Finite Element Method;
ME 4014, Design Studies in Mechanical Engineering (Mini
-
Baja car project); ME 4016, Engineering
Design and Project (Mini
-
Baja car project); EF 1005, Introductio
n to Engineering. Have modernized
several courses, including Computational Methods. To date have advised ten M.S. theses and seven Ph.D.
dissertations.



September 1985
-

June 1994
,
Associate Professor of Engineering Science & Mechanics
,
Virginia
Polytechnic

Institute & State University
,
Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
-
0219

Involved in teaching, advising students, and performing research in mechanics of composite materials.
Primary research interests include development of analytical and design tools for composite
s, including
laminates and textile composites. Current efforts include designing crashworthy composite airframe
components, analysis techniques for textile composites, and developing design and analysis tools for
smart, damage tolerant/compensating composi
te structural components.

Co
-
investigator, NASA
-
Virginia Tech Composites Program, an ongoing program with NASA Langley
Research Center. Primary activity was with Impact Dynamics Branch, involving analytical and
experimental work in the dynamic response and

failure of composite frames such as those used in aircraft
primary structures and with the Mechanics of Materials Branch, developing analytical models for
predicting stiffness, strength, and residual strength in textile composites.



15

Co
-
investigator of a Un
iversity Research Initiative on mechanics of smart materials and structures, funded
by the Army Research Office. Responsibility for developing models for designing active control
mechanisms for detecting and preventing growth of delaminations in composite
laminates
.



Graduate student supervisory experience (theses/dissertations):

10 M.S. (with thesis) graduates, 7 Ph.D. completed.



Mark D. Sensmeier (co
-
advised with E. R. Johnson of AOE), M.S. Thesis, “Static and Dynamic
Large Deflection Response of Graphite
-
Epoxy Beams,” June, 1987.



Marco A. Vidussoni, M.S. Thesis, “Global
-
Local Finite Element Analysis of Laminated
Composites,” July 1988.



Gajanan V. Gandhe, M.S. Thesis, “Impact Response of Interleaved Composite Materials,”
November 1988.



Shih Y. Lin, M.S. The
sis, “Investigation of the Use of Composite Materials in Highway Bridge
Deck Modules,” December 1988.



David E. Bowles, Ph.D., “Micromechanics Analysis of Space Simulated Thermal Deformations
and Stresses in Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites,” December
, 1989.



Danniella M. Thompson, M.S. Thesis, “Two
-
Dimensional to Three
-
Dimensional Global/Local
Finite Element Analysis of Laminated Composites in Compression,” May 1990.



Dong K. Shin (co
-
advised with Z. Gurdal of ESM), Ph.D., “Minimum
-
Weight Design of
Symm
etrically Laminated Composite Plates for Postbuckling Performance Under In
-
plane
Compression Loads,” September 1990.



Nicole Breivik (co
-
advised with Z. Gurdal of ESM), M.S. Thesis, “Compression of Thick
Laminated Composite Beams with Initial Impact
-
Like Da
mage,” February 1992.



David H. Mollenhauer, M.S. Thesis, “Induced Strain of Actuation of Surface Bonded and
Embedded Piezoceramic Patches,” April 1992.



Seshu R. Yalamanchili (co
-
advised with M. W. Hyer of ESM), M.S. Thesis, “Response of
Multiple Fastener
Composite Joints: Numerical and Experimental Results,” May 1992.



Jae Lee (co
-
advised with Z. Gurdal of ESM), Ph.D., “Vibration, Buckling and Postbuckling of
Laminated Composites with Delaminations,” May 1992.



Elissa E. Carapella (co
-
advised with M. W. Hyer

of ESM), M.S. Thesis, “Micromechanics of
Crenulated Fibers in Carbon/Carbon Composites,” October 1992.



Su
-
Yuen Hsu, Ph.D., “Finite Element Micromechanics Modeling of Inelastic Deformation of
Unidirectionally Fiber
-
Reinforced Composites,” July 1992.



Lucie
M. H. Parietti, M.S. Thesis, “Micromechanical Finite Element Model for Constitutive
Elastoplastic Analysis of Unidirectional Fiber
-
Reinforced Composites,” August 1994.



Eduardo Moas, Jr., Ph.D., “Progressive Failure Analysis of Laminated Composite Structure
s,”
April 1996.



