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Case Study
Paul L
Cejas

School of Architecture

Content
Research, Renovation Solutions, Program

Designers
Alexandra Fernandez, Andrea Moreno, Desiree
Vazques


FINAL
PROJECT

“This extraordinary building will


be a landmark on our campus,


it’s imaginative, it’s unique and will attract


visitors to the university and Miami
-
Dade County”.


-
Modesto
Maidique

T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S



2

CONTENTS



INTRODUCTION


1

COVER PAGE


2

TABLE OF CONTENTS



PART 1
-

RESEARCH


9

PROJECT DETAIL


overview, objectives and methods


needed resources and deliverables


3

BUILDING IDENTIFICATION


background information


areas of study




5

USER IDENTIFICATION


6

SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION


statement of problems


statement of successes


solutions and goals

12

RESOURCES AND




PART 2
-

RENOVATION SOLUTIONS

20

RENOVATIONS


level 1


level 2


level 3



PART 3
-

PROGRAM

13

PROGRAM SHEETS


gallery room 140


pin
-
up room 241


multi
-
purpose room 240


pin up room 341

17

PROGRAM SPECIFICATIONS




REFERENCES

23

RESEARCH REFERENCES

24

FIGURE REFERENCES






RESEARCH

/ BUILDING IDENTIFICATION



3

Building Information


Building name
Paul L.
Cejas

School of Architecture Building


Designed by


Bernard
Tschumi

Architects and BEA International


Project Architect Anne Save de Beaurecueil


Design group
Over 30 architects, 10 engineers, 1 landscape


architect and a couple construction managers


Location
11200 SW 8
th

St.,
Miami
, FL,
33199


Year designed
2000



Year completed 2003


Size

102,000 square
-
ft


Client
FIU

School of Architecture


Total cost $16,000,000.00




Brief Synopsis

Not only was the design selected from a competition, but some of the participating designers are affiliated with or part of
FIU

faculty and
staff. The new building had to create an identity and act as a generator, activating spaces as well as defining them (Santana
).

The Paul
Cejas

School of Architecture building is compromised of 5 individual buildings interconnected by walkways and bridges which
displays the idea of flowing energy.
The complex has two linear pre
-
cast concrete wings, which are intended to evoke a feeling of
sobriety. They border an event
-
oriented courtyard that is activated by exuberantly colored polygonal generators that are clad in

bright
yellow, orange and red tiles (Santana). The generator
on the west side of the complex contains a lecture hall, while the east side
generator, which is awaiting the renovation plans, encloses an art gallery(140), reading room(240), and review/
crit

rooms (241,341).







Areas of study

Background Information

RESEARCH

/ BUILDING IDENTIFICATION



4


Areas of Study

The exuberant generator that encompasses the gallery, multi
-
purpose room and 2 critique rooms, is currently under study and
being funded for renovation. It has three levels, and is clad in bright
yellow and light orange tiles. The west façade of each room has a
glass wall that extends from floor to ceiling. The west , north and
south sides have irregular angles and rectangular glass windows.

The spaces for possible renovations that we will be focusing on are:











1) GALLERY / Room 140



large 2 story room



located on the first floor



displays student work produced throughout the school semesters



occasionally holds meetings and exhibitions



visitors, prospective students and guests of students take tours


throughout this space



2) MULTI
-
PURPOSE ROOM / Room 341



entrance is located on the second floor



interior space extends to the third level



complex space



serves multiple functions



holds meetings, exhibitions, project presentations and “pin
-
ups”



some classes are even held in this space due to size and lighting.



numerous types of occupants


3) CRITIQUE ROOMS / Room 240 & 340



“pin
-
up rooms”



where students display their semester work per project



work is evaluated by their teachers or third
-
party panel



students conduct presentations and await criticism from the panel



when pin
-
ups are not in progress, students use these rooms to do work



individuals use these rooms to minimize interruption



groups use them to work on group projects in isolation

Areas of study

Background Information

RESEARCH

/ USER IDENTIFICATION



5


Users

Occupants that use these spaces are common amongst all three
spaces, what varies is the amounts and the time of day. Amount of
occupants change because of the function and/or size of the room,
while the time of day effects the use of the room due to natural
restrictions (e.g. amount of accumulated) heat or typical schedule
use of that room per day (e.g. busy during studio there may be a pin
-
up going on, or A/C is shut off).











