Smart Grid Strategy Key Components For Road Map

lettucestewΗλεκτρονική - Συσκευές

21 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

59 εμφανίσεις

1
Smart Grid Strategy
Key Components For Road Map
Smart Grid Forum 2011
Nov. 29 - Dec. 1, 2011,
Sao Paulo, Brazil

Ravi Seethapathy
Executive Advisor, Research & Innovation, Ryerson University
Expert Member, IEA PVPS Taskforce – Solar Integration
Canada Rep – CIGRE C6 (DG & Emerging Technologies)
Member, Steering Committee – NSERC Micro-Grid Network
Member, Advisory Council, Power Delivery, Utilization & Storage, EPRI
Adjunct Research Professor, Univ. of Western Ontario
Manager, Systems Innovation & Advanced Grid Dev, Hydro One Networks
Toronto, Canada

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Smart Grid: A Quantum Leap



Feature Existing Grid Smart Grid
Components Electromechanical Digital
Communications One-way Two-way
Billing Single Tariff Multi Tariff, Time of Use
Generation Centralized Distributed
Network Topology Hierarchical Peer-Peer, Adhoc
Sensors Few Everywhere
Visibility Blind (Dx) Self Monitoring
Restoration Manual Self-healing
Reliability Forced Outages Adaptive, Islanding
Maintenance Reactive Pre-emptive
Testing Manual / Local Self-check / Remote
Load Management Over-Provisioned Demand Response
Control Centralized Distributed / Localized
Customer Relations Broadcast Peer-Peer, Portals
3
SmartGrid


•Enabling
•Choices

Societal Legitimacy


Govt

& Regulatory


Shared Vision


Collaboration

• Consent for development
• Operate for the common good
• Trust
• Framework
• Consensus
• Direction
• Investment
• Multiple parties
• Common view
• Shared success
• Shared and living Vision
• Industry
• Markets
• Innovation
• Efficiency
• Price
• Complexity
•Technology
•Regulation
•Standards
•Commercial
•Supply Chain
•Demonstration
Smart Grid Strategy
Strategy Framework
Business
Environment
Policy &
Reg.
Analysis
Customer
Needs
Alignment
Business
Needs
Business
Constraints
Business
Imperatives
•Future
•Industry
•Scenarios
Systems/
Technology
Mapping
Road Map
Pilot
Project
Implement
Action Plans
Monitor
Action
Plans
Action Plan
Strategic
Options
Risk and
Reward
Strategic
Direction
Reassess Business Imperatives
Research
Interviews /
Workshops
Analysis
Plan
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Objectives
Smart Grid: Planning Paradigm
Strategic
Planning
•1
•Aging Assets
•Rebuild
•2
•Longer ‘EAs’
•NIMBYism
•3
•Old vs New tech
•Green Power Int
•4
•Same vs New
Elec Architecture
•5
•Govt. directives
•IPSP
•6
•Facilitate
Economic Growth
•7
•New Markets
•Green Jobs
•8
•Skills Shortage
•Training
•9
•Capital $$$
•Common Vision
•10
•$$ Risk Appetite
•Regulatory Risk
5
Smart Grid– T&D Conv./Divergence
Convergence
– (Digital Technology)
• - IT, Telecom, GIS, Sensors, Controls
Divergence
– (Power Systems)
• - Urban/Rural, Network architecture, Costs
Smart Grid: Network Transformation
7
8
Defining Key Business Requirements
Enhance DG
Integration
Improve
Reliability
(Dx Automation)
Improve
Outage
Restoration
Integrate PHEVs
(Res, ICI, Utility)
Customer
Enablement
(CDM, DR
Tools/Analysis)
New enhanced
Dx Planning Tools
Real Time
Operations
Enterprise
Applications
Power
Equipment
DG
CDM
SM
SG
Broadband
Communications
GIS System
9
Smart Grid: Systems Integration
• Quick Restoration
• Demand Response
• Customer Choice
• Thermal Energy
• Distribution
•Transmission
•ISO
•Customer
• Power Quality
• Reliability
• Stability
• Energy Balance
• Time critical Dx Information
• Inter-tie Capability
• Dynamic Var Control
• Predictive Tools
• Localised Gen- Load Balance
• Real-Time Control/Analytics
• Dynamic Volt-Var Management
• Predictive Tools
• Power Quality
Technology Map Framework
Value
Creation
Scope
& Context
Strategic
Issues
Financial Position
Strategic Position
Competitive
Position
Market
Attractiveness
Technology Leadership
Insight
Commercial Maturity
Technology
Strategy
Critical Success Factors & Key
Performance Indicators
Skills &
Resources
Organizational
Architecture
Resources
Performance
Performance Monitoring
& Incentives
Creativity
Scenarios
& Options
Growth
Economic
Profitability
Power Systems – IT – Telecom – DMS – GIS – Data – Tools - Process
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Risk Framework
0
1
2
3
4
5
Technology
Standards
ProcessCustomer
Sustain (SDO)
Reliability
Outage Management
Plg. & Op. Tools
Integrate DG
Assessment – Assurance - Mitigation
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DG Connection – Planning Impacts
Cumulative Impact
Integrative Impact
Connected- G / L Safety/Isolation Voltage Reg DG Technology
Short Circuit Power Quality Dynamics (>0.5 s) Net Energy
Neutral Currents Harmonics Transients (<0.5s) Fuel Mix
Demand (MW) Insulation Coord. Power factor Load/Gen profile
Demand (MVAR) Ops & Control Protections Capacity Factor
Thermal Limits Contingency Mgt
LDC

