Design and Management of Manufacturing Systems - Sheffield ...

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Automation & Robotics

Manufacturing Systems

Product Design


Computer Simulation

BEng (Honours)

Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering



STUDEN
T HANDBOOK

SUMMER 2004



T.A.R. College


Sheffield Hallam University



BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

1

Contents



Page

1.0

Introduction and Welcome


2

2.0

The Course Structure


T605
-

Concurrent Engineering for Product Design and
Manufacture


T606
-

Design and Management of Manufacturing Systems


T607
-

Simulation of Manufacturing System
s


T608
-

Automation and Robotics


3


4



8


12


16



3.0

Management of the Course and Course Team


2
0

4.0

Timetables


21

5.0

Cancellation of Lectures


2
1

6.0

Student Support and Guidance


2
1

7.0

Information on Assessment


2
2

8.0

Extenuating Circumstances


2
2

9.0

Appeals


2
2

10.0

Coursework


2
2

11.0

General


2
3


11.1
Submission of Coursework



11.2 Absence from the University



11.3 Change of Address



11.4 Course Committee



11.5 Library and Learning Resource Centre


12.0

E
-
Mail


25


Appendix
1
-

Timetable



Appendix 2
-

Terms Commonly Used in University Courses












BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

2

1.0 Introduction and Welcome


Congratulations! If you are reading this then you have been accepted on to
the Sheffield Hallam University, School o
f Engineering
-

T.A.R. College
Summ
er School 2004
.


We are dedicated to making your time with us a success. You can expect
quality tuition and support, a stimulating learning environment and state of the
art facilities. We hope you will soon settle into

your new environment, and
enjoy your time at University, both academically and socially. You will find
your achievements in both areas depends very much on your own self
-
discipline in organising your time and striking the right balance between time
spent

on your studies and time spent enjoying non
-
academic areas.


This handbook, read in conjunction with
information provided at
Student
Intranet


http://students.shu.ac.uk


which
contains most of the information yo
u will need on how your course is
run, what is expected of you and where to go for more information or help if
you need it.


BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

3


2.0 The Course Structure


The course consists of 60 credits delivered as follows;



Concurrent
Engineering for
Product Design &
Manufacture

Design and
Management of
Manufacturing
Systems

Simulation of
Manufacturing
Systems

Automation and
Robotics

Module Code

T605

T606

T607

T608

Semester of Delivery

Summer

Summer

Summer

Summer

Module Type

Mandatory

Mandatory

Mandatory

Mandatory

Level

6

6

6

6

Credit Points

20

10

10

20

Assessment Modes &
Weighting

Ex/CA 50/50

Ex/ CA 60/ 40

Ex/ CA 60/ 40

Ex/ CA 80/ 20

Pre
-
Requisite Modules

Completion of TARC
Advanced Diploma

Completion of TARC
Advanced Diploma

Completion of TARC
Advanced Diplom
a

Completion of TARC
Advanced Diploma

Typical Breakdown of
Student Learning
Hours by Type

16

hours Lectures

32 hours studio

152

hours Directed
Study

8 hours Lectures,

18 hours Tutorials,

76 hours Directed Study

10

hours Lectures

16 Tutorials/Lab

76 hours
Directed Study

24

hours Lectures

8

hours Tutorials

18

hours Labs

152

hours Directed
Study

Module Leader &
School

Mr
N Pickett


Engineering

Dr S Saad,

Engineering

Professor T Perera

Engineering

Dr M Howarth

Engineering


You must obtain an average grade o
f at least 40% overall to pass a unit.

You must obtain at least 35% in both coursework and examination to pass a
unit.


Your degree classification will be determined by the overall weighted
aggregate of your four units. The
guidelines

the Assessment Award
Boards
use when deciding classifications are:


First Class Honours

70% +

Upper Second (2i)


60
-
69%

Lower Second (2ii)


50
-
59%

Third (3)



40
-
49%

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

4



MODULE TITLE



Concurrent Engineering for Product Design and
Manufacture

Module Code

T605

Semester of Del
ivery

Summer

Module Type

Mandatory

Level

6

Credit Points

20

Assessment Modes &
Weighting

Ex/CA: 50/50

Pre
-
Requisite Modules

Completion of TARC Advanced Diploma

Typical Breakdown of
Student Learning Hours
by Type


Module Leader & School

Nick Pickett
:
Engineering


MODULE RATIONALE

The development of new products is undertaken under circumstances of cost
and time pressures requiring concurrent consideration of functionality,
manufacturing, environmental, maintenance and disposal issues. Successful
co
ncurrent engineering requires attention to three general aspects;
organisation in a commercial context, product specific engineering knowledge
and appropriate information systems to facilitate effective communication.
The
module

will deal with all three as
pects through application to a number of
mini
-
projects using the extensive facilities available within the University.


MODULE SUMMARY OF AIMS




To enable students to understand the organisational requirements and
commercial benefits of concurrent engineeri
ng for product development



To enable students to identify the engineering interactions involved in
satisfying customer needs for high value engineered products



To provide experience in using ‘time compression’ computer tools for
product development, virtua
l manufacturing and virtual testing



To provide experience in using ICT systems for defining and
communicating decisions in the product development cycle

MODULE ANTICIPATED LEARNING OUTCOMES

O
n successful completion of this module, students should be able t
o:


1.

Explain the elements and benefits of a concurrent engineering approach
to product development

2.