1) GALLERY / Room 140



used the least amount of times per day



It has occupants that come in to view the work and immediately leave



prospective students along with their families that are participating in a tour



administrative personnel that serve as tour guides



students viewing work on display (whether its their work or a classmates)


any guests of the students as well as outside visitors



teachers viewing student’s work



faculty members



2) MULTI
-
PURPOSE ROOM / Room 341



this space is used many time throughout the day



teachers conducting classes



students using the room for meetings or group work



stakeholder meetings



faculty and administrative personnel holding meetings and gatherings



student organization members



any other affiliates having presentations or exhibitions


3) CRITIQUE ROOMS / Room 240 & 340



are used by a couple occupants at many times throughout the day



students doing their own personal work



groups of students participating in group work



teachers and classes for critique and evaluation sessions



critique panel may also include other students, faculty and members from
other schools

RESEARCH

/ SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION



6


Statement of Problems

These three spaces that are considered for renovation pose a
number of issues, generally stated as follows:











1) LIGHTING ISSUES/ artificial & natural



track lighting is uniformly placed as opposed to by area of importance or use



drop down fluorescent lighting is suspended very high from floor



the morning light that comes into east façade of the reading room is very strong
and causes a glare, and tends to hurt occupants’ eyes



during sunset, the sunlight shining through the west side facades of all 4 spaces
(mainly the
crit

rooms) is “unbearable” creating an extremely uncomfortable
atmosphere.



2) TEMPERATURE ISSUES/ HVAC



natural light shining through the glass panes creates a change in temperature



HVAC system is also erratic; sometimes it may be excessively cold or hot



HVAC system is also very loud, and creates a loud or constant noise that causes
difficulty when listening to presentations


“At times during the day, it sounds like equipment is banging, or objects are being
thrown.”(
Rivero
)



the AC vent of the 2
nd

floor
crit

room is parallel to the reading room vent (its as if it
were a shared vent)which allows you to hear what is going on in the reading room


3) ACOUSTICS



the HVAC system is the main complaint of occupants when it comes to ultimate
hearing capabilities, because it produces a loud noise that becomes a distraction



the materiality of the floors and walls creates problems with acoustics



the concrete floors in the gallery and
crit

rooms are concrete and exemplify the
sound of footsteps and shuffling chairs



the majority of complaints accompanied echo problems belong to the reading
room, which become an annoyance during presentations (
DeLeon
)


Statement of successes

Statement of problems

RESEARCH

/ SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION



7

4) OCCUPANT EMOTION & DISPOSITION



occupants have complained that these rooms are very stoic and cold



due to material and color choices



the feeling the majority of students experience in these rooms(mainly the reading
room) is said to be “weird”, and even “unemotional” or “empty”(
DeLeon
, Diaz,
Rivero
,
Nawrocki
)



causes
crits

and pin
-
ups to feel longer and maybe less interesting


5) VIEW OR DIRECTION



the focus in the reading room is said to be “lost”



students have uncertainty when entering the room



during presentations, occupants are confused as where to start



an order of presentations does not exist



furniture seems to be scattered



the irregular wall angles also contribute to a messy,
incohesive

look



the gallery also seems to be messy, the space planning is not optimized here either


6) PIN
-
UP WALLS / DISPLAY BOARD



All spaces are lacking sufficient pin
-
up or display area



material is old, becoming ruined



rooms need spaces to display models


7) FURNITURE



furniture can be changed to optimize the experience in these spaces



smarter designs or furniture pieces that are multi functional










Statement of successes

Statement of problems

RESEARCH

/ SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION



8


Statement of Successes


As well as having issues, these spaces have successes or key
building features that are conclusive to the architects design intent.
These may be architectural features or positive use of natural
elements.