Edward H. Glaessgen, Ph.D., “Modeling of Textile Based Composite Materials, June 1996.



Mark D. Sensmeier, Ph.D., “Optimum Crashworthiness Design of Grid
-
Stiffened Composite
Fuselage Structures,” September 1996.

Served on advisory committees

of numerous students in Departments of Engineering Science and
Mechanics, Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. Served
on the examining committee for one MS student in Technology Education. Serving on PhD committe
es
of one student in Technology Education, one student in Computer Engineering, and several students in
Engineering Education.



Recent and Current Graduate Student Advising

Served on Ph.D. advisory committees of Jennifer Mullin (Ph.D., Engineering
Education, Virginia Tech,
May 2010) and Ricky Castles (Ph.D., Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, May 2010). Currently
serving on Ph.D. committee of Parhum Delgoshaei (Ph.D. Candidate, Engineering Education, Virginia
Tech, anticipated completion May 2012)
.



16

4.

Scholarly & Professional Activities related to proposed degree (with emphasis on the past
five years):

a.

Publications/Scholarly Activity related to proposed degree:



Benson, Lisa, Kurt Becker, Hayden Griffin, and Karl Smith, 2010. “Engineering Education:

Departments, Degrees and Directions,”
International Journal of Engineering Education
, Special
Edition on Applications of Engineering Education Research, Vol 5.



Lohani, V., Castles, R., Lo, J., and Griffin, H., 2008. “Tablet PC Applications in a Large Engi
neering
Program,”

Computers in Education Journal
, Vol XVIII, No. 1, April
-
June 2008, pp 52
-
63.




Snook, J., Lohani, V.K., Lo, J.L., Sirvole, K., Mullin, J.S., Kaeli, J.K., and Griffin, O.H.,
“Incorporation of a 3
-
D Interactive Graphics Programming Language into an Introductory
Engineering Course,”
Computers in Education Journal
, Vol XVI, No. 3,
July
-
September 2006, pp
63
-
72.



Lee, J., Gurdal, Z., and Griffin, O. H., Jr., “Buckling and Postbuckling of Circular Plates Containing
Concentric Penny
-
Shaped Delaminations,”
Computers & Structures
, vol. 58, No. 5, 1996, pp.
1045
-
1054.



S. Y. Hsu and O. H. G
riffin, Jr., “Algorithmic tangent matrix approach for mixed hardening model of
endochronic plasticity,”
Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
, Vol 133,
1996, pp 1
-
14.



E. H. Glaessgen, C. M. Pastore, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and A. Birger, “Geome
trical and finite element
modeling

of textile composites,”
Composites: Part B
, Vol 27B, No 1, 1996, pp 43
-
50.



E. H. Glaessgen and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Micromechanical Analysis of Thermal Response in Textile
-
Based Composites,”
AIAA Progress in Aeronautics a
nd Astronautics
, Earl A. Thornton, Editor,
Volume 168, 1995, pp 204
-
217.



J. Lee, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Postbuckling of Laminated Composites with Delaminations,”
AIAA Journal
, Vol 33, No 10, October 1995, pp 1963
-
1970.



D. Cohen, M. W. Hyer, O.
H. Griffin, Jr., S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, and C. Prasad, “Failure
Criterion for Thick Multi
-
Fastener Graphite
-
Epoxy Composite Joints,”
Journal of Composites
Technology and Research
, Vol 17, No 3, 1995, pp 237
-
248.



L. M. Parietti, S. Y. Hsu, and O.

H. Griffin, Jr., “Mini Constitutive Finite Element Model for Plastic
Response of Unidirectional Fiber Composites,”
Computers and Structures
, Vol 55, No 3, May
1995, pp 463
-
470.



E. Moas, R. L. Boitnott, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “An Analytical and Experiment
al Investigation of the
Response of Curved, Composite Frame/Skin Specimens,”
Journal of the American Helicopter
Society
, July, 1994, pp. 58
-
66.



J. Lee, R. T. Haftka, O. H. Griffin, Jr., L. T. Watson, and M. D. Sensmeier, “Detecting
Delaminations in a Compo
site Beam using Anti
-
optimization,”
Structural Optimization
, Vol 8
(2/3), October 1994, pp 93
-
100.