Describe and effectively use ICT tools such as TEAMSET for managing
and monitoring decision making in concurrent engineering projects

3.

Explain the benefits of
CAD systems in support of concurrent engineering
for product definition and data transfer, and use the software in the
execution of a project.

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

5

4.

Extend CAD software use to include virtual manufacturing activities such
as; rapid prototyping, CNC, injection mo
ulding, identifying benefits.

5.

Use virtual testing software to predict failure in CAD modelled components

6.

Keep a portfolio of detailed, organised, technical information arising from
design projects


MODULE LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY AND METHODS,
INCLUDI
NG RESOURCES

The major approach to this module’s delivery will be by several product
design studies, which will involve the use of the various computer systems to
analyse and synthesis the requirements of a particular system and develop
an appropriate solu
tion. Each exercise will be designed to explore one or
more aspects of the whole syllabus. The case studies and associated base
material will be presented in lectures and studio sessions will be used to
access computer systems and give students guidance t
owards acceptable
solutions. Students will work in groups of two or three during these studio
sessions, with individual aspects to differentiate contributions, and may
submit joint reports.


The typical balance of contact time will be:











Lecture

3
3%






Studio


66%

.


MODULE ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK STRATEGY AND METHODS

The module will be assessed by a combination of a two
-
hour unseen
examination paper (50%) and coursework (50%). The increased bias towards
coursework (from the ‘80/20’ standard) is

due to the case
-
study nature of the
module
.


Three assignments will be set as the summative coursework component. All
such coursework is also formative, in that progressive feedback is given, in
writing, in class situations, through a series of interim
assessments. This
builds on support and feedback given orally during all studio classes.


One assignment will take the form of a product/component design and
prototype manufacture exercise involving the use of rapid prototyping and/or
CNC machining. This

will largely be developed during the studio sessions,
but some material from keynote lectures will also contribute. This exercise
contributes 15% of the
module

mark, contributing to learning outcomes
3,aspects of 4 and 6.


The second assignment will take

the form of a product/component design and
injection moulding simulation using the Pro
-
Engineer software suite.. This
again will largely be developed during the studio sessions,
using material

from
keynote lectures. This exercise contributes 15% of the
module

mark,
contributing to learning
outcomes 3
, aspects of 4 and 6.


BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

6

The third assignment will take the form of a product/component design
exercise requiring identification of potential failure modes and a sample
computer analysis. Use of TAEMSET softwar
e will be required in this
exercise. This will largely be developed during the studio sessions, but some
material from keynote lectures will also contribute. This exercise contributes
20% of the
module

mark, contributing to learning outcomes 2,3, aspects
of 4
and 6.


The examination will cover material relevant to learning outcomes 1 to 5.


MODULE SPECIFIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA


To obtain a typical pass in this
module
, the student will demonstrate evidence
of:




Description of the basic elements and the benef
its to a commercial
organisation of the use of concurrent engineering methods for
product development.



Ability to model a product/component using a CAD system using
3d,surfaces and assembly functions.



Ability to develop a machining strategy, toolpaths and
CNC
instructions from a 3d computer model.



Ability to develop a rapid prototyped physical model from a CAD
computer model.



Ability to develop an injection moulded simulation from a CAD
computer model.



Ability to perform a finite element virtual test analys
is from a
computer CAD model



Using TEAMSET software for QFD, FMEA and DFMA analysis



Incorporating the results of the above activities in a technical report
written to an acceptable standard of presentation, clarity and
English usage. The content will be

judged on technical accuracy
and completeness.


Higher standards will be demonstrated by the complexity of the analyses and
the sophistication of the explanation of the benefits of the use of the
techniques.


INDICATIVE CONTENTS, READING LIST AND RESOUR
CES

Basic concepts of concurrent engineering, team working skills, team building,
project vs functional organisations, structure of CE projects. Virtual team
working, ICT for communications, QFD, FMEA, DFMA

CAD modelling, solids, surfaces, assemblies. D
ata transfer in Cad systems,
IGES, DXF, STEP etc

CNC machines, structure, functions, languages, instructions. CAM from CAD,
toolpaths, strategies, post
-
processors.

Rapid prototyping machines, accuracy, limitations. STL file structures.

Injection moulding s
imulation from CAD

Finite element analysis, element types, loading, boundary condition from CAD
models

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

7

Integrated computerised fatigue analysis.


Indicative reading list:


Managing the Design
-

Manufacturing Process, Ettlie & Stoll.

Mc Graw
-

Hill,
1998

C
oncurrent / simultaneous engineering : methods, tools and case studies /
Paul G. Ranky. CIMware, 1994.

www.ptc.com

www.teamset.com

www.eevl.ac
.uk

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

8



MODULE TITLE



Design and Management of Manufacturing
Systems

Module Code

T606

Semester of Delivery

Summer

State whether module is
Mandatory, Elective or
Option

Mandatory

Level

6

Credit Points

10

Assessment Pattern:
Components & Weighting

4
0 % Coursework

60% Exam

Pre
-
Requisite Modules
(if
applicable)

Completion of TARC Advanced Diploma

Breakdown of Student
Learning Hours by Type*

8

hrs Lectures,

18

hrs Tutorials,

76

hrs Directed/independent

Study

Module Leader & School

Dr S
ameh
Saad, Engi
neering



RATIONALE

The main characteristic feature of today’s dynamic manufacturing
environments are apparent and they can be listed as follows; stochastic
demand, variable but smaller production batch size, frequent and
unpredictable changes in producti
on mix, highly variable processing and set
-
up times, variable production sequences, very high volume of information and
a strong competition. To become competitive and thrive under such
environments, the manufacturing system should be designed, managed and

controlled to respond quickly and cost effectively.