1) LIGHTING



ample amount of existing artificial lighting in critique rooms and reading room



track lighting is close to the perimeter pin
-
up walls in the critique rooms



the morning light that comes into the spaces from the east façade is plentiful



as well as the light shining through the west facades during sunset.



gallery has clerestory windows



large size and amount of windows


2) TEMPERATURE



if heat from over exposure to sunlight is not accounted for, the A/C in each of the
rooms is at a decent temperature



when its not compensating in making up for the heat gain, or under performing


3) ACOUSTICS



the carpeting of the floors lessens acoustic problems in the reading room



as well as the non
-
linear walls



the installation of material of the pin
-
up walls allows an absorption of sound



the open plenums of all three rooms also help with sound reduction.


4) OCCUPANT EMOTION & DISPOSITION



the dynamism of the reading room is evident and can be exemplified, as well as
the gallery


5) VIEW OR DIRECTION



the size of the gallery may allow a great flow of direction if added panels or walls



the walls of the reading room may allow different areas of focus,


6) PIN
-
UP SPACE/DISPLAY



g
allery has a great amount of wall space that can be utilized



existing pin up panels are a good size

Statement of successes

Statement of problems

RESEARCH

/ PROJECT DETAIL



9


Overview


FIU

School of Architecture has been awarded a grant to improve these specific interior spaces of the
PCA

complex. As
previously stated, these interior spaces are integrated into one of the two exuberant “generators” that possess a unique
identity and role within the
PCA

complex. The grant should be enough to cover furnishings, finishes and architectural
enhancements that will intensify the value of these spaces and attempt to solve certain inefficiencies. Our job as

designers will be to develop a sustainable and smart design that could be incorporated into these spaces, while
maintaining the integrity of the initial building structure and design intent.









Overview

Objective

Methods

Needed Resources

Deliverables

Objectives and Methods

1) Building issues are to be experienced, to gain a better understanding of the resulting complications and how they affect t
he
different
types of users. Since these rooms are open and available, personal time should be spent in the over the next weeks to gain pe
rso
nal
experience.

2) Research is to be conducted through interviews, for all types of users in these spaces, as well as designers of the buildi
ng.

3) Furniture and substitute materials and their effects should be also researched.

4) Construction drawings would be ideal in analyzing the space and the opportunities to change it.

5) Building System components learned along the course should be identified: (
Bingelli
)


a) Structural:
floors, ceilings, walls, doors, windows, staircases(elevators)


b) Thermal Comfort:
HVAC, system components (vents, fans, ducts) Heat transfer, temperature qualities/irregularities


c) Acoustics:
materials, absorption, noise reduction, sound transmission, open plenum, white noise, AC buffering


d) Lighting:
maximizing or minimizing, glare issues, windows, light fixtures, light placement


e) Indoor Air Quality:
All systems should be tested or under some sort surveillance so problems can be identified.

RESEARCH

/ PROJECT DETAIL



10


Available Resources



Rooms are public and open for viewing at any time



Student users of the building can be found at any time and questioned about personal experience and views



Administrative users can be questioned as well, can be found during the day in the offices



Photos can be taken of spaces for further study



Research of materials, products and furnishings is available



We have the list of companies that produced or shipped the existing architectural elements, can always call and question for
further advice, product info and request



Companies are available daily for questioning about products and furniture


Needed Resources



Architectural floor plans and sections should be acquired for study and possible changes



Contact with stakeholders will be necessary for design choices



Budget needs to be acquired after selection of products









Overview

Objective

Methods

Needed Resources

Deliverables

Deliverables



PROJECT OVERVIEW

Discussing project guidelines, design intent and ideas for solutions. Turned in as power point presentation or
pdf
.



PROJECT RESEARCH

Research should be conducted on all solutions including materials, acoustics, lighting, furniture, partitions, products, wind
ow
treatments. Research on costs and quantities of all materials, products, finishes and changes turned in as a power point pres
ent
ation




BUDGET AND TIMELINE

Estimated timeline of work that will be produced, and turned in as a 8.5”x11”word document.



SELECTED MATERIALS


Final choices of materials, presented on a materials board, about 24”x36”, or multiples of 11”x17”.




ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS

Floor plans,
RCPs

and
FF&Es

with added renovations and elevations showing renovations, produced in
Autocad

or altered originals
and turned in as a set of 8.5”x11” drawings.