E. E. Carapella, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and H. G. Maahs, “Micromechanics of Crenulated
Fibers,”
Journal of Composite Materials
, Vol 28, No 14, 1994,

pp 1322
-
1346.



D. H. Mollenhauer and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Induced Strain of Actuation of Surface Bonded
Piezoceramic Patches: A Numerical and Experimental Study,”
Journal of Intelligent Material
Systems and Structures
, Vol 5, No 3, May 1994, pp 355
-
362.



O.

H. Griffin, Jr., M. W. Hyer, S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, C. B. Prasad and D. Cohen,
“Analysis of Multi
-
Fastener Composite Joints,”
Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets
, Vol 31, No 2,
March
-
April 1994, pp 278
-
284.



David H. Mollenhauer, Danniella Muheim
Thompson, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Finite Element
Analysis of Smart Structures,”
Advances in Engineering Software
, Vol 17, No 1, 1993, pp 7
-
12.



N. L. Breivik, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Compression of Laminated Composite Beams with
Initial Dam
age,”
Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites
, Vol 12, No 7, July 1993, pp 813
-
824.



17



D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Finite Element Predictions of Active Buckling Control of
Stiffened Panels,”
Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Struct
ures
, Vol 4, No 2, April,
1993, pp 243
-
247.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., E. R. Johnson, and M. D. Sensmeier, “Nonlinear Response of Graphite
-
Epoxy
Wide Columns Subject to Eccentric Load,”
Journal of Applied Mechanics
, Vol 60, No 1, March
1993, pp 101
-
108.



D. K. Shi
n, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal, “Postbuckling Response of Laminated Plates Under
Uniaxial Compression,”
International Journal of Nonlinear Mechanics
, Vol 28, No 1, Jan 1993,
pp 95
-
115.



S. Y. Hsu and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “On Stability and Efficiency of

Numerical Integration of
Endochronic Constitutive Equations,”
Computers and Structures
, Vol. 44, No. 3, 1992, pp 657
-
665.



D. M. Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Verification of a 2
-
D to 3
-
D Global/Local Finite Element
Method for Symmetric Laminates,”
Jou
rnal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites
, Vol 11, No 8,
August 1992, pp 910
-
931.



D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Minimum
-
Weight Design of Laminated Composite
Plates for Postbuckling Performance,”
Applied Mechanics Reviews
, Vol 44, No 11,
part 2, Nov
1991, pp S219
-
S231.



D. E. Bowles and O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Micromechanics Analysis of Space Simulated Thermal Stresses
in Composites. Part II: Multidirectional Laminates and Failure Predictions,”
Journal of Reinforced
Plastics and Composites
, Vol

10, No 5, September 1991, pp 522
-
539.



D. E. Bowles and O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Micromechanics Analysis of Space Simulated Thermal Stresses
in Composites. Part I: Theory and Unidirectional Laminates,”
Journal of Reinforced Plastics and
Composites
, Vol 10, No 5
, September 1991, pp 504
-
521.



N. F. Knight, Jr., J. B. Ransom, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and D. Muheim Thompson, “Global/Local
Methods Research Using a Common Structural Analysis Framework,”
Finite Elements in Analysis
and Design
, Vol 9, No 2, June 1991, pp 91
-
1
12.



S. S. Lane, R. H. Moore, H. P. Groger, G. V. Gandhe, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Eddy Current
Inspection of Graphite/Epoxy Laminates,”
Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites
, Vol 10,
No 2, March 1991, pp 158
-
166.



S. Y. Hsu, S. K. Jain, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Verification of Endochronic Theory for
Nonproportional Loading Paths,”
ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics
, Vol 117, No 1,
January 1991, pp 110
-
131.



D. Muheim Thompson, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and M. A. Vid
ussoni, “Global/Local Finite Element
Analysis of Cross
-
Ply Composite Laminates,”
Journal of Composites Technology and Research
,
Vol 12, No 4, December 1990, pp 209
-
216.



D. Muheim Thompson and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “2
-
D to 3
-
D Global/Local Finite Element Anal
ysis of
Cross
-
ply Composite Laminates,”
Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites
, Vol 9, No 5,
September 1990, pp 492
-
502.