Based on the above, the contents of this module are evolved in order to offer
the required understanding of the necessary techniques, procedures
and the
related tools and technologies.


SUMMARY OF AIM
S

T
his module aims to provide a good understanding of the principles and
methods for designing, operating and controlling competitive manufacturing
systems.

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

9


ANTICIPATED LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to
:



Demonstrate knowledge and understandin
g of manufacturing systems
elements.



apply structured approaches to the design of manufacturing systems.



make proposals for the design of manufacturing systems.



apply analytical techniques to obtain quantitative solutions to
manufacturing activity.



Use o
f appropriate technique(s) to manage and control manufacturing
systems.



Critically analyse and compare performance of different operations
scenarios.


LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY AND METHODS, INCLUDING
RESOURCES

The student will develop and enhance know
ledge, understanding and
relevant skills through a series of lecturers, tutorials, and through participation
within practical sessions.

Topics wi
ll be introduced in lectures (8

hrs), and then developed in tutorials/
laboratories (
18

hrs). In addition to h
andouts and other materials, a
recommended reading list is provided to help students to undertake self
-
directed study (
7
6 hrs).


ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK STRATEGY AND METHODS

The module will be assessed by 60% exam and 40% course work. The
coursework will c
omprise two assignments (
the
first assignment covers the
design issues and the second covers the management and operational
issues) through which student understanding of the module contents will be
assessed. Each assignment will be accounted for 20%. Stud
ent
s

will be
provided with feedback on their assignments in achieving the desired learning
outcomes as well as on their progress throughout the module through a
combination of classroom and laboratory activities.


SPECIFIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

It is expect
ed that the contents of the assignment should have a logical and
coherent structure such as:

Introduction

Specification

Analysis and recommendations

Supporting information/justifications

Discussion/conclusions

Source of data/information




In order to achi
eve a pass grade in this module, the reported work should
include appropriate design and logical operational procedures with some
BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

10

explanation and acceptable justification for the proposed design and
procedures adopted




In order to achieve a 2(ii) grade a c
lear explanation of the procedures is
required. Critically analyse and compare performance of different
operations scenarios.



In order to achieve a 2(i) grade a sound understanding of the underlying
methodology/techniques should be demonstrated.



In order t
o achieve first class grade, in addition to the requirements of 2(i)
grade, a logical argument should be developed about the final
achievements and some elements of originality/ uniqueness should be
demonstrated.


INDICATIVE CONTENTS, READING LIST AND RESO
URCES


INDICATIVE CONTENTS

The module contains topics related to design and management of
manufacturing enterprises:


Design topics:

Introduction
to manufacturing systems, factory location and layout, the design
of manufacturing and assembly cells, single
station manufacturing cells,
group technology and cellular manufacturing, virtual manufacturing, leveling
and balancing the manufacturing system, flexible manufacturing systems,
manual assembly lines


Management topics:

Introduction to manufacturing plann
ing and control, forecasting techniques,
aggregate planning, master production schedule, material requirement
planning, capacity requirement planning, enterprise resource planning and its
modules, sequencing and scheduling, shop floor control & drum
-
buffer
-
rope,
Juts
-
in
-
time elements, insights and lessons, lean manufacturing.


READING LIST


Evans, J.R., (1997), “Production/Operations Management, Quality,
Performance, and Value”, West Publishing Company, ISBN: 0314062475.

Goldman S, Nagel R, and Preiss K., (
1997), “
Agile Competitive and Virtual
Organisations: Strategies for Enriching the customer
”, Publisher: John Wiley
& Sons’ ISBN: 0471286508.

Pinedo M., and Chao X., (1999), “Operations Scheduling with Applications in
Manufacturing and Services”, McGraw Hil
l.


Saad S, (2001) “21 Century’s Manufacturing Systems”
EPSRC Research
Grant No: GR/R00432/01
.


Saad S. M., Baykasoglu, A. and Gindy N. N (2002), “An Integrated
Framework for Reconfiguration of Cellular Manufacturing Systems using
BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

11

Virtual Cells”, Internati
onal Journal of Production Planning and Controls,
Vol.13, No.4, pp. 381
-
393.


Slack, N., Chambers, S., and Johnson, R., (2001), “Operations Management”,
Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0273646575.

We, B., (1992), “Manufacturing Systems Design and Analysis”, Chapman &

Hall, ISBN 0412408406.


BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

12



MODULE

TITLE



Simulation of Manufacturing Systems

Module

Code

T607

Semester of Delivery

Summer

Module

Type

Mandatory

Level

6

Credit Points

10

Assessment Modes &
Weighting

Ex/CA 60/40

Pre
-
Requisite
Module
s

Completion of

TARC Advanced Diploma

Typical Breakdown of
Student Learning Hours
by Type

10 hours Lectures

16 Tutorials/Lab

76 hours Directed Study

Module

Leader & School

Professor
T
errence

Perera, Engineering


RATIONALE

The design and management of manufacturing sys
tems are considered to be
demanding tasks. For example, manufacturing system designers often
develop more than one feasible layout and identifying the best layout for a
given situation is a complicated process. Similarly, operations mangers tend
to identif
y alternative strategies to operate manufacturing systems and again
identifying the most appropriate approach is challenging. When alternative
strategies exist, a
model

of the real system can be used to identify the best
strategy. Model is used as the test

bed for evaluating the impact of alternative
strategies.