RESEARCH

/ SOLUTIONS AND GOALS



11

1) LIGHTING SOLUTIONS



Adding an opaque film to west facing glass facades



Movable shades or blinds that will allow occupants to control amount of light



Direction/angles of reading room windows can be altered to maximize light reflectance and direction



Material added to window panes to saturate light



Use of clerestory windows



Track lighting and suspended down lights can be lowered and more direct







2) TEMPERATURE SOLUTIONS



Vents could be added or direction and placement can be altered



Heat transfer should be reduced



Materials chosen wisely to help gain heat or lose heat depending on place



Create a comfortable space for users that will be there for hours at a time



West side sun should be taken into account





RESEARCH

/ SOLUTIONS AND GOALS



12


4) OCCUPANT EMOTION AND DISPLAY



Space should guarantee a positive experience



Especially in the reading room that holds presentations with other professionals and prospective students



Materials or color scheme should be inviting and harmonious



3) ACOUSTICS



Materials should be suited to help sound absorption, especially floor material



There should be a reduced echo effect



Muffle AC sound if possible



Open plenum should be kept for sound purposes, disperses sound better



Parallel/shared vents should be changed so sound doesn’t transfer between adjacent rooms


RESEARCH

/ SOLUTIONS AND GOALS



13

5) VIEW OR DIRECTION



Room set
-
up should also fulfill class and presentation needs



Way around room/circulation should create an easy flow



Focus should ensure no distractions or confusion






6) PIN
-
UP SPACE / DISPLAY



Pin
-
up walls should satisfy class needs to ensure easy going presentations



Mobile or freestanding partitions should be added



Material should be durable, long
-
lasting



Pin
-
up space should be maximized


RESEARCH

/ SOLUTIONS AND GOALS



14

7) FURNITURE


Furniture should suit occupant’s needs



Swivel chairs should be introduced to help rotating/changing focus



All furniture should be somewhat light
-
weight and easier to move around an easy flow



All materials and products should
be sustainable




PROGRAM

/
GALLERY /
ROOM 140



15



POSSIBLE RENOVATIONS



ARCHITECTURAL ENHANCEMENTS, FURNISHES AND FINISHES


GALLERY

The gallery was created as a space where students could showcase their work. The main entrance is on the

first floor on the east side of the building facing the courtyard. It was designed and should remain as an open

space where 2
-
dimensional and 3
-
dimensional displays could be reconfigurable and placed to the student or

faculty member’s liking.





































Area
Name


FF&E


Quantity

Minimum
Dimensions

W x D x H


Notes

Gallery Room

140

Double

Doors

1


32” x 4” x 84”

Hurricane

Resistant
Glass that meet code
standards.

Pin Up

Panels

Adequate to cover
interior walls

44”
x
72”
(W x H)

Self Healing

Magnetic

Fabric

Attached to wall

Model
Display

25

24”
x

8”
x

30”

White, easily

removable and
stackable.

Acoustical
Panels

Wall

Acoustical
Paneling

PROGRAM

/
PIN
-
UP ROOM /
ROOM 241



16



POSSIBLE RENOVATIONS



ARCHITECTURAL ENHANCEMENTS, FURNISHES AND FINISHES


PIN
-
UP ROOM (CRITIQUE ROOM)

It is located on the second floor on the south side of the studio building. Room 241 was created as a pin
-
up room

for student critiques and as a meeting place for studio classes. These rooms should come equipped with an area

for projection, sufficient seating and sufficient desk space. The furniture should be reconfigurable and comfortable

in the case of long presentations. In addition, the surrounding walls in the room must be available for showcasing

the students work. That is the walls should look clean and be made of a material that can be easily punctured.





