J. L. Sevart, O. H. Griffin, Jr., Z. Gurdal, and G. A. Warner, “Flammability and Toxicity of
Composite Materials for Marine Vehi
cles,”
Naval Engineers Journal
, Vol 102, No 4, September,
1990, pp 45
-
54.



D. K. Shin, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “A Penalty Approach for Nonlinear Optimization with
Discrete Design Variables,”
Engineering Optimization
, Vol 16, No 1, July, 1990, pp
29
-
42.



G. V. Gandhe and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Post
-
Impact Characterization of Interleaved Composite
Materials,”
SAMPE Quarterly
, Vol 20, No 4, July 1989, pp 55
-
58.



Mark D. Sensmeier, O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., and Eric R. Johnson, “Effect of Axial Impact on th
e
Static Flexure of Graphite/Epoxy Beams,”
Journal

of Reinforced Plastics and

Composites
, Vol 8,
No 3, May 1989, pp 299
-
309.



O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “Three Dimensional Thermal Stresses in Angle
-
Ply Composite Laminates,”
Journal of Composite Materials
, Vol
22, No 1, January 1988, pp 53
-
70.



18



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “The Use of Proper Shear Moduli in the Analysis of Composite Materials,”
Composites Technology Review
, Vol 6, No 1, Spring 1984, pp 22
-
24.



O. H. Griffin, Jr. and J. C. Roberts, “Numerical/Experimental C
orrelation of Three Dimensional
Thermal Stress Distributions in Graphite/Epoxy Laminates,”
Journal of Composite Materials
, Vol
17, Nov 1983, pp 539
-
548.



J. C. Roberts and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Numerical/Experimental Heat Transfer in Dry Sliding of
Polymeric

Composites,”
ASLE Transactions
, Vol 26, No 4, 1983, pp 493
-
500.



O. H. Griffin, Jr. “Three Dimensional Curing Stresses in Symmetric Cross
-
ply Laminates with
Temperature Dependent Properties,”
Journal of Composite Materials
, Vol 17, Sept 1983, pp 449
-
463.



O
. H. Griffin, Jr. and C. R. Wilson, “Finite Element Analysis on a Microprocessor Based Personal
Workstation,”
Computers and Structures
, Vol 17, No 4, 1983, pp 617
-
619.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Evaluation of Finite Element Software Packages for Stress Analysis
of Laminated
Composites,”
Composites Technology Review
, Vol 4, No 4, Winter 1982, p 136.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., M. P. Kamat, and C. T. Herakovich, “Three Dimensional Inelastic Finite Element
Analysis of Laminated Composites,”
Journal of Composite Materials
, V
ol 15, Nov 1981, pp 543
-
560.

b.

Status of Grants & Contracts submitted related to proposed degree (including agency names, years
of funding, collaborative partners):



“A National Symposium to Develop and Present a Case for the Establishment of Engineering
Educ
ation Academic Programs (SEEAP),” NSF Engineering Education and Centers unsolicited
proposal, Kurt Becker (Utah State), Kamyar Haghighi (Purdue), Esin Gulari (Clemson), Hayden
Griffin (Virginia Tech), ($99,548 for 1 year)



“Building Connections Within the E
ngineering Education Research Community,” NSF Engineering
Education and Centers unsolicited proposal, Hayden Griffin (PI), Lisa McNair, Jenny Lo, Lisa
McNair, and Marie Paretti ($153,691 for 1 year)



“Building Connections Within the Engineering Education Re
search Community,” NSF Engineering
Education and Centers unsolicited proposal, Hayden Griffin (PI), Lisa McNair, Marie Paretti, Aditya
Johri, and Christopher Williams ($307,468 for 2 years)



“International Network for Engineering Studies Workshop #1:
Engineers and Education,”, NSF
Office of International Science & Engineering, Gary Downey, Joe Pitt, Hayden Griffin ($32,820)



In 1993
-
94, I was the Principal Investigator at VPI&SU of SUCCEED Coalition, an eight
-
university
consortium funded by NSF to condu
ct engineering education research. As a part of this research, I
was responsible for monitoring all of the VPI&SU projects, control of the $100,000 plus
administrative budget, and had authority and responsibility for determination of how to use the six
FTE
’s (approximate value $330,000 per year) associated with SUCCEED. I passed the SUCCEED
responsibility along to an assistant dean because the demands on my time were too much considering
my responsibilities to the undergraduate program.