Among the various modelling tools available, computer simulation is
recognised as the most powerful and versatile modelling tool. It enables
managers/engineers to build animated models of real syst
ems and evaluate
the impact of alternative strategies quickly and accurately. Simulation models
facilitate the dissemination of the best strategy to a wide audience through
2D/3D animation. Leading manufacturing companies around the world
recognise compute
r simulation as a leading edge technology for the 21
st

century and it is rapidly becoming a mainstream business tool in many
industrial sectors including automotive and aerospace.


This
module

introduces the basic principles of computer simulation and its

applications within the manufacturing industry. Design, development and
deployment issues relating to simulation models are also discussed. A series
of models with different level of complexities are built using industry
-
strength
simulation software. All

key stages of model development life
-
cycle are
extensively discussed.


This module provides an excellent opportunity to learn and apply a leading
edge modelling technology and the module prepares the managers/engineers
of the future to develop essential

modelling skills encompassing computer
model building and relating data analysis techniques.

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

13


SUMMARY OF AIMS



To enable students to obtain experience of building and using
simulation models in manufacturing related applications.



To provide understanding

of data analysis and experimentation
techniques used in computer simulation



To provide an appreciation of where simulation models can be
deployed in the design and manufacturing systems.



To enable students to build comprehensive simulation models using
in
dustry strength simulation software.

ANTICIPATED LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this
module
, students should be able to:


1.

discuss the dynamic interrelationships of sub
-
systems in manufacturing
systems.

2.

critically analyse the strengths and w
eaknesses of alternative modelling
techniques.

3.

build and use simulation models in the design and management of
manufacturing systems

4.

demonstrate the understanding of all key stages involved in simulation
project life cycle.

5.

critically evaluate the performa
nce of a manufacturing system using
simulation and explain what changes might be made to improve it.

6.

demonstrate the ability to analyse both input and output data sets.


LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY AND METHODS, INCLUDING
RESOURCES

The major approach to
this
module's

delivery will be by case studies, which
will motivate the use of the various aspects of computer simulation to analyse
the performance of manufacturing systems and identify the optimum solution
for a given situation. These will be presented,

and solution methods
discussed in lectures. Tutorial and laboratory sessions will be used to
introduce model building using industry
-
strength simulation software, conduct
experiments and evaluate performance of alliterative scenarios. Students will
work

in groups of two or three during laboratory sessions and may submit
joint reports.


The typical balance of contact time will be:






Lecture

42%






Tutorial

33%






Laboratory

25%




BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

14



Resource requirements include:




Essential
-

availability of ARENA

simulation software. Annual renewal of
licences cost about £500.


ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK STRATEGY AND METHODS

The
module

will be assessed by a combination of a two
-
hour unseen
examination paper (60%) and coursework (40%). The increased bias towards
cou
rsework (from the ‘80/20’ standard) is due to the case
-
study nature of the
module
.


Two assignments will be set as the summative coursework component. All
such coursework is also formative, in that full feedback is given, both in
writing and orally in cla
ss situations. This builds on support given orally
during all tutorial and laboratory classes.


One assignment will take form of data collection, data analysis and simple
model building. This will largely be developed during the laboratory sessions,
but s
ome material from lectures and tutorial work will also contribute. This
contributes 15% of the
module

mark, contributing to all learning outcomes,
particularly outcome 6.


The other assignment will be the development of a comprehensive simulation
model us
ing ARENA.


The other assignment will be a piece of written problem
-
solving work,
answering set questions. This contributes 25% of the
module

mark,
contributing to learning outcomes 1 to 5. It will be set approximately half way
through the course.


The e
xamination will cover material relevant to learning outcomes 1 to 6
except 3.


MODULE

SPECIFIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

To obtain a typical pass in this
module
, the student will demonstrate evidence
of:




ability to develop a model of a manufacturing system and
simulate it using
ARENA simulation software. Pass standard


the ability to model a simple
system and simulate it to an extent which exhibits the major aspects of the
system’s behaviour.



an appreciation of the dynamic interrelation of interconnected sub
-
systems
of manufacturing systems. Pass standard


a reasonably accurate
appraisal should be made of the effects of changing one aspect of a
system on the dynamic behaviour of the system



an ability to analyse both input and output data sets. Pass standard



ability to derive a distribution for a given set of data .

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

15



reporting the results of model building and data analysis exercise. Pass
standard


a report written to an acceptable standard of presentation,
clarity and English usage. The content will be
judged on technical
accuracy and completeness. It should enable the reader to understand
what was done and why.



INDICATIVE CONTENTS, READING LIST AND RESOURCES


Manufacturing system design and management:

review of design and
management issues of manuf
acturing systems and dynamic interrelationships
between sub
-
systems.


Modelling techniques:

alternative modelling techniques available to analyse
the performance of manufacturing systems and their strengths/weaknesses.


Simulation project life cycle:

key s
tages of simulation projects and data
requirements .


Simulation model building:

Building both simple and comprehensive
simulation models using ARENA simulation software.


Data analysis techniques:

Understanding of data analysis techniques for
both input
and output data sets.