TS
Load 3
Load 4
Load 5
Distributio
n
Load 1
Load 2
Transmission

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DG
L
TS
DS
•DG
RS
DG
DG
R
Reverse “P”
High
“Q”

Data Analysis
•Periodic check for P & Q violations
•PF violations by DGs

Communications with DGs
•Isolating DGs
•PF or Voltage Mgmt

DMS Tools
•Volt-Var Optimization
•DG Status/Control
•State Estimation
•Switching Orders
•Auto Restoration
Operating Issues
L
L
L
R
L
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Benefit Attributes
Regulator
Generation
Green Energy
Energy Storage
CHP
Ancillary Services
Consumer Protection
Govt. Policy
T&D Utility
CVR/VVO/ Losses
Capital Deferment
Faster Restoration
Ops. Improvement
Energy Services
Bundled Services
Demand Response
Theft Prevention
Smart Charging
Consumers
Energy Savings
Smart Appliances

More Choices
EVs
14
Scattered SG Benefits
0 10 20 30
Capital Defer
Energy Mgt
Energy Savings
Dist. Gen
Other Services
Generator
0 10 20 30
Capital Defer
Energy Mgt
Energy Savings
Dist. Gen
Other Services
T&D Utility
0 10 20 30
Capital Defer
Energy Mgt
Energy Savings
Dist. Gen
Other Services
Consumers
0 10 20 30
Capital Defer
Energy Mgt
Energy Savings
Dist. Gen
Other Services
Energy Services
15
16
Hydro One “ADS” Road Map
DG
Integration
Smart Meter / CDM
 Wireless, WiMax
 Forecast, Dispatch
 Controls
 O&M, Reliability
Dx
Monitoring
 Network Metering
 PQ Measurement
Dx
Automation
Self Healing


Islanding
 Adaptive Prot
Synchro-
phasors
Tx DVAR
 Logic Controllers
 Adaptive Control
 Intelligent Devices
Energy Storage
 PQ
 Catch & Release
 VAR support
Utilization
 Cust. Information
 Tools to conserve
 PHEVs
 Batteries/Charging
 Forecasting
Power
Electronics
17
18
Concluding Thoughts:

Steps towards Smart Grid Strategy:

Seek Government Vision and Policy Drivers

Create R&D Partnerships – Universities and Industry

Formulate a Strategy Document for the utility

Prepare Detailed Plan for a Pilot site

Technology, Investments, Business Case, Industry

Organizational Impact Plan

Seek Govt. and Regulatory inputs for the Plan

Be Patient and put your Best People on it
19

Thank You
20


Brief CV of Ravi Seethapathy

•Professional Engineer, Ontario
•B.Tech (Hons), M.Eng, MBA
•Sr. Member IEEE
• ravi.seethapathy@gmail.com





Ravi Seethapathy, is Manager – Systems Innovation & Advanced Grid Development, at Hydro One Networks in Toronto, Canada and currently
leads the power systems technical architecture of its Advanced Grid System (Smart Grid) program as well as its Corporate RD&D efforts in its
implementation. He led the Corporate Smart Grid Strategy Taskforce in 2008 and from 2006 led the initial efforts in the integration of DER in the
Hydro One Distribution system including creating the R&D network involving universities, associations and other forums.

Ravi has over 25 years of experience (in Hydro One/ erstwhile Ontario Hydro) in all fields of electric utility business and has progressively held
leading positions in Research, Protection & Control, Field Operations, Hydraulic Generation and Transmission Operations, Generation Performance,
Distribution Strategy and Planning, Mergers & Acquisition, Corporate Audit, Asset Management and Asset Strategies Divisions.

He has Chaired/served on many technical and other voluntary Boards such as Ryerson University, Canadian Club, Scarborough Hospital, TV
Ontario, Engineers without Borders, Indo-Canada Chamber of Commerce and Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute Advisory Council. He currently Chairs
the Sustainable Generation Options Interest Group (SOIG) of the Center for Energy and Technologies International (CEATI) made up of Canadian
and US Utilities. He also sits on the Advisory Board of Ryerson University’s newly created Center for Urban Energy (with a research pipeline of over
13M$) and is on the Steering Committee of the “Large Scale Solar Integration” Research Project of the Ontario Centers of Excellence. He sits as the
Canadian expert on the IEA PVPS Taskforce on large-scale solar integration and on the International Microgrid Forum. He is the Canadian
Representative of CIGRE Canada on the C6 Study Committee and sits on several of its sub-committees in Energy Storage, Rural distribution,
Electric Vehicles, and is an active Advisory Council Member (Power Delivery, Utilization & Storage) in EPRI, IEEE and others.

Ravi currently serves as an Adjunct Research Professor at the University of Western Ontario and as an Executive Adviser (Research and
Innovation) to Ryerson University. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and a registered Professional Engineer in Ontario. He has co-authored many
leading technical papers in Advanced Grid systems and actively lectures at Conferences and Universities.

He holds a B.Tech (Hons) in Electrical Power from IIT, India, an M.Eng in Electrical Power from University of Toronto and an MBA from the Schulich
School of Business, York University, Toronto. He has received several citations and awards.