“Bridges for Enginee
ring Education


Virginia Tech,” $100,000, National Science Foundation,
8/1/2004


7/31/2006. One of many faculty involved.



“The NASA
-
Virginia Tech Composites Program”

NASA Langley Research Center

1974
-

1997

Total funding
-

1986
-

1997
-

$4,300,000 (appro
ximate)

Principal investigators:

O. H. Griffin, Jr., Z. Gurdal, M. W. Hyer, E. R. Johnson, A. C. Loos, D. H. Morris



19

My share of the responsibility was for planning and conducting a portion of the work done with the
Landing and Impact Dynamics Branch, Mecha
nics of Materials Branch, Aircraft Structures Branch,
and the Applied Materials Branch. In addition, I worked with the Program Director one year in
reviewing student applications, and was involved in the management of the Program during the year
when we ha
d an Interim Director.

My share of the project funding is as follows:

1985
-

1986: $11,000, 1986
-

1987: $50,000, 1987
-

1988: $48,500, 1989: $58,500,

1990: $46,000, 1991: $108,000, 1992: $138,035, 1993: $104,895, 1994: $95,000, 1995: $50,000

My portion o
f funding, 1985
-

1995 was $709,930.




“Smart Materials, Structures and Mathematical Issues for Active Damage Control”

Army Research Office University Research Initiative

Total funding
-

$400,000

July 1, 1992
-

June 30, 1994 (years 1 and 2 of three years)

P
rincipal Investigators: C. A. Rogers, H. H. Robertshaw, R. T. Haftka, and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.

The responsibility was equally divided between the four investigators

My share of the project funding for 92
-
93 was $100,000 ($79,909 directly, plus $20,091 in

educational and visiting scholar programs) and for 93
-
94 was $65,000.




“Development and Verification of Global/Local Analysis Techniques for Laminated Composites”

NASA Langley Research Center

June 16, 1986
-

December 31, 1992

Total funding
-

$183,194

I wa
s totally responsible for this project. The total funding, $183,194, was my responsibility.




“Thick Composite Joint Failure Analysis”

Hercules Aerospace Company

Total funding
-

$70,048

April 20, 1989
-

December 31, 1991

Principal Investigators: M. W. Hyer
and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.

The responsibility of this project was equally divided between myself and Dr. Hyer.

My share of the project funding was $35,024.




“Design of Stiffened Composite Plates for Postbuckling Performance”

Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry

Dock Company

October 7, 1988
-

September 30,1990

Total funding
-

$40,052 (plus 70% overhead returned to project)

Principal Investigators: Z. Gurdal and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.

The responsibility of this project is equally divided between myself and Dr. Gur
dal

My share of the project funding was $20,026.




“Virginia Institute for Material Systems”

Commonwealth of Virginia

July 1, 1988
-

July 1, 1990

Total funding 1988
-
89
-

$353,208, 1989
-
1990
-

$518,061, 1990
-
1991
-

$487,871, 1991
-
1992
-

$479,563 (excluding o
verhead)

Principal Investigators: J. McGrath, K. L. Reifsnider, G. Wilkes, T. Ward, W. W. Stinchcomb, A. C.
Loos, H. F. Brinson, O. H. Griffin, Jr., D. Baird.

My share of the responsibility has been to serve as an Associate Director of VIMS and conduct
res
earch into the mechanical behavior of composite materials.

My share of the project funding was: 1988
-
89
-

$34,000, 1989
-
90
-

$40,000, 1990
-
91
-

$30,000,
1991
-
92
-

$35,000, 1992
-
93, $18,843, 1993
-
94, $17,000 ($174,843 total).




“Automated Design of Composite

Plates for Marine Applications”



20

Virginia Center for Innovative Technology / Institute of Material Science and Engineering

Nov 20, 1987
-

Nov 19, 1988

Total Funding
-

$34,543

Principal Investigators: Z. Gurdal and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.

The responsibility
of this project was equally divided between myself and Dr. Gurdal

My share of the project funding was $17,271.



“Design of Composite Plates for Marine Vehicles”

Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company

Nov 20, 1987
-

Nov 19, 1988

Total funding
-

$37,997

Principal Investigators: Z. Gurdal and O. Hayden Griffin, Jr.