Case studies:

Introduction to a range of case studies to highlight the issues
involved in simulation model building


Indicative reading list:



Kelton D, Simulation with ARENA, McGraw
-
Hill, ISBN 0
-
07
-
239270
-
3


Robinson S, Successful

simulation, McGraw
-
Hill, ISBN 0
-
07
-
707622
-
2


Carrie A, Simulation of Manufacturing Systems, John Wiley, ISBN 0
-
471
-
91574
-
2

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

16


Module title

Automation and Robotics


Module code


T608

Semester of delivery


Module

Type

Mandatory

Level

6

Credit points

20

Assessment modes & weighting

Ex/CA 80/20

Pre requisites

Completion of TARC Advanced Diploma

Study hours by type

Lec.
24


Tut.
8

Lab.
18

Directed/independent learning 1
5
2

Module

leader & School

Dr Martin
Howarth, Engineering


RATIONALE:

Th
is
module

aims to provide prospective engineers with an understanding of
the major components of an automated system, both hardware and software,
and how these components may be integrated to perform real world tasks.
Such engineers are expected to be able

to bring a range of analytical and
simulation techniques to bear on the analysis and design of such systems.


The
module

will investigate discrete automation systems, both synchronous
and asynchronous, along with techniques used to control, program and
im
plement robotic systems.


The
module

is self contained but assumes mathematical, computing and
engineering skills commensurate with those of a final year engineering
student.


SUMMARY OF AIMS:




To equip the students with an understanding of where automat
ion should
be used, and at what level automation is appropriate in an industrial
environment.



Understand the hard and soft techniques required to attain different levels
of automation.



To enable the student to identify the class and appropriate capability
of a
robot for a given task.



To provide the students with the ability to implement robotic solutions to
automation tasks.



To enable the student to analyse problems in robot vision and implement
a number of representative vision techniques.


BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

17


ANTICIPATED L
EARNING OUTCOMES:


On successful completion of this
module

the student should be able to:


1.

Determine what types of automation are appropriate for various products
and industrial processes.

2.

Use an appropriate robot programming environment to generate effect
ive
motion control programs.

3.

Assess the feasibility of introducing machine vision into a given robot task
and environment and move towards a prototype implementation of a
suitable vision system.

4.

Design and implement controllers for sequential logic systems
, the
implementation being both by hardware and also by software, and should
appreciate the significance of the flexibility given by software solutions.

5.

Design and implement discrete versions of analogue controllers for
proportional controllers.

6.

Determine
the capability of a process.


INDICATIVE CONTENTS:


Manual, semi
-
automatic and automatic assembly. Comparison of
capabilities, and limitations of the levels of technology employed.


Robot programming techniques.


Robot simulation and modelling technique
s.


Kinematic assessment and performance of typical industrial robotic
manipulators.


Robot system assessment, economics, safety and system components.


Sensor and actuator techniques and performance and their application in
robot systems.


Robotic applica
tions of machine vision, feature identification, edge detection
and interpretation.


Sequential logic control.


Design using state machine concepts for synchronous and asynchronous
systems.


Technologies for implementation and assessment of system process
capability.

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

18


Human machine interface.


INDICATIVE READING
:


1. Saburo Muroja. Logic Design and Switching Theory. J Wiley & Sons

2. Green David. Modern logic design. Addison Wesley

3. Klafter Richard et al. Robotic Engineering. Prentice Hall

4. Gonzalez Raf
ael, Woods Richard. Digital Image Processing. Addison
Wesley


TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGY AND METHODS:


Students will be supported by lectures, tutorials and laboratories. Further
directed study will be supported by printed notes, guided reading and di
stance

learning material (Blackboard). The laboratory sessions will include both
hardware experiments and the use of appropriate software engineering and
programming tools.

The typical balance of contact time in a 12 week semester will be:






Lecture

50
%






Tutorial

17%






Laboratory

33%


ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK STRATEGY:


The final
module

mark will be determined as follows:

Continuous assessment: 20 per cent, comprising four assignments, an
assessment via Blackboard and a formally written
-
up laborat
ory report, all
equally
-
weighted.

Examination: 80 per cent, comprising a three hour unseen paper.

Assessment of learning outcomes is as follows:

Blackboard assessment:

learning outcome 4 set in about week 8

Assignment 1:

learning outcome 1 set in about wee
k 2.

Assignment 2:

learning outcome 3, set in about week 6.

Assignment 3:

learning outcomes 5, set in about week 10.

Assignment 4:

learning outcome 6, set in about week 12.

Laboratory report:

learning outcome 2, set according to laboratory rota.

Examinatio
n:


learning outcomes 1 to 6.


All summative assessment (except for the examination) is also formative, in
that full feedback is given regarding performance within two weeks of
submission. Further formative feedback is given directly during all the tutori
al
and laboratory sessions (i.e. 50 per cent of the contact time for any given
student).


ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Please see the table on the following page.

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

19



ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:


Outcome

Fail

3
rd

2.2

2.1

1
st

1. Appropriate
automation

Poor grasp of
ideas
and few
solutions.

Understand
the basic
requirements
and
implementatio
n issues for
automated
systems.

Good
understanding of
the requirements
and
implementation
issues for
automated
systems.

Good
understanding of
the requirements
and is able to
identify the

implementation
issues for
automated
systems.

Full understanding
of the issues.

2. Robot system
programming

Unable to
formulate
working robot
programs.

Able to
develop and
implement
basic robot
programs with
few errors.

Able to develop
and implement
funct
ioning robot
programs with
few errors.

Develops and
implements
functioning robot
programs with no
major errors.

Develops and
implements fully
functioning robot
programs with no
errors and
advanced program
structures.