Area
Name


FF&E


Quantity

Minimum

Dimensions

W x D x H


Notes

Pin
-

Up
Room 241

Window Treatments

4

SIZED TO FIT
APPROPRIATE
WINDOW

Placed on WIndows

Chairs

12

16” X 20” X 32”

Comfortable/ Durable

Pin Up Material

Adequate to
cover
interior walls

44”
x 72” (W x H)

Self Healing and Clean
(preferably white)

Desk Space

12
Linear Ft

Durable

Acoustical Panels

Sufficient for space

PROGRAM

/
MULTI
-
PURPOSE ROOM (READING ROOM) /
ROOM 340



17



POSSIBLE RENOVATIONS



ARCHITECTURAL ENHANCEMENTS, FURNISHES AND FINISHES


MULTI
-
PURPOSE ROOM (READING ROOM)

It is located on the third floor of the building. Room 340 was created as a room was people would read and study

in the space. The Room is currently used as a general room was class’s presentations and critics are healed. These

rooms should come equipped with an area for projection, sufficient seating and sufficient desk space, as well as a
partition wall that will provide space were projects can be displayed. The furniture should be reconfigurable and
comfortable in the case of long presentations. In addition, the room should also be equipped to hold presentation
without having glare problems or lighting issues.





































Area
Name


FF&E


Quantity

Minimum

Dimensions

W x D x H


Notes

Reading Room.
340

Window Treatments

10

SIZED TO FIT
APPROPRIATE
WINDOW

Placed on Windows, to
control light in and
glare.

Chairs

25


16” X 20” X 32”

Comfortable/ Durable

Pin Up Material

Adequate to
cover
interior walls

36” x 72” (W x H)

Self Healing and Clean
(preferably white) This
should accommodate
half wall, and adjacent
areas.

Desk Space

12
Linear Ft

Durable

Acoustical Panels

Sufficient for space

PROGRAM

/
PIN
-
UP ROOM /
ROOM 341



18



POSSIBLE RENOVATIONS



ARCHITECTURAL ENHANCEMENTS, FURNISHES AND FINISHES


PIN
-
UP ROOM (CRITIC ROOM)

It is located on the third/fourth floor on the south side of the studio building. Room 341 was created as a pin
-
up

room for student critiques and as a meeting place for studio classes. These rooms should come equipped with an

area for projection, sufficient seating and sufficient desk space. The furniture should be reconfigurable and

comfortable in the case of long presentations. In addition, the surrounding walls in the room must be available for
showcasing the students work. That is the walls should look clean and be made of a material that can be easily
punctured.






































Area Name


FF&E


Quantity

Minimum

Dimensions

W x D x H


Notes

Pin
-

Up Rm.
341

Window Treatments

4

Placed on Windows

Chairs

12

16” X 20” X 32”

Comfortable/ Durable

Pin Up Material

Adequate to cover
interior
walls

44”
x 72” (W x H)

Self Healing and Clean
(preferably white)

Desk Space

2

12

Linear Feet

Durable

Acoustical Panels

Sufficient for space

PROGRAM

/
SPECIFICATIONS



19


1) SHADES (Interior Retractable Shades
-
Duo Shades)



-
Polar Shades



-
Dual Shades allow for light percentage values of 1
-

10% openness
while saving on energy cost. They are mechanical as well so they be
can operated with the push of a button or by sun sensor.



-
can fit in any opening from 30 inches to 20 feet and are custom
made to fit the appropriate windows



-
cost varies as does size




2
) PIN UP BOARDS



-
Quartet® Prestige Plus® Diamond Mesh Fabric Bulletin Board



-
Highly durable, densely woven magnetic diamond
-
mesh bulletin
board backed by high
-
density fiberboard effortlessly secures
documents with push pins or magnets.



-
6' x 4‘



-
$425.95 per unit




3) PROJECTION SCREEN


-
Black matte, baked enamel casing features powder coated end
caps and a flat back design for simple wall mount or stable ceiling
suspension. It is easy to install and although hardware is not
included in price it can be easily mounted to any wall or ceiling



-
96” x 96”



-
$487.95










FIGURE 4

FIGURE 3

FIGURE 5

PROGRAM

/
SPECIFICATIONS



20












TABLES, CHAIRS, DISPLAY STANDS/ TRESTLES


-

This furniture proposes various complementary typologies
of seats, and heights of work
-
top. In this particular case for
the students of the new building of the school of Arts and
design of Saint
-
étienne

in the
Cité

du design; but it could be
imagined in lots of design studios or actually in every studio
looking for office furniture as modular as possible.
(
http://www.dezeen.com/2009/11/07/saint
-
etienne
-
by
-
sophie
-
franc%CC%A7on
-
and
-
franc%CC%A7ois
-
mangeol/
)