The responsibility of this project was equally divided between myself and Dr. Gurdal

My share of the project funding was $18,998.




“Application of Composite Materials to Rail Transit Systems”

N
ASA Langley Research Center and U.S. Department of Transportation

May 1, 1986
-

April 30, 1987

Total funding
-

$39,998

Principal Investigators: C. T. Herakovich, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal.

My portion of the project was to conduct a survey of the cu
rrent uses and near
-
term planned uses of
composite materials in urban mass transit systems. I also took the lead in writing the final report to the
sponsors.

My share of the funding was $18,000.

c.

Invited research presentations outside ECU:



Griffin, H., “
Capturing Recent and Near Future Advances in Engineering Education,” Invited
presentation at The Ohio State University, January 2008.



Griffin, H., “Innovation, Research, and Outreach in Engineering Education
,” Invited presentation at
The Ohio State
University, September 2007.



Lohani, V. and Griffin, H., “A New Department of Engineering Education
-

Accomplishments in First
Year and Near
-
Term Goals,” Invited paper, International Conference on Engineering Education
(iCEE 05), Gliwice, Poland, July 25
-
29,

2005.



Muffo, J., Lohani, V.K., Mullin, J., Backert, R., and Griffin, H., 2005, ‘From Engineering
Fundamentals to Engineering Education

What’s in a Name?’, Invited Paper, International
Conference on Engineering Education, February 28
-
March 5, 2005, Tainan
, Taiwan.



Aning, A. O., Lohani, V.K., Griffin, H., Kampe, J.C.M., and Aref, H., ‘An Interdisciplinary Graduate
Program in Engineering Education,’

Invited Paper, International Conference on Engineering
Education, February 28
-
March 5, 2005, Tainan, Taiwan.



O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., “The Virginia Tech Department of Engineering Education: Present and Future,”
presented at Purdue University, May 3, 2004.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Computational Structural Mechanics Needs Assessment,” presented at the
Computational Stru
ctural Mechanics Branch Grant Review, October 23
-
24, 1991, NASA Langley
Research Center, Hampton, Virginia.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Computational Mechanics Applied to Modern Materials and Structures,” invited
lecture at the National Center for Supercomputing
Applications, The Beckman Institute, University of
Illinois, July 25, 1991.



O. H. Griffin, Jr. and D. M. Thompson, “2
-
D to 3
-
D Global/Local Finite Element Analysis of
Laminated Composites,” invited presentation at the First U. S. National Congress on Compu
tational
Mechanics, Chicago, July 21
-
24, 1991.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “The Use of Computers in the Evaluation of Three Dimensional Stress Effects in
Composite Materials Products,” invited Keynote Address, presented at the Second International


21

Conference on Co
mputer Aided Design in Composite Material Technology, Brussels, Belgium, April
25
-
27, 1990, pp 171
-
187.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Development and Verification of Local/Global Analysis Techniques for Laminated
Composites II,” invited presentation at the LaRC Gra
nt Review/ACT Review, NASA Langley
Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, May 16
-
19, 1989.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Development and Verification of Local/Global Analysis Techniques for Laminated
Composites I,” invited presentation at the NASA Workshop on Computat
ional Structural Mechanics,
NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, 18
-
20 November, 1987, NASA Conference
Proceeding 10012, N. P. Sykes, Editor, February 1989, pp 683
-
732.

d.

Chapters of Books, Editor of Proceedings, Instructional Movies, Manuals



Wro
te article on “Composites” for
Encyclopedia of Science and Technology
, 1998.



Wrote articles on “Simple Machines,” “Lever,” “Wheel and Axle,” “Pulley,” “Inclined Plane,” for
1998 and 1999 versions of
Microsoft Encarta

electronic encyclopedia.



Computer Aided

Design in Composite Material Technology III, S. G. Advani, W. R. Blain, W. P. de
Wilde, J. W. Gillespie, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., Editors, Computational Mechanics Publications and
Elsevier Applied Science, Publishers, 1992.

e.

Refereed Papers Presented at Maj
or International or National Technical Meetings



Prashanth Jayaraman, Vinod Lohani, Garrett Bradley, Hayden Griffin, and John Dooley 2008.
“Enhancement of an Engineering Curriculum Through International Experiences,” Proceedings of the
2008 ASEE Annual Conf
erence and Exposition, Pittsburgh, PA, June 22
-
25, 2008.