3. Application of
machine vision

Unabl
e to set
up and use
appropriate
vision
algorithms.

Basic level of
understanding
of vision
algorithms and
their
application.

Good level of
understanding of
vision algorithms
and able to
implement the
algorithms with
some errors.

Able to implement
vision alg
orithms
with few errors.

Implements vision
algorithms with
advanced object
identification
capability.

4.

Sequential

Design


(Assessed in
Blackboard
quizzes)

Understands
very little of the
topic and
completes a
minimal
number of
quizzes, with
poor marks.

C
ompletes the
majority of
quizzes, but
with significant
mistakes.

Completes
almost all the
quizzes, with
minor errors and
few significant
mistakes.

Completes all the
quizzes, with only
minor errors and no
significant
mistakes, and
maintains a good
portfolio

of
preparatory work.

Submits all the
quizzes with no
evidence of any
weakness and
maintains an
exemplary portfolio
of preparatory work.

Shows complete
awareness of
alternative
solutions.

5.

Controller design
and Implementation

Poor grasp of
ideas requi
red
to design,
simulate and
implement a
discrete
controller, as
evidenced by
the report.

A grasp of
ideas required
to design,
simulate and
implement a
discrete
controller, as
evidenced by
the report.

Produces a well
presented report
with all the
necessary
elements, but
lacking in
conclusions,
and/or having
some major
errors.

Produces a report
of the work, with
correct
conclusions, no
significant errors,
and programs
incorporated.

Produces a
faultless report of
the work, with
rigorous
conclusions, and
fully
documented
programs
incorporated as
appendices.

6.

Process Capability
Evaluation

Little
appreciation of
SPC

Have a grasp
of the basic
concepts of
SPC and
process
capability

Have an
effective
understanding of
process
capability and is
able to apply the
key

concepts.

Have a full
understanding of
process capability
and is able to apply
the key concepts
with only minor
errors.

Demonstrates
complete
understanding of
SPC.




BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

20


3.0 Management of the Course and Course Team


The day to day co
-
ordination of the Cou
rse w
ill be under the direction of
Professor
Terrence

Perera
. In his
absence
Dr

Martin Howarth
should be
contacted. All matters relating to the operation of the course should be
referred to one of them. If the problem is of direct relevance to one of the
U
nits then the Unit Lecturer(s)/Tutor(s) should be consulted in the first
instance and only after that should
Professor Perera or Dr Howarth
be
consulted.


Contact details of all staff involved in the operation and delivery of this course
are given below.


Name

Role/Subject

Room
Number

Email


Professor Terrence
Perera

Course
Leader

4126

(Access via
Engineering
Reception)

t.d.perera@shu.ac.uk


Kerry Langton


(
Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday am
)

Helen M Dawson


(
We
dnesday, Thursday and
Friday
)


Course Administrative
Support

4103

k.langton@shu.ac.uk

h.m.dawson@shu.ac.uk



Ms Kerry Worley

Receptionist

4118

k.l.worley@shu.ac.uk


Mr Nick Pickett

Concurrent Engineering
for Product Design and
Manufacture

(T605)


4006

n.pickett@shu.ac.uk


Dr Sameh Saad

Design and
Management of
Manufacturing Syste
ms

(T606)


4024

s.saad@shu.ac.uk


Professor Terence
Perera

Unit Leader


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Au瑯mat
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m⹨owa牴r@獨u⹡挮ck



BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

21



4.0 Timetables

The timetable for the course is given in appendix 1. A web based timetable
can be found at http://timetable.eng.shu.ac.uk/.


In addition there

will be special arrangements for library induction, special
visits and/or individual laboratories which will normally be notified by lecturers
or announced on the notice board located at floor level 0.


The timetable will identify the member of staff inv
olved and the room number.
The room numbering for the Sheaf Building is as follows:



4xxx
-

the first digit identifies the Sheaf Building


43xx
-

the second digit identifies the floor (note L is the basement)


4301
-

the last two digits identify the room


Most other buildings in the University follow the same numbering system
except the Owen Building (12 storey block) for which the first digit(s) signify
the floor number.


Please note that you will be working late some evenings and the catering
facilities
in the University close at 4pm.


5.0 Cancellation of lectures

It is unlikely that lectures will be cancelled but if this becomes essential then
we will notify you in class and notices will be placed on the White Board in the
entrance to the Sheaf Building
and on your notice board on level zero in the
Sheaf Building.


6.0 Student Support and Guidance

You will all experience quite a change in culture, climate, language and the
general differences that we all experience when living in a different country.
We h
ope that you will be happy and successful but there may be times when
you require advice and support.


Within the School of Engineering the Course
Leader
is your first point of
contact. There are other sources of help and advice available to you either
thr
ough the Student Services Centre, which is located by the main entrance
on level 5 of the Owen Building or the Students Union. Information about
these services and general

information about the University, its procedures and regulations, can be found
at
the web site below:



http://students.shu.ac.uk


BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

22

7.0 Information on Assessment

Subjects are assessed by means of various combinations of examination and
coursework. To pass a unit you must achieve at least 40% in

the overall
assessment and at 35% in each component of assessment. That is you must
get a minimum of 35% in your coursework and any examination. You will be
given detailed information on the assessment in each of the units you are
studying by the staff co
ncerned. Some information on assessment is also
provided in the unit descriptions at the end of this document. If you are
unfamiliar with any of the terminology used then please read Appendix 3

“Terms Commonly Used in University Courses”


You will be give
n details of the examination arrangements at a later stage.