-




6’ x 7.5’

3’x 6.6’

2.5’

3.3’

3.3’

3.5’

3.5’

1.5’

1.5’


2.3’

FIGURE 6

FIGURE 7

FIGURE 8

FIGURE 9

FIGURE 10

PROGRAM

/
SPECIFICATIONS



21













7) GALLERY BENCH



-

The Return Bench from Gus* Modern is rugged yet simple
making it perfect for a clean modern interior design. The
illusion of a solid beam floating in mid air accentuates the
smooth, hand
-
applied finish of the light
Zebrano

wood
veneers over a solid wood construction.



-

60"L x 16"W x 18"H



-
$722.50



FIGURE 11

8) CARPET


-
Jumbo Tiles are the perfect solution for medium to larger size
spaces.


These tiles are the heaviest industrial grade
available.


They wear like Iron in the highest traffic conditions.



-
Manufactured in 1 meter size (39.0" x 39.0") = 10.56 sq/ft each,
they install quickly and easily.


-
$9.99 per tile


-
Company:
icarpettiles


-
Color:

175122


-
Style:

block weave





FIGURE 12

PROGRAM

/
LEVEL ONE



22












Projector

Projector Screen

Model Display Stand

Gallery Bench

Duo Shade

PROGRAM

/
LEVEL TWO



23












Reconfigurable Table

Stackable Chairs

Display Stands

Stackable Chairs

Shades

PROGRAM

/
LEVEL THREE



24












Same Furniture Applies

Same Window

Treatments Apply

RESEARCH

/
REFERENCES



25



REFERENCES


Werne
, J. (2004, March). Build it, and they will come!. Hispanic Magazine, 1
-
3. Retrieved from



http://www.hispaniconline.com/magazine/2004/march/Features/fiu.html.


Penton

Inc. Florida International University, Paul L.
Cejas

School of Architecture and Building. American




School & University Magazine, 1. Retrieved from http://schooldesigns.com/Project
-




Details.aspx?Project
_ ID=1679.



McGraw
-
Hill Company. Paul L.
Cejas

School of Architecture Building. Architectural Record, 1. Retrieved




from
http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/portfolio/archives/0310school.asp
.


Santana
-
Bravo, M.
FIU

presents the Paul L.
Cejas

School of Architecture Building, 2
-
5.





Retrieved from
http://www2.fiu.edu/~soa/cejas/architecture.html
.



Binggeli
, C. (2010).
Building Systems for Interior Designers
. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



Rivero
, Carmen. Architecture student, Graduate Design 1.


DeLeon
, Mauricio. Architecture student, Graduate Design 1.


Nawrocki
, Zak. Architecture student, Graduate Design 1.


Diaz, Andres. Architecture student, Graduate Design 1.



































RENOVATIONS
/
FIGURES AND REFERENCES



26



FIGURES AND REFERENCES


FIGURE 1
-

Werne
, J. (2004, March). Build it, and they will come!. Hispanic Magazine, 1
-
3. Retrieved from



http://www.hispaniconline.com/magazine/2004/march/Features/fiu.html
.


FIGURE 2
-

http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpSctDspRte.jsp?section=17219&minisite=10022http://www.leviton.com/OA_



HTML/
ibeCCtpSctDspRte.jsp?section
=17219&minisite=10022


FIGURE 3
-

http://www.polarshade.com/photo_gal.html



FIGURE 4
-

http://www.acco.com/productdetail.aspx?s=0&pid=B443A#


FIGURE 5
-

http://www.ergoindemand.com/manual
-
pull
-
down
-
projection
-
screen
-
96
-
x
-
96
-
wall
-
or
-
ceiling
-
mounted.html



FIGURE 6
-
10
-

http://www.modecodesign.com/search/modular+school+furniture+sophie+franc



FIGURE 11
-

http://www.furniturestoreblog.com/2009/01/11/the_industrial_styled_return_bench_from_gus_modern.html