Vinod Lohani, Ricky Castles, Jenny Lo, and Hayden Griffin, 2007. “Tablet PC Applications in a
Large Engineering Program,” Proceedings of the 2007 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition,
Honolulu, HI,
June 24
-
27, 2007.



Odis Hayden Griffin, Jr. and Susan Cortes, “A Learning Space Of, By, And For Engineers: Virginia
Tech’s Joseph F. Ware, Jr. Advanced Engineering Laboratory,” Paper DETC2006
-
99205,
Proceedings of IDETC/CIE 2006: 3rd Symposium on Internatio
nal Design and Design Education,
September 10
-
13, 2006, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania



Jennifer Mullin, Hayden Griffin, Jenny Lo, Vinod Lohani, “Co
-
teaching a Freshman Engineering
Course: A Collaboration Between Experienced Faculty and Novice Graduate Students
,” 2006 ASEE
Conference, Chicago, June 19
-
21, 2006



Sharnnia Artis, Glenda Scales, Hayden Griffin, “From the Classroom to the Boardroom: The Use of
Role Play in Graduate Education,” 2006 ASEE Conference, Chicago, June 19
-
21, 2006



Jenny Lo, Vinod Lohani, Hay
den Griffin, “Full Implementation of a New Format for Freshman
Engineering Course at Virginia Tech,” 2006 ASEE Conference, Chicago, June 19
-
21, 2006



Jennifer Mullin, Hayden Griffin, Jenny Lo, Vinod Lohani, “Sustainable Development Design Projects
for Engin
eering Freshmen,” 2006 ASEE Conference, Chicago, June 19
-
21, 2006.



Lohani, V. K., Lo, J., Mullin, J., Muffo, J., Backert, R., and Griffin, H., 2005. “Transformation of a
Freshman Year Engineering Course,” International Conference on Engineering Education,
July 25
-
29,
2005, Gilwice, Poland.



Lohani, V. K., Wildman, T., Connor, J., Mallikarjunan, K., Wolfe, M. L., Muffo, J., Knott, T.W., Lo,
J., Loganathan, G.V., Goff, R., Gregg, M., Chang, M., Cundiff, J., Adel, G., Agblevor, F., Vaughan,
D., Fox
,
E., Griffi
n, H., Mostaghimi, S., 2005. “Spiral Curriculum Approach to Reformulate
Engineering Curriculum,” Work
-
in
-
progress paper, Frontiers in Education Conference, Indianapolis,
IN, 18
-
21 October 2005.



Griffin, O. H. and T. Walker, “
Faculty and Student Response to

a Laptop Computer Requirement for
Engineering Freshmen,”
2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.



Griffin, H., Aning, A., Lohani, V.K., Kampe, J., Goff, R., Paretti, M., Alley, M., Lo, J., Terpenny, J.,
Walker, T., Aref, H., Magliaro, S., and Sande
rs, M. 2005. “Designing and Implementing Graduate
Programs in Engineering Education.” 2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.



22



Lo, J., Goff, R., Lohani, V., Walker, T., Knott, T., and Griffin, H., 2005. “New Paradigm for
Foundational Engineering Educ
ation.” 2005 ASEE Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon.



Knott, M., Lohani, V.K., Griffin, H., Loganathan, G.V., Adel, G., Paretti, M., Wolfe, M.,
Mallikajunan, K., and Wildman, T., 2005, “Using e
-
portfolios in a large engineering program.” 2005
ASEE Annual
Conference, Portland, Oregon.



Snook, J., Lohani, V.K., Lo, J., Sirvole, K., Mullins, J., Kaeli, J., and Griffin, H., 2005. “Incorporation
of a 3
-
D Interactive Graphics Programming Language into an Introductory Engineering Course.”
2005 ASEE Annual Conferen
ce, Portland, Oregon.



Lohani, V.K., Sanders, M., Wildman, T., Connor, J., Mallikarjunan, K., Dillaha, T., Muffo, J., Knott,
T.W., Lo, J., Loganathan, G.V., Adel, G., Wolfe, M.L., Goff, R., Gregg, M., Chang, M., Agblevor, F.,
Vaughan, D., Cundiff, J., Fox,
E., Griffin, H., and Magliaro, S., 2005,
“From BEEVT to DLR NSF
Supported Engineering Education Projects at Virginia Tech,


2
005 ASEE Annual Conference, June
12
-
15, Portland, Oregon.