8.0 Extenuating Circumstances

If you have any extenuating circumstances which affect your studies, e.g. an
illness, you should bring this information to the attention of the examination
board. Th
is can be done by completing form (EC1) and submitting this
together with supporting evidence e.g. a doctor’s note, to the Courses Office
in Sheaf Building (room 4103).


Form EC1 is available form the Course Office, Students Union, Student
Services Centre
, the Medical Centre and the Library.


9.0 Appeals

If you wish to appeal against an examination decision you must do so within
14 days of the publication of the results. Details of the procedure can be
found in the Assessment Regulations and Procedures, a

copy of which is
available at Reception in the Sheaf Building.


10.0 Coursework

Lecturers will provide information about the type and number of pieces of
coursework and also the marks associated with the each piece of coursework.



Coursework must be subm
itted via Reception in the Sheaf Building. The
procedure is to obtain an Assignment Cover Sheet from reception, complete
all the details in the top two boxes and submit this sheet with your
coursework. You will then be given the white copy of the cover she
et as proof
that the work has been handed in. The pink copy is also used as proof of
submission and this is kept in Reception.


You will be given submission dates for coursework which must be
adhered to.



BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

23


11.0 General Information


11.1 Submission of Cou
rsework

It is very important to ensure that you do not miss submission deadlines for
coursework, since penalties are applied to marks awarded on late work.
Try
to leave enough time before the deadline to ask for help with the work if
you are having diffic
ulties, or to ask for an extension to the deadline.

Do
not be afraid to ask members of staff for assistance, they will be glad to help.


11.2 Absence from the University

If you are forced to be absent through illness or otherwise, please tell your

Course
Co
-
ordinator without delay, in writing if possible. Obtain medical
certificates or other evidence to cover your absence and to certify your fitness
to return, and hand these to your course co
-
ordinator on your return. (Such
evidence is also important to
help the Examination Board check whether any
poor performance may have been influenced by your problems.


11.3 Change of Address

It is essential that the School Office has your correct term
-
time and home
address (and telephone number if possible) so that y
ou can be contacted in
case of an emergency, and with your exam results and other urgent course
information. If there is a change to your term
-
time or home address you must
inform the School Office and your course co
-
ordinator immediately. A
"Student Reco
rd Amendment" form can be obtained from the Reception


11.4 Course Committee

This is made up of elected representatives from each group of the summer
course, the course team and other lecturing staff. Meetings are held to
review how the course is operati
ng and to air suggestions for change. It is
one key way of feeding your ideas and comments into the way the course is
run. All students are eligible to stand in the elections, which take place during
the first few weeks of the course.


11.5 Library and L
earning Resource Centre

The

Library and Learning Resource Centre or Adsetts Centre is open six days
a week.



Monday


Friday

9:00am


5:00pm


Saturday

10:00am
-

5:00pm


Further information on library and on
-
line information services can be
found at:


http://students.shu.ac.uk

BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

24



The procedure for registering with the
Learning Centre

and
Computing
Services

is outline
d

below:


When you enrolled in Malaysia you were issued with
a
Temporary
Registration Certific
at
e.
During your induction period at Sheffield Hallam
University this certificate will be exchanged for a
Full Registration
Certificate

which will give you access to all SHU facilities including the
Learning Centre and the Computing Services. You will also

need your full
registration certificate to obtain your SHU card (ID).



12.0 E
-
mail

A Staff/Student Conference facility has been set up in our “First Class Intranet
Client” e
-
mail package. You are strongly advised to check this course specific
conference
facility at least once per day. This conference group is not meant
for personal messages. You will have your own e
-
mail account for personal
use.


You can access the conference by following the simple instructions below.




Log on to “First Class”. You will
receive your password when you register
with CIS



From the “Desk Top” go to “Eng Forum.



Then go to “ENLearning Environment” followed by “TARC Students”



You can now open your conference group



If you wish to reply to an e
-
mail you must go back one page to

the “student
Feedback” icon. You should aware that, in Conferencing, you are replying to
the whole conference group.




















BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

25



A
ppendix 1 Timetable



Intentionally Blank


the timetable will be issued when you arrive at Sheffield
Hallam Univers
ity



In the meantime you can check with


http://students.shu.ac.uk/eng/timetables/index.html




BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

26

Appendix 2


STUDYING IN THE UK


TERMS COMMONLY USED IN UNIVERSITY COURSES


TEACHING AND LE
ARNING


1

Lectures


Lectures are designed to provide a
broad introduction
to

a subject,
text or debate. The group will usually be large and one lecturer will
speak to the whole group for about an hour or more. The aim is to
pass on information that it wou
ld take you a long time to put together
for yourself. There is sometimes an opportunity to ask questions at
the end. Lecturers will sometimes offer guidance for further essential
reading to enable you to follow up points raised in the lecture.


2

Seminars


A smaller group of students meet with a member of teaching staff to
hear and discuss an oral presentation by one or more of the students.
A wide exchange of ideas is expected. Students should speak as well
as listen. It is acceptable and not impolite to
disagree with other
members of the group, including staff. You should offer reasons and
evidence for your views. Students who do not contribute their own
ideas may be judged as weak students.


3

Workshops


In a workshop


You meet with your tutor and other

students to discuss pieces of work
you are currently writing, or


You work with other students on material in class.