O. Hayden Griffin, Jr., Edward A. Fox, Calvin J. Ribbens, Thomas D. L. W
alker, Nathaniel J. Davis
IV, Richard M. Goff, Jenny L. Lo, Vinod K. Lohani, Michael H. Gregg, and Dwight Barnette, “Work
in Progress


A Freshman Course for Engineering and Computer Science Students,” presented at the
IEEE/ASEE Frontiers in Education Conf
erence, October 2004, Savannah, GA.



Snook, J.S., Lohani, V. K., Lo, J., Sirvole, K., Mullins, J., Kaeli, J., Griffin, H. 2005 “Use of a
Graphical Programming Language in an Introductory Engineering Course.” Poster presented at ACM
SIGCSE 2005, St. Louis, M
O, February 23
-
27, 2005.



Lohani, V. K., Sanders, M., Knott, T., Griffin,

H., Bull, E., McIntyre, S., Connor, J., Loganathan, G.
V., Wildman, T., Adel, G., and Magliaro, S. 2004, “Engineering
-
Education Collaboration
-

Virginia
Tech,” Proc. Int. Conference
on Engineering Education, Gainesville, FL. Oct. 2004.



O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Hands On, 24/7


Virginia Tech’s Joseph F. Ware Jr. Advanced Engineering
Laboratory,”
Proceedings of the 2004 ASEE Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.



J.B. Connor, V.K. Lohani,

E. Bull,

T.M. Wildman,


S.G. Magliaro, T.W. Knott, O.H. Griffin, Jr, and
J.A. Muffo, “An Analysis of Freshman Engineering: A Cross
-
College Perspective”, Proceedings of
the 2004 ASEE Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.



T. W. Knott, V. K. Lohani, O.H. Griffin, Jr., G.
V. Loganathan, G. T. , Adel, and T. M. Wildman,
“Bridges for Engineering Education: Exploring ePortfolios in Engineering Education at Virginia
Tech”, Proceedings of the 2004 ASEE Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.



E. Moas and O.H. Griffin, Jr., “Progressive

Failure Analysis of Laminated Composite Structures,”
37th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials (SDM)
Conference, April 1996, pp 2246
-
2256.



M. D. Sensmeier, P. K. Sensharma, R. T. Haftka, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and L. T. Watso
n, “Experimental
Validation of Anti
-
optimization Approach for Detecting Delamination Damage,” Proceedings of the
36th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials (SDM)
Conference, New Orleans, LA, April 1995, p 3717.



E.H.
Glaessgen and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Effect of Applied Boundary Condition on the Analysis of
Composites Based on Woven Preforms,” Proceedings of the 36th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC
Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials (SDM) Conference, New Orleans, LA,

April 1995, p
38.



D. Cohen, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, Jr., S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, and C. Prasad, “Strength
Predictions for Thick Multi
-
Fastener Graphite
-
Epoxy Composite Joints,” ASTM Symposium on
Bolted and Bonded Joints in Composite Materials
, November 16
-
17, 1993, Fort Worth, Texas.



J. Lee, O. H. Griffin, Jr., and Z. Gurdal, “Postbuckling of Laminated Composites with Delaminations,”
presented at the AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC 34th Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials
Conference, La Joll
a, California, April 1993.



23



E. E. Carapella, M. W. Hyer, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Micromechanics of Noncircular Fibers,”
presented at the American Society for Composites 7th Technical Conference on Composite Materials,
State College, PA, October 1992.



N. L.

Breivik, Z. Gurdal, and O. H. Griffin, Jr., “Compression of Laminated Composite Beams with
Initial Damage,” presented at the American Society for Composites 7th Technical Conference on
Composite Materials, State College, PA, October 1992.



D. Cohen, L. Q.
Do, M. W. Hyer, O. H. Griffin, S. R. Yalamanchili, M. J. Shuart, and C. B. Prasad,
“Failure Criterion for Thick Multi
-
Fastener Graphite/Epoxy Composite Joints,” Proceedings of the