4

Tutorials


In a tutorial you discuss your work (and any difficulties which may
have arisen) with your tutor. This may be someone who teac
hes you,
or it may be another tutor. These sessions are not formally timetabled
and are arranged as required either at your request or the tutor's.
They are an opportunity for an in
-
depth discussion on a topic which
may be based on written work you have be
en asked to prepare.



BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

27


5

Assessment


Courses may be assessed in a variety of ways, ranging from essays,
seminar papers and practical classes to formal examinations.


Essays


An essay is a formal piece of writing which should range from a few
hundred to t
wo thousand words in length, excluding quotations. Long
essays are not necessarily better and have probably gone off the
point. The aim of an essay is not just to list facts or repeat what you
have heard in lectures. Academic staff want to see that you:




have understood what you have heard



have read around the subject and under
-
stand your
reading



are able to analyse



can express yourself clearly and concisely



can back
-
up your own opinions with evidence


In the course of an essay you may seek suppo
rt from published
opinions of other writers, or you may disagree with them, provided
you can justify your argument. Often you take words or ideas from
others. You must acknowledge them and include reference to the
books and periodicals from which they came

in a bibliography (list of
sources) at the end of your essay. This bibliography is compulsory
and must be provided if the work is to be accepted for assessment.

(See note on plagiarism.)


Seminar Paper


A seminar paper is a more informal piece of writing

which may be in
prose or note form. Sometimes you will be asked to read out or take
your cue from a seminar paper in initiating discussion in class.
Alternatively, you might be asked to write a seminar paper and hand it
in to be marked. Other oral contrib
utions to seminars can contribute
to your assessment.


Independent Study


Your timetable of formal instruction (lectures, seminars, tutorials and
practicals) may not appear to be very full. However, you are expected
to spend a good deal of your time
readin
g books and articles,
reading over lecture notes, preparing for seminars and tutorials,
working on

projects
and so on. (See study skills.)





BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

28

Research


Research degrees
-
involve independent study assisted by a
supervisor and the production of a thesis. The
se are mainly at post
-
graduate level,

but some taught courses can also involve research
and the production of a dissertation.



6

Reading Lists


Most course units and courses have reading lists. You are not
expected to read


every book on them, or even th
e whole of a text. Find out from your
teachers which books you must read. Use the list of contents and the
index sections to guide you to the sections of the book which will be
most useful. Read other books on the list as you need to or when you
can.


Alth
ough library books are sometimes in great demand, it is worth not
buying a book until you are sure that you need to own it. Second
hand books are sometimes available, or a group of students can get
together to share standard texts.


7

Plagiarism


In the
British academic tradition, copying text from other people's
work (books, articles, journals, theses, dissertations of other students)
is not permitted under University regulations, unless the amount is
small and the
source is clearly stated.
You will be p
enalised or
disciplined and can fail your course even if your plagiarism is not
discovered until later. Full details are given in the assessment
regulations section of the Undergraduate Student handbook.


It is often appropriate to use information from oth
er people's
work
using your own words. You can do this if you also state your
source.
Ask in

your School about preferred methods of quoting or
citing information.

Make sure you also know the regulations relating to behaviour in

examinations.


8

Legibilit
y


Students whose work cannot be read will be asked to have it typed
before marking can begin . Students with a recognised physical
incapacity or disability can be given assistance.


All work should be submitted word
-
processed, double
-
spaced and on
one sid
e of paper only.


BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

29




9


Study Skills


The British University system places greater emphasis on long term
activity and less on short
-
term assessment. You are expected to work
independently, read widely
-
deciding for yourself what is most useful
to your studi
es. You will need to be well organised to study as widely
and in depth as you will need. Pacing your study time should take
account of your other commitments both in term
-
time and holiday
times. Make sure you organise yourself and your work on a weekly,
te
rmly and annual basis.


Don't believe everything that other students may say about how little
work they are doing. There is often a tendency to exaggerate and if
what they say is true, they will not do well


10

Student Development Programme


The Student S
ervices Centre offers a Student Development
Programme during standard semesters. These provide drop
-
in
workshops and seminars for students to develop their study skills and
academic writing skills. They are intended to help students reflect on
their curren
t expertise in coping with academic work, and to improve
learning skills. Check the student notice boards for further details on
the workshops and seminars; or pick up a leaflet from Floor 5 of the
Owen Building.



11

Study Packs


You can also make use of

study packs which provide self assessment
on a range of topics including use of computers. These are available
at Learning Centres or from your School Office.


12

Equality of Opportunity


Sheffield Hallam University is committed to policies based on
prin
ciples of equal opportunities. This commitment underpins and
impacts on every area of activity and influences how the University
works and what it does. The University is opposed to any form of
discrimination and is committed to being a friendly and safe p
lace for
all staff and students. The support services of the University have
developed measures to promote equality of opportunity within
specified standards. These include recognition and promotion of the
University as a secular and multi
-
cultural commun
ity which supports
students who practise their faith.



BEng (Hons
) Automation and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Sheffield Hallam University


T.A.R. College

30

Racist and sexist graffiti is not tolerated within the University and such
incidents are treated seriously. The student handbook details the
support available to students in respect of equal opportunit
ies and
harassment.



13

Reporting changes in contact address telephone numbers
and enrolment information


If any of the information on your enrolment form should change during
the course of your study you must inform the administrative office in
your Sch
ool. This is vital for the forwarding of exam marks.


14

Email


Students and tutors use email extensively for quick communication.





Produced by the Guidance Service, Student Services Centre, 5th
Floor, Owen Building